Saier "Dougall" de Lens

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About Saier "Dougall" de Lens

Source= http://books.google.com/books?id=usUcAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA432&lpg=PA432&dq=Alex+Setoun+de+Wintoun&source=bl&ots=DCwo9Mjwuv&sig=ypVOWbbHPH4ZVivxDfRY2Cy6Eic&hl=en&sa=X&ei=Qb8RUon_E6es2wWWxICwBQ&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAjgU#v=onepage&q=Alex%20Setoun%20de%20Wintoun&f=false

During the reign of David 1 Seiher de Say who emigrated from England obtained from the Scotish king some lands in East Lothian where he settled and to which the emigrant gave the name of Say tun Seiher was succeeded by his son Alexander who flourished under Malcolm iv and enjoyed Sayton and Wintoun in Hadington and Winchburgh in West Lothian By several descents all those lands came to Sir Christopher Seyton who married a sister of Robert Bruce and who fell in 1306 in support of his crown under the axe of Edward 1 And he was succeeded by Alexander de Seyton who obtained from his uncle the Scotish king various lands in the Lothians and in Berwickshire p This respectable family was enobled by the title of Lord Seton under James 1 and in 1600 by the higher rank of Earl of Winton which were all sacrificed to mistaken principles.

The Carolingian Lineage of the House of Seton

Boulogne was originally named Gesoriacum and probably also to be identified with Portus Itius. By the 4th century Boulogne was known to the Romans as Bononia and served as the major port connecting the rest of the empire to Britain. The emperor Claudius used this town as his base for the Roman invasion of Britain, in AD 43, and until 296 it was the base of the Classis britannica.

Like so many other pedigrees, the Norman origin offered for the Seton family is careless nonsense. As their own distinctive crescents show, Seier de Seton and his brother Walter sprang from a second son of the House of Boulogne. Known in their Flemish homeland as Seier and Walter de Lens, they were sons of Count Eustace I’s second son, Count Lambert de Lens from his first wife, and whose daughter by a second marriage (to the sister of William the Conqueror) was the Countess Judith, mother of Scotland’s Queen Maud. With the previous Flemish ties to the ruling House in Scotland and in Northumbria, both Seier and his brother were one of many that were invited to come and settle in Scotland by King Malcolm III, of the Alpin line.

The Flemish-Boulonnaise enjoyed a much respected status throughout Europe as a result of their lineage in the Empirical-French Monarchy, as well as those of others, and inter-marriages between Flanders and the courts in Scotland and Northumbria had reached their zenith when Judith, daughter of Lambert of Lens from his second marriage to Adele of Normandy, (sister of Duke William, later King William I), married Waltheof of Northumberland, Earl of Huntingdon. Their oldest daughter, Maud, married David of Scotland (son of King Malcolm III) who became Earl of Huntingdon and later King David I of Scotland.

The Flemish influence at the Scottish court cemented their presence there, coupled with service to the Royal household, and which tradition was continued by Seier’s eldest son, Walter de Lens, or Walter the Fleming as he is described in Domesday. Although he had his chief English home at Wahull (now called Odell) in Bedfordshire, it was on the Firth of Forth as heir there of his father Seier (where he was called Dougall or "the dark stranger", a nickname which was also given to his own son Walter, and duly recorded by the family’s first official chronicler, Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington, in 1554), that he concentrated his principal efforts. With the estates of Boulogne and Lens passing to more senior family, the brother's Seier and Walter (Walcher) became de Seaton/Seton and le Flandrensis/Fleming, respectively in Britain. Seier's line founded the Houses of Seton and Oliphant, and which prospered as a combined result of their Carolingian lineage and dedicated military service to the Scottish Court. Their Arms then, as senior and junior, state this lineage proudly.

http://www2.thesetonfamily.com:8080/history/The_Early_Setons.htm

The Early Seton Family

As their own distinctive crescents show, Seier de Seton (I) and his brother Walter sprang from a second son of the house of Boulogne. Known in their Flemish homeland as Seier and Walter de Lens, they were sons of Count Eustace I ’s second son, Count Lambert de Lens, whose daughter by a second marriage (to the sister of William the Conqueror) was the Countess Judith, mother of Scotland’s Queen Maud.

Count Lambert died when the boys were too young to administer to the important estate of Lens, and thus they followed the Flemish military contingent into England with their half-sister's husband, Duke William of Normandy, in his quest for the English crown and settled there in the north following William's success. Count Lambert himself was the second son of his father, Eustace I of Boulogne, and brother of Eustace II, and they were lineally descended in both Eustace I’s mother and father from King Charles I, Charlemagne, Holy Roman Emperor and the first of the Carolingian Empire.

Seier’s eldest son, Walter de Lens, or Walter the Fleming as he is described in Domesday, had his chief English home at Wahull (now called Odell) in Bedfordshire. On the Firth of Forth, as heir there of his father, Seier, he was called Dougall or "the dark stranger", a nickname which was also given to his own son Walter, and duly recorded by the family’s chronicler, Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington, in 1554.

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Saier "Dougall" de Lens's Timeline

1030
1030
Sai, Orne, Normandy, France
1060
1060
Age 30
Seton, East Lothian, Scotland
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