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Samuel Hubbard

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mendelsham, Suffolk, England
Death: Died in Newport, Aquidneck Island (Present Newport County), Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations
Place of Burial: Berkley's Whitehall Farm Cemtery, Hubbard Lot, Middletown, Newport County, Rhode Island, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of James Hubbard, Sr. and Naomi Hubbard
Husband of Tacy Hubbard
Father of Naomi Hubbard; Clarke Hubbard; Hugh Hubbard; Ruth Burdick; Rachel Hubbard and 3 others
Brother of Sarah Jackson (Hubbard); Rachel Wilson (Hubbard); Thomas Hubbard; James Hubbard; Hannah Prince (Hubbard) and 7 others

Occupation: Immigrated to Salem Connecticut Colony, 1633 on "James Grant"
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Samuel Hubbard

Samuel b. abt 1610 in Suffolk, England, d. 10 May 1689 Baptist's Berkely Whitehall Farm, England. Married Tacy/Tasie Cooper/Cowper, daughter of Thomas Cooper and Mary Raynor 4 Jan 1635/6.

Children:

Naomi (1) 1637 - 1637

Naomi (2) 1638 - 1643

Ruth 1640-1691 m. Robert Burdick

Rachel 1643 - 1712 m. Andrew Langworthy

Samuel Jr. (1) 1644 - 1644

Bethiah 1646 - 1707 m. Joseph Clark

Samuel Jr. (2) 1649 - 1670

http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/gen/report/rr03/rr03_169.htm#P41543

1633, October- Arrived at Salem, MA from England.

1665-66: He and his wife become Sabbatarians.

1671, December 23- He and six others secede from the First Baptist Church and form the first Sabbatarian Church in America.

1708, 17th of the 7th month- The part of the congregation in and around Westerly form the First Seventh Day Church of Westerly, RI.

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One of the founders of the Seventh-Day Baptist Church in Newport, R.I.

wrote (March 28, 1686): “...I have no greater joy than to hear of my children walking in the truth, & with me and my wife all of them and two of their husbands the other is a baptized person....”. His children were Ruth, Rachel and Bethia - all of them appear on the 1692 list. Ruth’s husband Robert Burdick and Bethia’s husband Joseph Clarke also appear on the 1692 list. This means that “the other” was Rachel’s husband Andrew Langworthy, who was baptized at the mill in Newport in 1652 but didn’t join the Seventh Day Baptists.

On his parents: Stiles, Henry R., The History and Genealogies of Ancient Windsor, Connecticut, Hartford, Conn., 1891, p.414.

Came to Salem, Mass in 1633 as a youth, moved to Watertown, Mass., then to Wethersfield, Conn, then Springfield, Mass, finally locating at Newport, RI. His only son, Samuel, died without issue. (Holmes, Frank R., Directory of the Ancestral Heads of N.E. Families, 1620-1700, Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc., Baltimore, 1888, reprinted 1991, Directory of the Ancestral Heads of NE Families.); http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hal/Langworthy/wc_src.html#C179/ accessed Aug 15, 2009)

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1633, October- Arrived in Salem, MA.

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1. Samuel came to Salem, Massachusetts in 1633 as a youth, removed to Watertown, Massachusetts, then to Wethersfield, Connecticut, then Springfield, Massachusetts, finally locating at Newport, Rhode Island. His only son, Samuel, died without issue.

2. From the Lewisana source:

"In 1665 Samuel Hubbard and his wife, according to his own record, 'took up the keeping of the Lord's holy seventh day

Sabbath.' The following year, 1666, his daus., Ruth, wife of Robert Burdick, Rachel, wife of Andrew Langworthy, and Bethia

and her husband, Joseph Clarke, Jr., embraced the same faith; a ll of whom were ever afterwards identified with that

denomination in Newport and the early church in Westerly."

--------------------

"Ancestors of Justin Tanner KNULL"

Samuel HUBBARD was born in 1610 in Mendalshom, Suffolk, England. He emigrated in Oct 1633 from to Salem, Mass., on the ship, "James", Mr. Grant, Master. He lived in Rhode Island in 1648. He died in 1689 in Newport, R.I.. Samuel Hubbard was an immigrant. Born 80 miles NW of London. He & his wife were among the 60 colonists who in 1635 settled Conn. Samuel arrived in Salem, Mass., Oct 1633 on the ship, James, Mr. Grant, Master. He joined the church at Watertown, 1634. Tacy Cooper arrived at Dorchester, June 9,1634. After their marriage, they moved to Wethersfield, Conn. and on May 10, 1639 to Springfield, Mass. On May 10, 1647, they moved to Fairfield,R. I., having

organized a church at each place. On the Oct.2, 1648 they went left for Newport, R.I. and arrived there Oct. 12, 1648, where they remained for the rest of their lives.

___________________

In about 1688, Samuel and Tacy Hubbard erected a memorial stone enumerating their children and grandchildren. It was such a remarkable stone that Rev. Ezra Stiles, later President of Yale, copied it into his diary. He then wrote " I took this inscription off a gravestone in a family burying place on Bp. Berkleys White Hall farm on Rd. Isld about AD 1763. Collector Robinson bought the lease about 1765 and demolished the gravestones & put them into a wall: so that all is now lost."

It's pretty clear that the "family burying ground" belonged to Samuel and Tacy Hubbard, who lived in that area.

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hal/Langworthy/first.html

___________________

Samuel Hubbard kept a Journal in which he recorded events of his own family and important events of the community. He was active in the community and in Church, apparently asserting considerable influence. He corresponded with important people, both in the Colonies and in England. In his journal he said," I was born of good parents, my mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, In Mendlesham, in catechizing me, and hearing choice Ministers."

In July 1668, he wrote his cousin, John Smith of London, from Boston, where he had been to a disputation. "Through God's great mercy, the Lord have given me in this wilderness, a good, diligent, careful, painful and very loving wife...a good house...a trade, a carpenter, a health to follow it...Praise be to God." Ref: Vol. Acts & Monuments, by John Fox p.106

In a journal he mentions a son, Joseph, taking up the keeping of the Lord's holy seventh day Sabbath, Feb. 12, 1666. Ref: "One Thousand years of Hubbard History" Published by Harlan Page Hubbard, New York. 1895.

Samuel Hubbard, youngest son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, was born in Mendlesham (a market town about eighty miles northeast of London), Suffolk County, in 1610. He arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, in October,1633, and probably came in the ship James, Grant, master, which left Gravesend, England, late in August, 1633, and arrived in Massachusetts Bay October 10, 1633. He says in his Diary,(*) "I was born of good parents. My Mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendlesham, in catechiseing me and hearing choice ministers," Etc. March 4, 1634-5, he was admitted a freeman, and shortly moved to Watertown, Massachusetts, where he joined the church "by giving account of my faith." This same year he went to Dorchester (Windsor), Ct., with the overland migrators. He was married there by Mr. [Roger?] Ludlow to Tacy Cooper, who

was born in England in 1608 and came to Dorchester, Massachusetts, June 9, 1634, and to Dorchester (Windsor), Ct., in 1635.

She had brothers Robert, of Yarmouth, Norfolk, and John of London, Eng. Robert returned to England from America in 1644.

Samuel Hubbard went to Wethersfield, Ct., in 1637, and May 10, 1639, removed to Springfield, Massachusetts, which he left for Fairfield, Ct., in 1647, though staying there but a short time on account of church disagreements. Samuel was now with his wife imbibing freely and preaching ardently the doctrines of Anabaptism. He says in his diary: "God having enlightened both (but mostly my wife) into his holy ordinance of baptising only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at, and answered two terms publicly, where I was said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened with imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove: that scripture came into our minds:

"If they persecute you in one place flee to another;" and so we did 2 day of October, 1648. We went for Rhode Island and arrived there the 12 day. I and my wife upon our manifestation of our faith were baptised by brother Joseph Clarke, 3 day of November, 1648."

Samuel Hubbard spent the remainder of his life in and about Newport, or "Mayford," as he termed it. He was a zealous Baptist and public religous disputant. For twenty-three years he belonged to the First Baptist Church of Newport, which sent him August 7, 1651, to Boston "to visit the bretherin who was imprisoned in Boston jayl for witnessing the truth of baptising believers only, viz: Brothers John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes, and John Crandall."

In 1657 he went with Holmes on a preaching tour on Long Island. In 1664 he was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony. April 7, 1668, he went to Boston with Joseph

Torrey and William Hiscox "to publicly dispute with those baptised there." December 23, 1671, with his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America. In July, 1668, he wrote a letter to his cousin John Smith, of London, detailing his worldly possessions "through God's great mercy."

In 1675 in his diary he refers to a "testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed in 1549, which he [Cocke] hid in his bed straw lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary's days." In 1676 he corresponded with Dr.Edward Stennett, Pastor of the Seventh Day Baptist Church in Bell Lane, London. John Thornton and Roger Williams of Rhode Island, and Governor Leete of Connecticut were his friends.

He died between 1688 and 1692, and his wife after 1697, but no traces of their burial places have been found.

Children--

NAOMI (b Nov 18, 1637, at Wethersfield, Ct, d Nov 28, 1637),

NAOMI (b Oct 19, 1638, at Wethersfield, Ct, d in Springfield, Mass, May 5, 1643),

RUTH (b Jan 11, 1640, in Springfield, Mass, d in Westerly, R. I., in1691, m Robert Burdick of "Musquamicot," or Westerly, R. I., who was made freeman May 22, 1655, d in 1692, and had Robert, Son, Hubbard, Thomas, Naomi, Ruth, Benjamin, Samuel, Tacy and Deborah),

RACHEL (b. Mch 10, 1642, in Springfield, Mass, m Nov 3, 1658, Andrew Langworthy, who came to Newport, R. I., in 1656, and had Samuel and James),

SAMUEL (b in Springfield, Massachusetts, Mch 25, 1644, d y),

BETHIAH (b in Springfield Dec 19, 1646, d at Westerly, R. I., Apl 17,1707, m Joseph Clarke Jr, formerly of Westhorpe, Suffolk, Eng., b there Apl 2, 1643, d Jan 11, 1727, and had Judith, Joseph, Samuel, John, Bethiah, Mary, Susanah, Thomas and William),

SAMUEL (b in Newport Nov 30, 1649, d there unm Jan 20, 1670-1).

(*)Copious notes were made from this diary by Dr. Issao Backus, a Baptist historian of about 1777, These notes are now possessed by Ray Greene Huling, of New Bedford. Mass, though the original diary and other valuable manuscripts of Samuel Hubbard disappeared about 1852. There are living descendants of this Samuel Hubbard through Bethiah Hubbard and Joseph Clarke of various names, but none of the name of Hubbard.

ref "A Brief History of a few Early Settlers of Rhode Island and some of their Descendants" by Mary S. Andrews Farina, Illinois, 1910

The Second Baptist Church in America

Dr. William Clarke was born at Westhorpe, Suffolk County, England,October 8, 1609 and died at Newport, RI, April 20, 1676. He was a physician in London, educated at Cambridge University. He arrived at Boston, with his wife, Elizabeth Harges, in November of 1637. He was soon allowed to leave the Boston colony because of his religious beliefs. After some time he went to Providence, and with the help of Roger Williams he and his followers purchased island of Aquidneck, later called Rhode Island, for their future home. The first settlement was made in1638 at Pocasset, later called Portsmounth, and Dr. Clarke began preaching for them. In 1639 members of the colony took steps to make a settlement at Newport. In 1644 he founded at Newport, the Second Baptist Church in America, and became its pastor. In 1648 this church had but 15 members, including Dr. John Clarke, pastor, Thomas Clarke, Joseph Clarke and Samuel Hubbard.

The First Seventh Day Baptist Church in America

In 1664, or probably in 1665 (new style) Stephen Mumford and his wife came from England to Newport, probably sent as Missionaries. They were members of the Belle Lane S.D.B. Church of London. Through his efforts several members of John Clarke's church at Newport embraced the Sabbath, the first convent to the Sabbath in America being Tacy (Cooper) Hubbard.

Samuel Hubbard was born at Mendelsham, Eighty miles northwest of London,in Suffolk Co., in 1610, the youngest of seven children. He came from Trekesbury in 1633, and settled at Salem, Massachusetts. In the autumn of 1635 he removed in a company of settlers, to the Valley of the Connecticut River. In the spring of 1636 he married Tacy Cooper, who was also of the company of settlers. Samuel and Tacy settled at Weathersfieldand later moved to Newport. Before removing with her parents, to the valley of the Connecticut River, Tacy Cooper lived at Dorchester, and was a member of the church at Dorchester. After their removal to Newport, Samuel and Tacy joined Dr. John Clarke's church.

The following is taken from Samuel Hubbard's Journal, (old stylecalendar):

"My Wife took up keeping of the Lord's holy 7th day, April,1665: Our daughter Ruth, October 25, 1666: Rachel, January 15, 1666: Bethiah, February, 1666: our son Joseph

Clarke, February 23, 1666." Their daughter, Rachel Langworthy was the third convert, Samuel Hubbard having embraced the sabba the three weeks after his wife embraced it. Roger Baster followed. Then William Hiscox, both in 1666. These five all lived at Newport and were members of Dr. John Clarke's church in which, for some years, they continued their membership.

With Stephen Mumford andwife, these five organized at Newport the first S.D.B Church in America.December 23, 1671, old style calendar, or January 3, 1672, new style. Samuel Hubbard made the following entry in his journal:

"We entered into a church covenant the 23rd day of December, 1671. Wm. Hiscox, StephenMumford, Samuel Hubbard, Roger Baster, Sister Hubbard, Sister Mumford,Sister Rachel Langworthy."

Joseph Clarke. Sr., and his wife Bethiah Hubbard, and Robert Burdick and his wife Ruth, who was also Samuel Hubbard's daughter, and Mrs. John Maxson Sr. all of whom were living in Misquanicut: Joseph and Bethiah Clarke soon following. The first pastoror leading elder of the Newport church was Wm. Hiscox, who was born in1638. He served as pastor 33 years. In his journal, Samuel Hubbard states that Stephen Mumford returned to England and brought Return to America with him, Wm. Gibson who came from the Belle Lane church, with his wife and two children, in 1675, Wm. Gibson was second pastor of the Newport church, serving from 1704 - 1717. The third pastor was Joseph Crandall, a convert to the Sabbath, of Westerly, son of Elder John Crandall of Westerly, who was the first minister converted to the Sabbath in America. His wife (John's) was the first S.D.B. to die in America. Elder John Crandall was an elder in Dr. John Clarke's church at the time of his conversion to the Sabbath.

For some time the church at Newport had no official name, it was sometimes called The Church of Rhode Island and Westerly. Sometimes The Church.

In November 1887 the Historical Society moved the Church to a safer location, fearing fires. Thomas Hubbard of England was the grand father of Samuel Hubbard, is not known to have been a Sabbath keeper, but for the truth's sake he was burned at the stake March 26, 1555, in the reign of Bloody Mary, Queen of England. The father of Samuel Hubbard was James Hubbard. The father of James Hubbard was Thomas Hubbard, Samuel's mother was Naomi, daughter of Thomas Cocke, England, Thomas Cocke had a Testament, printed in 1549, which was afterward owned by Samuel Hubbard. Samuel HUBBARD and Tacy COOPER were married on 4 Jan 1635/36.

Tacy COOPER was born in 1608. She died in 1697 in Newport, R.I.. Samuel

HUBBARD and Tacy COOPER had the following children:

i. Ruth HUBBARD.

ii. Bethiah HUBBARD.

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SOURCE 1

Founders of Connecticut

Tacy and Samuel were amongst the group of pioneers that marched down from Watertown in the harsh winter of 1635 to find Connecticut. They did not stay because they were being persecuted for expressing Baptist views and went on to Newport RI.

SOURCE 2

Sam and Rachel Hubbard

Sam and Rachel were siblings. They were born in England. Rachel and John settled in Mass and Sam went on to found Newport RI. Religious freedom was important: Their grandfather Cook was burned at the stake by Mary Queen of Scots for not recanting Protestantism. I have some info and will publish this later. I am related directly to both Sam and Rachel - so I get this line twice!

SOURCE 3

History

Samuel arrived in Salem, Massachusetts, in October, 1633, and probably came in the ship "James", Grant, master, which left Gravesend, England, late in August of 1633, and arrived in Massachusetts Bay in October. He says in his diary, "I was born of good parents. My Mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendlesham, in catechiseing me and hearing choice ministers."

In 1635, he moved to Watertown, Massachusetts, where he joined the church and that same year he went to Dorchester (Windsor), Ct. where he married Tacy. She had brothers Robert and John of London.Samuel and Tacy went to Wethersfield, Ct., in 1637, and moved up the Connecticut River to Springfield, MA in 1639. In Dec. 1640 "Samuel Hubbard is alsoe appoynted by a generall vote to keepe an Ordinary [Inn] for ye entertaynment of Strangers."

They left for Fairfield, Ct., in 1647, though only stayed a short time on account of church disagreements. Samuel and Tacy were preaching the doctrines of Anabaptism. He says in his diary: "God having enlightened both (but mostly my wife) into his holy ordinance of baptising only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at, and answered two terms publicly, where I was said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened with imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove: that scripture came into our minds."

"If they persecute you in one place flee to another;" and so we did 2 day of October, 1648. We went for Rhode Island and arrived there the 12 day. I and my wife upon our manifestation of our faith were baptised by brother Joseph Clarke, 3 day of November, 1648."

Samuel was a zealous Baptist and public religous disputant . For twenty-three years he belonged to the First Baptist C hurch of Newport, which sent him to Boston in 1651 "to visit the bretherin who was imprisoned in Boston jayl for witnessing the truth of baptising believers only, viz : Brothers John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes, and John Crandall." In 1657 he went with Holmes on a preaching tour on Long Island, and in 1664 he was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony.

In about 1665, a Seventh Day Baptist missionary and his wife arrived in Newport from London; the first convent to the Sabbath in America being Tacy. Samuel and Tacy, one daughter, and four other persons formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America in 1671. Samuel reported that in 1678 there were 37 "Sabbatarians" in America; 20 in Newport , 7 at Westerly (also known as Hopkinton) and 10 at New London, Connecticut. Three years later the number of member s reached 51; of this group two were Indians.In 1675 in his diary he refers to a "testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed in 1549, which he [Cocke] hid in his bed straw lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary's days."He died between 1688 and 1692, and his wife after 1697, but no traces of their burial places have been found.

SOURCE 4

Seventh Day Baptists

Samuel's wife Tacy Cooper was the first New World convert to Seventh Day Baptism. They founded their own congregation, pastored by John Clarke, on 23 December 1671.

Seventh Day Baptists differ from other Baptists mainly in their observance of a Saturday sabbath.

SOURCE 5

Bio

  1. ID: I948
  2. Name: Samuel HUBBARD 1
  3. Sex: M
  4. Change Date: 25 SEP 2005
  5. Birth: 1610 in Mendelsham, County Suffolk, England 1 2
  6. Death: ABT 1689 in Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island
  7. Note:
   Samuel Hubbard, quoted in Genealogical Dictionary of RI: "I was born o f good parents, my mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mende lsham, in catechiseing me and hearing choice ministers, &c."
   Based on the "Ebenezer" quoted by Ezra Stiles (Literary Diary III:82) an d by Nellie Johnson (6), his birthday may be 10 May 1610.
   Samuel and Tacy were part of the group that marched from Watertown, MA t o Connecticut in winter of 1635. (From Descendants of Robert Burdick).
   1648: Moved to RI.
   1664: Samuel appointed General Solicitor for Colony of RI.
   From the Langworthys' appendix VII:
   "His father was James Hubbard who married Naomi Cocke of Ipswich. His g randfather was Thomas Hubbard, who is mentioned, as is supposed, in the B ook of Martyrs, Vol. 3, Page 704, under the name of Thomas Higbee. He ca me to America in 1633 and settled first at Salem, Mass., but soon moved t o Watertown where he joined the church in 1635. Tase Cooper, who becam e his wife, came to Dorchester in 1634. In 1635 both moved to Windsor, C onn., where they were married by Mr. Ludlow on Jan. 4, 1636. In 1639 the y moved to Springfield, Mass. where their fourth child Rachel, was born o n March 10, 1642. . . . May 10, 1647 they moved to Fairfield, Conn., bu t says Hubbard, 'God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into hi s holy ordinances of baptizing only of visible believers, and being ver y zealous for it she was mostly struck at and answered two times publicly , where I was also said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened with imp risonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it, or to remove: that sc ripture came into our minds, if they persecute you in one place flee to a nother: and so we did, 2 day October 1648 we went for Rhode Island and a rrived there 12 day. I and my wife upon our manifestation of our faith w ere baptized by brother John Clarke 3 day, Nov. 1648.'"
   His journal and letters apparently surrive only in transcription by Dr . Isaac Backus.
   From Samuel Hubbard in Boston to his cousin John Smith of London 6 Jul y 1668: "Thro' God's great mercy the Lord have given me in this wilderne ss a good, dilligent, careful, painful and very loving wife; we thro' mer cy live comfortably, praised be God, as coheirs together, of one mind i n the Lord, travelling thro' this wilderness to our heavenly Sion, knowin g we are pilgrims as our fathers were: and good portion being content th erewith. A good house as with us judged and 25 acres of ground fenced in , and 4 cows, which give milk, one young heifer and 3 calves and a very g ood mare; trade a carpenter, and health to follow it and my wife very dil ligent and painful, praised be God. This my joy and crown in humilit y I speak it, for God's glory, I trust all both sons-in-law and daughte r are in visible order in general; but in especial manner my son Clarke a nd my three daughters, with my wife and about 4 [others?] walk in the obs ervation of God's holy sanctified 7 day sabbath, with much comfort and li berty, for so we and all ever had and yet have in this colony."
   Hubbard's journal as quoted in the SDB Trilogy: "My wife took up keepin g the lord's holy 7th day Sabbath the 10 day March 1665. I took it u p 1 day April 1665. Our daughter, Ruth 25 Oct. 1666. -- Rachel -- Jan . 15 1666 -- Bethian -- February 1666. Our son Joseph Clarke 23 Feb. 166 6."
   One of seven original signers of SDB founding document:
   Original SDB covenant is dated 7 December 1671 in one version (Backus) a nd 23 in the other version (Comer):
   "After serious consideration and seeking God's face among our Selves fo r the Lord to direct us in a right way for us, and our children so as mig ht be for God's glory and our Souls good and others Example, We Entered i nto Covenant with ye Lord and with one another and gave up our Selves t o God and one another to walk togather in all God's Holy Commandments an d Holy Ordinances according to what the Lord had Discovered to us or Shou ld Discover to be his mind for us to be obedient unto; with Sence upon ou r Hearts of great need to be watchfull over one another, Do promise So t o do, and in Edyfying and building up one another in our Most holy fait h ---"
   A controversy probably about 24 November 1677 in New London CT, as recou nted in Samuel Hubbard's journal (p. 12 typescript), somewhat amplified b y the account in the 1852 SDB Memorial 1(4):156:
   "Bro. [William] Hiscox went on in his sermon; the constable came in & to ok him away, so we went with him all before the magistrate; arose much di scourse their minister [Mr. Bradstreet] being there, & he saying their go od way which their forefathers set up &c. I, asking leave of the magistr ate say, that he was a young man, but I was a old planter of about 40 yea rs [ago], before Conecticut was planted and a beginer of that place, & ha d been persecuted for my conscience from that colony, & I could assure th em that the old beginers was not for persecution but [we] had our libert y at first, &c." According to the SDB Memorial account, when the Hubbard s first lived in Springfield it was under CT jurisdiction, but passed t o MA when CT, MA, and PL agreed to unify against the Indians. And by th e time he resettled in CT, their more tolerant laws had changed too.
   Samuel Hubbard to cousin John Broudish/Brandish, 26 Feb. 1676/77, quote d in Hubbard's Journal:
   "Dear cousin we all desire that yo would come & give us a visit this spr ing, because yo might see all to-gether here, only 2 sons-in-law, Rober t went in the winter to Squomicut, [Westerly] Joseph Clarke went away las t night -- My rates for the wars was but 10s or 10 lb of wool as I rememb er; my son Joseph Clarke was at Squomicut 3 pound money, altho' he and so me of his estate was not there."
   Backus apparently summarizing in Samuel Hubbard's Journal:
   "July 16, 1678 letter of reproof was written to Jonn Rogers, for carryin g a burden on the sabbath, &c. signed in behalf of the chh by Wm Hiscox , Wm Gibson, S. Hubbard, S. Mumford, John Maxon, John Read, Roger Baster , John Thornton. And they sent another letter of reproof at the same tim e to Japeth, indian, for growing cold & vain.
   "Sept. 15, 1678 they wrote to mr. Reeve at Jameca, & said of their churc h, 'our number here is 20, at Westerly 7, at New London 10." 3 4 5 6 7 8
  1. Residence: 1639 Springfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts

Father: James HUBBARD

Mother: Naomi COCKE

Marriage 1 Tacy COOPER b: ABT 1608 in England

   * Married: 04 JAN 1635/36 in Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut

Children

  1. Naomi HUBBARD b: 18 NOV 1637 in Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut
  2. Naomi HUBBARD b: 19 OCT 1638 in Wethersfield, Hartford County, Connecticut
  3. Ruth HUBBARD b: 11 JAN 1639/40 in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts
  4. Rachel HUBBARD b: 10 MAR 1641/42 in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts
  5. Samuel HUBBARD b: 25 MAY 1644 in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts
  6. Bethiah HUBBARD b: 19 DEC 1646 in Springfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts
  7. Samuel HUBBARD b: 30 NOV 1649 in Newport, Newport County, Rhode Island

Sources:

  1. Title: Johnson, Nellie Willard. The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Islan d. 1937.
     Abbrev: Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island
     Author: Nellie Johnson
     Publication: 1937
  2. Title: Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy
     Abbrev: Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy
     Author: Ilou M. and Don A. Sanford
     Publication: 1998, Heritage Books Inc.
     Page: 17; Recorded 10 Sep 2001
  3. Title: The Langworthy Family
     Abbrev: Langworthy Family
     Author: William S. and Orthello S. Langworthy
     Publication: 1940
     Repository:
           Name: Rochester NY Public Library
     Page: 316-19; Recorded 25 Aug 2001
  4. Title: Newport Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy
     Abbrev: Seventh Day Baptist Trilogy
     Author: Ilou M. and Don A. Sanford
     Publication: 1998, Heritage Books Inc.
     Page: 13, 19; Recorded 10 Sep 2001
  5. Title: Johnson, Nellie Willard. The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Islan d. 1937.
     Abbrev: Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island
     Author: Nellie Johnson
     Publication: 1937
     Page: 6; Citing Ezra Stiles Literary Diary III:82; Recorded 29 Sep 2001
  6. Title: Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island; Comprising Three Generations o f Settlers Who Came Before 1690
     Abbrev: Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island
     Author: John Osborne Austin
     Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Second Date, 15 Sep 2001
     Repository:
           Name: St. Joseph County Public Library
     Page: 106; Recorded 15 Sep 2001
  7. Title: Samuel Hubbard's Journal Circa 1633-1686
     Abbrev: Samuel Hubbard's Journal
     Author: Samuel Hubbard
     Publication: WPA transcription, Rhode Island Historical Records Survey Project, Januar y 1940, Second Date, 08 Oct 2001
     Repository:
           Name: Seventh Day Baptist Historical Society
           Note:
           Phone2: 608/752-7711 (fax)
           E-mail: sdbhist@inwave.com
           Rev. Don A. Sanford, historian
     Page: 12, 88, 97; Recorded 08 Oct 2001
  8. Title: The Seventh-Day Baptist Memorial: A Quarterly Magazine, Devoted to Biogr aphy, History, and Statistics
     Abbrev: Seventh Day Baptist Memorial
     Publication: New York, Seventh-Day Baptist Publishing Society
     Repository:
           Name: Henderson files
     Page: I(4):156; Recorded 13 Oct 2001 

SOURCE 6

Immigrant Convert FOunded Connecticut, founded a church

He sailed from England to Salem, Mass. in 1633. His Grandfather Thomas Hubbard was burned at the stake in Essex County England for refusing to recant his Prodestantism. Samuel and Tacy Hubbard were in the party that, in 1635, marched through the wilderness from Watertown, Mass. to become the founders of Conneticut because of persicution for expressing his baptist views. Samuel and his wife sought refugee in Rhode Island in 1648. In 1664 he was appointed Solicitor General of the colony. December 23, 1671 Samuel with his wife one daughter and four other persons formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in the New World. Tacy Hubbard was the first convert for the doctrine that no authority exists substituting another day for the seventh day as the sabath.

SOURCE 7

Fairfield and the Witch Trials

According to Geneological Dictionary of Rhode Island, Samuel and Tacy Hubbard settled in Fairfield and did not stay long due to the zealousness of religious beliefs. They were married in Fairfield by Mr. Ludlow in 1635. Sam and Tacy forged through and settled on the island of Newport where they established the 7 Day Baptist Church and founded the town.

20 years later, a Roger Ludlow was being sued for slander by Thomas Staples in Fairfield, Conn. for accusing his wife of Witchcraft. In a twist of fate, Goodwife Elizabeth Knapp was accused in this slander suit and condemned to death. This information is from History of Fairfield - by E Hubbel Schenck.

Ironically, Goody Knapp was related to Samuel through marriage, her brother Timothy married Bethia Brundage - daughter of Samuel's sister Rachel Hubbard (John) Brondish.  

SOURCE 8

1000 Years of Hubbard History

 First Generation           1.  Thomas1  Hubbard[1] birth date unknown.  Thomas died May 26, 1555 in England.                 Thomas Hubbard was a gentleman residing at Horden-on-the-Hill, in Essex, England, "of good estate and great estimation," and "zealous and religious in the true service of God." Discovered by an informer to Bishop Bonner, he was seized, imprisoned and burned May 26, 1555.  It is believed that the story of Thomas Highbed in Fox's Book of Martyrs, refers to him.         Thomas Hubbard had the following children:      +         2     i.     James2 Hubbard.             3     ii.     Richard Hubbard.  He was christened in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG, September 13, 1562.  The following individual is also linked to this event: Thomas Hubbard (father).            4     iii.     Elizabeth Hubbard.  She was christened in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG, September 13, 1562.  The following individual is also linked to this event: Thomas Hubbard (father).      Second Generation          2.  James2  Hubbard (Thomas 1)[2] birth date unknown.  James died in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG.          He married Naomi Cocke.  Naomi was the daughter of Thomas Cocke.  Naomi died in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG.         James Hubbard was a yeoman of Mendelsham, Suffolk, England, 80 miles northwest of London.  His Testament (printed in 1549) "which he hid in his bedstraw lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary's days," was brought to America by his son Samuel, and is possibly in the Library of Alfred University, at Alfred Centre, NY.  He and Naomi Cocke reportedly had ten children.  Benjamin, James, Rachel, and Samuel came to America, but probably none of the others.  Six are identified in Day's, "1000 Years of Hubbard History."         James Hubbard and Naomi Cocke had the following children:              5     i.     Rachel3 Hubbard was born in England.  Rachel died in Fairfield Co, CT.  She married John Brandish in England.  John died in Fairfield Co, CT.                             Rachel who married John Brandish, of Ipswich, Suffolk, ENG.  They came to America in 1633, and lived in Salem, MA, Wethersfield, CT, and Fairfield, CT.  After the death of her husband, Rachel married secondly, Anthony Wilson, of Fairfield, CT. Rachel and John Brandish had four children.                            1)  Mary, b. 1628, Ipswich, ENG.  Married Francis Purdy of Fairfield, CT                            2)  John, b. 1633, Salem, MA.  Removed to Flushing, New Netherlands                            3)  Bethia, b. 1637, Wethersfield, CT.  Married Timothy Knapp, of Greenwich, near Stamford, CT.                            4)  A posthumous son born 1639, Wethersfield, CT.             6     ii.     Benjamin Hubbard.             7     iii.     James Hubbard.  He was christened in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG, August 14, 1603.  The following individuals are also linked to this event: Naomi Cocke (mother); James Hubbard (father).            8     iv.     Sarah Hubbard was born 1598.  She married John Jackson in England.  John was born in England.  John died in England.                             Sarah, the eldest daughter, and her husband John Jackson, lived in Yarmouth, Norfolk, ENG. They had a son, Robert Jackson, who served four years under Oliver Cromwell.             9     v.     Thomas Hubbard was born 1604.  He married Esther.  Esther was born in England.  Esther died in England.                             Thomas, the eldest son, and his wife Esther, lived in Freeman Lane, near Horsley, down in Southwark, London.     +      10     vi.     Samuel Hubbard was born May 10, 1610.       Third Generation          10.  Samuel3  Hubbard (James 2)[3] was born in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG May 10, 1610.  Samuel died 1689 in Newport, Newport Co, RI, at 79 years of age.          He married Tacy  Cooper in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT, January 4, 1635/6.  Tacy was born in England February 12, 1608/9.  Tacy died circa 1697 in Newport, Newport Co, RI.                 From the Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island and "1000 Years of Hubbard History," we learn:        He says of himself: "Such was the pleasure of Jehovah towards me, I was born of good parents, my mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendelsham, in catechising me and hearing choice ministers, & c."        Oct 1633 - Salem, MA.  He came this month from England.        1634 - He went to Watertown, MA, where he says he joined the church, "by giving account of my faith."        Oct 1635 - With a party of about one hundred, he started to march through the wilderness to the Connecticut Valley; winter coming on before they reached their destination they suffered much from exposure, and insufficient food.  Samuel Hubbard remained at Windsor during the winter where he married to Tacy Cooper by Mr. Ludlow.  Tacy Cooper had come to Dorchester, MA, 9 Jun 1634, and was one of the party.        In 1636, shortly after their marriage, they went to Wethersfield, CT.      10 May 1639 - Springfield, MA.  He moved here at this date, in search of peace, and a church was soon gathered; he says: "I gave acct. of my faith" and that there were "five men in all...my wife soon after added."        To escape persecution under the harsh laws of Massachusetts they agin moved 10 May 1647 to Fairfield, CT. His stay here was short: "God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into his holy ordinances of baptizing only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at and answered two terms publicly, where I was also said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove; that Scripture came into our mouths, if they persecute you in one place, flee to another; and so we did 2 day of October, 1648, we went for Rhode Island, and arrived there 12 day.  I and my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptized by brother John Clarke, 3 day Nov 1648."        7 Aug 1651 - He was sent by the church to visit the brethren in prison at Boston, viz: John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes and John Crandall.        Oct 1652 - "I and my wife had hands laid on us by brother Joseph Torrey."        He was admitted Freeman of Newport, RI in 1655.        1 Oct 1657 - "Brother Obadiah Holmes and I went to the Dutch and Gravesend and to Jamaica and to Flushing and to Hamsted and to Cow Bay."  They came home 15 Nov 1657.        In 1664 he was chosen to be General Solicitor, in case of inability of Lawrence Turner.        He writes:  "My wife took up the keeping of the Lord's holy Seventh Day Sabbath. the 10th day March, 1665.  I took it up 1 day April 1665; our daughter Ruth, 25 Oct 1666; Rachel, 15 Jan 1666; Bethiah, Feb 1666; our son Joseph Clarke, 23 Feb 1666."        7 Apr 1668 - "I went to Boston to public dispute with those baptised there."        Jul 1668 - He wrote his cousin, John Smith, of London, from Boston, where he had been to a disputation:  "Through God's great mercy, the Lord have given me in this wilderness, a good, diligent, careful, painful and very loving wife; we, through mercy, live comfortably, praised be God, as co- heirs together of one mind in the Lord, traveling through this wilderness to our heavenly Sion, knowing we are pilgrims as our fathers were, and good portion being content therewith.  A good house, as with us judged, 25 acres of ground fenced, and four cows which give, one young heifer and three calves, and a very good mare, a trade, a carpenter, a health to follow it, and my wife very diligent and painful, praised be God. This is my joy and crown, in humility I speak of it, for God's Glory, I trust all, both sons in law and daughters are in visible order in general; but in especial manner my son Clarke and my three daughters, with my wife and about 14 walk in the observation of God's holy sanctified 7 day Sabbath, with much comfort and liberty, for so we and all ever had and yet have in this Colony."        16 Dec 1671 - He wrote to his children at Westerly, about the differences between those favoring the seventh day observance and the rest of the church.  Several spoke on both sides.  Mr. Hubbard gave his views. Brother Torrey said they required not my faith. Other discussion followed: "They replied fiercely, it was a tumult.  J. Torrey stopped them at last."        With his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America.  He writes: "We entered into a church covenant the 23rd day of December, 1671, viz: William Hiscox, Stephen Mumford, Samuel Hubbard, Roger Baxter, sister Hubbard, sister Mumford, Rachel Langworthy," &c.  Their church was not formed without a depature by their former associates from that spirit of toleration and "soul liberty" which Roger Williams claimed; for the members who united on Dec. 23, had been excommunicated Dec. 7, when the Rev. Obidiah Holmes preached against their doctrine of Seventh Day observance, and even declared "they had left Christ, and gone after Moses."  There is extant a letter from Roger Williams to Samuel Hubbard, in which he argues the position taken by the latter, and cites various texts against his views; but it is written in a very different spirit from that shown by the Newport church, and recognizes the conscientious motives which actuated Hubbard. "Bro' Hiscox and I send this Church to N. London and Westerly, 7 day Mar 1675," and again March, 1677/8 and 1686.        1675 - He says:  "I have a testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed 1549, which he hid in his bedstraw, lest it be found and burned, in Queen Mary's days."        1 Nov 1675 - He wrote Mr. Henry Reeves, at Jamaica; "Very sudden and strange changes these times afford in this, our age, everywhere, as I hear and now see in N.E. God's hand seems to be stretched out against N. England, by wars by the natives, and many Englishmen fall at present." "This island doth look to ourselves as yet, by mercy not one slain, blessed be God." "My wife and 3 daughters, who are all here by reason of the Indian war, with their 15 children, desire to remember their christian love to you."        Nov 1676, he writes:  "In the midst of these troubles of the war [King Philip's] Lieut. Joseph Torrey, Elder of Mr. Clarke's Church, having one daughter living at Squamicut and his wife being there, he said unto me `Come, let us send a boat to Squamicut, my all is there, and part of yours.'  We sent a boat, and his wife, his daughter and son in law and all their children and my two daughters, and their children [one had eight, the other three, with an apprentice boy] all came. ...My son Clarke came afterwards before winter, and my other daughter's husband in the spring, and they have all been at my house to this day."        Feb 26, 1676, he writes a nephew at Rye:  "I bless my God, my condition is comfortable, and I am very well contented with knowing it is more to give than to receive.  ...My wife and daughter Langworthy desired me to write about flax, yet if you bring some 20 pound if at a pound of flax for a pound of wool, it's so at Stonington; if bring Indian Corn it's now 4 pound of wool a bushel and I think it wiil be more."        Sep 2, 1677, he writes: "Truely Children for the present I am not altogether beset with thoughts (as its judged from Satan) I have been in very sore exercise, ever since br. Hiscox came to ye and a week before, occasioned by a sudden sentence of the Ch. declaring yet I have not the gift of prophesying publickly in the church tho' hereto fore judged by those brethren of the Old Ch.  Yet by most here and encouraged in it, was so sorely set on, that I was horribly tempted to deny all, yet kept; but sorely harried.  I pray be silent in this manner for the present."        29 Jun 1678 - He wrote Dr. Stennett, of London: "From my own house in Mayford, in Newport," &c.  "Last winter the Lord visited me with a very sore cough as long as strength, and breath did last, oft 5 times together only a little respite; my dear wife oft took her farewell of me, my dear brethren watched me in their terms.  Major Cranston [his physician] I sent for - he judged none help or hope for sure, but for present refreshment he gave me a small vial of spirits, which I took, and had some sleep, but my cough rather increased."  He was visited by the church which drew into the other room agreeing to seek God's face for me poor one.  "The next day I would have gone to town to give public praise, but was advised not to go," &c.  "Our Governor died the 19th day of June, 1678, buried 20th day, all this island was invited, many others were there, judged near a thousand people, our brother Hiscox spake there excellently," &c.        1680 - Taxed 6s. 2d.        In 1683, Samuel Hubbard went by water to visit friends at Rye, returning by Fairfield, Milford, New Haven, Guilford, Lyme, New London, and Westerly, arriving home after six weeks absence, Sept 25.  In a letter dated May 23, 1684, he says:  "What marvelous rich grace...hath made known his holy sabbath to such poor worms: first to my wife, I next, the first settlers or planters in N.E. (one brother and one sister came over with the practice of it)."        19 Dec 1686 - He wrote to John Thronton, of Providence: "My old brother who was before me, you and brother Joseph Clarke (only alive) in that ordinance of baptism, I next and my wife in New England, although we stept before you in other ordinances:  Oh! let us strive still to be first in the things of God," &c. ..."My wife and I counted up this year 1686:  My wife a creature 78 years, a convert 62 years, married 50 years and independent and joined to a church 52 years, a baptist 38 years, a Sabbath Keeper 21 years.  I a creature of 76 years, a convert 60 years and independent and joined to a church 52 years, a baptist 38 years, a Sabbath Keeper 21 years.  We are by rich grace bornup and adorned with rich mercies above many, as to have all my three daughters in the same faith and order, and 2 of their husbands and 2 of my grandaughters and their husbands also with us.  O praise the Lord for his goodness endures forever!  Not to us, not to us poor creatures.  These may be my last lines unto you, farewell."       7 May 1688 - He wrote Richard Brooks, of Boston: "The mesles is not gone here. My daughter Rachel have them and some of her family." "        From "1000 Years of Hubbard History," we learn:        "Samuel Hubbard, youngest son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, was born in Menddelsham (a market town about eighty miles northeast of London), Suffolk County, in 1610.  He arrived in Salem Mass., in October, 1633, and probably came in the ship James, Grant, master, which left Gravesend, England late in August, 1633, and arrived in Massachusetts Bay October 10, 1633."        "1000 Years of Hubbard History," says this about Samuel Hubbard's diary:        "Copious notes were made from this diary by Dr, Isaac Backus, a Baptist historian of about 1777.  These notes are now possessed by Ray Greene Huling, of New Bedford, Mass., though the original diary and other valuable manuscripts of Samuel Hubbard disappeared about 1852.  There are living descendants of this Samuel Hubbard through Bethiah Hubbard and Joseph Clarke of various names, but none of the name of Hubbard."        "Tacy Cooper who was born in England in 1608 and came to Dorchester, Mass., June 9, 1634, and to Dorchester (Windsor), Ct., in 1635.  She had brothers Robert, of Yarmouth, Norfolk, and John of London, Eng. Robert returned to England from America in 1644."        In May 1647, "Samuel was now with his wife imbibing freely and preaching ardently the doctrines of Anabaptism." Upon arrival in Rhode Island, 12 Oct 1648, "I and my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptised by brother Joseph Clarke, 3 day of November, 1648."  "He was a zealous Baptist and public religious disputant.  For twenty three years he belonged to the First Baptist Church of Newport."         Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper had the following children:             11     i.     Naomi4  Hubbard was born in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT November 18, 1637.  Naomi died November 28, 1637 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT, at less than one year of age.            12     ii.     Naomi Hubbard was born in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT October 19, 1638.  Naomi died May 5, 1643 in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA, at 4 years of age.     +      13     iii.     Ruth Hubbard was born January 11, 1639/0.     +      14     iv.     Rachel Hubbard was born March 10, 1641/2.            15     v.     Samuel Hubbard was born in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA March 25, 1644.  Samuel died in died young.            16     vi.     Bethiah Hubbard was born in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA December 19, 1646.  Bethiah died April 17, 1707 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, at 60 years of age.  She married Joseph Clarke in Newport, Newport Co, RI, November 16, 1664.  Joseph was born in Newport, Newport Co, RI April 2, 1643.  Joseph died January 11, 1726/7 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, at 83 years of age.  He was christened in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, September 30, 1643.            17     vii.     Samuel Hubbard was born in Newport, Newport Co, RI November 30, 1649.  Samuel died January 20, 1670/1 in Newport, Newport Co, RI, at 21 years of age. 

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hubbard/hubbard_photos/hubbard_thomas_tree.htm

SOURCE 9

Samuel Hubbard - Tacy COoper

SAMUEL HUBBARD – TACY COOPER

(1610-1689) (1609-1687)

Samuel was born 10 May 1610 in Mendelsham, Suffolk, England, son of James Hubbard and Naomi Cocke. Tacy was born 12 Feb 1609 in Mendelsham, the daughter of Thomas Cowper. Samuel emigrated to Salem, Massachusetts in 1633. Around 1634, he moved to Watertown, Massachusetts and jointed the church in 1635 "by giving account of my faith". Tacy arrived in Dorchester in 1634 and joined the church shortly thereafter. They were married in 1636 in Windsor, Connecticut. They moved to Springfield, then in 1647 to Fairfield and in 1648 they settled in Newport where they were baptized by John Clarke.From the beginning, Samuel was recognized as a leader. In 1665 the Hubbards accepted the seventh day Sabbath which Samuel recorded in his journal: "My wife took up keeping of the Lord's holy 7th day Sabbath the 10 day March 1665. I took it up 1 day April 1665. Our daughter Ruth 25 October 1666 -- Rachel January 15 day 1666 -- Bethiah February 1666. Our son Joseph Clarke 23 February 1666."

A passage from Samuel’s journal states "God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into his holy ordinance of baptizing only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at and answered two times publickly; where I was also said to be as bad as she, and are threatened with imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove; that scripture came into our minds, if they persecute you in one place flee to another: and so we did.”

The growth of Sabbath convictions created a concern within the First Baptist church. Many Baptist leaders urged cooperation and acceptance of the Sabbath keepers, but as time went by, tension increased. The two groups eventually separated officially on December 7, 1671 and the covenant was signed sixteen days later. During the six years following the organization of the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America, thirty members were added, although not all resided in Newport

In 1675, King Philip's War forced most of the settlers to temporarily abandon their claims and seek protection from the Indians in Newport

The church continued to grow during the 1700 and early 1800s, but began a steady decline after that time. This decline appears to have been due to migration to the west and the organization of other churches from its membership. The Seventh Day Adventist Church was formed on some of the beliefs of the original Seventh Day Baptist Church.'

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~lcowen/HUDSON/samuel_hubbard.htm

SOURCE 10

Founder of Newport, RI

10.  Samuel3  Hubbard (James 2)[3] was born in Mendelsham, Suffolk, ENG May 10, 1610.  Samuel died 1689 in Newport, Newport Co, RI, at 79 years of age. 

      He married Tacy Cooper in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT, January 4, 1635/6.  Tacy was born in England February 12, 1608/9.  Tacy died circa 1697 in Newport, Newport Co, RI. 

     
      From the Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island and "1000 Years of Hubbard History," we learn:
      He says of himself: "Such was the pleasure of Jehovah towards me, I was born of good parents, my mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendelsham, in catechising me and hearing choice ministers, & c."
      Oct 1633 - Salem, MA.  He came this month from England.
      1634 - He went to Watertown, MA, where he says he joined the church, "by giving account of my faith."
      Oct 1635 - With a party of about one hundred, he started to march through the wilderness to the Connecticut Valley; winter coming on before they reached their destination they suffered much from exposure, and insufficient food.  Samuel Hubbard remained at Windsor during the winter where he married to Tacy Cooper by Mr. Ludlow.  Tacy Cooper had come to Dorchester, MA, 9 Jun 1634, and was one of the party.
      In 1636, shortly after their marriage, they went to Wethersfield, CT.      10 May 1639 - Springfield, MA.  He moved here at this date, in search of peace, and a church was soon gathered; he says: "I gave acct. of my faith" and that there were "five men in all...my wife soon after added."
      To escape persecution under the harsh laws of Massachusetts they agin moved 10 May 1647 to Fairfield, CT. His stay here was short: "God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into his holy ordinances of baptizing only of visible believers, and being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at and answered two terms publicly, where I was also said to be as bad as she, and sore threatened imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove; that Scripture came into our mouths, if they persecute you in one place, flee to another; and so we did 2 day of October, 1648, we went for Rhode Island, and arrived there 12 day.  I and my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptized by brother John Clarke, 3 day Nov 1648."
      7 Aug 1651 - He was sent by the church to visit the brethren in prison at Boston, viz: John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes and John Crandall.
      Oct 1652 - "I and my wife had hands laid on us by brother Joseph Torrey."
      He was admitted Freeman of Newport, RI in 1655.
      1 Oct 1657 - "Brother Obadiah Holmes and I went to the Dutch and Gravesend and to Jamaica and to Flushing and to Hamsted and to Cow Bay."  They came home 15 Nov 1657.
      In 1664 he was chosen to be General Solicitor, in case of inability of Lawrence Turner.
      He writes:  "My wife took up the keeping of the Lord's holy Seventh Day Sabbath. the 10th day March, 1665.  I took it up 1 day April 1665; our daughter Ruth, 25 Oct 1666; Rachel, 15 Jan 1666; Bethiah, Feb 1666; our son Joseph Clarke, 23 Feb 1666."
      7 Apr 1668 - "I went to Boston to public dispute with those baptised there."
      Jul 1668 - He wrote his cousin, John Smith, of London, from Boston, where he had been to a disputation:  "Through God's great mercy, the Lord have given me in this wilderness, a good, diligent, careful, painful and very loving wife; we, through mercy, live comfortably, praised be God, as co- heirs together of one mind in the Lord, traveling through this wilderness to our heavenly Sion, knowing we are pilgrims as our fathers were, and good portion being content therewith.  A good house, as with us judged, 25 acres of ground fenced, and four cows which give, one young heifer and three calves, and a very good mare, a trade, a carpenter, a health to follow it, and my wife very diligent and painful, praised be God. This is my joy and crown, in humility I speak of it, for God's Glory, I trust all, both sons in law and daughters are in visible order in general; but in especial manner my son Clarke and my three daughters, with my wife and about 14 walk in the observation of God's holy sanctified 7 day Sabbath, with much comfort and liberty, for so we and all ever had and yet have in this Colony."
      16 Dec 1671 - He wrote to his children at Westerly, about the differences between those favoring the seventh day observance and the rest of the church.  Several spoke on both sides.  Mr. Hubbard gave his views. Brother Torrey said they required not my faith. Other discussion followed: "They replied fiercely, it was a tumult.  J. Torrey stopped them at last."
      With his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America.  He writes: "We entered into a church covenant the 23rd day of December, 1671, viz: William Hiscox, Stephen Mumford, Samuel Hubbard, Roger Baxter, sister Hubbard, sister Mumford, Rachel Langworthy," &c.  Their church was not formed without a depature by their former associates from that spirit of toleration and "soul liberty" which Roger Williams claimed; for the members who united on Dec. 23, had been excommunicated Dec. 7, when the Rev. Obidiah Holmes preached against their doctrine of Seventh Day observance, and even declared "they had left Christ, and gone after Moses."  There is extant a letter from Roger Williams to Samuel Hubbard, in which he argues the position taken by the latter, and cites various texts against his views; but it is written in a very different spirit from that shown by the Newport church, and recognizes the conscientious motives which actuated Hubbard. "Bro' Hiscox and I send this Church to N. London and Westerly, 7 day Mar 1675," and again March, 1677/8 and 1686.
      1675 - He says:  "I have a testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed 1549, which he hid in his bedstraw, lest it be found and burned, in Queen Mary's days."
      1 Nov 1675 - He wrote Mr. Henry Reeves, at Jamaica; "Very sudden and strange changes these times afford in this, our age, everywhere, as I hear and now see in N.E. God's hand seems to be stretched out against N. England, by wars by the natives, and many Englishmen fall at present." "This island doth look to ourselves as yet, by mercy not one slain, blessed be God." "My wife and 3 daughters, who are all here by reason of the Indian war, with their 15 children, desire to remember their christian love to you."
      Nov 1676, he writes:  "In the midst of these troubles of the war [King Philip's] Lieut. Joseph Torrey, Elder of Mr. Clarke's Church, having one daughter living at Squamicut and his wife being there, he said unto me `Come, let us send a boat to Squamicut, my all is there, and part of yours.'  We sent a boat, and his wife, his daughter and son in law and all their children and my two daughters, and their children [one had eight, the other three, with an apprentice boy] all came. ...My son Clarke came afterwards before winter, and my other daughter's husband in the spring, and they have all been at my house to this day."
      Feb 26, 1676, he writes a nephew at Rye:  "I bless my God, my condition is comfortable, and I am very well contented with knowing it is more to give than to receive.  ...My wife and daughter Langworthy desired me to write about flax, yet if you bring some 20 pound if at a pound of flax for a pound of wool, it's so at Stonington; if bring Indian Corn it's now 4 pound of wool a bushel and I think it wiil be more."
      Sep 2, 1677, he writes: "Truely Children for the present I am not altogether beset with thoughts (as its judged from Satan) I have been in very sore exercise, ever since br. Hiscox came to ye and a week before, occasioned by a sudden sentence of the Ch. declaring yet I have not the gift of prophesying publickly in the church tho' hereto fore judged by those brethren of the Old Ch.  Yet by most here and encouraged in it, was so sorely set on, that I was horribly tempted to deny all, yet kept; but sorely harried.  I pray be silent in this manner for the present."
      29 Jun 1678 - He wrote Dr. Stennett, of London: "From my own house in Mayford, in Newport," &c.  "Last winter the Lord visited me with a very sore cough as long as strength, and breath did last, oft 5 times together only a little respite; my dear wife oft took her farewell of me, my dear brethren watched me in their terms.  Major Cranston [his physician] I sent for - he judged none help or hope for sure, but for present refreshment he gave me a small vial of spirits, which I took, and had some sleep, but my cough rather increased."  He was visited by the church which drew into the other room agreeing to seek God's face for me poor one.  "The next day I would have gone to town to give public praise, but was advised not to go," &c.  "Our Governor died the 19th day of June, 1678, buried 20th day, all this island was invited, many others were there, judged near a thousand people, our brother Hiscox spake there excellently," &c.
      1680 - Taxed 6s. 2d.
      In 1683, Samuel Hubbard went by water to visit friends at Rye, returning by Fairfield, Milford, New Haven, Guilford, Lyme, New London, and Westerly, arriving home after six weeks absence, Sept 25.  In a letter dated May 23, 1684, he says:  "What marvelous rich grace...hath made known his holy sabbath to such poor worms: first to my wife, I next, the first settlers or planters in N.E. (one brother and one sister came over with the practice of it)."
      19 Dec 1686 - He wrote to John Thronton, of Providence: "My old brother who was before me, you and brother Joseph Clarke (only alive) in that ordinance of baptism, I next and my wife in New England, although we stept before you in other ordinances:  Oh! let us strive still to be first in the things of God," &c. ..."My wife and I counted up this year 1686:  My wife a creature 78 years, a convert 62 years, married 50 years and independent and joined to a church 52 years, a baptist 38 years, a Sabbath Keeper 21 years.  I a creature of 76 years, a convert 60 years and independent and joined to a church 52 years, a baptist 38 years, a Sabbath Keeper 21 years.  We are by rich grace bornup and adorned with rich mercies above many, as to have all my three daughters in the same faith and order, and 2 of their husbands and 2 of my grandaughters and their husbands also with us.  O praise the Lord for his goodness endures forever!  Not to us, not to us poor creatures.  These may be my last lines unto you, farewell."
      7 May 1688 - He wrote Richard Brooks, of Boston: "The mesles is not gone here. My daughter Rachel have them and some of her family." "
      From "1000 Years of Hubbard History," we learn:
      "Samuel Hubbard, youngest son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, was born in Menddelsham (a market town about eighty miles northeast of London), Suffolk County, in 1610.  He arrived in Salem Mass., in October, 1633, and probably came in the ship James, Grant, master, which left Gravesend, England late in August, 1633, and arrived in Massachusetts Bay October 10, 1633."
      "1000 Years of Hubbard History," says this about Samuel Hubbard's diary:
      "Copious notes were made from this diary by Dr, Isaac Backus, a Baptist historian of about 1777.  These notes are now possessed by Ray Greene Huling, of New Bedford, Mass., though the original diary and other valuable manuscripts of Samuel Hubbard disappeared about 1852.  There are living descendants of this Samuel Hubbard through Bethiah Hubbard and Joseph Clarke of various names, but none of the name of Hubbard."
      "Tacy Cooper who was born in England in 1608 and came to Dorchester, Mass., June 9, 1634, and to Dorchester (Windsor), Ct., in 1635.  She had brothers Robert, of Yarmouth, Norfolk, and John of London, Eng. Robert returned to England from America in 1644."
      In May 1647, "Samuel was now with his wife imbibing freely and preaching ardently the doctrines of Anabaptism." Upon arrival in Rhode Island, 12 Oct 1648, "I and my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptised by brother Joseph Clarke, 3 day of November, 1648."  "He was a zealous Baptist and public religious disputant.  For twenty three years he belonged to the First Baptist Church of Newport."

      Samuel Hubbard and Tacy Cooper had the following children:

          11     i.     Naomi4 Hubbard was born in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT November 18, 1637.  Naomi died November 28, 1637 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT, at less than one year of age.
          12     ii.     Naomi Hubbard was born in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT October 19, 1638.  Naomi died May 5, 1643 in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA, at 4 years of age.
   +      13     iii.     Ruth Hubbard was born January 11, 1639/0.
   +      14     iv.     Rachel Hubbard was born March 10, 1641/2.
          15     v.     Samuel Hubbard was born in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA March 25, 1644.  Samuel died in died young.
          16     vi.     Bethiah Hubbard was born in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA December 19, 1646.  Bethiah died April 17, 1707 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, at 60 years of age.  She married Joseph Clarke in Newport, Newport Co, RI, November 16, 1664.  Joseph was born in Newport, Newport Co, RI April 2, 1643.  Joseph died January 11, 1726/7 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, at 83 years of age.  He was christened in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, September 30, 1643.
          17     vii.     Samuel Hubbard was born in Newport, Newport Co, RI November 30, 1649.  Samuel died January 20, 1670/1 in Newport, Newport Co, RI, at 21 years of age. 

SOURCE 11

Samuel Hubbard

Samuel Hubbard, youngest son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, was born in Mendelsham, a market town 85 miles northeast of London in Suffolk County, in 1610.

He says in his diary, "I was born of good parents. My mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord in Mendelsham in catechising me and hearing choice ministrers." In 1634 he removed to Watertown and was admitted freeman the same year. That year he also removed to Windsor, Conn. and thence to Weathersfield in 1637, thence, May 10, 1639 to Springfield, Mass. which he left for Fairfield, Conn in 1647. He was now ardently preaching the deoctrine of Anabaptism. He went to Rhode Island, where - his diary states - "I and my wife were baptized Nov. 3, 1648 by brother Joseph Clarke."

He spent the remaider of his life in and about Newport, where for 21 years he belonged to the Baptist Church of Newport, which sent him Aug 7, 1651 to Boston "to visit bretherin who was imprisoned in Boston jayl for witnessing the truth about baptism, viz. Brothers John Clarke? Obediah Holmes, and John Crandall. In 1657 he went with Holmes on a preaching tour of Long Island. In 1664 he was appointed general solicitor for the Colony. April 7, 1668, he went to Boston with two others "to publicly dispute with those baptized there."

Dec. 23, 1671 wiht his wife and daughter and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in American. In 1675 in his diary he refers to a "testament of my grandfather Cocke's printed in 1549 which he (my grandfather Cocke) hid in his bed-straw, lest it should be found and burned in Queen Mary's days. He died between 1688 and 1692, and his wife died after 1697.

He was married in Windsor, Conn by Mr. Roger Ludlow, Governor of the Colony, to Tacy Cooper, who was born in England in 1608 and came to Dorchester, Mass. in 1635, coming with her brothers, Robert and John.

SOURCE 12

Church founder at Newport Rhode Island

http://www.burdick-sullivanfamilyphotogallery.org/FamilyTree/RobertBurdickofRhodeIsland.htm

Samuel Hubbard, was one of the founders, at Newport, Rhode Island, on December 23, 1671, of the Seventh Day Baptist Church.

He was born in 1610, at Mendelsham, Suffolk County, England, and was the son of James and Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard. His mother was the daughter of Thomas Cocke of Ipswitch.

His grandfather, Thomas Hubbard, was burned at the stake, May 26, 1555, in Essex County, England, for refusing to recant his Protestantism. His fate is related in Fox's "Book of Martyrs" (Book III, Chap. 14), under the name of Thomas Higbed.

Samuel Hubbard came in 1633 to Salem, Massachusetts. At Windsor, Connecticut, on January 4, 1636, he married Tasy Cooper. They were both in the party that marched through the wilderness in the hard winter of 1635 from Watertown, Mass., to become the founders of Connecticut.

On account of persecution for expressing Baptist views, Mr. Hubbard finally, in 1648, sought refuge in Rhode Island. In 1664 he was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony.

On December 23, 1668, along with his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America. He died between 1688 and 1692 and his wife died after 1697, but no trace of their burial places have been found.

This information was taken from "The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island," by Nellie (Willard) Johnson, 1937. 

SOURCE 13

Samuel Hubbard

Samuel Hubbard came from England to Salem, Massachusetts in 1633. He marched through the wilderness in 1635 to become one of the founders of Connecticut. He was one of the founders of the Seventh Day Baptist Church on December 23, 1671; his wife was the first convert.

He was appointed General Solicitor of the Colony of Rhode Island in 1664.

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Samuel Hubbard was a descendant of Thomas igbee/Hubbard who was burned at the stake and is recorded in Fox's Book of Martyrs.

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Samuel Hubbard, was the youngest of the ten children of James (and Naomi Cocke) Hubbard, and was born about 1610, at Mendelsham, Suffolk County, England; landed at Salem, Mass., Oct 1633. At Windsor, Conn., 4 January 1636/7, he married Tase Cooper age 28, who had come to Dorchester, Mass., in 1634; they began their married life at Wethersfield, and soon removed to Springfield, where they kept an inn; 1647 removed to Fairfield, Conn. He was dead by 1692; his wife was living 1697.

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Samuel Hubbard b Mendelsham, Suffolk, Eng May 10, 1610, d 1689 Newport, Newport Co, RI, 79 yrs of age. m Tacy Cooper in Windsor, Hartford Co, CT, Jan 4, 1635/6. Tacy b Eng Feb 12 1608/9. Tacy d c1697 Newport, Newport Co, RI.

From Genealogical Dictionary of RI & "1000 Yrs of Hubbard History," we learn:

He says of himself: "Such was the pleasure of Jehovah towards me, I was born of good parents, my mother brought me up in the fear of the Lord, in Mendelsham, in catechising me & hearing choice ministers, & c."

Oct 1633-Salem, MA. Came this month from Eng.

1634-Went to Watertown, MA, where he joined the church, "by giving account of my faith."

Oct 1635-With a party of about 100, started to march through wilderness to CT Valley; winter coming on before they reached their destination they suffered much from exposure, & insufficient food. Samuel Hubbard remained at Windsor during winter where he married Tacy Cooper by Mr Ludlow. Tacy Cooper had come to Dorchester, MA, 9 Jun 1634, & was 1 of the party.

1636 shortly after marriage, went to Wethersfield, CT.

10 May 1639-Springfield, MA. Moved here at this date, in search of peace, & church was soon gathered; he says: "I gave acct. of my faith" & that there were "5 men in all...my wife soon after added."

To escape persecution under harsh laws of MA they again moved 10 May 1647 to Fairfield, CT. Stay here was short: "God having enlightened both, but mostly my wife, into his holy ordinances of baptizing only of visible believers, & being very zealous for it, she was mostly struck at & answered 2 terms publicly, where I was also said to be as bad as she, & sore threatened imprisonment to Hartford jail, if not to renounce it or to remove; that Scripture came into our mouths, if they persecute you in 1 place, flee to another; & so we did

2 Oct 1648 Went for RI, & arrived there 12 Oct. I & my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptized by brother John Clarke, 3 Nov 1648."

7 Aug 1651-He was sent by church to visit brethren in prison at Boston, viz: John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes & John Crandall.

Oct 1652-"I & my wife had hands laid on us by brother Joseph Torrey."

He was admitted Freeman of Newport, RI in 1655.

1 Oct 1657-"Brother Obadiah Holmes & I went to the Dutch & Gravesend & to Jamaica & to Flushing & to Hamsted & to Cow Bay." They came home 15 Nov 1657.

In 1664 chosen to be Genl Solicitor, in case of inability of Lawrence Turner.

He writes: "My wife took up the keeping of the Lord's holy 7th Day Sabbath. 10 Mar 1665. I took it up 1 Apr 1665; dtr Ruth, 25 Oct 1666; Rachel, 15 Jan 1666; Bethiah, Feb 1666; son Joseph Clarke, 23 Feb 1666."

7 Apr 1668-"I went to Boston to public dispute with those baptized there."

Jul 1668-wrote cousin, John Smith, of London, from Boston, where he had been to a disputation: "Through God's great mercy, Lord have given me in this wilderness, a good, diligent, careful, painful & very loving wife; we, through mercy, live comfortably, praised be God, as co-heirs together of 1 mind in the Lord, traveling through this wilderness to our heavenly Sion, knowing we are pilgrims as our fathers were, & good portion being content therewith. A good house, as with us judged, 25 acres of ground fenced, & 4 cows which give, 1 young heifer & 3 calves, & a very good mare, a trade, a carpenter, a health to follow it, & my wife very diligent & painful, praised be God. This is my joy & crown, in humility I speak of it, for God's Glory, I trust all, both sons in law & dtrs are in visible order in general; but in especial manner my son Clarke & my 3 dtrs, with my wife & about 14 walk in the observation of God's holy sanctified 7 day Sabbath, with much comfort & liberty, for so we & all ever had & yet have in this Colony."

16 Dec 1671-wrote to his children at Westerly, about the differences between those favoring 7th day observance & rest of the church. Several spoke on both sides. Mr. Hubbard gave his views. Brother Torrey said they required not my faith. Other discussion followed: "They replied fiercely, it was a tumult. J Torrey stopped them at last."

With his wife, 1 daughter, & 4 other persons he formed 1st 7th Day Baptist Church in America. He writes: "We entered into a church covenant 23 Dec 1671, viz: William Hiscox, Stephen Mumford, Samuel Hubbard, Roger Baxter, sister Hubbard, sister Mumford, Rachel Langworthy," &c. Their church was not formed without depature by their former associates from that spirit of toleration & "soul liberty" which Roger Williams claimed; for the members who united on Dec 23, had been excommunicated Dec 7, when Rev Obidiah Holmes preached against their doctrine of 7th Day observance, & even declared "they had left Christ, & gone after Moses." There is extant a letter from Roger Williams to Samuel Hubbard, in which he argues the position taken by the latter, & cites various texts against his views; but it is written in a very different spirit from that shown by the Newport church, & recognizes conscientious motives which actuated Hubbard. "Bro' Hiscox & I send this Church to N London & Westerly, 7 Mar 1675," & again Mar 1677/8 & 1686.

1675-He says: "I have a testament of my grandfather Cocke's, printed 1549, which he hid in his bedstraw, lest it be found & burned, in Queen Mary's days."

1 Nov 1675-He wrote Mr Henry Reeves, at Jamaica; "Very sudden & strange changes these times afford in this, our age, everywhere, as I hear & now see in NE God's hand seems to be stretched out against N Eng, by wars by the natives, & many Englishmen fall at present." "This island doth look to ourselves as yet, by mercy not one slain, blessed be God." "My wife & 3 dtrs, who are all here by reason of the Indian war, with their 15 children, desire to remember their Christian love to you."

Nov 1676, he writes: "In the midst of these troubles of the war [King Philip's] Lt Joseph Torrey, Elder of Mr Clarke's Church, having 1dtr living at Squamicut & his wife being there, he said unto me Come, let us send a boat to Squamicut, my all is there, & part of yours.' We sent a boat, & his wife, his daughter & son in law & all their children & my 2 dtrs, & their children [1 had 8, the other 3, with an apprentice boy] all came. ...My son Clarke came afterwards before winter, & my other dtr's husband in the spring, & they have all been at my house to this day."

Feb 26 1676 he writes a nephew at Rye: "I bless my God, my condition is comfortable, & I am very well contented with knowing it is more to give than to receive. ...My wife & dtr Langworthy desired me to write about flax, yet if you bring some 20 lb if at a lb of flax for a lb of wool, it's so at Stonington; if bring Indian Corn it's now 4 lb of wool a bushel & I think it will be more."

Sep 2 1677 he writes: "Truly Children for the present I am not altogether beset with thoughts (as its judged from Satan) I have been in very sore exercise, ever since Bro Hiscox came to ye & a week before, occasioned by a sudden sentence of the Ch declaring yet I have not the gift of prophesying publickly in the church tho' hereto fore judged by those brethren of the Old Ch. Yet by most here & encouraged in it, was so sorely set on, that I was horribly tempted to deny all, yet kept; but sorely harried. I pray be silent in this manner for the present."

29 Jun 1678-wrote Dr Stennett, of London: "From my own house in Mayford, in Newport," &c. "Last winter the Lord visited me with a very sore cough as long as strength, & breath did last, oft 5 times together only a little respite; my dear wife oft took her farewell of me, my dear brethren watched me in their terms. Major Cranston [his physician] I sent for-he judged none help or hope for sure, but for present refreshment he gave me a small vial of spirits, which I took, & had some sleep, but my cough rather increased." He was visited by the church which drew into the other room agreeing to seek God's face for me poor one. "The next day I would have gone to town to give public praise, but was advised not to go," &c. "Our Gov died 19 Jun 1678, buried 20th day, all this island was invited, many others were there, judged near a 1000 people, our brother Hiscox spake there excellently," &c.

1680-Taxed 6s. 2d.

In 1683, Samuel Hubbard went by water to visit friends at Rye, returning by Fairfield, Milford, New Haven, Guilford, Lyme, New London, & Westerly, arriving home after 6 wks absence, Sep 25. In a letter dated 23 May 1684, he says: "What marvelous rich grace...hath made known his holy sabbath to such poor worms: 1st to my wife, I next, the 1st settlers or planters in NE (1 brother & 1 sister came over with the practice of it)."

19 Dec 1686-He wrote to John Thronton, of Providence: "My old brother who was before me, you & brother Joseph Clarke (only alive) in that ordinance of baptism, I next & my wife in New England, although we stept before you in other ordinances: Oh! let us strive still to be 1st in the things of God," &c. ..."My wife & I counted up this year 1686: My wife a creature 78 yrs, a convert 62 yrs, married 50 yrs & independent & joined to a church 52 yrs, a baptist 38 yrs, a Sabbath Keeper 21 yrs. I a creature of 76 yrs, convert 60 yrs & independent & joined to a church 52 yrs, a baptist 38 yrs, a Sabbath Keeper 21 yrs. We are by rich grace bornup & adorned with rich mercies above many, as to have all my 3 dtrs in the same faith & order, & 2 of their husbands & 2 of my grandtrs & their husbands also with us. O praise the Lord for his goodness endures forever! Not to us, not to us poor creatures. These may be my last lines unto you, farewell."

7 May 1688-He wrote Richard Brooks, of Boston: "The mesles is not gone here. My dtr Rachel have them & some of her family."

From "1000 Yrs of Hubbard History," we learn:

"Samuel Hubbard, youngest son of James & Naomi (Cocke) Hubbard, b in Menddelsham (market town abt 80 mi NE of London), Suffolk Co, 1610. He arrived in Salem MA, Oct 1633, & probably came in ship James, Grant, master, which left Gravesend, Eng late Aug 1633, & arrived in MA Bay Oct 10 1633."

"1000 Yrs of Hubbard History," says this abt Samuel Hubbard's diary:

"Copious notes were made from this diary by Dr Isaac Backus, Baptist historian abt 1777. These notes are now possessed by Ray Greene Huling, New Bedford, MA, though original diary & other valuable manuscripts of Samuel Hubbard disappeared abt 1852. There are living descendants of this Samuel Hubbard thru Bethiah Hubbard & Joseph Clarke of various names, but none of the name of Hubbard."

"Tacy Cooper b in Eng 1608 & came to Dorchester, MA, Jun 9 1634, & to Dorchester (Windsor), CT in 1635. She had brothers Robert, Yarmouth, Norfolk; & John, London, Eng. Robert returned to Eng from Am in 1644."

May 1647, "Samuel was now with his wife imbibing freely & preaching ardently the doctrines of Anabaptism."

Upon arrival in RI, 12 Oct 1648, "I & my wife upon manifestation of our faith were baptized by bro Joseph Clarke, 3 Nov 1648." "He was a zealous Baptist & public religious disputant. For 23 yrs he belonged to 1st Baptist Church of Newport."

Samuel Hubbard & Tacy Cooper had following children:

i. Naomi Hubbard b in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT Nov 18 1637. Naomi d Nov 28 1637 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT, < 1 yr of age.

ii. Naomi Hubbard b in Wethersfield, Hartford Co, CT Oct 19 1638. Naomi d May 5, 1643 in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA, 4 yrs of age.

iii. Ruth Hubbard b Jan 11 1639/0.

iv. Rachel Hubbard b Mar 10 1641/2.

v. Samuel Hubbard b in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA Mar 25 1644. Samuel d young.

vi. Bethiah Hubbard b in Springsfield, Hampden Co, MA Dec 19 1646. Bethiah d Apr 17, 1707 in Westerly, Washington Co, RI, 60 yrs of age. She m Joseph Clarke in Newport, Newport Co, RI, Nov 16 1664. Joseph b in Newport, Newport Co, RI Apr 2 1643. Joseph d Jan 11, 1726/7 in Westerly, Kings Co, RI, 83 yrs of age. He was c in Westerly, Kings Co, RI, Sep 30 1643.

vii. Samuel Hubbard b in Newport, Newport Co, RI Nov 30 1649. Samuel d Jan 20 1670/1 in Newport, Newport Co, RI, 21 yrs of age.

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With his wife, one daughter, and four other persons he formed the first Seventh Day Baptist Church in America. He writes: "We entered into a church covenant the 23rd day of December, 1671, viz: William Hiscox, Stephen Mumford, Samuel Hubbard, Roger Baxter, sister Hubbard, sister Mumford, Rachel Langworthy," &c. Their church was not formed without a depature by their former associates from that spirit of toleration and "soul liberty" which Roger Williams claimed; for the members who united on Dec. 23, had been excommunicated Dec. 7, when the Rev. Obidiah Holmes preached against their doctrine of Seventh Day observance, and even declared "they had left Christ, and gone after Moses." There is extant a letter from Roger Williams to Samuel Hubbard, in which he argues the position taken by the latter, and cites various texts against his views; but it is written in a very different spirit from that shown by the Newport church, and recognizes the conscientious motives which actuated Hubbard. "Bro' Hiscox and I send this Church to N. London and Westerly, 7 day Mar 1675," and again March, 1677/8 and 1686.

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Came to Salem in 1633

was in Springfield then in Rhode Island.

view all 57

Samuel Hubbard's Timeline

1610
May 10, 1610
Mendelsham, Suffolk, England
1633
1633
Age 22
Went to Salem, Massachusetts.
1635
January 4, 1635
Age 24
Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
1637
November 18, 1637
Age 27
Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
1638
1638
Age 27
Of,,,Mass
1640
January 11, 1640
Age 29
Agawam (Springfield), Hampden, Massachusetts, USA
1640
Age 29
Dorsetshire,England
1640
Age 29
Of,,,Mass
1642
March 10, 1642
Age 31
Agawan, Springfield, Hampden, MA
1646
December 19, 1646
Age 36
Springfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA