Sgt. John Plimpton

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John Plimpton

Nicknames: "John Plympton"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Probably England
Death: Died in Dedham, Suffolk County (Present Norfolk County), Massachusetts Bay Colony
Cause of death: Burned at the stake by Indians
Immediate Family:

Son of John William Plimpton, Sr. and nn Plumpton
Husband of Jane Plimpton
Father of Hannah Sutliff; Mary Johnson (Plympton); John Plimpton; Peter Plympton; Joseph Plimpton and 7 others

Occupation: Burned by the indians
Managed by: Janet Mclarty-Schroeder
Last Updated:

About John Plimpton

John Plympton was born in 1620 in Cambridge, England. He died on 19 May 1677 in Canada. He married Jane Dammin on 13 Mar 1642/1643 in Dedham, MA.

THE FIRST GENERATION IN AMERICA BEARING THE NAME OF PLIMPTON, PLYMPTON,OR PLUMPTON.

1. John (5); b. about 1620. His birth-place has not been found. A few facts having a bearing, appear to indicate that he originated withinthe limits of a section of England, of which the county of Cambridge and of Lincoln is central. He received a good education, and early in life accepted the religious views of the Puritans, and thereby rendered himself exceedingly oboxious to his family who were zealously Catholic.The treatment which he received from his aristocratic and bigoted relatives, led to self-expatriation; and secretly, without registration, he left the cherished shores of his nativity. He landed in New England not only penniless, but also indebted for the expense of his passage.

In cutting himself loose so utterly from all his relatives, he appears to have carefully preserved a link of family names among his children. At Roxbury, in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, the 22 (11) 1640, [January 22, 1641], Dr. George Alcocke made his will, in which he gave"To my servant John Plympton his time from after mid-summer, for five pounds." Whatever the contract, it appears the one party had advanced some value, for which an equivalent was due. It may be inferred that JohnPlympton was one of that class of emigrants who, by indenture, served a certain length of time to pay their passage from Old England to New England. In 1677John Plympton was captured by the indians and burned at the stake.

Jane Dammin was born in 1626. She married John Plympton on 13 Mar 1642/1643 in Dedham, MA.

They had the following children:

  F i Hannah Plympton was born on 1 Mar 1643/1644.  
  M ii John Plympton was born on 21 Mar 1645/1646.  
  F iii Mary Plympton was born on 9 Apr 1648.  
  M iv John Plympton was born on 16 Jun 1650.  
  M v Peter Plympton was born on 7 Mar 1651/1652.  
  M vi Joseph Plympton was born on 7 Oct 1653. He died on 22 Jun 1702.  
  F vii Mehitable Plympton was born on 15 Sep 1655.  
  M viii Jonathan Plympton was born on 25 Nov 1657.  
  M ix Eleazer Plympton was born on 20 Feb 1658/1659.  
  M x Eleazer Plympton was born on 3 May 1661.  
  F xi Leida Plympton was born on 2 Feb 1661/1662.  
  M xii Henry Plympton was born on 9 Jun 1664.  
  F xiii Jane Plympton. 

-------------------- http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=dowdcj&id=I00099

ID: I00099

Name: John Plympton 1

Sex: M

Birth: 1620 in Cambridge, England

Death: in Dedham, MA of Burned at the stake!

Note:

"John Plympton, the father of Hannah who became the wife of Nathaniel Sutliff, Sr., was very young when he came to the New World in charge of Dr. Olcock, both of them coming from England with Governor Winthrop and his followers in 1630. Dr. Olcock was the first ancestor in America of the well-known philosopher, E. Bronson Alcott, and his daughter, the novelist, Louisa Alcott.

In 1641, or the early part of 1642, John Plympton left Roxbury, having bought his time for five pounds, as permitted by the will of Dr. Olcock, and settled in Dedham. It may be added that in those times lads of tender years and belonging to good families in England, were sent over to the New World in charge of responsible men or leaders of settlements, such as Dr. Olcock, as apprentices, and they were to remain until they had repaid their passage or were to pay a certain sum to the master, as stated, upon the termination of the apprenticeship. The death of Dr. Olcock affected the future calling of young Plympton, for he no longer was determined to become a physician, but became a surveyor in Dedham and Medfield. On the "20th d. 1 m. 1642"] he was received within the church, and a month thereafter, "22nd d. 12 m. 1642" he purchased two acres of upland on the island of Dedham, and in 1643 John Plymton took a step which, to some of his descendants, was of social importance, since he then joined the "Ancient and Honorary Artillery of the Massachusetts Bay Company," thereby giving to his descendants the right to become honorary members of this company; claimed to be one of the most exclusive organizations in America. This society has from time of its organization been particular as to its recruits and as an instance we cite that among those who joined at the same time (1643) as John Plympton, was William Aspinwall, who had in 1636-37 been a selectman of Boston and in 1637-38 chosen as a representative from Boston to the General Assembly to succeed the well-known Harry Vane.

In the year 1643 John Plympton becomes a freeman of Dedham. The purpose of this will be seen when it is stated that the General Court in 1631 passed a law that no one could vote who was not connected with some church (only one-quarter of the inhabitants were church members at that time); also just prior to 1640 another law was enacted forbidding anyone to abide in any settlement without the consent first had of a magistrate of that settlement. These two laws were strictly enforced by the settlements or plantations. In time, the requirements of the settlers became very rigid for persons who desired to join and become members of the settlement. An application was required, which was followed by an investigation as to the applicant's antecedents, his character and reputation before he was permitted to become a freeman of the settlement.

On March 13, 1644, John Plympton married Jane Drummer or Denan, a sister of Deacon John Denan of Reading, and lived in Dedham settlement of the township of Dedham, having purchased during the same year an additional one and one-half acres of woodland, which was followed in 1646 by still another purchase of two acres for five shillings.

The township of Dedham at that time was a large tract of land extending from the banks of the Charles River southward well towards the state line of Rhode Island, being bounded on the east by the grant made to the Dorchester settlers or plantation, and was first established by the general court, in 1633. In 1649, a few of the settlers at Dedham settled at a place called Boggertown, John Plympton in 1652-3, moved to Boggertown, just before the township in which it was located was separated from Dedham and created into Medfield, for in 1652 the town of Dedham gave John Plympton permission "to fell trees upon the brook to use about his house."

In 1661, he became a surveyor of the town as well as the constable and was selected as fence viewer in 1670. The office of constable at that time being in power and in importance was something like unto our modern sheriff. Before he moved from Dedham, according to its records, Hannah Plympton, his oldest child, afterwards wife of Nathaniel Sutcliffe, was born on 19 December 1644-45, and according to the church records "in 1645 ye 16 d. and 1 m., Hannah ye daughter of our brother John Plympton, and his wife Jane our sister, was baptized." Nathaniel Sutliff probably first met with John Plympton and his family at Dedham, since Nathaniel in 1661 was taxed for school purposes on property he held in Dedham. At that time the law was, there must be a school in each settlement for every fifty inhabitants therein."

"While John Plympton and Nathaniel Sutliff were residents of Medfield, a subscription list was circulated among its inhabitants for the purpose of raising a fund to further educational matters and the erection of college buildings for a new college - Harvard, now Harvard University. There is still in existence a list of seventy-five names of persons who were subscribers to this fund and amongst them were both John Plympton and Nathaniel Sutliff. Again we find a member of this family not only aiding in the establishment of higher education - Harvard College, but also in taking part on the very first instance in the new work - in the establishment of higher education. Money being scarce at that time a large proportion of the subscribers gave their subscriptions in wheat or grain."

"John Plympton, as well as son-in-law, Nathaniel Sutliff, having applied to Pocomtuck for the privilege of becoming a settler therein, a town meeting was held on 14 December 1671, at which, after a vote was taken, the inhabitants authorized a sale of land to him "provided the said John Plympton doe settle them, "which he did. Nathanel Sutliff, as we have been, had been permitted before then to purchase land from Lieutenant Fischer, which permisison also gave the right to purchase other land; which he did in 1672, having purchased lot No. 43, the Asa Stebbin lot, and settling there immediately; the records showing Nathaniel Sutliff, Jr. to be born there 27 July 1672.

On the same year and after John Plympton and Nathaniel Sutliff had settled at Pocomtuck (1672) the town held a meeting, when after a vote, they signed and presented a petition to the general court of Massachusetts for the establishment of a township, and among the signers were John Plympton and Nathaniel Sutliff. The petition was soon granted and the town of Pocomtuck there after became known as Deerfield.

The following year, 1673, Nathaniel closed the six cow commons and one sheep common, paying for the same. In 1674 John Sutliff, the second son of Nathaniel was born.

When King Phillip's war began in 1675, John Plympton being the chief military officer in Deerfield, joined the army and served throughout with honor and distinction. At a time when the war, as all then living thought, he returned to rebuild his home, when on 19 Sept 1675 (two years and one day after his son Jonathan was killed - 18 Sept 1675; he with Mr. Stockwell and Mr. Dickerson, three women and fourteen children, were taken captive by a band of Indians under Ashporton, carried to Canada where he was burned at the stake, at a point new Chambly; nearly all of the other captives being permitted to be ransomed. During the war he attained the rank of captain, which was one of the highest military ranks to be attained at that time in the province or state. Prior to the war he was affectionately known to his townsmen as "Old Sergeant Plympton." He left a widow and thirteen children."

Father: John Plumpton

Marriage 1 Jane Denan b: 1623 in Roxbury, MA

Married: 13 MAR 1643/44 in Dedham, Norfolk Cty., Massachusetts

Children

Hannah Plympton b: 1 MAR 1645/46 in Dedham, MA
Mary Plympton
John Plympton
Peter Plympton
Joseph Plympton
Mehitable Plympton
Jonathan Plympton
Eleazer Plympton
Lede Plympton
Jane Plympton
Henry Plympton

Sources:

Title: Coat of Arms Sutliff, Sutliffe, or Sutcliffe

Author: Compilation: Samuel Milton Sutliff, Jr. (1909); Donald D. Sutliff; Bennett Hurd Sutliff

Publication: 1995

Note: Not clear who published the final manuscript.

Note: A monumental work.

Repository:

Note: Donald D. Sutliff, 605 SE 98th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98664 Phone 1-360-892-0949

Media: Book

Page: 12, 13, 15 -------------------- From: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mcowens&id=I2538

--------------------------------------------------------- Information below from Jane Devlin: --------------------------------------------------------- John was the son of John Plympton (b. abt 1590). His mother's name is unrecorded. Direct descent is through his daughter Hannah.

From Savage: PLYMPTON, JOHN, Dedham, 1642; perhaps brother of the preceding (Henry) came prob. some years before for Dr. George Alcock of Roxbury, in his will 1640, calls him his servant, meaning apprentice, may be the freeman of 1643, printed Plimton: by wife Jane (prob. daughter of Richard Dummer, brought from England, married 1644), had Hannah, born 1645; John, 1646, died soon; Mary, 1648; John, again, 1650; Peter, 1652, and the following at Medfield, of whom only dates of birth appear: Joseph, 1653; Mehitable, 1655; Jonathan, 1657; Eleazer, 1660; died soon; Eleazer, again, 1661; Rhoda, 1663, died soon; Jane, 1664, died soon; and Henry, 1666, who died 1668. He removed after the war began, supposes Savage, to Deerfield, where he was Serg.; his son, Jonathan, was killed by the Indians, 1675, at Bloody Brook, and the father taken two years and one day after death of Jonathan, by the Indians, carried towards Canada, and killed, one report says, by burning at the stake. The Hampsh. Prob. rec. takes notice, 1678, of his wife, Jane, and that the children were to have the lands; all removed in few years to the old settlement near Boston. His widow married, 1679, Nicholas Hide. ----- From Abridged Compendium: PLIMPTON (Plympton), John (ca. 1620-1677), from Eng. ca. 1630; was at Dedham Mass., before he settled at Deerfield, ca. 16i3; sgt. mil. company; captured and burned at the stake by lndians, 1677; m 1644, Jane Dammant. ----- From the Family Plympton: John (5); b. about 1620. His birth-place has not been found. A few facts having a bearing, appear to indicate that he originated within the limits of a section of England, of which the county of Cambridge and of Lincoln is central. He received a good education, and early in life accepted the religious views of the Puritans, and thereby rendered himself exceedingly obnoxious to his family who were zealously Catholic. The treatment which he received from his aristocratic and bigoted relatives, led to a precipitate self-expatriation; and secretly, without registration, he left the cherished shores of his nativity. He landed in New England not only penniless, but also indebted for the expense of his passage. In cutting himself loose so utterly from all his relatives, he appears to have carefully preserved a link of family names among his children. At Roxbury, in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, the 22 (11) 1640, [January 22, 1641], Dr. George Alcocke made his will, in which he gave "To my servant John Plympton his time from after mid-summer, for five pounds." Whatever the contract, it appears the one party had advanced some value, for which an equivalent was due. It may be inferred that John Plympton was one of that class of emigrants who, by indenture, served a certain length of time to pay their passage from Old England to New England. The several items from the Church Records at Dedham, were transcribed and forwarded by Miss Lucy E. Eaton. "John Plympton was received into ye church 20d., 11m., 1642," [January 20, 1643]; and according to the rules, at that time, of admission into the church, it appears he must have resided in Dedham one year or more previous to that date. May 10, 1643, he was admitted freeman of the Colony at Dedham; the name being printed Plunton. The same year, 1643, he joined the "Incorporated Artillery Company," at Boston, an organization that has existed until the present day; known as "The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company." He was the seventeenth on the enlistment of that year, and it is supposed that he trained in that Company for many years.

"Hannah ye daughter of or brother Joh. Plympton & his wife Jane, our sister, was baptised 16d., 1m., 1645." "John ye sone of or brother John Plympton and Jane his wife was baptised 5d., 2m., 1646." "John ye son of or brother John Damat was baptised 5d., 6m., 1649." "John ye sone of or br. John Plympton was baptised ye 23d., 4m., 1650." "Peter ye sone of or br. John Plympton was baptised ye same day ye 7d., 1m., 1652."

"John Eaton of Dedham, though sicke, yet sound in memory, doe make this my Last Will: I give unto Abigail my wife, the free use of my parlor in my now dwelling house, & the Leantoe thereunto adjoining, and all the household stuff at present in them, to her use all the time she shall remain a widdow. . . . I give to John Dammant, of Reading, œ5; to John Plympton, of Meadfield, œ5; unto Edward Hodsman, my kinsman, 4os. . . . My sone and my two daughters to pay to my wife, their mother, that œ6 per annum, as above written. I nominate Abigail, my wife, to be my executrix. 2: 9: 1658." his JOHN X EATON. mark. The inventory amounted to œ392, 1os., exclusive of lands to the value of fifty pounds or more--at that time a large estate.

Suff. Reg. of Deeds. (Copy--abstract.) Eleazer Lusher of Dedham, in consideration of fyve [shillings] the acre in hand received--granted John Plympton of Dedham, two acres of Meadow in Fowle formerly purchased of Capt. Atherton, being bounded wh John Frarie on the south, a small river on the west, Peter Woodward on the north, & a hilly prsel [parsel] of land towards the east, with provision of redemption as in the foregoing bill of purchase is expressed. Sealed & dd in prse of Nathan Allen, Joshua Fisher, (date) 20 (9) 1646.

Same date, 20, (9) 1646, Capt. Humphrey Atherton of Dorchester, deeds to Eleazer Lusher, by two deeds (page 120, vol. 1)--64 acres of Meadow land in Dorchester; and Lusher deeds to Robert Fuller 2 acres; Nathan Allen, 4; John Plympton, 2; John Dwight, 10; George Barber, 8; Robert Hinsdale, 6; Edward Kemp, 6; John Frarie, 10; and Peter Woodward, 10 acres. Suff. Reg. Deeds, Lib. I, P. 83, 84. 20, (7), 1647, [84.] John Batchelr for & in consideration of 2 cowes sould to him & John Plimton for 14ll granted unto Tho: Dudly, Dep't Govr., his dwelling house in Dedham wth all the out houses & ground thereto adjoining being 16 acres inclosed, of wch 4 acres is meddow, uppon this condition that said Batchelr & Plimton shall pay 35s in good dry wheate & sound the first of May next, & 35s in butter the 16th of 7ber, 1648; & so the like summes & like pay each 1 (3) & 16, (7) successively after the year 48. The butter to be salted up in a vessell, & the wheate to be valued as it is worth the 16(1) before the delivery. . . . They may pay half in cheese instead of butter. . . . Dated, 16 (7ber), 1647. Acknowledged, the same day, before the Governor.

Valuation of John Plympton's Estate at the end of the year 1652: Item, 2 "Cowes," 12œ " 1 Calf, 1 " 1 Swine, 1 " Land, 6 " Other Estate, 26 Total, 46œ Six persons in his family, reckoned at 10 pounds each in drawing land. Ten years later, the valuation of his estate was 102œ, 13s., 3d., with nine persons in his family. The largest estate in the town at this date was 384œ, the smallest 48œ. In 1669 the valuation of his estate was 238œ. He received from the town 2œ, 5s., 2d., "for sweeping the meeting-house" in 1661 and 2.

p. 35: His townsmen evidently regarded him as a man of practical ability in town affairs. He was one of two surveyors of high-ways in 1661, and was one of three men chosen to "burn the woods" for the herd walks in 1666. The following year he was one of the two Constables, and was chosen with others to execute the "towns orders restricting swine," in 1670. In 1671 he was one of a committee of three to lay out a road through the swamp to Stop River; since known as Long-Causeway. He was also one of the fence viewers.

p 36: At a proprietors' meeting, the 4th of December, 1672, it was voted:-- "John Plympton is allowed to buy land of John Baken, at Pocomtuck, provided the said Plympton will settle there in his own person." This record is worthy of notice as the expression of practical men, who had known John Plympton a score of years. Realizing that the success of their enterprise depended largely on the thrift and energy of the first settlers, they evidently desired him as an associate, because they knew he would be no drone or dragweight, but a wise and hardy leader of self-denying intrepidity. In the spring of 1673, the Plymptons and Sutliefes removed to Pocomtuck.

John Plympton was captured by Indians 19 Sep 1677 along with some of his neighbors. Captives were also taken at Hatfield. Obadiah Dickinson, aged twenty-eight, and Obadiah Dickinson, Jr., eight years old; the wife and two other children remained safely at Hatfield. Martha Waite, aged twenty-eight, wife of Ben Waite of Hatfield, with her three children: Mary, aged five; Martha, four, and Sarah, two years old. Noah, aged six, and Sarah, aged four, children of John Coleman of Hatfield; their mother and an infant, Bethia, were killed at the time they were captured. Samuel Kellog, aged eight, son of Samuel and Sarah; the latter and her youngest child, Joseph, were killed. Mary Foote, aged twenty-five; Nathaniel, aged five, and Mary, aged three: wife and children of Samuel Foote, of Hatfield. Goodwife Jennings and two children. A child of William Bartholemew, and a child of John Alline. The foregoing were taken at Hatfield. At Deerfield were captured :-- Sergeant John Plympton. Quentin Stockwell, a young man; his wife, Abigail, and son, John, about a year old, remained safely at Hatfield. Benoni Stebbins, a young man; his wife and an infant remained at Hatfield. Samuel Russell, aged eight: son of Philip, younger brother of Rev. John of Hadley. It appears that young Samuel was away from his family, being captured at Deerfield; at Hatfield his mother and youngest brother, Stephen, three years old, were killed. "Sergeant Plympton was actually burnt at the stake when near Chamblee, and one Dickinson of Hatfield was compelled to lead him to the fatal spot." (Hoyt's Ant. Res., p. 147.) (1, 5, 6)

Source Citations

1. Ancestors of Timothy Charles Zimmerman, (Timothy C. Zimmerman, CMR 454, Box 1965, APO, AE 09250, A-United States, 011-49-981-481-7010, Fax: 011-49-9802-832-486, zimmert@email.ansbach.army.mil). 2. Michael C. Owens, (mcowens@mcowens.com). 3. Ancestors of Sandra Kay Scott, (Sandra Kay Scott-Fritzen, 30972 Electric Ave, Nuevo, CA 92567, 909-928-5516, sandee@pe.net). 4. Levi B. Chase, A Genealogy and Historical Notices of the Family of Plimpton or Plympton, (Hartford, CT 1884). p 29. 5. Levi B. Chase, A Genealogy and Historical Notices of the Family of Plimpton or Plympton, (Hartford, CT 1884). 6. Frederick Virkus, Abridged Compendium, (1925). p 3517. 7. Levi B. Chase, A Genealogy and Historical Notices of the Family of Plimpton or Plympton, (Hartford, CT 1884). p 60. ----- His memorial stone at Deerfield reads: SARGEANT JOHN PLYMPTON; Born in England about 1620 Member of The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company; Settler of Pocumtuck 1673; Captured by Indians September 19, 1677; Burned at the state in Canada; His son Jonathan Was Killed at the Bloody Brook Massacre 1675 -----

From: History of the Military Company of the Massachusetts, Now Called, the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachusetts, 1637-1888 – Oliver Ayer Roberts

John Plympton (1643), of Dedham in 1642; but probably came over some years before, as Dr. George Alcock, of Roxbury, in his will of Dec. 22, 1640, mentions his apprentice, John Plympton (1643). He was admitted to be a freeman May 10, 1643, and married, at Dedham, March 13, 1644, Jane Daman, or Damon, of Dedham. He moved from Dedham to Medfield in 1652. His house-lot was on Main Street, where William Kingsbury now lives. His field was on the south side of the street, opposite his house. In the spring of 1673, he emigrated to Deerfield, and, when King Philip's War began, he was the chief military officer in Deerfield. Mr. Plympton (1643) was captured by the Indians, Sept. 19, 1677, carried toward Canada, and subsequently killed. One report says he was burned at the stake by the savages near Chambly. ----------------------

Find-a-Grave: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=18520653

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Sgt. John Plimpton's Timeline

1620
1620
Probably England
1643
March 13, 1643
Age 23
Dedham, Ma
1645
March 1, 1645
Age 25
Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts
1648
April 9, 1648
Age 28
Dedham, MA
1649
June 16, 1649
Age 29
Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA
1652
March 7, 1652
Age 32
Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States
1653
October 7, 1653
Age 33
Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States
October 17, 1653
Age 33
1655
September 15, 1655
Age 35
Medfield, Suffolk County (Present Norfolk County), Masssachusetts Bay Colony
1657
November 23, 1657
Age 37
Medfield,Norfolk,Massachusetts