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Samuel Convers

Nicknames: "Conyers", "Conyers/converse"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Woburn, Massachusetts, United States
Death: Died in Killingly, Thompson, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Sgt. Samuel Converse and Judith Converse (Carter)
Husband of Dorcas Abigail Convers
Father of Samuel Converse; Edward Convers, Sr.; Thomas Converse, Sr.; Dorcas Whitmore; Paine Converse and 2 others
Brother of Abigail Converse

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Samuel Convers

A search for the identity of Dorcas was made by Miss Emily W. Leavitt, of Boston, genealogist, who wrote as follows 5 June 1900: "It seems my inference is correct that Dorcas was Dorcas Pain, on the authority of Judge Johnson of Woburn, who consulted a local historian. You know Mrs. Judith Convers married, second, Giles Fifield and went to Charlestown to live, of course taking her children with her. She died in Charlestown, and Giles Fifield, in his will, mentioned Samuel Convers and his sister Abigail. The Pains were early in Charlestown, and Samuel may have married Dorcas there. Wyman's Charlestown gives early members, Stephen, Edward, etc. I have not found a Dorcas there in the history, but a search in Middlesex Co. records may reveal her. In the Pain early families of Ipswich there was a Dorcas, and it seems to come in other lines.

By other genealogists, however, who have carefully followed this clue, it is suggested that as a thorough examination of Massachusetts records fails to show this connection, the son was probably named Pain, on account of friendship with the Pain family, the families being closely associated.

In a sketch of Deacon Edward Convers in the issue of the "New York Genealogical and Biographical Record for January 1895, " it is stated that Samuel Convers' founded the town of Thompson, Conn.

The following is from Mr. Wm. G. Hill's "Family History of Deacons James W. and Elisha S. Converse":

"July 2, 1705, Samuel and Doreas Convers gave deed of five acres land on Abijona River; Woburn, to John Convers for £14. In February, 1709, they gave deed of seven acres land in Woburn, to Thomas Belknap, for £21. On April 8, 1710, they conveyed to James Richardson, for £205, eighty acres land in Woburn;(see Nliddlesex Deeds.) In 1710, Samuel 3 Convers and his family removed to and occupied. a farm and dwelling house in Thompson Parish, Killingly, Conn., which farm he had previously bought of Richard Evans, the first settler in Killingly. Mr. Convers was the first, settler of Thompson. The farm was located in that part of the town which, in, later years, was, set off, as Putnam. The region was at that time very rude, rough and, wild, and uninhabited except by Indians, otherwise then properly called savages. The place where Mr. Convers settled was about sixty miles nearly due west of Boston; the family finding their way, most of the distance, chiefly by means of blazed trees through the forest. In 1716 he sold the Evans farm and purchased part of the "Quinatisset farm," laid out to John Gore of Roxbury, Mass., surveyor, in 1686. (Quinatisset was the Indian name for that region.) This farm is about a mile southwest of Thompson Hill, and in 1882, was occupied by Stephen Mallard and Benj. Bugbee. Here Mr. Convers removed his residence, conveying portions of his farm to his sons as they settled in life. They attended worship in Killingly, and were connected with its church till the erection of Thompson Parish in 1728. Mr. Convers and his sons were active in building

Thompson meeting house, and providing for religious worship, and his name heads the list of church members at its organization, January 28, 1730, a distinction denoting seniority in age or acknowledged leadership in position.

But little is known of the early life of Samuel Convers. He was left fatherless at the age of seven, and an orphan at the age of sixteen, by the death of his mother, Mrs. Fifield, of Charlestown; and living, as he did, remote from other settlements, in a wild country, but little has been gleaned concerning him in Thompson. We are unable to discover the precise date of his death, or any record of the distribution of his property thereafter."

In her History of Windham County, Connecticut, Miss Ellen D. Larned, mentions Samuel Convers and his sons as follows:

Vol. 1, p. 168. Purchase of the Northern farm of Richard Evans in the North part of Killingly by Samuel Convers of Woburn in 1710. Vol. 1, p. 174. "The first settler in the vicinity of Quinnatisset Hill Was Samuel Converse of Woburn who secured a deed of land from Richard Evans in 1710, and with his Wife and five sons settled about a mile South of the hill top. The Killingly settlers were near him on the South, but northward to the old towns of Oxford and Mendon the country was a savage wilderness, its rude paths only designated by marks on tree trunks. Mr. Converse's dwelling house stood near the Boston road, and furnished rest and entertainment to many a passing traveler." Vol. 1, p. 177. Samuel Convers, for fifty pounds conveyed "a part of High Plain, near Quinnatisset," to Urian Horsrnor of Woodstock, in 1716. Vol. 1, p. 306. July 9, 1728, the first public meeting of the inhabitants north of Killingly was held, and Samuel Converse "the first settler near Quinnatisset Hill, still active in public affairs with four grown sons," joined in organizing a religious society, which was the second society in Killingly, then called the North Society of Killingly, and two years afterward renamed Thompson Parish. Vol. 1, p. 308. Samuel Converse amt his four sons from the Quinnatisset farm and meadows, working with others, in building the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 309. November 15, 1728, Samuel's son Edward, chosen with five others to provide for the raising of the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 310. January 20, 1729, Samuel's son, Edward, one of committee of five on finishing outside work of meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 311. January 28, 1730, Samuel and his sons Edward and Thomas, with twenty-five others, original signers of the covenant in the formation of the new church. Vol. 1, p. 315. Purchase of farms in Thompson Parish from Josiah Wolcott by Samuel's sons, Edward, Samuel and Josiah. Vol. 1, p. 315. Sale of two hundred acres of land with dwelling house and orchard by Samuel Converse to Ephraim Guile.

Vol. 1, p. 317. March, 1733, Samuel's son, Thomas, one of committee of three to provide for building seats in the gallery of the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 533. 1737, Edward Converse appointed to rebuild Killingly portion of bridge over the Quinnebaug at the Falls.

Page 26 - The Converse Family

The first division of land to Samuel Convers, Jr., is thus described in the first volume of Proprietors' Records of Killingly: - Laid out to Samual Convers, Junr. on the 21 Day of November, 1720 nine acres and fourty rods of land in our undivided Lands in Killingly for his first Division of land, and is bounded as followeth. Beginning at a heap of stones in the farm line formerly belonging to Mr. Goor thence running Easterly upon line 30 rods to a heap of stones from thence running Sotherly 60 rods to a white oak tree from thence Running northerly to the bound first mentioned. Laid out and alowed (?) by us to be 9 acres and 40 rods. PETER ASPENWELL Recorded July 13th, 1721 JAMES LEAVENS by me David Church, town Clerk JOSEPH CAD Y Com 'tee

--------------------

A search for the identity of Dorcas was made by Miss Emily W. Leavitt, of Boston, genealogist, who wrote as follows 5 June 1900: "It seems my inference is correct that Dorcas was Dorcas Pain, on the authority of Judge Johnson of Woburn, who consulted a local historian. You know Mrs. Judith Convers married, second, Giles Fifield and went to Charlestown to live, of course taking her children with her. She died in Charlestown, and Giles Fifield, in his will, mentioned Samuel Convers and his sister Abigail. The Pains were early in Charlestown, and Samuel may have married Dorcas there. Wyman's Charlestown gives early members, Stephen, Edward, etc. I have not found a Dorcas there in the history, but a search in Middlesex Co. records may reveal her. In the Pain early families of Ipswich there was a Dorcas, and it seems to come in other lines.

By other genealogists, however, who have carefully followed this clue, it is suggested that as a thorough examination of Massachusetts records fails to show this connection, the son was probably named Pain, on account of friendship with the Pain family, the families being closely associated.

In a sketch of Deacon Edward Convers in the issue of the "New York Genealogical and Biographical Record for January 1895, " it is stated that Samuel Convers' founded the town of Thompson, Conn.

The following is from Mr. Wm. G. Hill's "Family History of Deacons James W. and Elisha S. Converse":

"July 2, 1705, Samuel and Doreas Convers gave deed of five acres land on Abijona River; Woburn, to John Convers for £14. In February, 1709, they gave deed of seven acres land in Woburn, to Thomas Belknap, for £21. On April 8, 1710, they conveyed to James Richardson, for £205, eighty acres land in Woburn;(see Nliddlesex Deeds.) In 1710, Samuel 3 Convers and his family removed to and occupied. a farm and dwelling house in Thompson Parish, Killingly, Conn., which farm he had previously bought of Richard Evans, the first settler in Killingly. Mr. Convers was the first, settler of Thompson. The farm was located in that part of the town which, in, later years, was, set off, as Putnam. The region was at that time very rude, rough and, wild, and uninhabited except by Indians, otherwise then properly called savages. The place where Mr. Convers settled was about sixty miles nearly due west of Boston; the family finding their way, most of the distance, chiefly by means of blazed trees through the forest. In 1716 he sold the Evans farm and purchased part of the "Quinatisset farm," laid out to John Gore of Roxbury, Mass., surveyor, in 1686. (Quinatisset was the Indian name for that region.) This farm is about a mile southwest of Thompson Hill, and in 1882, was occupied by Stephen Mallard and Benj. Bugbee. Here Mr. Convers removed his residence, conveying portions of his farm to his sons as they settled in life. They attended worship in Killingly, and were connected with its church till the erection of Thompson Parish in 1728. Mr. Convers and his sons were active in building

Thompson meeting house, and providing for religious worship, and his name heads the list of church members at its organization, January 28, 1730, a distinction denoting seniority in age or acknowledged leadership in position.

But little is known of the early life of Samuel Convers. He was left fatherless at the age of seven, and an orphan at the age of sixteen, by the death of his mother, Mrs. Fifield, of Charlestown; and living, as he did, remote from other settlements, in a wild country, but little has been gleaned concerning him in Thompson. We are unable to discover the precise date of his death, or any record of the distribution of his property thereafter."

In her History of Windham County, Connecticut, Miss Ellen D. Larned, mentions Samuel Convers and his sons as follows:

Vol. 1, p. 168. Purchase of the Northern farm of Richard Evans in the North part of Killingly by Samuel Convers of Woburn in 1710. Vol. 1, p. 174. "The first settler in the vicinity of Quinnatisset Hill Was Samuel Converse of Woburn who secured a deed of land from Richard Evans in 1710, and with his Wife and five sons settled about a mile South of the hill top. The Killingly settlers were near him on the South, but northward to the old towns of Oxford and Mendon the country was a savage wilderness, its rude paths only designated by marks on tree trunks. Mr. Converse's dwelling house stood near the Boston road, and furnished rest and entertainment to many a passing traveler." Vol. 1, p. 177. Samuel Convers, for fifty pounds conveyed "a part of High Plain, near Quinnatisset," to Urian Horsrnor of Woodstock, in 1716. Vol. 1, p. 306. July 9, 1728, the first public meeting of the inhabitants north of Killingly was held, and Samuel Converse "the first settler near Quinnatisset Hill, still active in public affairs with four grown sons," joined in organizing a religious society, which was the second society in Killingly, then called the North Society of Killingly, and two years afterward renamed Thompson Parish. Vol. 1, p. 308. Samuel Converse amt his four sons from the Quinnatisset farm and meadows, working with others, in building the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 309. November 15, 1728, Samuel's son Edward, chosen with five others to provide for the raising of the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 310. January 20, 1729, Samuel's son, Edward, one of committee of five on finishing outside work of meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 311. January 28, 1730, Samuel and his sons Edward and Thomas, with twenty-five others, original signers of the covenant in the formation of the new church. Vol. 1, p. 315. Purchase of farms in Thompson Parish from Josiah Wolcott by Samuel's sons, Edward, Samuel and Josiah. Vol. 1, p. 315. Sale of two hundred acres of land with dwelling house and orchard by Samuel Converse to Ephraim Guile.

Vol. 1, p. 317. March, 1733, Samuel's son, Thomas, one of committee of three to provide for building seats in the gallery of the meeting house. Vol. 1, p. 533. 1737, Edward Converse appointed to rebuild Killingly portion of bridge over the Quinnebaug at the Falls.

Page 26 - The Converse Family

The first division of land to Samuel Convers, Jr., is thus described in the first volume of Proprietors' Records of Killingly: - Laid out to Samual Convers, Junr. on the 21 Day of November, 1720 nine acres and fourty rods of land in our undivided Lands in Killingly for his first Division of land, and is bounded as followeth. Beginning at a heap of stones in the farm line formerly belonging to Mr. Goor thence running Easterly upon line 30 rods to a heap of stones from thence running Sotherly 60 rods to a white oak tree from thence Running northerly to the bound first mentioned. Laid out and alowed (?) by us to be 9 acres and 40 rods. PETER ASPENWELL Recorded July 13th, 1721 JAMES LEAVENS by me David Church, town Clerk JOSEPH CAD Y Com 'tee --=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

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Samuel Convers's Timeline

1662
April 4, 1662
Woburn, Massachusetts, United States
1689
1689
Age 26
1693
1693
Age 30
Killingly, Windham, CT
1694
May 26, 1694
Age 32
Woburn, Massachusetts, United States
1696
September 25, 1696
Age 34
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts
1699
October 28, 1699
Age 37
Woburn, Middlesex, Mass
1701
February 1, 1701
Age 38
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1706
November 25, 1706
Age 44
Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts
1714
November 20, 1714
Age 52
Woburn, Middlesex Co., MA
1732
February 9, 1732
Age 69
Killingly, Thompson, Connecticut, United States