Shri Rama DASARATHA

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Shri Rama DASARATHA

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
Death: Died in Basti, Uttar Pradesh, India
Immediate Family:

Son of DASARATHA AJA and KAUSHALYA DASARATHA
Husband of SEETHA (JANAKI) SHRI RAMA
Father of KUSHA KING OF KUSHAVATI ON THE VINDHYAS SHRI RAMA and LAVA KING OF SHARAVATI SHRI RAMA
Brother of SANTA RISHYSRINGA
Half brother of BHARATHA DASARATHA; LAXMANA DASARATA and SATRUGANA DASARATA

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About Shri Rama DASARATHA

Born BCE 1/10/5114

RAMA, RAMACHANDRA. [Source: Dowson's Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology]Eldest son of Dasaratha, a king of the Solar race, reigning at Ayodhya. This Rama is the seventh incarnation (Avatar) of the god Vishnu, and made his appearance in the world at the end of the Treta or second age. His story is briefly told in the Vana Parva of theMahabharata, but it is given in full length as the grand subject of the Ramayana. King Dasaratha was childless, and performed the Aswamedha sacrifice with scrupulous care, in the hopes of obtaining offspring. His devotion was accepted by the gods, and he received the promise of four sons. At this time the gods were in great terror and alarm at the deeds and menaces of Ravana, the Rakshasa king of Lanka, who had obtained extraordinary power, in virtue of severe penances and austere devotion to Brahma. In their terror the gods appealed to Vishnu for deliverance, and he resolved to become manifest in the world with Dasaratha as his human father. Dasaratha was performing a sacrifice when Vishnu appeared to him as a glorious being from out of the sacrificial fire, and gave to him a pot of nectar for his wives to drink.Dasaratha gave half of the nectar to Kausalya, who brought forth Rama with a half of the divine essence, a quarter to Kaikeyi, whose son Bharata was endowed with a quarter of the deity, and the fourth part toSumitra, who brought forth two sons, Lakshmana and Satrughna, each having an eighth part of the divine essence. The brothers were all attached to each other, but Lakshmana was more especially devoted to Rama and Satrughna to Bharata. [...] The four brothers grew up together at Ayodhya, but while they were yet striplings, the sage Vishvamitra sought the aid of Rama to protect him from the Rakshasas. Dasaratha, though very unwilling, was constrained to consent to the sage's request. Rama and Lakshmana then went to the hermitage of Vishvamitra, and there Rama killed the female demon Taraka, but it required a good deal of persuasion from the sage before he was induced to kill a female. Vishvamitra afterwards took Rama and his brothers to Mithila to the court of Janaka king ofVideha. This king had a lovely daughter name Sita, whom he offered in marriage to any one who could bend the wonderful bow which had once belonged to Siva. Rama not only bent the bow but broke it, and thus won the hand of the princess, who became a most virtuous and devoted wife. Rama's three brothers also were married to a sister and two cousins ofSita. This breaking of the bow of Siva brought about a very curious incident, which is probably an interpolation of a later date, introduced for sectarian purpose. Parasurama, the sixth incarnation of Vishnu, the Brahman exterminator of the Kshatriyas, was still living upon earth. He was a follower of Siva, and was offended at the breaking of that deity's bow. Notwithstanding that he challenged Rama to a trial of strength and was discomfited, but Rama spared his life because he was a Brahman. Preparations were made at Ayodhya for the inauguration of Rama as successor to the throne. Kaikeyi, the second wife of Dasaratha, and mother of Bharata, was her husband's favourite. She was kind to Rama in childhood and youth, but she had a spiteful humpbacked female slave named Manthara. This woman worked upon the maternal affection of her mistress until she aroused a strong feeling of jealousy against Rama. Kaikeyi had a quarrel and a long struggle with her husband, but he at length consented to install Bharata and to send Rama into exile for fourteen years. Rama departed with his wife Sita and his brother Lakshmana, and traveling southwards, he took up his abode at Chitrakuta, in the Dandaka forest, between the Yamuna and Godavari. Soon after the departure of Rama, his father Dasaratha died, and Bharata was called upon to ascend the throne. He declined, and set out for the forest with an army to bring Rama back. When the brothers met there was a long contention. Rama refused to return until the term of his father's sentence was completed, and Bharata declined to ascend the throne. At length it was arranged that Bharata should return and act as his brother's viceregent. As a sign of Rama's supremacy Bharata carried back with him a pair of Rama's shoes, and these were always brought out ceremoniously when business had to be transacted. Rama passed ten years of his banishment moving from one hermitage to another, and went at length to the hermitage of the sage Agastya, near the Vindhya mountains. This holy man recommended Rama to take up his abode at Panchavati, on the river Godavari, and the party accordingly proceeded thither. This district was infested with Rakshasas, and one of them named Surpanakha, a sister of Ravana, saw Rama and fell in love with him. He repelled her advances, and in her jealousy she attackedSita. This so enraged Lakshmana that he cut off hers and nose. She brought her brothers Khara andDushana with an army of Rakshasas to avenge her wrongs, but they were all destroyed. Smarting under her mutilation and with spretae injuria formae, she repaired to her brother Ravana in Lanka, and inspired him by her description with a fierce passion for Sita. Ravana proceeded to Rama's residence in an aerial car, and his accomplice Marichahaving lured Rama from home, Ravana assumed the form of a religious mendicant and lulled Sita's apprehensions until he found an opportunity to declare himself and carry her off by force to Lanka. Rama's despair and rage at the loss of his faithful wife were terrible. He and Lakshmanawent in pursuit and tracked the ravisher. On their way they killed Kabandha, a headless monster, whose disembodied spirit counseled Rama to seek the aid of Sugriva, king of the monkeys. The two brothers accordingly went on their way to Sugriva, and after overcoming some obstacles and assisting Sugriva to recover Kishkindhya, his capital, from his usurping brother Vali (Bali), they entered into a firm alliance with him. Through this connection Rama got the appellations of Kapiprabhu and Kapiratha. He received not only the support of all the forces of Sugriva and his allies, but the active aid of Hanuman, son of the wind, minister and general of Sugriva. Hanuman's extraordinary powers of leaping and flying enabled him to do all the work of reconnoitering. By superhuman efforts their armies were transported to Ceylon by "Rama's bridge," and after many fiercely contested battles the city of Lanka was taken, Ravana was killed andSita rescued. The recovery of his wife filled Rama with joy, but he was jealous of her honour, received her coldly, and refused to take her back. She asserted her purity in touching and dignified language, and determined to prove her innocence by the ordeal of fire. She entered the flames in the presences of men and gods, and Agni, god of fire, led her forth and placed her in Rama's arms unhurt. Rama then returned, taking with him his chief allies to Ayodhya. Reunited with his three brothers, he was solemnly crowned and began a glorious reign, Lakshmana being associated with him in the government. The sixth section of the Ramayana here concludes; the remainder of the story is told in the Uttarakanda, a subsequent addition. The treatment which Sita received in captivity was better than might have been expected at the hands of a Rakshasa. She had asserted and proved her purity, and Rama believed her; but jealous thoughts would cross the sensitive mind, and when his subjects blamed him for taking back his wife, he resolved, although she was pregnant, to send her to spend the rest of her life at the hermitage ofValmiki. There she was delivered of her twin sons Kusa and Lava, who bore upon their persons the marks of their high paternity. When they were about fifteen years old they wandered accidentally to Ayodhya and were recognized by their father, who acknowledged them, and recalled Sita to attest her innocence. She returned, and in a public assembly declared her purity, and called upon the earth to verify her words. It did so. The ground opened and received "the daughter of the furrow," and Rama lost his beloved and only wife. Unable to endure life without her, he resolved to follow, and the gods favoured his determination. Time appeared to him in the form of an ascetic and told him that he must stay on earth or ascend to heaven and rule over the gods. Lakshmana with devoted fraternal affection endeavoured to save his brother from what he deemed the baleful visit of Time. He incurred a sentence of death for his interference, and was conveyed bodily to Indra's heaven. Rama with great state and ceremony went to the river Sarayu, and walking into the water was hailed by Brahma's voice of welcome from heaven, and entered "into the glory ofVishnu." The conclusion of the story as told in the version of the Ramayana used by Mr. Wheeler differs materially. It represents that Sita remained in exile until her sons were fifteen or sixteen years of age. Rama had resolved upon performing the Aswamedha sacrifice; the horse was turned loose, and Satrughna followed it with an army. Kusa and Lava took the horse and defeated and wounded Satrughna. Rama then sent Lakshmana to recover the horse, but he was defeated and left for dead. Next Bharata was sent with Hanuman, but they were also defeated. Rama then sent out himself to repair his reverses. When the father and sons came into each other's presence, nature spoke out, and Rama acknowledged his sons. Sita also, after receiving an admonition from Valmiki, agreed to forgive her husband. They returned to Ayodhya. Rama performed theAswamedha, and they passed the remainder of their lives in peace and joy.

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Shri Rama DASARATHA's Timeline

-5114
January 10, -5114
Age 74
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

The Ramayana has seven long sections called kandas. The first section, the Bala-Kanda (pages 2-19), tells of Prince Rama's birth, his youthful adventures, and his marriage to the Princess Sita. Bala refers to "childhood" or "early" events
Date of Birth of Lord Ram 10 TH JANUARY 5114 BC

Aadikavi Valmiki in 1/18/8-10 of Ramayan has given details that Shri Ram was born on 9th tithi of Chaitra month during day time when the position of different planets vis-à-vis zodiac constellations and nakshatras (visible stars) was as under:
1. Sun in Aries 2. Saturn in Libra
3. Jupiter in Cancer 4. Venus in Pisces
5. Mars in Capricorn 6. Lunar month of Chaitra
7. Ninth day after Amavasya 8. Lagna as Cancer
9. Moon near the star Punar vasu (Pollux) in Gemini Constellation.
Moon & Jupiter were shining together in Cancer.

This data was entered into the ‘Planetarium Gold’ software, the results indicated that this was exactly the location of planets/stars vis-à-vis zodiac constellations on the 10th of January noon time in the year 5114 BC if viewed from latitude/longitude of Ayodhya (25°N 81°E). Thus Shri Ram was born on 10th January in 5114 BC.

By making use of software to convert solar calendar into lunar calendar, it was found that this date also happened to be the 9th day of Shukla Paksha in ‘Chaitra’ month and the time was around 12 to 1 noontime. This is exactly the time and date when Ramnavmi is celebrated all over India till date .

Ramayan – lesson 6 BALA KANDA
Shivadhanusha
The wedding of sita
The humbling of Parshurama
Shivadhanusha
Vishwamitra travelled with Rama and Lakshmana towards the northeast from Sage Gauthama ashram and reached Mithila. Mithila was the capital of the king of Videha. Seeradhwaja Janaka Maharaja was the ruler. He was the son of Hraswaroma Janaka. The founder of his dynasty had three names – Videha, Mithi and Janaka. And so every king of the kingdom used to be called Janaka, the kingdom was called Videha and the capital was called Mithila. Janaka was a rajarshi – a king-sage. His wife was Sunayane. Janaka had two daughters – Seetha and Urmila. Janaka younger brother Kushadhwaja, ruled over Sankasha Nagara, on the banks of the Ikshumathi.
At the time Vishwamitra, Rama and Lakshmana arrived in Mithila, King Janaka was engaged in a great sacrifice. Hundreds thronged Mithila because of the sacrifice. Rishis, munis and other religious leaders were in the city. Vishwamitra chose a place near a water source but far from the crowds and camped there.
As soon as Janaka learnt that Sage Vishwamitra was in Mithila he went to his camp with the royal priest Shatananda. He paid his respects and welcomed the sage. After the exchange of courtesies Janaka pointed to Rama and Lakshmana and said, Great Sage, who are these two youths? They look like Ashwinis – the twin gods. They are tall and well-built. Their eyes sparkle. Their faces are attractive and look energetic. Who are these young men, carrying bows and arrows, and moving about like lion cubs?
Vishwamitra told him about Rama and Lakshmana. He narrated how they had killed Tataki and how they had saved his sacrifice from the menace of Maricha and Subahu. He also narrated how Rama had set Ahalya free from the curse and how Gauthama and Ahalya had been reunited.
The royal priest Shatananda was in raptures when he heard what Vishwamitra said. He was the son of Gauthama and Ahalya. He was immensely happy that his mother had been set free from the curse. Again and again he thanked Rama. He made obeisance to Vishwamitra who had once again brought together his parents through, Rama.
Then Shatananda said to Rama, Rama, you redeemed my mother from the curse. Because of you my parents were reunited. I shall ever be in your debt. You are the most virtuous of men. Rama, you are really fortunate that you have a mentor like Vishwamitra. Do not imagine that he is a rishi just like any other. Human endeavour can achieve what seems impossible – and this great sage Vishwamitra is a fine example.
Shatananda then narrated to Rama and Lakshmana the story of Vishwamitra – how the king Kaushika received Sage Vashista hospitality and then coveted the cow of the ashram; how, when Vashista declined the king attempted to seize the cow by force but was thwarted; how by the sheer force of his tapas he first earned the title of rajarshi and then that of a rishi; how he bestowed on Thrishanku a realm equal to heaven there to dwell in his body; how, although once he surrendered to Menaka loveliness and his tapas was thwarted he acquired the strength of will which could spurn even the loveliness of Rambha; how, he gained the status of a maharshi and finally won recognition as Brahmarshi even from Vashishta.
Rama and Lakshmana knew that Vishwamitra was a great sage. But only now that they understood the measure of his greatness. They realized that it was their immense good fortune that had him for their Guru; they eulogized the sage again and again and made obeisance to him. Janaka led all of them to his palace.
Vishwamitra said to Janaka, Maharaja, these princes are eager to see the Shivadhanus which is in your possession. Show it to them and tell them the story of that mighty bow. Janaka said, Princes, the Shivadhanus was made by Vishwakarma. The gods gave it to Shiva at the time of killing of Tripurasura. It is called Sunabha. When Daksha performed a sacrifice he humiliated both his daughter Dakshayini and her husband Shiva. The enraged Shiva contemplated annihilating the entire universe with this bow. The gods then supplicated to him; he overcame his wrath and returned the bow to the gods. One of our ancestors, Devaratha, performed a sacrifice; the gods were pleased and bestowed the bow on our dynasty. Since then it has been in our possession. So strong is the bow that, so far, no one has been able to bend and string it.
Princes, for a long time I had no children. I decided to perform a sacrifice in order to have children. Before the sacrifice, I was ploughing, as is customary, with a plough. I then found a girl child. The word Seetha means the mark made by a plough. Because I found her when I was ploughing I called her Seetha. She has grown up and has now come of age. She is exquisitely lovely, and as virtuous as she is beautiful. People say she is like a goddess.
It is my desire that only a strong and valiant man should marry Seetha. And so I have set a challenge.: Any one who wishes to marry Seetha should bend and string the Shivadhanus. But so far no one has succeeded. Any number of princes have made the attempt, but they have not even been able to lift the bow. Gods, Rakshas and mighty monarchs have sought to bend the bow, but in vain. Gandharvas, Kinnaras and Yakshas have shared the same fate. This is such a formidable bow.Rama, you look like a youth of prowess. I shall have the bow brought here. Make an attempt.String the Shivadhanus and marry Seeta; that will make me immensely happy.
Sri Rama breaks Shiva Dhanush
The king servants brought the bow. It had been placed in a huge eight wheeled carriage. It needed the effort of hundreds of servants to draw it. Janaka pointed to the bow and said to Vishwamitra,Great Sage, show this bow to the princes. It is my desire that at least Rama, the son of Dasharatha, should succeed in the test. Vishwamitra said to Rama, Look at this bow, my child.Rama opened the lid and had a good look. He, too, wished to lift and string it. He told the sage so and Vishwamitra acceded.
7ram 7
Rama went up to the box and put his hands inside. Effortlessly he lifted the bow which gods and daithyas had not been able to lift. the spectators were tongue-tied in wonder. Gods assembled in the sky to witness the stunning feat of Rama. He raised the bow and bent in order to string it. But the bow was not equal to his strength and broke in to two, with an ear-shattering noise like that of lightning. All who were present, save Rama, Lakshmana, Vishwamitra, Janaka and Shatananda swooned for a while. When they recovered, they applauded Rama prowess in raptures and jumped and danced in joy.
King Janaka joy knew no bounds. Rama prowess surpassed his imagination. He belonged to the Ikshwaku dynasty. He was handsome beyond the reach of words, and was a treasure-house of virtues. What more could Janaka desire? He invited Rama to marry Seetha. He summoned his principal ministers and said to them, Go at once to Ayodhya. Report to king Dasharatha all that has happened here. Request him, on my behalf, to come to Mithila and receive Seetha as his daughter-in-law. He said to Sage Vishwamitra, Revered Sage, be pleased to stay here and guide us in the celebrations. And he ordered his ministers, Make arrangements for the marriage of Rama and Seetha; make it an event of unprecedented grandeur.
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The Wedding of Sita
The news reached Dasharatha. He was in ecstasies when he heard about the unique feat his son had performed. He considered himself fortunate in this marriage alliance with the king-sage Janaka. He set out for Mithila with his retinue.
Janaka and his priest and ministers as well as the citizens greeted Dasharatha and his retinue at the main entrance of Mithila and gave them a splendid welcome. King Janaka and King Dasharatha embraced and displayed their affection and friendship. Janaka extended the finest hospitality to all of them.
Vashishta, Dasharatha priest and Shathananda, Janaka priest, sat together for consultations.Dasharatha, Janaka and Kushadhwaja – Janaka younger brother and the king of Sankashanagara – also sat with them. At their request, Vishwamitra also joined them. They fixed an auspicious day for the marriage of Rama and Seetha. Janaka made a request to Dasharatha, Accept my other daughter Urmila as Lakshmana bride. Dasharatha gladly consented. Janaka younger brother Kushadhwaja had two daughters- Mandavi and Shrutakeerti. Like Seeta and Urmila, they,too, were beautiful and endowed with many virtues. Vishwamitra suggested that they should marry Bharata and Shatrughna, adding that it would be an excellent alliance. Dasharatha consented and Kushadhwaja was overjoyed.
The wedding preparations proceeded briskly. The entire city wore a festive and joyous look. Canopies and festoons of green leaves appeared everywhere. Banners fluttered from tall poles. The ground before every house was swept and cleaned with water and decorated with designs drawn with coloured powders. Musical instruments played tunes celebrating an auspicious occasion, in every house, and filled all minds and hearts with joy.
The marriage rites were to be performed in a vast sacrificial hall. It could accommodate any number of guests, no matter how many thousands thronged the venue. The marriage mantap was at a higher level. The hall glowed like the royal court of Lord Indra.
The day of the marriage dawned. Uttaraphalguni was the presiding star of the day. The auspicious rites of the morning were completed. Led by his priests, Dasharatha arrived at the marriage hall with Rama, Lakshamana, Bharata and Shatrughna. Rama and his brothers were wearing the kankanas – auspicious strings worn at the time of marriage. They were wearing magnificent jewels and were splendidly dressed, and shone like gods. The milling crowds gazed upon the princes in great joy. In particular, Rama lovely face, his strong build, his enthralling smile and his modesty that dwelt in his visage held them spellbound.
Seeta and Urmila, wearing dresses signalling an auspicious occasion, shone brightly in the marriage pandal. By their side Mandavi and Shruthakeerthi, the daughters of Kushadhwaja, sparkled in similar dresses. The loveliness of their faces and the effulgence – unusual to this world- bestowed a new luster on the entire hall.
Rama, Lakshmana, Bharata and Shatrughna came up to the platform. Janaka requested Vashishta to guide the marriage rituals. Vashista,Vishwamitra and Shatananda together offered worship to the pandal, Ritualistically they prepared the sacrificial pit. They decorated it with flowers. They placed Kalasa – vessels carrying holy waters, conches, bells, sandalwood and other auspicious articles on the platform. As they recited the Vedas they installed holy fire in the sacrificial pit. They poured sacred ghee into the fire.
Bejewelled, Seeta sparkled like a goddess; Janaka guided her to Rama and said, Sri Rama, accept my
daughter Seetha in marriage. She will be your wife and assist you in the practice of Dharma. May good fortune brighten your lives. He then placed Seetha hand in Sri Rama hand, and gave her away in marriage with the prescribed rites. The gods who were watching in the skies rejoiced. Celestial kettledrums sounded and there was a shower of flowers. Joy was writ large on every face.
Then Janaka celebrated the Panigrahana of Lakshmana and Urmila. Panigrahana means taking the bride hand with the Fire God for witness. Kushadhwaja gave his daughter Mandavi to Bharata and Shruthakeerthi to Shathrughna in marriage.
The princes went round the sacred fire, performedSapthapadi – taking seven steps, holding the hands of their brides. They made obeisance to the rishis and munis who had assembled. They paid their respects to their parents and all other elders present there. Once again the heavenly kettledrums sounded. Celestial nymphs danced, gandharvas sang melodiously. The people of Mithila and the relatives, friends and retinue of Dasharatha forgot themselves in their raptures.
The celebrations concluded; Rama, Lakshmana, Bharata and Shathrughna were now married. They returned to the palace in great joy.
The day after the marriage Vishwamitra said to Rama,My child, my mission is accomplished. I shall now go to the banks of Kaushiki at the foot of Himalayas for the pursuits that lie before me. You are yet to accomplish mighty feats. Do not lose heart, no matter what obstacles block your way and whatever trials and tribulations you may encounter. Let the protection of Dharma be your goal. Let the chastisement of the wicked and the protection of the virtuous be your objective. Rama replied with all humility, Holy sage, your advice will be ever green in my memory. Every one bowed respectfully to Vishwamitra. They followed him to the outskirts of Mithila and then took leave of him.
King Dasharatha then made preparations to return to Ayodhya. Janaka presented rich gifts and honourd every one suitably. Dasharatha set out for Ayodhya with his sons, daughters-in-law and his retinue.
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The humbling of Parshurama
As Dasharatha and his party continued their journey unfavourable omens appeared. Dasharatha was perturbed. He was apprehensive, not knowing what misfortune would befall them. He said to Vashishta, Guruji, these bad omens upset me. Vashishta said, Fear not. It is certain that we shall encounter some grave danger, but it will have a fortunate conclusion. Therefore do not be troubled.
Just then a terrible storm burst on them. The earth seemed to tremble. Even gigantic trees were felled. All of a sudden dark clouds hid the sun. They were all blinded. A person emerged from the enveloping darkness. He was walking fast and was awesome to behold. His hair was matted; he carried an axe in his right hand. A bow rested on his left shoulder. And he seemed to be hastening towards Dasharatha party in flaming wrath.
The man who thus charged the atmosphere with fear was named Rama. He belonged to the Brighu family. He was the son of a great sage Jamadagni. Jamadagni was the son of Vishwamitra sister, Sathyavathi. This son of Jamadagni, who appeared before Dasharatha party always carried a parashu – an axe – in his hand and therefore came to be known as Parashurama.
Parashurama was a man of rare valour and a fiercetapaswi. His feet were endowed with such rare power that he could traverse any distance in the twinkling of an eye. He never transgressed the instruction of an elder. Once Jamadagni was furious with his wife who had done something unworthy.He called Parashurama and said, Cut off the head of your mother. Without reflecting for a moment, Parashurama obeyed his father. Jamadagni said,I am pleased with your obedience. Seek what boon you will. Parashurama answered, Father, may my mother whom I killed come back to life.And may no trace of this bitter event linger in her memory. Jamadagni said,So be it. Renuka came back to life.
The earth was over crowded with kshatriyas in those days. They formed small groups and were always fighting with one another. They were arrogant and ill treated the people. Their harassment made the people wretched. Once when Jamadagni was engaged in tapas, a king called Karthaviryarjuna came their hunting. He killed Jamadgni. When Parashurama learnt the news he was in volcanic rage. He took a vow: The arrogance of these kshathriyas knows no limits. I am not Parashurama if I do not subdue them. With his chosen weapon, the axe, he set forth to exterminate the Kshatriyas. Twenty one times he went round the earth, and made mincemeat of the kshatriyas he encountered. Many kings fled in fear. So the entire earth was his. Parashurama then performed a sacrifice; and the entire earth he gifted away to Sage Kashyapa who had presided over the sacrifice. He then retired to Mount Mahendra and engaged in tapas.
When Dasharatha himself a kashtriya – saw this quick tempered Parashurama he was in a panic. Is
Parashurama still enraged with the kshatriyas? What will now be the fate of my sons? he asked himself, severely shaken. But he managed to greet the sage Parashurama with a smile, make obeisance and make respectful enquiries.
Parashurama did not even through a glance at Dasharatha. He said to Rama, Rama, I have heard of your prowess. It seems you broke the Shivadhanus in Janaka court. That is truly a great feat. Rama, look at this Vishnudhanus I have. Both this bow and the Shivadhanus which you broke were made by Vishwakarma. He gave one of these to Shiva and so it came to be known as Shivadhanus and the other which he gave to Vishnu came to be known as Vishnudhanus. Vishnu gave his bow to my grandfather Richika. Since then it has been in the keeping of my family. It was Shivadhanus which you broke. I have the Vishnudhanus here with me. If you are really a man of great prowess fix an arrow to this Vishnudhanus. I shall then concede that you are powerful.
Rama heard what Parashurama said. The arrogance, the provocative tone, the challenge – all enraged him. But yet he thought it would be disrespectful to exhibit his anger before his father. So he spoke in a gentle tone and expressed his feelings in these words: Parashurama, I, too, have heard of your prowess. May be you have overcome some kings. But that does not justify your assuming that all the kshatriyas are weak, and provoking them in this fashion. Parashurama, do not imagine that I am a weakling. Do you wish to witness my prowess? Look then. At once he seized the Vishnudhanus from Parashurama hand and as if it was just a game, he fixed an arrow.
He then aimed the arrow at Parashurama. He said,Watch, Parashurama, I have fixed an arrow. You are the grand son of the sister of my Guru, Vishwamitra. I cannot kill anyone who is related to my Guru. But the arrow I shoot cannot be in vain. Tell me, Shall I destroy all thepunya – spiritual merit – you have earned, or shall I take away your power of travelling like lightening?
Parashurama was now subdued. His arrogance withered. He turned to Rama and said, Rama, I am now cured of my arrogance. That you are the great master of bow is beyond question. Dasharathi, may good fortune follow in your footsteps. I cannot surrender my power of travelling to your arrow. The reason is that, when, long ago, I gifted this land to sage Kashyapa, I had vowed that I would not spend a night in the territory I had given away. So, in a moment, I have to be back in the Mahendra region, where I perform tapas. So take away the power of mytapas with your arrow, if you will. Accordingly, Rama shot the arrow. Parashurama lost the power of his tapas. At once Parashurama, with the special endowment of his feet, hastened towards Mount Mahendra.
It was as if pitch darkness had lifted and light had returned. They who had shrunk in fear at the approach of Parashurama now shouted in joy. Dasharatha drew Rama to him and embraced him. Every one was happy. They continued their journey with a carefree mind.
There was glad excitement everywhere in Ayodhya. The entire population of the city rejoiced to hear that Dasharatha was returning to Ayodhya with his sons and daughters-in-law and prepared to welcome them. They decorated the city with banners and festoons. Arches of welcome appeared everywhere. Flags also began to flutter from tall poles. Songs glorifying Rama valour were composed. Musical instruments of auspiciousness welcomed the party at the main gate of the city.The party was taken to the palace in a huge procession. It was formally welcomed at a grand ceremony. Everyone acclaimed the Rama-Seetha couple as well as the other couples. The people of the city sang and danced and blessed the newly wed couples. And the couples now began a new wife.
Rama and Seeta were a most happily suited pair. They were like a single soul in two bodies. They loved each other deeply. They never forgot any duty enjoined on them by Dharma. They ardently assisted elders in the duties of Dharma. They were all reverence towards their Gurus and elders. They were affectionate towards those younger than they. They acted as they thought. Their conduct reflected their innermost thoughts. They treated one and all as their kith and kin, so magnanimous were they. Their ideal life delighted every heart.

-5114
- -5099
Age 401
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
-5098
-5098
Age 401
-5098
Age 401
Kosala, Angul, Odisha, India

Janaka was the king of Mithila. One day, a female child was found in the field by the king in the deep furrow dug by his plough. Overwhelmed with joy, the king regarded the child as a "miraculous gift of God". The child was named Sita, the Sanskrit word for furrow.[35] Sita grew up to be a girl of unparalleled beauty and charm. When Sita was of marriageable age, the king decided to have aswayamvara which included a contest. The king was in possession of an immensely heavy bow, presented to him by the God Shiva: whoever could wield the bow could marry Sita. The sage Vishwamitra attends the swayamvarawith Rama and Lakshmana. Only Rama wields the bow and breaks it. Marriages are arranged between the sons of Dasharatha and daughters of Janaka. Rama gets married to Sita, Lakshmana to Urmila, Bharata to Mandavi and Shatrughan to Shrutakirti. The weddings are celebrated with great festivity at Mithila and the marriage party returns to Ayodhya.[34]

King Janaka had declared that any man who could lift and string Shiva’s heavy bow might have Sita for his wife. As Sita grew in years and beauty, many suitors tried, but none succeeded in budging the weighty weapon. But when Rama entered the contest, he easily lifted the bow and strung it. So tightly did he set the string that he cracked the bow in two (17). So pleased was Sita by this astonishing sight that she came forward and offered him the garland of marriage (19). On the very same day that they were wed, Sita’s sister married Lakshmana and her two cousins wed Rama’s other brothers, Bharata and Shatraghna.

-5098
Age 401
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

VISWAMITRA ARRIVAL AT AYODYA, AND ASKING HELP OF SHRI RAMA TO KILL DEMONS LIKE TADAKAS.....

VISHWAMITRA GAVE MANY ASTHIRAS (MISSILES) TO SHRI RAMA, EXPLAINING THE EFFECT AND USE OF EACH.

When Rama is 16 years old, the sage Vishwamitra comes to the court of Dasharatha in search of help against demons, who were disturbing sacrificial rites. He chooses Rama, who is followed by Lakshmana, his constant companion throughout the story. Rama and Lakshmana receive instructions and supernatural weapons from Vishwamitra, and proceed to destroy the demons.[34]
When Rama was sixteen, a holy sage named Vishwamitra came to Ayodhya and asked the young prince to go with him to the forest. The forest dwellers needed help to destroy the wild rakshasas who were deliberately disturbing the quiet devotions of the holy hermits. Accompanied by his devoted brother Lakshmana, Rama went with Vishwamitra. No sooner had they entered the forest than they met the accursed rakshasi Tataka. Vishwamitra told Rama to kill her, but Rama hesitated because Tataka was a woman. But, persuaded that her dreadful deeds deserved the most dire punishment, and observing that she was then charging at him in unruly wrath, Rama shot an arrow (9). It pierced her hard heart. She fell down dead. This was Rama’s first victory against the rakshasa raiders. Thereupon, Vishwamitra took Rama aside and, while Lakshmana stood by, taught him the mastery of celestial spells and wondrous weapons (11).

-5098
Age 401
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

1)
KILLING OF RACKSHASI TADAKA---
When Rama was sixteen, a holy sage named Vishwamitra came to Ayodhya and asked the young prince to go with him to the forest. The forest dwellers needed help to destroy the wild rakshasas who were deliberately disturbing the quiet devotions of the holy hermits. Accompanied by his devoted brother Lakshmana, Rama went with Vishwamitra. No sooner had they entered the forest than they met the accursed rakshasi Tataka. Vishwamitra told Rama to kill her, but Rama hesitated because Tataka was a woman. But, persuaded that her dreadful deeds deserved the most dire punishment, and observing that she was then charging at him in unruly wrath, Rama shot an arrow (9). It pierced her hard heart. She fell down dead. This was Rama’s first victory against the rakshasa raiders. Thereupon, Vishwamitra took Rama aside and, while Lakshmana stood by, taught him the mastery of celestial spells and wondrous weapons (11).
2) DRIVING AWAY MARICHA.
The great sage Vishvamitra was living in the area near the forest of Tataka and was doing penance and yajna with his disciples and was tormented by Tataka and her sons. Unable to tolerate the menace any longer, Vishvamitra approached Dasharatha, the King of Ayodhya for help. He requested Dasharatha to send his eldest son, Rama to protect his yajna. Though Dasharatha was initially reluctant to send his 13-year old boy, he finally sent Rama and his younger brother Lakshmana with Vishvamitra on the advice of the royal guru Vashishtha. Vishvamitra trained them in warfare and taught them various mantras.[2][3][4]
When Vishvamitra and the princes were passing through the forest of Tataka, Tataka attacked them. Rama, aided by Lakshamana, slew her with his arrow. Vishvamitra blessed Rama, as the gods rejoiced the end of Tataka. The sage gifted him with divine weapons as a reward. Vishvamitra then began his six-day yajna, with the princes standing in guard.[2][3][4]
While the first five days passed without incidence, on the sixth day the sacrificial fire suddenly falters, indicating trouble. Maricha and his brother Subahu, with a hoard of a rakshasas, appeared from tree tops like black clouds, roaring and making lot of noise. They tried to destroy the yajna fire showering blood and flesh. Rama fired hisManavastra (human missible arrow) from his bow. The arrow stroke Maricha's chest and threw him hundred leagues away in the ocean. In another version, Maricha fled to the ocean just by hearing the sound of Rama's bow. Subahu and the other demons were killed by Rama, using various other weapons. The sacrifice was completed successfully.[1][5][6][7] Under the guidance of Vishvamitra, Rama gets wed to Sita, the adopted daughter of Janaka and the princess of Mithila.

3) AHALYA'S CURSE BROKEN
One day, traveling North, the trio saw a miracle. A beautiful lady saint named Ahalya had been separated from her husband by a curse. She had been condemned to remain invisible and immobile in one place while her husband wandered elsewhere. The curse could only be broken by Rama. As soon as he entered the place where Ahalya stayed unseen, unmoving, the curse was lifted. As Rama and Lakshmana looked on, caught by surprise, Ahalya regained her former shape, and she began to shine with luminous beauty (13). Moments later she was reunited with the sage who was her faithful husband.

-5098
Age 401
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India


Ramayan - Parasurama's Discomfiture
Having thus safely handed back to Dasaratha at Mithila the princes entrusted to him in Ayodhya, and after attending the wedding celebrations, Viswamitra took leave of the two kings and went to Himalaya. In the story of Rama, Viswamitra has no further part. Viswamitra may be said to be the foundation of the grand temple of Rama's story. After Rama's wedding in Mithila, we do not see him again. It should be noted that characters that play a leading role in one canto of Valmiki almost fade out in subsequent cantos. Viswamitra who dominates the Bala Kanda does not appear again. Similarly, Kaikeyi and Guha are prominent only in Ayodhya Kanda. The same thing can be said of Bharata whom we do not come across in the chapters intervening between the Chitrakuta meeting and Rama's return to Ayodhya. The poet hardly brings Bharata before our eyes during the period of Rama's distress. The characters in Valmiki Ramayana (unlike those in the Mahabharata and in ordinary plays and novels) do not present themselves off and on. Critics should bear this general characteristic of Valmiki's epic in mind.
King Dasaratha returned to Ayodhya, accompanied by his retinue. On the way, there were bad omens and anxious Dasaratha asked Vasishtha what they portended. Vasishtha replied that there was no need to be alarmed, for though the birds in the air indicated approaching trouble, the animals on the land promised a happy consummation. As Dasaratha and Vasishtha were thus conversing, there broke out a great storm. Trees were uprooted; the earth quaked and clouds of dust went up and hid the sun and there was an all-enveloping darkness. Everyone was terror-struck. Soon they knew the reason for the strange phenomenon. There stood before them the awe-inspiring figure Parasurama, the sworn enemy of Kshatriyas, with a bow on one shoulder and a battle-axe on the other, and with an arrow shining like lightning in his hand. Terrible in appearance, with his matted locks gathered overhead, he looked like Rudra exulting in the destruction of Tripura. His face emitted flame-like radiance. The son of Sage Jamadagni struck terror among Kshatriyas, many generations of which he had annihilated. Wherever he went he was preceded by storm and earthquake. And the Kshatriya race trembled in fear. The Brahmanas in Dasaratha's retinue said to one another: "Because his father was killed by a king, Parasurama took a vow to destroy the Kshatriya race. We dared to hope that his vengeful wrath had been quenched in the blood of the innumerable kings he has slain. Has he again started his cruel campaign?" However, they honored him with the customary offering of water. After receiving it, Parasurama addressed himself to Rama: "Son of Dasaratha, I have heard of your prowess. I was somewhat surprised to learn that you strung the bow in King Janaka's court and that you drew the string till the bow broke. Here is my bow, equal in all respects to the one that you broke. This is the bow of Vishnu which was entrusted to my father. If you are able to string this bow, you will be worthy of my battle."
Dasaratha was perturbed at this turn of events and he begged that his son Rama should be spared the trial. He said to Parasurama: "You are a Brahmana. We have heard that, satiated with your revenge, you have gone back to tapas as becomes your order, in pursuance of your plighted word to Indra, after giving away the earth you had conquered to Kashyapa. Is it proper that you should break your vow, and seek to injure a prince of tender years who has done you no wrong, and who is dearer to us than life?" Parasurama heard him unmoved without so much as looking at him, and addressed himself solely to Rama, as though the others did not exist: "Viswakarma originally made two exactly similar bows. One of them was given to Rudra and the other to Vishnu. This is the one given to Vishnu. What you are said to have strung and bent to the breaking point was Siva's bow. See if you can, string this bow of Vishnu; and if you do, it will be proof of your skill and strength and I will then honor you by fighting with you." Parasurama spoke in a loud and arrogant tone. To him Rama replied in courteous manner, yet in firm tones: "Son of Jamadagni! You have been vengeful because your father was killed by a king. I do not blame you for that. But you cannot put me down as you have humbled others. Please give me your bow." So saying, he took the bow and arrow from Parasurama. He strung the bow and setting the arrow to it, drew the string. Addressing Parasurama, he said with a smile: "This mighty Vaishnava arrow placed on the string cannot be put back idly. It must destroy something. Tell me, shall it destroy your powers of locomotion, or would you rather that it consumes the fruits of your tapas?" As the son of Dasaratha strung the bow of Vishnu, the glory on Parasurama's face faded, and he stood, no longer the warlike conqueror, but a self-subdued rishi, for the purpose of the Parasurama avatar was over.
Parasurama said mildly to the Prince of Ayodhya: "I realise who you are. I am not sorry that you have quenched my arrogance. Let all my tapas go to you. But because of my promise to Kashyapa, I cannot remain in his domains and have therefore to hurry back to the Mahendra Mountains before the sunsets. Let me use my power of locomotion for this single thing. Subject to this, let the arrow which you have set to the bow consume all my power earned through tapas." So saying, Parasurama went in reverent circumambulation around the prince and departed. Ayodhya's citizens were over-joyed to hear that Dasaratha and the royal princes were returning to the capital. The city was festive with flowers and shone like the deva-loka. Rama and Sita lived happily in Ayodhya for twelve years. Rama had surrendered his heart to Sita. It was difficult for one to say whether their love grew because of their virtues or it was planted in their beauty of form. Their hearts communed even without speech. Sita, rejoicing in Rama's love, shone like Lakshmi in heaven. Long afterwards, when their forest-life began, Anasuya, the great sage Atri's holy wife, extolled Sita's love for Rama. And Sita answered: "How else could it be? Rama is a perfect being. His love for me equals mine for him. His affection is unchanging. Pure of heart, he has mastered the senses."

-5089
January 4, -5089
Age 74
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

After Rama and Sita have been married for twelve years, an elderly Dasharatha expresses his desire to crown Rama, to which the Kosala assembly and his subjects express their support.

January 4, -5089
Age 74
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

After Rama and Sita have been married for twelve years, an elderly Dasharatha expresses his desire to crown Rama, to which the Kosala assembly and his subjects express their support.

January 5, -5089
Age 74
Ayodhya, Faizabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

IT CAN BE CONCLUDED, THAT LORD RAMWAS EXILED ON HIS 25TH BIRTHDAY WHEN HE WAS TO BECOME KING AS PER MODERN CALENDER THAT DATE WAS 5TH JAN. 5089BC.

Rama accepts his father's reluctant decree with absolute submission and calm self-control which characterizes him throughout the story.

He is joined by Sita and Lakshmana. When he asks Sita not to follow him, she says, "the forest where you dwell is Ayodhya for me and Ayodhya without you is a veritable hell for me."
When Rama is exiled, Shatrughna drags Kaikeyī's old nurseMantharā (who was responsible for poisoning the queen's mind against Rāma) and makes an attack to kill her, but he is restrained by Bharata who feels that Rāma would not approve.
Bharata goes to Rama and asks him to come back to Ayodhya but Rama refuses. Bharata rules Ayodhya from Nandigramam and is an excellent leader, often referred to as the avatar of dharma. Shatrughna is instructed to stay in the palace during this time.