Senator George Frisbie Hoar

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George Frisbie Hoar

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
Death: Died in Worcester, Worcester Co., Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Hon. Samuel Hoar, Jr. and Sarah Hoar
Husband of Mary Louisa Hoar and Ruth Ann Hoar
Father of Hon. Rockwood Hoar; Alice Miller Hoar and Anna Huntington
Brother of Elizabeth Sherman Hoar; Sarah Sherman Hoar; Samuel Hoar, III; Edward Sherman Hoar and Ebenezer R. Hoar, U.S. Attorney General

Occupation: Lawyer, Politician
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About George Frisbie Hoar

George Frisbie Hoar (August 29, 1826 – September 30, 1904) was a prominent United States politician and United States Senator from Massachusetts. Hoar was born in Concord, Massachusetts. He was a member of an extended family that was politically prominent in 18th and 19th century New England.

Contents

   * 1 Political and legal career
   * 2 Hoar family and relations
   * 3 See also
   * 4 Notes
   * 5 References
   * 6 External links

Political and legal career

Hoar graduated from Harvard University in 1846, then studied at Harvard Law School and settled in Worcester, Massachusetts where he practiced law before entering politics. Initially a member of the Free Soil Party, he joined the Republican Party shortly after its founding, and was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives (1852), and the Massachusetts Senate (1857).

In 1865, Hoar was one of the founders of the Worcester County Free Institute of Industrial Science, now the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He represented Massachusetts as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1869 through 1877, then served in the U.S. Senate until his death. He was a Republican, who generally avoided party partisanship and did not hesitate to criticize other members of his party whose actions or policies he believed were in error.

Hoar was long noted as a fighter against political corruption, and campaigned for the rights of African Americans and Native Americans. He argued in the Senate in favor of Women's suffrage as early as 1886 and opposed the Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882. As a member of the Congressional Electoral Commission, he was involved with settling the highly disputed U.S. presidential election, 1876. He authored the Presidential Succession Act of 1886, and in 1888 he was chairman of the 1888 Republican National Convention.

Unlike many of his Senate colleagues, Hoar was not a strong advocate for an American intervention into Cuba in the late 1890s. After the Spanish-American War, Hoar became one of the Senate's most outspoken opponents of the imperialism of the William McKinley administration. He denounced the Philippine-American War, calling for allowing independence of the Philippines. He also denounced the U.S. intervention in Panama. George F. Hoar in his elder years. “ You have sacrificed nearly ten thousand American lives—the flower of our youth. You have devastated provinces. You have slain uncounted thousands of the people you desire to benefit. You have established reconcentration camps. Your generals are coming home from their harvest bringing sheaves with them, in the shape of other thousands of sick and wounded and insane to drag out miserable lives, wrecked in body and mind. You make the American flag in the eyes of a numerous people the emblem of sacrilege in Christian churches, and of the burning of human dwellings, and of the horror of the water torture. Your practical statesmanship which disdains to take George Washington and Abraham Lincoln or the soldiers of the Revolution or of the Civil War as models, has looked in some cases to Spain for your example. I believe—nay, I know—that in general our officers and soldiers are humane. But in some cases they have carried on your warfare with a mixture of American ingenuity and Castilian cruelty.

Your practical statesmanship has succeeded in converting a people who three years ago were ready to kiss the hem of the garment of the American and to welcome him as a liberator, who thronged after your men when they landed on those islands with benediction and gratitude, into sullen and irreconcilable enemies, possessed of a hatred which centuries can not eradicate.

—Senator George F. Hoar, From a speech in the United States Senate in May, 1902, chastising the Philippine-American War and the three Army officers, who were court-martialed.[1] ”

Hoar pushed for and served on the Lodge Committee investigating alleged, and later confirmed, war crimes in the Philippine-American War. In addition to his political career, he was active in the American Historical Society and the American Antiquarian Society, serving terms as president of both organizations. He was a regent of the Smithsonian Institution in 1880, and a trustee of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. His autobiography, Autobiography of Seventy Years was published in 1903; it first appeared in serial form in Scribner's magazine.

Hoar enjoyed good health until June 1904. He died in Worcester, and was buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord. After his death, a statue of him was erected in front of Worcester's city hall, paid for by public donations.

Hoar family and relations

Through his mother, Sarah Sherman, G.G. Hoar was a grandson of prominent political figure, Roger Sherman and Sherman's second wife, Rebecca Minot Prescott. Roger Sherman signed the Articles of Confederation, United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

   * G.G. Hoar's father, Samuel Hoar, was a prominent lawyer who served on the Massachusetts state senate and the United States House of Representatives.
         o G.G. Hoar's brother Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar was an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, one of Ulysses S. Grant's Attorneys General, and a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.
         o G.G Hoar's first cousin Roger Sherman Baldwin was Governor of Connecticut and a U.S. Senator.
         o Another of G.G. Hoar's first cousins, William Maxwell Evarts was US Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General and a U.S. Senator.

See also

   * Fulham Palace

Notes

  1. ^ Hoar, George Frisbie. From a speech in the United States Senate given May, 1902. Originally published in Bryan, William Jennings, ed. The World’s Famous Orations. Volume X, America III. New York: Funk and Wagnalls, 1906.

References

   * George Frisbie Hoar at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
   * Hoar, George F. Autobiography of Seventy Years. 2 vols., New York: Scribner’s Sons, 1903.
   * Welch, Richard E., Jr. George Frisbie Hoar and the Half-Breed Republicans. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971.
   * Sherman Genealogy Including Families of Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk, England By Thomas Townsend Sherman
   * Hoar-Baldwin-Foster-Sherman family of Massachusetts at Political Graveyard

External links

   * Works by George Frisbie Hoar at Project Gutenberg

Source: Downloaded 2011 from Wikipedia. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Frisbie_Hoar

George Frisbie Hoar (August 29, 1826 – September 30, 1904) was a prominent United States politician and United States Senator from Massachusetts. Hoar was born in Concord, Massachusetts. He was a member of an extended family that was politically prominent in 18th and 19th century New England.

Political and legal career

Hoar graduated from Harvard University in 1846, then studied at Harvard Law School and settled in Worcester, Massachusetts where he practiced law before entering politics. Initially a member of the Free Soil Party, he joined the Republican Party shortly after its founding, and was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives (1852), and the Massachusetts Senate (1857).

In 1865, Hoar was one of the founders of the Worcester County Free Institute of Industrial Science, now the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He represented Massachusetts as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1869 through 1877, then served in the U.S. Senate until his death. He was a Republican, who generally avoided party partisanship and did not hesitate to criticize other members of his party whose actions or policies he believed were in error.

Hoar was long noted as a fighter against political corruption, and campaigned for the rights of African Americans and Native Americans. He argued in the Senate in favor of Women's suffrage as early as 1886 and opposed the Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882. As a member of the Congressional Electoral Commission, he was involved with settling the highly disputed U.S. presidential election, 1876. He authored the Presidential Succession Act of 1886, and in 1888 he was chairman of the 1888 Republican National Convention.

Unlike many of his Senate colleagues, Hoar was not a strong advocate for an American intervention into Cuba in the late 1890s. After the Spanish-American War, Hoar became one of the Senate's most outspoken opponents of the imperialism of the William McKinley administration. He denounced the Philippine-American War, calling for allowing independence of the Philippines. He also denounced the U.S. intervention in Panama.

George F. Hoar in his elder years.“ You have sacrificed nearly ten thousand American lives—the flower of our youth. You have devastated provinces. You have slain uncounted thousands of the people you desire to benefit. You have established reconcentration camps. Your generals are coming home from their harvest bringing sheaves with them, in the shape of other thousands of sick and wounded and insane to drag out miserable lives, wrecked in body and mind. You make the American flag in the eyes of a numerous people the emblem of sacrilege in Christian churches, and of the burning of human dwellings, and of the horror of the water torture. Your practical statesmanship which disdains to take George Washington and Abraham Lincoln or the soldiers of the Revolution or of the Civil War as models, has looked in some cases to Spain for your example. I believe—nay, I know—that in general our officers and soldiers are humane. But in some cases they have carried on your warfare with a mixture of American ingenuity and Castilian cruelty.

Your practical statesmanship has succeeded in converting a people who three years ago were ready to kiss the hem of the garment of the American and to welcome him as a liberator, who thronged after your men when they landed on those islands with benediction and gratitude, into sullen and irreconcilable enemies, possessed of a hatred which centuries can not eradicate.

—Senator George F. Hoar, From a speech in the United States Senate in May, 1902, chastising the Philippine-American War and the three Army officers, who were court-martialed.[1]

Hoar pushed for and served on the Lodge Committee investigating alleged, and later confirmed, war crimes in the Philippine-American War. In addition to his political career, he was active in the American Historical Society and the American Antiquarian Society, serving terms as president of both organizations. He was a regent of the Smithsonian Institution in 1880, and a trustee of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. His autobiography, Autobiography of Seventy Years was published in 1903; it first appeared in serial form in Scribner's magazine.

Hoar enjoyed good health until June 1904. He died in Worcester, and was buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord. After his death, a statue of him was erected in front of Worcester's city hall, paid for by public donations.

Hoar family and relations

Through his mother, Sarah Sherman, G.G. Hoar was a grandson of prominent political figure, Roger Sherman and Sherman's second wife, Rebecca Minot Prescott. Roger Sherman signed the Articles of Confederation, United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution.

G.G. Hoar's father, Samuel Hoar, was a prominent lawyer who served on the Massachusetts state senate and the United States House of Representatives.

G.G. Hoar's brother Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar was an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, one of Ulysses S. Grant's Attorneys General, and a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court.

G.G Hoar's first cousin Roger Sherman Baldwin was Governor of Connecticut and a U.S. Senator.

Another of G.G. Hoar's first cousins, William Maxwell Evarts was US Secretary of State, U.S. Attorney General and a U.S. Senator.

__________________________________________

"Noted for his legal acumen, his broad statesmanship and his extended and diversified culture, Senator George F. Hoar, of Massachusetts, is regarded as one of the truly great men connected with the government at Washington. Born in Concord, Mass., August 29, 1826, he was graduated at Harvard in 1846, studied law and began the practice of his profession in Worcester. He was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1852 and of the State Senate in 1857. He was elected as a Republican to four successive Congresses, serving from March 4, 1869, until March 3, 1877. He was elected United States senator to succeed George S. Boutwell, taking his seat March 5, 1877, and was re-elected in 1883, 1889 and 1895. His term of service will expire March 3, 1901. Senator Hoar was a delegate to the Republican National conventions of 1876, 1880, 1884 and 1888, presiding over the convention of 1880. He was one of the managers on the part of the House of Representatives of the Belknap impeachment trial in 1876, and was a member of the electoral commission in that year. From 1874 to 1880 he was an overseer of Harvard College, and in the latter year was regent of the Smithsonian Institution. He has been president, and is now vice-president, of the American Antiquarian Society, trustee of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology, trustee of Leicester Academy, and is a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the American Historical Society, the Historic-Genealogical Society and the Virginia Historical Society. The degree of LL. D. has been conferred upon him by William and Mary, Amherst, Yale and Harvard Colleges. Senator Hoar is a typical American statesman." ----------------------------------------- from the Hoar Family, Unitarian Universalist Historical Society, by Paula Robbins

 George Frisbie Hoar (1826-1904) graduated from Harvard College in 1846 and its law school in 1848. He practiced law and lived in Worcester, MA where in 1853 he married Mary Louisa Spurr. After Mary's death he married Ruth Miller in 1862. He was elected to the Massachusetts House as a Republican in 1852, the Senate in 1857, and to the U.S. House in 1868 and the Senate in 1877, spending 38 years in public service. Senator Hoar chaired the National Unitarian Conference in 1899, as his brother had earlier done, and described himself as one who 'loved our Unitarian faith with the full fervor of his soul.'

The Hoar family papers are in the Concord Free Public Library, Concord, Massachusetts. Some of Elizabeth Hoar's correspondence is available in Elizabeth Maxfield-Miller, "Elizabeth of Concord: Selected Letters of Elizabeth Sherman Hoar to the Emersons, Family, and the Emerson Circle" in Joel Myerson, ed., Studies in the American Renaissance (1984). Rockwood Hoar has a biography, Moorfield Storey and Edward W. Emerson, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, A Memoir (1911). George Frisbie Hoar wrote a two volume autobiography, George F. Hoar, Autobiography of Seventy Years (1903) and there are two biographical works on him: Frederick H. Gillett, George Frisbie Hoar (1934) and Richard E. Welch, George Frisbie Hoar and the Half-Breed Republicans (1971). Information on the Hoars in Concord can be found in John W. Teele, ed., The Meeting House on the Green (1985) and Ruth R. Wheeler, Concord: Climate for Freedom (1967). ------------------------------------------------------------------ US Senate biography Senate Years of Service: 1877-1904 Party: Republican

HOAR, George Frisbie, (grandson of Roger Sherman, son of Samuel Hoar, brother of Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, father of Rockwood Hoar, and uncle of Sherman Hoar), a Representative and a Senator from Massachusetts; born in Concord, Mass., August 29, 1826; attended Concord Academy; graduated from Harvard University in 1846 and from the Harvard Law School in 1849; admitted to the bar in 1849 and commenced practice in Worcester, Mass.; elected to the State house of representatives in 1852; elected to the State senate in 1857; elected as a Republican to the Forty-first and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1869-March 3, 1877); was not a candidate for renomination in 1876; one of the managers appointed by the House of Representatives in 1876 to conduct the impeachment proceedings against William W. Belknap; appointed a member of the Electoral Commission created by act of Congress to decide the contests in various States in the presidential election of 1876; elected as a Republican to the United States Senate in 1877; reelected in 1883, 1889, 1895, and 1901 and served from March 4, 1877, until his death in Worcester, Mass., September 30, 1904; chairman, Committee on Privileges and Elections (Forty-seventh through Fifty-second Congresses), Committee on the Judiciary (Fifty-second Congress, Fifty-fourth through Fifty-eighth Congresses), Committee on the Library (Fifty-second Congress); overseer of Harvard University 1874-1880 and from 1896 until his death; Regent of the Smithsonian for many years; interment in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, Mass.

Bibliography American National Biography; Dictionary of American Biography; Hoar, George F. Autobiography of Seventy Years. 2 vols., New York: Scribner’s Sons, 1903; Welch, Richard E., Jr. George F. Hoar and the Half-Breed Republicans. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1971. ---------------------------------------------------- Enclopedia Britannica

 

George Frisbie Hoar born Aug. 29, 1826, Concord, Mass., U.S. died Sept. 30, 1904, Worcester, Mass.

American politician who was one of the leading organizers of the Republican Party and a lifelong crusader for good government.

Hoar graduated from Harvard College (1846) and Harvard Law School (1849) and then went into private law practice in Worcester. His political life, which spanned more than half a century, began with his support of the Free Soil Party. During the 1850s he was busily organizing the Republican Party in Massachusetts while serving terms in both houses of the state legislature. He did not enter national politics until elected to the House of Representatives in 1869, but then he was in the House (1869–77) and the Senate (1877–1904) continuously for the rest of his life.

Hoar served on several important committees in both houses of Congress, and he was a member of the electoral commission selected to determine the winner of the Hayes-Tilden presidential contest in 1876. For many years he was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and he drafted the Presidential Succession Act of 1886.

Hoar fought for civil-service reform, and he was an outspoken opponent of the American Protective Association—an anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant organization. He broke with his own party in protesting imperialistic U.S. policies toward the Philippines after the Spanish-American War, but he was so greatly admired for his honesty that he was decisively re-elected (1901–07).

Always interested in education and scholarship, Hoar served as an overseer of Harvard, trustee of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Clark University, regent of the Smithsonian Institution, and president of the American Antiquarian Society and the American Historical Association. [1, 2, 3]

http://capecodhistory.us/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I11612&tree=Nauset

12177. (document) George Frisbie Hoar, Senate of the United States re. Life Saving Service. c. 1893. Rare document is on United States Senate stationery, dated September 16, 1893 and is signed in hand by Senator Hoar. Letter is addressed to Solomon R. Hawes, Esq., Wellfleet, Mass., who apparently wrote to Hoar discussing the importance of the work of the Life-Saving Service and the need for proper compensation for the men. The letter reads “My dear Sir: You can say nothing that will seem to me exaggerated in regard to the importance of the Life Saving Service, or the title of the brave men who belong to it to public gratitude and to full and generous compensation. I shall do all that I can to carry out the principles so well stated in your letter. I am faithfully yours, [signed] Geo F. Hoar.” George F. Hoar (1826 – 1904) was a U.S. Representative (1869-1877) & Senator (1877-1904) from Massachusetts. Hoar was long noted as a fighter against political corruption, and campaigned for the rights of African Americans and Native Americans. He argued in the Senate in favor of Women's suffrage as early as 1886 and opposed the Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882. As a member of the Congressional Electoral Commission, he was involved with settling the highly disputed U.S. presidential election, 1876. He authored the Presidential Succession Act of 1886. Letter is typed by a stenographer on official Senate stationery and is signed in hand by Hoar. Rare and important document. Clean, crisp, with original folds. (VG+). $145.

http://www.lighthouseantiques.net/USLSS.htm

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Senator George Frisbie Hoar's Timeline

1826
August 29, 1826
Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
1853
1853
Age 26
1855
August 24, 1855
Age 28
Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
1863
August 27, 1863
Age 36
Worcester, Worcester, MA, USA
1865
December 11, 1865
Age 39
Boston, MA, USA
1904
September 30, 1904
Age 78
Worcester, Worcester Co., Massachusetts
????
Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA