Shlomo Dov Fritz Goitein (1900 - 1985)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: Burgkunstadt, Bavaria, Germany
Death: Died in Princeton, NJ, USA
Occupation: orientalist
Managed by: György Ujlaki, Jr.
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About Shlomo Dov Fritz Goitein

Shlomo Dov Goitein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Shlomo Dov Goitein (April 3, 1900 — February 6, 1985) was a German-Jewish ethnographer, historian and Arabist known for his research on Jewish life in the Islamic Middle Ages.

Contents 1 Biography 2 Academic career 3 Awards 4 Agnon correspondence 5 Published works 6 Bibliography 7 References


Biography Shelomo Dov (Fritz) Goitein was born in the town of Burgkunstadt in Upper Franconia, Germany; his father, Dr. Eduard Goitein, was born in Hungary to a long line of rabbis. The name Goitein points probably to Kojetín in Moravia as the city of origin of the family. He was brought up with both secular and talmudic education. In 1914 his father died and the family moved to Frankfurt am Main, where he finished high school and university.

During 1918-1923 he studied Arabic and Islam at the University of Frankfurt while continuing his talmudic study with a private teacher. In 1923 he sailed together with Gershom Scholem to Palestine.[1] He lived four years in Haifa until he was invited to lecture at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which had been inaugurated two years earlier. In Jerusalem, he married Theresa Gottlieb (1900–1987), a eurythmics teacher who composed songs and plays for children. They had three children, Ayala, Ofra, and Elon.

In 1957 he moved to the United States where more funding was available for his research.[citation needed] He settled in Philadelphia and worked at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He died on February 6, 1985, the day his last volume was sent to the publisher.

Academic career In 1918-1923, Goitein attended the universities of Frankfurt and Berlin and studied Islamic history under Joseph Horowitz. His Ph.D. thesis was "On prayer in Islam." He also pursued Jewish studies, and was a leader in the Zionist Youth Movement. In 1923 he immigrated to Palestine, where he taught Bible and Hebrew language at the Reali School in Haifa. In 1927 he wrote a play called Pulcellina about the blood libel killings in Blois in 1171. In 1928, he was appointed Professor of Islamic History and Islamic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[2] He was founder of the School of Asian and African studies and of the Israel Oriental Society. In 1928, he began his research of the language, culture and history of the Jews of Yemen. In 1949, did research in Aden, questioning the Jews who gathered there from all parts of Yemen before being flown to Israel. In 1938-1948, he served as Senior Education Officer in Mandatory Palestine, responsible for Jewish and Arab Schools, and published books on methods of teaching the Bible and Hebrew. From 1948, he began his life's work on the Cairo Geniza documents. An especially rich Geniza with a large volume of correspondence was discovered in Old Cairo containing thousands of documents dating from the 9th to the 13th centuries. Since Jews began every letter or document with the words "With the help of God," the papers reflected all aspects of everyday life in the countries of North Africa and bordering the Mediterranean. The documents included many letters from Jewish traders en route from Tunisia and Egypt to Yemen and ultimately to India. The papers were mostly written in Arabic spelled in the Hebrew alphabet. After deciphering the documents Goitein vividly reconstructed many aspects of Jewish life in the Middle Ages in A Mediterranean Society.[3]. Although the documents were written by Jews, they reflect the surrounding Moslem and Christian environments not only in countries bordering the Mediterranean but all the way to India. This has thrown new light on the whole study of the Middle Ages.

Awards Goitein was awarded honorary degrees from many universities. He received research awards from Guggenheim (1965), Harvey (1980), and the MacArthur lifetime fellowship (1983).

Agnon correspondence Goitein's lengthy correspondence with the Nobel-prize winning author S.Y. Agnon was published by his daughter, Ayala Gordon, in 2008.[4][5] Agnon's wife, Esther, had studied Arabic privately with Goitein while she was a student at the University of Frankfurt. When Goitein moved to Jerusalem, he and Agnon became close friends. Most of the letters are from the mid-1950s onwards, after Goitein left Israel, a move of which Agnon was highly critical.[4][5]

Published works A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. I: Economic Foundations, University of California Press (September 1, 2000), ISBN 0-520-22158-3 A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. II: The Community, 1967 A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. III: The Family, ISBN 0-520-22160-5 A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. IV: Daily Life, ISBN 0-520-22161-3 A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. V: The Individual, ISBN 0-520-22162-1 A Mediterranean Society: The Jewish Communities of the Arab World as Portrayed in the Documents of the Cairo Geniza, Vol. VI: Cumulative Indices, ISBN 0-520-22164-8 The Land of Sheba: Tales of the Jews of Yemen, 1947 Religion in a Religious Age, June 1996 Jews and Arabs: Their Contact Through the Ages, 1955 Letters of Medieval Jewish Traders Jews and Arabs: A Concise History of Their Social and Cultural Relations India Traders of the Middle Ages: Documents From the Cairo Geniza (ISBN 9789004154728), 2008 (also known as "India Book") [edit] Bibliography Two editions of his bibliographies are available: 1. Attal, Robert. A Bibliography of the writings of Prof. Shelomo Dov Goitein, Israel Oriental society and the Institute of Asian and African Studies, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem ,1975. It includes among other articles an introduction by Richard Ettinghausen, as well as Goiteins own article:"The Life Story of a Scholar", 547 publications are mentioned. 2. Attal, Robert. A Bibliography of the writings of Prof. Shelomo Dov Goitein, Ben Zvi Institute Jerusalem 2000, an expanded edition containing 737 titles, as well as general Index and Index of Reviews. 3. Udovitch, A.L., Rosenthal, F. and Yerushalmi, Y.H. Shelomo Dov Goitein 1900-1985 Memmorial comments, The Institute of Advanced Study Princeton, 1985

[edit] References ^ http://www.dayan.org/mel/cohen.htm ^ http://www.princeton.edu/~geniza/goitein.html ^ http://www.dayan.org/mel/cohen.htm ^ a b Gentlemen and scholars, By Dan Laor, 14.01.09 ^ a b Gentlemen and scholars Dan Laor, Haaretz, Books, January 2009, p. 16

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelomo_Dov_Goitein"

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Shlomo Dov Goitein's Timeline

1900
April 3, 1900
Burgkunstadt, Bavaria, Germany
1985
January 6, 1985
Age 84
Princeton, NJ, USA