Sgt. Thomas Barber, of Windsor

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Thomas Barber

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
Death: Died in Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
Place of Burial: Palisado Cemetery plot: Founder,s Monument., Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of John Barber, Sr. and Elizabeth Barber
Husband of Jane Barber (Coggins)
Father of Lt. Josiah Barber; John Barber, Sr.; Sarah Hall (Barber); Lt. Thomas Barber, of Simsbury; Samuel Barber and 3 others
Brother of Rebecca Barber; Sarah Barber; Elizabeth Barber; Josiah Barber; John Barber, Jr. and 1 other

Occupation: Carpenter, yeoman, first settler of Windsor CT
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sgt. Thomas Barber, of Windsor

1. Sgt. THOMAS1 BARBER (JohnA) baptised at St George Parish, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England 25 Dec 1612; b probably 21 Dec 1612 (St Thomas’s Day); d Windsor CT 11 Sep 1662; m Windsor 7 Oct 1640 Jane ‑‑‑, b ; d Windsor 10 Sep 1662; r Windsor.

Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England. Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian". [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~]

After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue. The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant. After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold.

The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669.

On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry. The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so. Shortly after that Thomas was a free man. At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres.

Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt."

Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds.

A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas.  He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan.  Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested.  One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593. 

It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children. This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely. Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622. That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely.

It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”.

One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children.

There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~]

                  Children of Thomas and Jane, born at Windsor:

--------------------

  1. Occupation: Carpenter, farmer, founder of Windsor, Connecticut
  2. Event: Military Sargeant in the Pequote War of 1637
  3. Event: Freeman 1645
  4. Note:

The Barber family history dates back nearly 900 years, taking their name from their occupation of barber, which was hair dressing, shaving beards, pulling teeth, and wound dressing, in which they were accounted very skillful. They were styled the Baron's Barber by the nobility before surnames were much used. The red and white sign posts (barber poles) signify white bandages soaked in blood. The Barber name has several variations, including Barbour. It is also Anglo-Norman French, Barber, Old French, Barbier, from Late Latin Barbarius, a derivative of barba, "beard". The name is found in Northumberland and Cumberland, but also branches north over the border into Scotland, from England. The Barber coat of arms has a gold shield with two chevrons and three fleur de lys with a silver bull's head.

Thomas Barber was the son of John Barber and Elizabeth Lumley. John Barber was called a labourer in 1609, and a yeoman later. Yeoman were small land owners, a step up from labourers, but below gentry. John and Elizabeth lived first in St. George Parish, Stamford, Lincoln County, which is the part of Stamford adjacent to Uffington, and later in All Saints Parish on the other side of Stamford. Stamford is about 80 miles north of London. John and Elizabeth had five children, Rebecca, Sarah, Thomas, Elizabeth, and John.

Thomas Barber was baptized on Dec. 25 1612 in St. George, Stamford, Lincoln Co., England. He was probably born on Dec. 21, 1612 on St. Thomas's Day. Beford coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on Dec. 18, 1634 for a period of 9 years until Dec. 1643, under Francis Stiles, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England and a London freeman. A search of the appropriate guild records in London by Frances Markham, a London researcher, located the following entry in the records of the "Worshipful Company of Carpenter" at the guildhall. From the minutes of a meeting held on Dec. 18, 1634, "Received of Francis Stiles for apprenticing Thomas Barber, son of John Barber of Stamford in the County of Lincoln, yeoman, deceased, from St. Thomas's day next for 9 years. Stiles was later contracted by Sir Richard Saltonstall to bring apprentices to Windsor, and build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at age 21 was among the twenty plus apprentices who sailed with Stiles for New England on the ship, Christian, with John White as their Master. The ship left London on March 16, 1634 (Julian calender) and arrived 3 months later in Boston in June of 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part, "with certificate from St. Mildren, Bread Stree, London, having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the Christian." (from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London). After 10 days in Boston the ship, Christian, sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first day of July in 1635.

When the early Massachusetts towns became crowded, their land hungry people spilled over into Connecticut. Windsor was settled by Englishmen from Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1633. The rivers and the coastal inlets of the sea were the first highways of Connecticut and Windsor lay close to the Connecticut River. The people of Connecticut were almost entirely of English descent until about 1850.

According to the Windsor, Connecticut records, Thomas Barber was granted in 1635, "a lot ten rods west of Humphrey Hyde's Mill Road, 8 acres and 22 rods wide, bounded south by Mill Brook, extending as stated 2 rods wide, to accommodate Barber and Alvord, and also a way for Mr. Wareham, Minister, to go to his lot north of Barber's and Alvord's and ended in the Poquonnock."

   

Thomas Barber's residence was located, "upon an ancient road which running about southwesterly from the rivulet (near where the present road from Palisade Green comes in) intersected the Poquonnock road above the old mill." On the North side of this road were the residences of Thomas Barber, Humphrey Hyde, and Alex Alvord, and on the south side that of Jonathan Gillett.

It is evident from the records, that Francis Stiles failed to fulfill his contract with Thomas Barber and the other young men of his party, for on March 28, 1637 the following order was made by the court of Hartford, Connecticut, "that Mr. Francis Stiles shall teach George Chapple, Thomas Cooper, and Thomas Barber, his servant apprentices in the trade of a carpenter, according to his promise for their services for their term, behind 4 days a week only to saw and slitt their own work that they are to frame themselves with their own hands, together with himself or some other master workman; the time to begin for the performance of this order is 14 days hence without fail."

Many Indians were friendly with the settlers. They taught the settlers to grow corn and other crops, but the Pequots didn't want the settlers on their land and they were Connecticut's largest tribe. The Indians were upset as the colonists moved more and more into Indian Territory and made it harder for the Indians to fish and hunt. In 1636, a settler was killed and the colonist blamed the Pequots. This led to the Pequot War (1636-1637). The Pequot Indians made many raids on the early settlements, but were decisively defeated in a battle at West Mystic in 1637, where more than 700 Pequot men, women, and children died. Thomas Barber, a Sargeant, was one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who was enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John Mason, the May 26, 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber took part in several battles with the Pequot Indians and greatly distinguished himself in the attack made upon the Pequot Fort. Thomas Barber was inside the Pequot Fort at West Mystic during the attack, which the Indians considered impregnable. In an account of this battle, written by Mason and published in Boston in 1727, the following reference is made to the part taken by Thomas Barber, "We had entered the fort and in getting out of a wigwam encountered seven Indians. They fled and we pursued to the end of a lane, but before we could reach them they were met by Thomas Barber and Edward Patterson, who slew the entire seven with their axes and knives, their muskets having been discharged."

Upon his return to Windsor, he contracted to build the first meeting house. In 1640 Thomas Barber married Jane or Joan and they had six children, John, Thomas, Sarah, Samuel, Mary, and Josiah. A deep mystery of Jane's maiden name surrounds her. Two of Thomas's sons married Coggin ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested. It has also been suggested that Thomas Barber married Jane Bonython, widow of John Bancroft, who died in 1637, but Jane Bonython was born in 1573 and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas Barber's children. This theory was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol. 37, pg. 164, in 1961 by George E. McCracken and more or less disproves this possibility. It has also been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was "the first white woman to land in Connecticut." There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was, an all too frequent problem in genealogy.

In 1641, the lands in the locality were called by the Indian name, Massaco, and were apportioned among the colonists. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669. As an Indian fighter he evidenced a courage and sagacity which secured him the confidence of the colonies and the fear and respect of the Indians. His bravery gained him honorable mention from Captain Mason and in return for this service in 1641, he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco in the Western part of Windsor. Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas Barber. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William Franklin. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas Ford to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. Cooke in an argument over church matters. Thomas believed that the church had not right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized, "I was affected with a great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt."

At the time of Thomas Barber's death in 1662, he was making preparations to move to Northampton, Massachusetts. The records of Northampton town meeting on April 24, 1661 stated that it was voted and agreed for Thomas Barber of Windsor to become an inhabitant of that town. Thomas Barber and his wife died at the same time of unknown causes and left four children still at home, ages ten through sixteen. Pnemonia, tuberculosis, and dysentery claimed more lives in New England than any other illnesses. Yet there were also infections diseases like smallpox. Thomas Barber's will provided well for these children and left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds.

Thomas Barber was thoughtful, intelligent, and a God fearing man, and for the times exceedingly liberal in religious views. His probate record was taken on Oct. 20, 1662 by Benjamin Newbery and John Moore (Page 184, Probate Records of Hartford, Connecticut and Court Records, page 187).

sources

  1. http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jpsegalla&id=I3362
  2. [https://archive.org/stream/barbergenealogyi00wils#page/14/mode/2up Barber genealogy

(in two sections) Section I. Descendants of Thomas Barber of Windsor, Conn. 1614-1909.] Section II. Descandants of John Barber of Worcester, Mass. 1714-1909. Pub. by John Barber White, ed. by Lillian May Wilson.Published 1909 by Press of the Nichols print. in Haverhill, Mass . Written in English.

____

Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England. Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian". [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~]

 After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue.  The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant.  After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold.
 The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred.  Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669.
 On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry.  The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so.  Shortly after that Thomas was a free man.   At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres.
 Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER.  Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN.  Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin.  Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt." 
 Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds.
 A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas.  He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan.  Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested.  One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593.
 It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children.  This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken  and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely.  Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622.  That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely. 
 It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”.
 One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605.  She married in England and presumably remained there.  There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her.  It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children. 
 There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~]

___

It has long been known that Thomas1 Barber, with several others, was apprenticed to Francis Stiles, who was paid to bring them to Windsor CT.

 Francis Stiles was a carpenter and London freeman, so it seemed reasonable to search in the appropriate guild records in London. The following entry was found in the records of the Worshipful Company of Carpenters at the Guildhall, in the minutes of a meeting held on 18 December 1634: "Received of Francis Stiles for apprenticing Thomas Barber son of John Barber of Stamford in the County of Lincoln, yeoman, deceased, from St Thomas's day next for 9 years. 2s 2d". (which is 2 shillings, 2 pence).
 In the parish registers in Stamford and the adjacent parish of Uffington is the following information: [~ Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Films ~]
          St George Parish, Stamford, Lincoln County
          Rebecca, daughter of John Barber, labourer, baptised 17 April 1609
          Rebecca, daughter of John Barber, buried 6 Aug 1609
          Sara, daughter of John Barber, labourer, baptised 16 Sept 1610
          Thomas, son of John and Elizabeth Barber, baptised 25 Dec 1612
          All Saints Parish, Stamford
          Elizabeth LUMLEY, daughter of Thomas LUMLEY, baptised 4 August 1597 (How related?)
          Elizabeth, daughter of John Barber, baptised 10 or 11 Nov 1616
          John, son of John Barber, baptised 4 Aug 1620
          John Barber, buried 21 Apr 1620
          Elizabeth Barber, widow, buried 8 Mar 1632
          John Barber, son of Widow Barber, buried 22 Mar 1632
          Uffington Parish, Lincoln County  
          Elizabeth Barber m William FOWLER, 8 Jun 1590   (? related)
          Margaret Barber m John PREESTE, 2 Oct 1607     (? a sister of JohnA)
          John Barber m Elizabeth LUMLEY, 17 Oct 1608

source: THE BARBERS OF CONNECTICUT

FIRST THREE GENERATIONS, complete, Part 1 -------------------- Sergeant, Indentured 28 Mar 1637.

MILITARY 1st- Sergeant Thomas Barber, immigrated from England, and served as Sergeant in Pequot War- see description of battle pg 16 Barber Genealogy [Reference: Genealogy of Our Barber Family 1614-1965 by Lucy James COLE Flemming- Military Record of Barber (Our) Lineage]

NOTES Part of the Genealogy of the Barber Family (Handwritten by ?Col Levi Barber vs Capt Levi Barber) First Generation Thomas Barber of Mildred Bradstreet England aged 21 years, sailed from London England, in March 1635 in the ship 'Christian' for America after taking the oath of Allegiance and Subservience, resided in Dorchester Massachusetts afterwards in Windsor Connecticut, was engaged in teh Pequot war under Stoughton, his wife's name Jane, who with her husband both died in 1662. Thomas and Jane had 6 children...

Lucy Mayberry BARBER Cole, Dictated by her father Capt Levi BARBER, and copied by her great grand daughter Linda Jean ENGLE Lackore Summer 2000: "The first settlers of Simsbury Connecticut came from Windsor Connecticut. A very large proportion of the inhabitants as late as 1845 can trace their ancestry to that small flock who under the pastoral charge of the Rev Mr Warham left England in 1630 and after remaining a short time in Dorchester Massachusetts near Boston removed in the fall of 1635 and spring of 1636 to Windsor Connecticut."

"Thomas Barber- born about 1614 in County of Bedfordshire England. He came to Windsor Connecticut with a party fitted out by Richard Saltonstall, under Francis Stiles, a master carpenter of London. The Saltonstall party sailed on 16 Mar 1635 on the ship, 'Christian'. "Thomas Barber's residence was located 'upon an ancient road which runs SW from the revulet intersecting the Poquonnack road above the old mill.' "Thomas was a soldier with the rank of Sergeant in the Pequot War. He distinguished himself by his bravery in a number of fights with the Pequots and particularly taking of a fort, which the Indians considered inpregnable (description of battle on pg 16 of Barber Genealogy). He was granted 600 acres of land in 1641 in locality called by Indian name 'Massaco'. "Records of town of Northampton Massachusetts: 'At a town meeting 24 Apr 1661 voted and agreed that he be made an inhabitant of Northampton with plat of ground of 20 acres.' "He died 11 Sep 1662, married to Jane or Joan (surname not known) daughter of Dutch settler- said to have been first white woman to land in Connecticut. She died 10 Sep 1662.

Source: http://www.geneal.net/446.htm -------------------- FOUNDING FATHER (1 of 7) of the COMMONWEALTH of Connecticut. Arrived in America March 16,1634 on the ship "Christian."Settled in Windsor,Conn. in 1635 with the Saltonstall party, under Francis Stiles. indentured servant from 1635-1642 for English nobleman sponsor to clear land, learn carpentry trade (building houses, furniture,etc.) in return granted/deeded acreage by the King's representative.

The West Simsbury Historical Society, West Simsbury,CT. has 100s of documents relating to THE BARBER FOUNDING FATHERS of Connecticut. And maps to their burial plots. Back in 1987 I was able to locate burial stones of Lt. Thomas and Samuel Barber flagstone headstones through contacting local funeral homes cemetery maps. There was a broken-off stone aside Lt. Thomas Barber's worn headstone, most likely the original grave marker for FOUNDING FATHER SGT. THOMAS BARBER! - Jerry Barber 1/3/2011. -------------------- Sgt. THOMAS1 BARBER (JohnA) baptised at St George Parish, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England 25 Dec 1612; b probably 21 Dec 1612 (St Thomas’s Day); d Windsor CT 11 Sep 1662; m Windsor 7 Oct 1640 Jane ‑‑‑, b ; d Windsor 10 Sep 1662; r Windsor.

 Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England.  Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635.  Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian".  [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~]
 After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue.  The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant.  After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold.
 The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred.  Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669.
 On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry.  The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so.  Shortly after that Thomas was a free man.   At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres.
 Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER.  Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN.  Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin.  Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt."  
 Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds.
 A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas.  He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan.  Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested.  One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593. 
 It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children.  This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken  and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely.  Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622.  That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely.  

It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”.

One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children.

There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~]

Children of Thomas and Jane, born at Windsor:

JOHN2, baptised 24 Jul 1642; m/1 Bathsheba COGGIN; m/2 Mrs. Hannah (GARDNER) BANCROFT.

THOMAS2, baptised 14 Jul 1644; m Mary PHELPS.

SARAH2, baptised 19 Jul 1646; m Windsor 26 Nov 1663 Timothy HALE, b about 1642, d Suffield CT 26 Jul 1689, probably son of John and Dorothy (ROYLE) HEALD of Concord and Springfield MA. John HEALD came from Berwick-on-Tweed, Cheshire Eng to Concord MA. It is also possible that Timothy was son of Thomas and Jane (LORD) HALE of Hartford. Timothy and Sarah lived at Windsor and Suffield. [~ Barbour Index; Hale,House;Corresp:Angela Cosby ~]

                       Children of Sarah and Timothy:
                          i  Sarah HALE3, b 9 Apr or Aug 1665; m John RISING, b Salem MA 1660, son James and Elizabeth  (HINSDALE) RISING; r Suffield.  They had 9 children.  A son of Sarah and John, John RISING, was taken as a child  from Deerfield MA during the Deerfield Massacre in 1704, and brought to Canada.  He married another English captive there in 1715, and they had a large family that married into the French

community there.

                        ii   Timothy HALE3, b 12 Dec 1667; m Hannah BARBER, daughter of John Jr and  Joanna (MILLER) BARBER of Springfield.  This Springfield John BARBER     family was not related to the Windsor Barbers.
                       iii   John HALE3, b 24 Aug 1670; d Windsor 1708/9.
                       iv    Thomas HALE3, b 26 Aug 1672; m/1 Experience BURT; m/2 Mrs Abigail (WARNER) FERRY; r Springfield  (Longmeadow).
                       v     Samuel HALE3, b 3 Jan 1673/4; d Suffield 1748; unmarried.
                       vi     Daughter3, b 28 Nov 1675; died young.
                        vii   Josias HALE3, b 22 Sep 1678; m/1 1705 Sarah HARMON; m/2 1713 Hannah (SEYMOUR) POMEROY; r Suffield.
                       viii     Hannah HALE3, b 14 Sep 1680; m John REMINGTON; r Suffield.

iv SAMUEL (our line), baptised 1 Oct 1648; m/1 Mary COGGIN; m/2 Ruth DRAKE.

v MARY2 (Mercy), baptised 12 Oct 1651; d Suffield CT 29 Mar 1725; m/1 Windsor (“both of Windsor”) 8 Jul 1669 John GILLETT, b Windsor 5 Oct 1644, d there 1682, son of Jonathan and Mary (DOLBERE) GILLETT, the Emigrant. Mary m/2 14 Jun 1683 Capt. George NORTON of Suffield, baptised Salem MA 28 Mar 1641, d 15 Nov 1696, son of

George and Mary (MACHIAS) NORTON;  (George was first married to Sarah ‑‑‑, who d in 1682).  After her parents' death when she was 9 years old, Mercy was placed by the court (4 Feb 1662/3) in the home of  Walter FYLER until age 18, unless she were married sooner (which she was).  [~ Corresp:Betty Simonson; IGI:CT;  CT Hist Soc:LBBarbour Manuscripts; CT Hist Soc:Fellows Gen; CT Hist Soc:Norton Manujscript; Barbour Index;

Stiles:Windsor; Windsor Hist.Soc:DFAW ~]

                                          Children of Mary and John, born at Windsor:
                          i    Thomas GILLETT3, b 7 Jan 1671/2; died before 1676.
                         ii    John GILLETT3, b 6 Aug 1673; d 4 Jul 1699; unmarried.
                        iii    Thomas GILLETT3, b 18 Jul 1676; d Suffield 11 Jun 1708; m/1 1700 Martha MILLS; m/2 1704 Hannah CLARK (d 1798).
                        iv      Samuel GILLETT3, b 16 Feb 1677/78; d Suffield 1739; m Rebecca BANCROFT.
                         v      Benjamin (or Nathaniel) GILLETT3, b 3 Oct 1680; m Elizabeth AUSTIN; r Suffield.
                         vi    Mercy GILLETT3, b 31 Jan 1683/4; d Suffield 1756; m Jacob ADAMS Jr.
                                          Children of Mary and George NORTON:
                        vii    Mary NORTON3, b 18 Jan 1684/5; m Jared HUXLEY.
                       viii    Abigail NORTON3, b 14 Dec 1686; d 21 Oct 1705.
                         ix   Freegrace NORTON3, b 1 Jan 1688/9; m Sarah MARTIN; r Suffield.
                         x    Johanna NORTON3, b 17 Mar 1692/3; m Abraham ADAMS.
                         xi   Elizabeth NORTON3, b 31 Aug 1695; d 1 Aug 1697 (?).
                        xii   Elizabeth NORTON3, b 19 Mar 1696/7. She was born 4 months after her father died.     

5 JOSIAH2, baptised 15 Feb 1653/4; m/1 Abigail LOOMIS; m/2 Sarah (PORTER) DRAKE.


-------------------- 1635, "Christian" -------------------- (f/g) Thomas Barber Birth: Dec., 1612 Boston, England Death: Sep. 11, 1662 Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA

Baptized at Stamford, Lincolnshire, 25 Dec 1612, son of John & Elizabeth (Lumley) Barber. Carpenter from St. Mildred Breadstreet, London, who came to Massachusetts Bay in 1635 on the "Christian," & settled in Windsor CT. Died at Windsor 11 Sep 1662. Married at Windsor, 7 Oct 1640, Jane ____. She died at Windsor on 10 Sep 1662 as "[t]he wife of Thomas Bar Ber." In the inventory of Thomas Barber, taken 20 Oct 1662, his wives apparrel deceased was valued at [pounds]15. Source: Anderson's Great Migration Study Project


Family links:

Parents:
 John Barber (1580 - 1620)
 Elizabeth Lumley Barber (1588 - 1632) 
Spouse:
 Jane Barber (1620 - 1662) 
Children:
 Thomas Barber (1644 - 1713)*
 Mercy Barber Norton (1651 - 1725)*
 Josiah Barber (1653 - 1733)

Burial: Palisado Cemetery Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA Plot: Founder's Monument Created by: Linda Mac Record added: Jun 19, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 38520644 -tcd -------------------- Immigrant to US.

Baptized at Stamford, Lincolnshire, 25 Dec 1612, son of John & Elizabeth (Lumley) Barber. Carpenter from St. Mildred Breadstreet, London, who came to Massachusetts Bay in 1635 on the "Christian," & settled in Windsor CT. Died at Windsor 11 Sep 1662. Married at Windsor, 7 Oct 1640, Jane ____. She died at Windsor on 10 Sep 1662 as "[t]he wife of Thomas Bar Ber." In the inventory of Thomas Barber, taken 20 Oct 1662, his wives apparrel deceased was valued at [pounds]15. Source: Anderson's Great Migration Study Project

1. Sgt. THOMAS1 BARBER (JohnA) baptised at St George Parish, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England 25 Dec 1612; b probably 21 Dec 1612 (St Thomas’s Day); d Windsor CT 11 Sep 1662; m Windsor 7 Oct 1640 Jane ‑‑‑, b ; d Windsor 10 Sep 1662; r Windsor.

Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England. Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian". [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~] After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue. The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant. After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold. The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669. On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry. The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so. Shortly after that Thomas was a free man. At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres. Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt." Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds. A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas. He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan. Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested. One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593. It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children. This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely. Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622. That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely. It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”. One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children. There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~] Children of Thomas and Jane, born at Windsor: --------------------

Occupation: Carpenter, farmer, founder of Windsor, Connecticut Event: Military Sargeant in the Pequote War of 1637 Event: Freeman 1645 Note: The Barber family history dates back nearly 900 years, taking their name from their occupation of barber, which was hair dressing, shaving beards, pulling teeth, and wound dressing, in which they were accounted very skillful. They were styled the Baron's Barber by the nobility before surnames were much used. The red and white sign posts (barber poles) signify white bandages soaked in blood. The Barber name has several variations, including Barbour. It is also Anglo-Norman French, Barber, Old French, Barbier, from Late Latin Barbarius, a derivative of barba, "beard". The name is found in Northumberland and Cumberland, but also branches north over the border into Scotland, from England. The Barber coat of arms has a gold shield with two chevrons and three fleur de lys with a silver bull's head. Thomas Barber was the son of John Barber and Elizabeth Lumley. John Barber was called a labourer in 1609, and a yeoman later. Yeoman were small land owners, a step up from labourers, but below gentry. John and Elizabeth lived first in St. George Parish, Stamford, Lincoln County, which is the part of Stamford adjacent to Uffington, and later in All Saints Parish on the other side of Stamford. Stamford is about 80 miles north of London. John and Elizabeth had five children, Rebecca, Sarah, Thomas, Elizabeth, and John. Thomas Barber was baptized on Dec. 25 1612 in St. George, Stamford, Lincoln Co., England. He was probably born on Dec. 21, 1612 on St. Thomas's Day. Beford coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on Dec. 18, 1634 for a period of 9 years until Dec. 1643, under Francis Stiles, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England and a London freeman. A search of the appropriate guild records in London by Frances Markham, a London researcher, located the following entry in the records of the "Worshipful Company of Carpenter" at the guildhall. From the minutes of a meeting held on Dec. 18, 1634, "Received of Francis Stiles for apprenticing Thomas Barber, son of John Barber of Stamford in the County of Lincoln, yeoman, deceased, from St. Thomas's day next for 9 years. Stiles was later contracted by Sir Richard Saltonstall to bring apprentices to Windsor, and build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at age 21 was among the twenty plus apprentices who sailed with Stiles for New England on the ship, Christian, with John White as their Master. The ship left London on March 16, 1634 (Julian calender) and arrived 3 months later in Boston in June of 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part, "with certificate from St. Mildren, Bread Stree, London, having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the Christian." (from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London). After 10 days in Boston the ship, Christian, sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first day of July in 1635. When the early Massachusetts towns became crowded, their land hungry people spilled over into Connecticut. Windsor was settled by Englishmen from Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1633. The rivers and the coastal inlets of the sea were the first highways of Connecticut and Windsor lay close to the Connecticut River. The people of Connecticut were almost entirely of English descent until about 1850. According to the Windsor, Connecticut records, Thomas Barber was granted in 1635, "a lot ten rods west of Humphrey Hyde's Mill Road, 8 acres and 22 rods wide, bounded south by Mill Brook, extending as stated 2 rods wide, to accommodate Barber and Alvord, and also a way for Mr. Wareham, Minister, to go to his lot north of Barber's and Alvord's and ended in the Poquonnock." Thomas Barber's residence was located, "upon an ancient road which running about southwesterly from the rivulet (near where the present road from Palisade Green comes in) intersected the Poquonnock road above the old mill." On the North side of this road were the residences of Thomas Barber, Humphrey Hyde, and Alex Alvord, and on the south side that of Jonathan Gillett. It is evident from the records, that Francis Stiles failed to fulfill his contract with Thomas Barber and the other young men of his party, for on March 28, 1637 the following order was made by the court of Hartford, Connecticut, "that Mr. Francis Stiles shall teach George Chapple, Thomas Cooper, and Thomas Barber, his servant apprentices in the trade of a carpenter, according to his promise for their services for their term, behind 4 days a week only to saw and slitt their own work that they are to frame themselves with their own hands, together with himself or some other master workman; the time to begin for the performance of this order is 14 days hence without fail." Many Indians were friendly with the settlers. They taught the settlers to grow corn and other crops, but the Pequots didn't want the settlers on their land and they were Connecticut's largest tribe. The Indians were upset as the colonists moved more and more into Indian Territory and made it harder for the Indians to fish and hunt. In 1636, a settler was killed and the colonist blamed the Pequots. This led to the Pequot War (1636-1637). The Pequot Indians made many raids on the early settlements, but were decisively defeated in a battle at West Mystic in 1637, where more than 700 Pequot men, women, and children died. Thomas Barber, a Sargeant, was one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who was enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John Mason, the May 26, 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber took part in several battles with the Pequot Indians and greatly distinguished himself in the attack made upon the Pequot Fort. Thomas Barber was inside the Pequot Fort at West Mystic during the attack, which the Indians considered impregnable. In an account of this battle, written by Mason and published in Boston in 1727, the following reference is made to the part taken by Thomas Barber, "We had entered the fort and in getting out of a wigwam encountered seven Indians. They fled and we pursued to the end of a lane, but before we could reach them they were met by Thomas Barber and Edward Patterson, who slew the entire seven with their axes and knives, their muskets having been discharged." Upon his return to Windsor, he contracted to build the first meeting house. In 1640 Thomas Barber married Jane or Joan and they had six children, John, Thomas, Sarah, Samuel, Mary, and Josiah. A deep mystery of Jane's maiden name surrounds her. Two of Thomas's sons married Coggin ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested. It has also been suggested that Thomas Barber married Jane Bonython, widow of John Bancroft, who died in 1637, but Jane Bonython was born in 1573 and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas Barber's children. This theory was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol. 37, pg. 164, in 1961 by George E. McCracken and more or less disproves this possibility. It has also been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was "the first white woman to land in Connecticut." There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was, an all too frequent problem in genealogy. In 1641, the lands in the locality were called by the Indian name, Massaco, and were apportioned among the colonists. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669. As an Indian fighter he evidenced a courage and sagacity which secured him the confidence of the colonies and the fear and respect of the Indians. His bravery gained him honorable mention from Captain Mason and in return for this service in 1641, he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco in the Western part of Windsor. Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas Barber. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William Franklin. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas Ford to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. Cooke in an argument over church matters. Thomas believed that the church had not right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized, "I was affected with a great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt." At the time of Thomas Barber's death in 1662, he was making preparations to move to Northampton, Massachusetts. The records of Northampton town meeting on April 24, 1661 stated that it was voted and agreed for Thomas Barber of Windsor to become an inhabitant of that town. Thomas Barber and his wife died at the same time of unknown causes and left four children still at home, ages ten through sixteen. Pnemonia, tuberculosis, and dysentery claimed more lives in New England than any other illnesses. Yet there were also infections diseases like smallpox. Thomas Barber's will provided well for these children and left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds. Thomas Barber was thoughtful, intelligent, and a God fearing man, and for the times exceedingly liberal in religious views. His probate record was taken on Oct. 20, 1662 by Benjamin Newbery and John Moore (Page 184, Probate Records of Hartford, Connecticut and Court Records, page 187). source: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jpsegalla&id=I3362 ____

Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England. Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian". [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~]

After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue. The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant. After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold. The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669. On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry. The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so. Shortly after that Thomas was a free man. At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres. Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt." Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds. A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas. He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan. Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested. One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593. It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children. This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely. Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622. That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely. It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”. One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children. There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~] ___

It has long been known that Thomas1 Barber, with several others, was apprenticed to Francis Stiles, who was paid to bring them to Windsor CT.

Francis Stiles was a carpenter and London freeman, so it seemed reasonable to search in the appropriate guild records in London. The following entry was found in the records of the Worshipful Company of Carpenters at the Guildhall, in the minutes of a meeting held on 18 December 1634: "Received of Francis Stiles for apprenticing Thomas Barber son of John Barber of Stamford in the County of Lincoln, yeoman, deceased, from St Thomas's day next for 9 years. 2s 2d". (which is 2 shillings, 2 pence). In the parish registers in Stamford and the adjacent parish of Uffington is the following information: [~ Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Films ~] St George Parish, Stamford, Lincoln County Rebecca, daughter of John Barber, labourer, baptised 17 April 1609 Rebecca, daughter of John Barber, buried 6 Aug 1609 Sara, daughter of John Barber, labourer, baptised 16 Sept 1610 Thomas, son of John and Elizabeth Barber, baptised 25 Dec 1612 All Saints Parish, Stamford Elizabeth LUMLEY, daughter of Thomas LUMLEY, baptised 4 August 1597 (How related?) Elizabeth, daughter of John Barber, baptised 10 or 11 Nov 1616 John, son of John Barber, baptised 4 Aug 1620 John Barber, buried 21 Apr 1620 Elizabeth Barber, widow, buried 8 Mar 1632 John Barber, son of Widow Barber, buried 22 Mar 1632 Uffington Parish, Lincoln County Elizabeth Barber m William FOWLER, 8 Jun 1590 (? related) Margaret Barber m John PREESTE, 2 Oct 1607 (? a sister of JohnA) John Barber m Elizabeth LUMLEY, 17 Oct 1608 source: THE BARBERS OF CONNECTICUT

FIRST THREE GENERATIONS, complete, Part 1 -------------------- Sergeant, Indentured 28 Mar 1637.

MILITARY 1st- Sergeant Thomas Barber, immigrated from England, and served as Sergeant in Pequot War- see description of battle pg 16 Barber Genealogy [Reference: Genealogy of Our Barber Family 1614-1965 by Lucy James COLE Flemming- Military Record of Barber (Our) Lineage]

NOTES Part of the Genealogy of the Barber Family (Handwritten by ?Col Levi Barber vs Capt Levi Barber) First Generation Thomas Barber of Mildred Bradstreet England aged 21 years, sailed from London England, in March 1635 in the ship 'Christian' for America after taking the oath of Allegiance and Subservience, resided in Dorchester Massachusetts afterwards in Windsor Connecticut, was engaged in teh Pequot war under Stoughton, his wife's name Jane, who with her husband both died in 1662. Thomas and Jane had 6 children...

Lucy Mayberry BARBER Cole, Dictated by her father Capt Levi BARBER, and copied by her great grand daughter Linda Jean ENGLE Lackore Summer 2000: "The first settlers of Simsbury Connecticut came from Windsor Connecticut. A very large proportion of the inhabitants as late as 1845 can trace their ancestry to that small flock who under the pastoral charge of the Rev Mr Warham left England in 1630 and after remaining a short time in Dorchester Massachusetts near Boston removed in the fall of 1635 and spring of 1636 to Windsor Connecticut."

"Thomas Barber- born about 1614 in County of Bedfordshire England. He came to Windsor Connecticut with a party fitted out by Richard Saltonstall, under Francis Stiles, a master carpenter of London. The Saltonstall party sailed on 16 Mar 1635 on the ship, 'Christian'. "Thomas Barber's residence was located 'upon an ancient road which runs SW from the revulet intersecting the Poquonnack road above the old mill.' "Thomas was a soldier with the rank of Sergeant in the Pequot War. He distinguished himself by his bravery in a number of fights with the Pequots and particularly taking of a fort, which the Indians considered inpregnable (description of battle on pg 16 of Barber Genealogy). He was granted 600 acres of land in 1641 in locality called by Indian name 'Massaco'. "Records of town of Northampton Massachusetts: 'At a town meeting 24 Apr 1661 voted and agreed that he be made an inhabitant of Northampton with plat of ground of 20 acres.' "He died 11 Sep 1662, married to Jane or Joan (surname not known) daughter of Dutch settler- said to have been first white woman to land in Connecticut. She died 10 Sep 1662.

Source: http://www.geneal.net/446.htm -------------------- FOUNDING FATHER (1 of 7) of the COMMONWEALTH of Connecticut. Arrived in America March 16,1634 on the ship "Christian."Settled in Windsor,Conn. in 1635 with the Saltonstall party, under Francis Stiles. indentured servant from 1635-1642 for English nobleman sponsor to clear land, learn carpentry trade (building houses, furniture,etc.) in return granted/deeded acreage by the King's representative.

The West Simsbury Historical Society, West Simsbury,CT. has 100s of documents relating to THE BARBER FOUNDING FATHERS of Connecticut. And maps to their burial plots. Back in 1987 I was able to locate burial stones of Lt. Thomas and Samuel Barber flagstone headstones through contacting local funeral homes cemetery maps. There was a broken-off stone aside Lt. Thomas Barber's worn headstone, most likely the original grave marker for FOUNDING FATHER SGT. THOMAS BARBER! - Jerry Barber 1/3/2011. -------------------- Sgt. THOMAS1 BARBER (JohnA) baptised at St George Parish, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England 25 Dec 1612; b probably 21 Dec 1612 (St Thomas’s Day); d Windsor CT 11 Sep 1662; m Windsor 7 Oct 1640 Jane ‑‑‑, b ; d Windsor 10 Sep 1662; r Windsor.

Before coming to New England Thomas was apprenticed on 18 Dec 1634 for a period of 9 years (until December 1643) under Francis STILES, a master carpenter from Millbrook, Bedfordshire, England. Stiles was contracted by Sir Richard SALTONSTALL to bring apprentices to Windsor, and to build houses in America for Englishmen who were to follow. Thomas Barber at the age of 21 was among the twenty apprentices plus others who sailed with Stiles for New England in the ship "Christian" (John White, Master), which left London 16 Mar 1634 (Julian Calendar), and arrived 3 months later in Boston June 1635. Each of the passengers had a certificate which read in part: "with certificate from St. Mildred, Bread Street, London, and having taken the oaths, to be transported to New England from London in the "Christian". [~ from the Public Record Office, Westminster Hall, London ~] After 10 days at Boston the Christian sailed up the Connecticut River to Windsor, arriving there on the first of July 1635. That same year Thomas was granted a lot of a few acres, extending from Mill Brook, near the old Warham gristmill, north along both sides of Poquonock Avenue. The author's father was born on this same land, and my brother, sister, and I were brought up on this, the original land grant. After 330 years of continuous Barber ownership, the land has now all been sold. The Pequot War in 1637, which according to the settlers was precipitated by the Pequot Indians and their continual harassment of the settlers, the friendly Mohegan Indians, and sometimes the Narragansetts, found Thomas a Sargeant, one of 30 soldiers from Windsor who were enrolled under Major Stoughton for 3 weeks and 2 days. Under the leadership of Captain John MASON, the May 26 1637 night attack on the Pequot fort was a complete surprise to the sleeping Pequots, and a large percentage of the tribe was massacred. Thomas Barber's bravery (he was inside the Pequot Fort at Mystic during the attack, and along with Edward Pattison, “having no time to reload their muskets, slew seven fleeing Indians with axes and knives”), gained him honorable mention from Capt. Mason, and in return for this service, in 1641 he was granted 600 acres of land in Massaco, in the western part of Windsor. Massaco became Simsbury in 1669. On March 28, 1637 Francis Stiles (master carpenter) was ordered to teach his servants, George Chapple, Thomas Cooper and Thomas Barber in the trade of carpentry. The year 1645 found Thomas still an apprentice carpenter. Stiles apparently was slow to finish Thomas's apprenticeship, and needed a court order to force him to do so. Shortly after that Thomas was a free man. At the time of his death in 1662, Thomas may have been making preparations to move to Northampton MA, where he was offered a home lot and 20 acres. Life was apparently not completely peaceful for Thomas1 BARBER. Court records in 1649 show that he was found liable for a debt to William FRANKLIN. Thomas claimed that he had given the money to Thomas FORD to pay to Franklin. Then in 1650 Sargeant Barber was fined 5 pounds and forced to surrender his rank, for the disorderly striking of Lt. COOKE in an argument over church matters; Thomas believed that the church had no right to interfere in temporal matters. This penalty was later canceled when apparently Thomas apologized: "he is affected with his great evil and rash passionate carriage in striking the Lt." Thomas left an estate appraised at over 132 pounds. A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas. He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only the name Jane or Joan. Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have suggested. One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593. It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children. This theory against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken and more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely. Another account has John BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622. That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely. It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford, and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”.

One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children.

There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~]

Children of Thomas and Jane, born at Windsor:

JOHN2, baptised 24 Jul 1642; m/1 Bathsheba COGGIN; m/2 Mrs. Hannah (GARDNER) BANCROFT.

THOMAS2, baptised 14 Jul 1644; m Mary PHELPS.

SARAH2, baptised 19 Jul 1646; m Windsor 26 Nov 1663 Timothy HALE, b about 1642, d Suffield CT 26 Jul 1689, probably son of John and Dorothy (ROYLE) HEALD of Concord and Springfield MA. John HEALD came from Berwick-on-Tweed, Cheshire Eng to Concord MA. It is also possible that Timothy was son of Thomas and Jane (LORD) HALE of Hartford. Timothy and Sarah lived at Windsor and Suffield. [~ Barbour Index; Hale,House;Corresp:Angela Cosby ~]

Children of Sarah and Timothy: i Sarah HALE3, b 9 Apr or Aug 1665; m John RISING, b Salem MA 1660, son James and Elizabeth (HINSDALE) RISING; r Suffield. They had 9 children. A son of Sarah and John, John RISING, was taken as a child from Deerfield MA during the Deerfield Massacre in 1704, and brought to Canada. He married another English captive there in 1715, and they had a large family that married into the French community there.

ii Timothy HALE3, b 12 Dec 1667; m Hannah BARBER, daughter of John Jr and Joanna (MILLER) BARBER of Springfield. This Springfield John BARBER family was not related to the Windsor Barbers. iii John HALE3, b 24 Aug 1670; d Windsor 1708/9. iv Thomas HALE3, b 26 Aug 1672; m/1 Experience BURT; m/2 Mrs Abigail (WARNER) FERRY; r Springfield (Longmeadow). v Samuel HALE3, b 3 Jan 1673/4; d Suffield 1748; unmarried. vi Daughter3, b 28 Nov 1675; died young. vii Josias HALE3, b 22 Sep 1678; m/1 1705 Sarah HARMON; m/2 1713 Hannah (SEYMOUR) POMEROY; r Suffield. viii Hannah HALE3, b 14 Sep 1680; m John REMINGTON; r Suffield. iv SAMUEL (our line), baptised 1 Oct 1648; m/1 Mary COGGIN; m/2 Ruth DRAKE.

v MARY2 (Mercy), baptised 12 Oct 1651; d Suffield CT 29 Mar 1725; m/1 Windsor (“both of Windsor”) 8 Jul 1669 John GILLETT, b Windsor 5 Oct 1644, d there 1682, son of Jonathan and Mary (DOLBERE) GILLETT, the Emigrant. Mary m/2 14 Jun 1683 Capt. George NORTON of Suffield, baptised Salem MA 28 Mar 1641, d 15 Nov 1696, son of

George and Mary (MACHIAS) NORTON; (George was first married to Sarah ‑‑‑, who d in 1682). After her parents' death when she was 9 years old, Mercy was placed by the court (4 Feb 1662/3) in the home of Walter FYLER until age 18, unless she were married sooner (which she was). [~ Corresp:Betty Simonson; IGI:CT; CT Hist Soc:LBBarbour Manuscripts; CT Hist Soc:Fellows Gen; CT Hist Soc:Norton Manujscript; Barbour Index; Stiles:Windsor; Windsor Hist.Soc:DFAW ~]

Children of Mary and John, born at Windsor: i Thomas GILLETT3, b 7 Jan 1671/2; died before 1676. ii John GILLETT3, b 6 Aug 1673; d 4 Jul 1699; unmarried. iii Thomas GILLETT3, b 18 Jul 1676; d Suffield 11 Jun 1708; m/1 1700 Martha MILLS; m/2 1704 Hannah CLARK (d 1798). iv Samuel GILLETT3, b 16 Feb 1677/78; d Suffield 1739; m Rebecca BANCROFT. v Benjamin (or Nathaniel) GILLETT3, b 3 Oct 1680; m Elizabeth AUSTIN; r Suffield. vi Mercy GILLETT3, b 31 Jan 1683/4; d Suffield 1756; m Jacob ADAMS Jr. Children of Mary and George NORTON: vii Mary NORTON3, b 18 Jan 1684/5; m Jared HUXLEY. viii Abigail NORTON3, b 14 Dec 1686; d 21 Oct 1705. ix Freegrace NORTON3, b 1 Jan 1688/9; m Sarah MARTIN; r Suffield. x Johanna NORTON3, b 17 Mar 1692/3; m Abraham ADAMS. xi Elizabeth NORTON3, b 31 Aug 1695; d 1 Aug 1697 (?). xii Elizabeth NORTON3, b 19 Mar 1696/7. She was born 4 months after her father died. 5 JOSIAH2, baptised 15 Feb 1653/4; m/1 Abigail LOOMIS; m/2 Sarah (PORTER) DRAKE.

-------------------- 1635, "Christian" -------------------- (f/g) Thomas Barber Birth: Dec., 1612 Boston, England Death: Sep. 11, 1662 Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA

Baptized at Stamford, Lincolnshire, 25 Dec 1612, son of John & Elizabeth (Lumley) Barber. Carpenter from St. Mildred Breadstreet, London, who came to Massachusetts Bay in 1635 on the "Christian," & settled in Windsor CT. Died at Windsor 11 Sep 1662. Married at Windsor, 7 Oct 1640, Jane ____. She died at Windsor on 10 Sep 1662 as "[t]he wife of Thomas Bar Ber." In the inventory of Thomas Barber, taken 20 Oct 1662, his wives apparrel deceased was valued at [pounds]15. Source: Anderson's Great Migration Study Project

Family links:

Parents: John Barber (1580 - 1620) Elizabeth Lumley Barber (1588 - 1632) Spouse: Jane Barber (1620 - 1662) Children: Thomas Barber (1644 - 1713)* Mercy Barber Norton (1651 - 1725)* Josiah Barber (1653 - 1733) Burial: Palisado Cemetery Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA Plot: Founder's Monument Created by: Linda Mac Record added: Jun 19, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 38520644 -tcd

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Sgt. Thomas Barber, of Windsor's Timeline

1612
December 21, 1612
Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
December 25, 1612
Stamford, Lincolnshire , England
1640
October 7, 1640
Age 27
Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
1642
1642
Age 29
Windsor, Connecticut Colony
1646
July 19, 1646
Age 33
Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
1647
1647
Age 34
Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
1648
1648
Age 35
Windsor, (Present Hartford County), Connecticut Colony
1651
October 12, 1651
Age 38
Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Colony
1653
February 15, 1653
Age 40
Windsor, Hartford County, Connecticut Colony, (Present USA)
1655
1655
Age 42
Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut