Sancha de Castilla, reina consort de Aragón (1154 - 1208) MP

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Nicknames: "Sancia", "Pricess of Castile & Leon", "Sanchia //"
Birthplace: Toledo, CM, España
Death: Died in Jaén, AL, España
Occupation: Queen of Aragón, Queen of Aragon, Infanta de Castilla, Reina de Aragón (1174-1196)
Managed by: Victar
Last Updated:

About Sancha de Castilla, reina consort de Aragón

Sancha of Castile, Queen of Aragon (1154-1208)

NOT TO BE CONFUSED WITH SANCHA DE CASTILE, QUEEN OF NAVARRE, HER HALF SISTER

  1. # Father: Alfonso VII of León and Castile
    1. Mother: Richilde of Poland
    2. Husband: Alfonso II of Aragón
    3. Sons:

1) Pedro II of Aragón, The Catholic

2) Alfonso II of Provence

3) Sancho, died young

4) Ramón, died young

5) Fernando of Aragón, abade

  1. # Daughters:

1) Constanza of Aragón and Castile

2) Leonor of Aragón and Castile

3) Sancha of Aragón and Castile

4) Dulce de Aragón, nun

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancha_of_Castile,_Queen_of_Aragon

Infanta Sancha of Castile (21 September 1154/5 – 9 November 1208, Sijena) was the only surviving child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon, married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

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Sancha is the main character of a novel, The Borgia Bride, by American writer Jeanne Kalogridis, portraying life in the Borgia dynasty through the eyes of Princess Sancha of Aragon.

Plot introduction

Sancha de Aragon, princess of Naples and illegitimate daughter to the coldhearted duke of Calabria (briefly king of Naples), is used to establish ties to the feared and influential House of Borgia when her father betroths her to the younger scion, Jofre. War with the French briefly returned her to Naples, but rumors of her beauty reach her lecherous father-in-law, Pope Alexander VI, who recalls her and Jofre to opulent Rome. There, she avoids the pope's advances—and her jealous sister-in-law Lucrezia's animosity—but falls into a steamy affair with her brother-in-law, Cesare Borgia. Cesare becomes furious when she refuses to leave Jofre, and he sets out on a warpath that includes her brother Alfonso, who has also married into the Borgia clan—to Lucrezia.

Plot summary

Autumn 1488

The book starts off with Princess Sancha remembering the thirtieth anniversary of her grandfather's ascension to the Neapolitan throne. Because Naples needed a blessing after many wars and natural disasters, the royal family was to beseech San Gennaro to witness a miracle. Inside a reliquary was believed to be ancient blood of the royals and if the blood became liquid once again, it is a good omen for the king. After the "miracle" is performed, the royal procession makes its way back to Castel Nuovo in Naples. A feast celebrating the anniversary of the king was held later that night, and out of boredom, seeks the chamber of the dead of her her grandfather, King Ferrante. It is said here that the King had brought his enemies that he had killed, preserved and on occasion visited the dead. She quickly finds the legend of the chamber to be true, and meets her grandfather there. After discussing several matters with her grandfather, Sancha is told by her grandfather to watch over her brother, for he is considered by Ferrante to be "weak". As the pair return to the party, the Duke of Calabria, Sancha's father, sees them and discovers that she was in the chamber of the dead, and had not been invited. He tells her that he will speak to her later. Sancha then leaves to be comforted by her brother. Duke Alfonso returns later to tell Donna Trusia (Sancha's mother) that she will not be allowed to go on a picnic with the other children. He speaks to her in the study and denies her contact with her brother (also named Alfonso) for two weeks for her incorrigible behaviour, since that is the one thing she loves above all else. After two weeks pass, Sancha and Alfonso are reunited and Sancha swears that she would never give her father cause to punish her.

Late Spring 1492

Although a little more less than three years had passed, little had changed in the royal household. Sancha and Alfonso are still close, although they do not share a nursery any longer. A new pope was elected that year, one by the name of Rodrigo Borgia, Pope Alexander VI. In the beginning of this chapter, Sancha is summoned to the King's chambers. There, she finds that she is betrothed to the Count Onorato Caetani. His manner towards the royal family is described as jovial. The courtship between the count and the princess preceded rapidly. As a whim, Sancha went to see a strega (witch). When she reached the strega's house, she was surprised to find herself required to enter alone. Immediately, Sancha realizes that the news has a hint of foreboding. After spreading the tarot cards, Sancha chooses the card of a "heart, impaled by two blades, which together made a great silver X".

The strega warns Sancha that if she does not resort to evil, she will "condemn to death those whom you most love". She also says that the princess will not marry the Count, but the son of the most powerful man in Italy, and that she will not love him, nor have many children by him. She ends by saying "Take great care, Sancha, or your heart will destroy all that you love.

(from wikipedia)

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Sancha of Castile, Queen of Aragon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Not to be confused with Sancha of Castile, Queen of Navarre

Sancha and Alfonso, centre, surrounded by the ladies of their court

Infanta Sancha of Castile (21 September 1154/5 – 9 November 1208, Sijena) was the only surviving child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

   * Constance of Aragon, married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
   * Leonor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse
   * Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213
   * Dolça (nun)
   * Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209
   * Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227
   * Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

Preceded by

Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona Queen Consort of Aragon

1174–1196 Succeeded by

Marie of Montpellier

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Infanta Sancha of Castile (September 21, 1154 or 1155 – November 9, 1208, Sijena) was the only child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon-> married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor -> married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancha_de_Castilla_y_de_Polonia

Sancha de Castilla y Polonia (¿?, 21 de septiembre de 1154/56 - Sigena, 1208), infanta de Castilla y reina consorte de Aragón (1174-1206).

Hija del rey de Castilla Alfonso VII y de su segunda mujer, Riquilda de Polonia.

El 18 de enero de 1174 se casó en la catedral de Zaragoza con el rey Alfonso II de Aragón. De este matrimonio nacieron:

   * Pedro el Católico (1174 - 1213), conde de Barcelona, con el nombre de Pedro I, y rey de Aragón, con el nombre de Pedro II;
   * Constanza (1179 - 1222), casada en 1198 con Emerico I de Hungría y en 1210 con Federico II Hohenstaufen, Sacro Emperador Romano Germánico, Rey de Sicilia y Rey de Jerusalen;
   * Alfonso (1180 - 1209), conde de Provenza, con el nombre de Alfonso II;
   * Leonor (1182 - 1226), casada en 1202 con Ramón VI de Tolosa:
   * Sancha (1186 - 1241), casada en 1211 con Ramón VII de Tolosa;
   * Sancho, muerto joven.
   * Ramón Berenguer, muerto joven.
   * Fernando (1190 - 1249), sacerdote y abad en Montearagón.
   * Dulce (1192 - ¿?), monja en Sijena.

Fue enterrada en el Monasterio de Sigena, que ella había mandado construir.

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Infanta Sancha of Castile (21 September 1154/5 – 9 November 1208, Sijena) was the only surviving child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon, married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

Preceded by

Ramon Berenguer IV, Count of Barcelona Queen Consort of Aragon

1174–1196 Succeeded by

Marie of Montpellier

[edit] References

E.L. Miron, The Queens of Aragon: Their Lives and Times, Stanley Paul & Co, London (c1910).

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Infanta Sancha of Castile (September 21, 1154 or 1155 – November 9, 1208, Sijena) was the only child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon-> married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor -> married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

--------------------

Sancha of Castile

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Infanta Sancha of Castile (September 21, 1154 or 1155 – November 9, 1208, Sijena) was the only child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon-> married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor -> married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

[edit]

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Sancha of Castile (21 September 1154/5 – 9 November 1208, Sijena) was the only surviving child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

   * Constance of Aragon, married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor
   * Leonor, married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse
   * Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213
   * Dolça (nun)
   * Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209
   * Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227
   * Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

A patroness of troubadours such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond, the queen became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties which formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses which had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Senora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem which she wore till the end of her life. The queen mother entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with the emperor Frederick II in 1208. She died soon afterwards, aged fifty-four, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

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Sancha of Castile, b. 21 September 1154 in Toledo, Castile, Spain, d. 9 November 1208 in Jaen, Spain
   Father: Alfonso VII, King of Castile, b. 1 March 1105 in Toledo, Castile, Spain, d. 21 August 1157 in La Fresneda, Teruel, Aragon, Spain, He became King of Castile, 1126 in Castile, Spain
   Mother: Richilde of Poland, b. ca. 1131 in Wroclaw, Poland, d. 16 June 1185 in Castile, Spain
   Married Alfonso II "the Chaste", King of Aragon, b. 1152 on 18 January 1174 in Zaragoza, Spain.

Children:

   * Pedro II, King of Aragon, b. ca. November 1174 in Aragon, Spain
   * Alfonso II, Prince of Aragon, b. ca. 1176 in Zaragoza, Spain, m. Gersinde de Sabran, July 1193, d. February 1209 in Palermo, Sicily, Italy
   * Constance of Aragon, b. ca. 1190

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Infanta Sancha of Castile (September 21, 1154 or 1155 – November 9, 1208, Sijena) was the only child of King Alfonso VII of Castile by his second queen, Richeza of Poland, who was the daughter of Vladislav II, Duke of Silesia.

On January 18, 1174 in Saragossa she married King Alfonso II of Aragon. They had 9 children, but only seven would survive into adulthood:

Constance of Aragon-> married King Imre of Hungary and later, Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Leonor -> married Count Raymond VI of Toulouse

Peter II of Aragon (I of Barcelona), b. 1174, killed at the Battle of Muret, September 12, 1213

Dolça (nun)

Alfonso II, Count of Provence, b. 1180, d. 1209

Fernando, Abbot of Montearagon, d. after 1227

Ramon Berenguer, d. in the 1190s

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Infanta Sancha of Castile married King Alfonso II of Aragon; they had 9 children, but only 7 would survive into adulthood--including our ancestor Alfonso of Provence.

Sancha was a patroness of troubadours, such as Giraud de Calanson and Peire Raymond. She became involved in a legal dispute with her husband concerning properties that formed part of her dower estates. In 1177 she entered the county of Ribagorza and took forcible possession of various castles and fortresses that had belonged to the crown there.

After her husband died at Perpignan in 1196, Sancha was relegated to the background of political affairs by her son Pedro II, and she retired from court, withdrawing to the abbey of Nuestra Señora, at Sijena, which she had founded. There she assumed the cross of the Order of St John of Jerusalem, which she wore till the end of her life.

Sancha entertained her widowed daughter Queen Constanza of Hungary (1179-1222) at Sijena prior to her leaving Aragon for her marriage with our ancestor, the Emperor Frederick II, in 1208. She died soon afterward, aged 54, and was interred before the high altar of the church at Sijena.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sancha_of_Castile for more information.

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Sancha de Castilla, reina consort de Aragón's Timeline

1154
September 21, 1154
Toledo, CM, España
1173
January 18, 1173
Age 18
Of,Zaragoza,Zaragoza,Spain
1174
January 18, 1174
Age 19
Zaragoza, Spain
1174
Age 19
1180
1180
Age 25
Barcelona, CT, Spain
1182
1182
Age 27
Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
1184
1184
Age 29
Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
1186
1186
Age 31
Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
1186
Age 31
Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
1190
1190
Age 35
Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain