Siegbert I, King of Austrasia

Is your surname d'Austrasie?

Research the d'Austrasie family

Siegbert I, King of Austrasia's Geni Profile

Records for Siegbert d'Austrasie

4,525,139 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Siegbert d'Austrasie, roi d'Austrasie

Nicknames: "Segisberto", "Sigisbert", "Sigebert"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Metz,Neustria,,
Death: Died in Vitry-sur-Seine, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Chlothar I the Old, King of the Franks and Ingonde, Queen of the Franks
Husband of Brunichild
Father of Ingunda de Metz; Childébert II, King of Austrasia & Burgundy; Clodesinde and N.N. d'Austrasie
Brother of Charibert I, King of the Franks at Paris; Saint Guntram, King of Burgundy; Chlodosinda, Queen of the Lombards and Dagobert
Half brother of Chilpéric I, King of the Franks at Soissons; Gonthaire (Gunthar, Guntram) d'Orléans; Theudebald {Thibaud, Theobald) d' Orléans; Clodoald (St. Cloud) d' Orleans and Chram of the Franks

Occupation: King of Austrasia 561, de Reims, de Neustrie, 575, Rey de Austrasia, Roi d'Austrasie (561-575), Roi d'Austrasie, Roy d'Austrasie, König der Franken in Austrasien.
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Siegbert d'Austrasie, roi d'Austrasie

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigebert_I

--------------------

[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 14, Ed. 1, Tree #3302, Date of Import: Jan 26, 1999]

Sigebert I (535-575) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it:

Now when king Sigebert saw that his brothers were taking wives unworthy of them, and to their disgrace were actually marrying slave women, he sent an embassy into Spain and with many gifts asked for Brunhilda, daughter of king Athanagild. She was a maiden beautiful in her person, lovely to look at, virtuous and well behaved, with good sense and a pleasant address. Her father did not refuse, but sent her to the king I have named with great treasures. And the king collected his chief men, made ready a feast, and took her as his wife amid great joy and mirth. And though she was a follower of the Arian law she was converted by the preaching of the bishops and the admonition of the king him self, and she confessed the blessed Trinity in unity, and believed and was baptized. And she still remains catholic in Christ's name. [1]

Upon seeing this, Chilperic, the most base of Sigebert's brothers, sent to Athanagild for his other daughter's hand. This daughter, Galswintha, was given him and he abandoned his other wives. However, he soon tired of her and had her murdered in order to marry Fredegund, Sigebert sought revenge. The two brothers had already been at war, but their hostility now elevated into a long and bitter war that was continued by the descendants of both.

In 573, Sigebert took possession of Poitiers and Touraine, and conquered most of his kingdom. Chilperic then hid in Tournai. But at Sigebert's moment of triumph, when he had just been declared king by Chilperic's subjects at Vitry, he was struck down by two assassins working for Fredegund.

He was succeeded by his son Childebert under the regency of Brunhilda. Brunhilda and Childebert quickly put themselves under the protection of Guntram, who eventually adopted Childebert as his own son and heir.

Franks 481-511.

Reigned 561-575. Sigebert was assassinated in 575 while at war with his half brother Chilperic I, king of the western Franks.

His Assassination caused a bloody war between Austrasia & Neustria

Sources:

Ancestral File #: 9GBL-M2

Title: "FamilySearch? Ancestral FileÙL v4.19" Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publication: (Created by FamilySearch Internet Genealogy Service, 50 East North Temple Street, Salt Lake City, UT 84150, April 1, 1999)

Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 U.S.A.

Abbrev: Columbia Encyclopedia Title: "Concise Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia" Author: Ansley, Clarke F. Publication: (Morningside Heights, New York, Columbia University Press, Licensed from INSO Corporation, December 31, 1941, 1994), Hard Cover & Internet Site

Abbrev: European Heraldry #2 Crests by Arnaud Bunel Title: "Héraldique européenne" Author: Arnaud Bunel Publication: Coats of Arms for European Royalty and Nobility (http://www.heraldique-europeenne.org, Arnaud Bunel, 1998) , Internet

Title: Encyclopedia Britannica, Treatise on Page: Sigebert I

Title: The Plantagenet Ancestry, by William Henry Turton, 1968 Page: 8 Text: Sigebert I of France

1

--------------------

Sigebert I of Metz (1)

Marriage: Brunhild Queen of Austrasia on an unknown date (1)

Died: 575 (1)

Sigebert married Brunhild Queen of Austrasia, daughter of Athanagild, on an unknown date.1 (Brunhild Queen of Austrasia was born in 550 1 and died in 613 1.)

Spouses/Children:

Brunhild Queen of Austrasia

-1. Childebert II King of Austrasia and Burgundy+

Forrás / Source:

http://www.delmars.com/family/perrault/7370.htm

--------------------

Sigebert I

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the Saxon ruler by this name, see Sigeberht I of Essex.

Sigebert I (535 c. - 575 c.) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it:

Now when king Sigebert saw that his brothers were taking wives unworthy of them, and to their disgrace were actually marrying slave women, he sent an embassy into Spain and with many gifts asked for Brunhilda, daughter of king Athanagild. She was a maiden beautiful in her person, lovely to look at, virtuous and well- behaved, with good sense and a pleasant address. Her father did not refuse, but sent her to the king I have named with great treasures. And the king collected his chief men, made ready a feast, and took her as his wife amid great joy and mirth. And though she was a follower of the Arian law she was converted by the preaching of the bishops and the admonition of the king him self, and she confessed the blessed Trinity in unity, and believed and was baptized. And she still remains catholic in Christ's name. [1]

Upon seeing this, Chilperic, the most base of Sigebert's brothers, sent to Athanagild for his other daughter's hand. This daughter, Galswintha, was given him and he abandoned his other wives. However, he soon tired of her and had her murdered in order to marry his mistress Fredegund. Probably spurred by his wife Brunhilda's anger at her sister's murder, Sigebert sought revenge. The two brothers had already been at war, but their hostility now elevated into a long and bitter war that was continued by the descendants of both.

In 573, Sigebert took possession of Poitiers and Touraine, and conquered most of his kingdom. Chilperic then hid in Tournai. But at Sigebert's moment of triumph, when he had just been declared king by Chilperic's subjects at Vitry, he was struck down by two assassins working for Fredegund.

He was succeeded by his son Childebert under the regency of Brunhilda. Brunhilda and Childebert quickly put themselves under the protection of Guntram, who eventually adopted Childebert as his own son and heir.

Forrás / Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigebert_I

--------------------

Sigebert I (535 c. - 575 c.) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it:

   Now when king Sigebert saw that his brothers were taking wives unworthy of them, and to their disgrace were actually marrying slave women, he sent an embassy into Spain and with many gifts asked for Brunhilda, daughter of king Athanagild. She was a maiden beautiful in her person, lovely to look at, virtuous and well-­behaved, with good sense and a pleasant address. Her father did not refuse, but sent her to the king I have named with great treasures. And the king collected his chief men, made ready a feast, and took her as his wife amid great joy and mirth. And though she was a follower of the Arian law she was converted by the preaching of the bishops and the admonition of the king him self, and she confessed the blessed Trinity in unity, and believed and was baptized. And she still remains catholic in Christ's name. [1]

Upon seeing this, Chilperic, the most base of Sigebert's brothers, sent to Athanagild for his other daughter's hand. This daughter, Galswintha, was given him and he abandoned his other wives. However, he soon tired of her and had her murdered in order to marry his mistress Fredegund. Probably spurred by his wife Brunhilda's anger at her sister's murder, Sigebert sought revenge. The two brothers had already been at war, but their hostility now elevated into a long and bitter war that was continued by the descendants of both.

In 573, Sigebert took possession of Poitiers and Touraine, and conquered most of his kingdom. Chilperic then hid in Tournai. But at Sigebert's moment of triumph, when he had just been declared king by Chilperic's subjects at Vitry, he was struck down by two assassins working for Fredegund.

He was succeeded by his son Childebert under the regency of Brunhilda. Brunhilda and Childebert quickly put themselves under the protection of Guntram, who eventually adopted Childebert as his own son and heir.

--------------------

FUENTES:

-http://www.abcgenealogia.com/Godos00.html

--------------------

Sigebert I (535-575) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it:

--------------------

Sigebert I (535 c. - 575 c.) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it:

Now when king Sigebert saw that his brothers were taking wives unworthy of them, and to their disgrace were actually marrying slave women, he sent an embassy into Spain and with many gifts asked for Brunhilda, daughter of king Athanagild. She was a maiden beautiful in her person, lovely to look at, virtuous and well-behaved, with good sense and a pleasant address. Her father did not refuse, but sent her to the king I have named with great treasures. And the king collected his chief men, made ready a feast, and took her as his wife amid great joy and mirth. And though she was a follower of the Arian law she was converted by the preaching of the bishops and the admonition of the king him self, and she confessed the blessed Trinity in unity, and believed and was baptized. And she still remains catholic in Christ's name. [1]

Upon seeing this, Chilperic, the most base of Sigebert's brothers, sent to Athanagild for his other daughter's hand. This daughter, Galswintha, was given him and he abandoned his other wives. However, he soon tired of her and had her murdered in order to marry his mistress Fredegund. Probably spurred by his wife Brunhilda's anger at her sister's murder, Sigebert sought revenge. The two brothers had already been at war, but their hostility now elevated into a long and bitter war that was continued by the descendants of both.

The assassination of Sigebert by Jean Fouquet, from the fifteenth century Grandes Chroniques de France.

In 573, Sigebert took possession of Poitiers and Touraine, and conquered most of his kingdom. Chilperic then hid in Tournai. But at Sigebert's moment of triumph, when he had just been declared king by Chilperic's subjects at Vitry-en-Artois, he was struck down by two assassins working for Fredegund.

He was succeeded by his son Childebert under the regency of Brunhilda. Brunhilda and Childebert quickly put themselves under the protection of Guntram, who eventually adopted Childebert as his own son and heir. -------------------- Kung av Austrasien från 561 till sin död.

Källa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigebert_I -------------------- University of Hull Royal Database (England)

     Title: Brian Tompsett, Dept of Computer Science, University of Hull Royal Database (England) (copyright 1994, 1995, 1996)base (England)base (England). copyright 1994, 1995, 1996.
     Note:
     Call number:
     usually reliable but sometimes includes hypothetical lines, mythological figures, etc
     WWW, University of Hull, Hull, UK HU6 7RX bct@tardis.ed.ac.uk
     Text: s of Chlothar I the Old of the Franks King of Franks
  2. Abbrev: Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet & Cecily de Nevill
     Title: Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler, Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet & Cecily de Neville (published by author 1978)evilleeville. published by author 1978.
     Note:
     Call number:
     J.H. Garner
     Page: chart 1780
     Text: s of Chlodomer of the Franks King of Orléans, no title

-------------------- Sigebert I (535-575) was the king of Austrasia from the death of his father in 561 to his own death. He was the third surviving son out of four of Clotaire I and Ingund. His reign found him mostly occupied with a successful civil war against his half brother, Chilperic.

When Clotaire I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons: Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, with its capital at Rheims, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert, in 567 or 568; Charbiert himself had received the kingdom centred on Paris; Guntram received the Kingdom of Burgundy with its capital at Orléans; and the youngest son, the aforementiond Chilperic, received Soissons, which became Neustria when he received his share of Charibert's kingdom. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, caused Sigebert to move his capital from Rheims to Metz. He repelled their attacks twice, in 562 and c.568.

About 567, he married Brunhilda, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild. This marriage, if we take the chief chronicler of the age, Gregory of Tours, at his word, reveals something about Sigebert's superior character in that violent and lascivious age. As Gregory tells it: -------------------- Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii

b. 535, d. November 575

Father Chlothacharius I, gracia Dei Francorum rex1,2 b. between 501 and 502, d. 10 November 561

Mother Ingundis (?) b. circa 515

    Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii was born in 535. He was the son of Chlothacharius I, gracia Dei Francorum rex and Ingundis (?).1,2 Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii succeeded his father to the kingdom of Austrasia in 561. King of Franks at Rheims, Austrasia, Frankish Kingdoms, between 561 and 575.2 "Ad nomen ejus ornandum et augendum est determinatum ut vocaretur Brunechildis, quam cum multa laetitia atque jucunditate Sigibertus accepit uxorem."3 He was the youngest and best of the three brothers, determined to wed a princess of his own rank and married Brunihilde, daughter of Athanagild, the Visigothic king of Spain in 566. He seems to have loved her with genuine affection.4 He married Brunechildis the Visigoth, daughter of Athanagildus, rex Gotthorum and Goiswinth (?), in 566 at Metz, Austrasia; "Brunhild married Sigebert I, king of Austrasia, changing her religion from Arianism to Roman Catholicism."5,6,3 Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii was added to his lands those of his deceased brother, Charibert I, in 567. He was was faced with attaks by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns between 567 and 568. He therefore moved his captial from Reims to Metz. He was a witness where Chilpericus I, rex Francorum, vir inluster murdered his first wife Galswintha in order to marry her maid, Fredegund, and his brother, husband of Galswintha's sister, was obliged to seek revenge, and a terrible civil war broke out between the brothers in 568. Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii approved the election of Gregory as Bishop of Tours in 573.7 He was a witness where Georgius Florentius, évèque de Tours succeeded his cousin, once removed, St. Eufronius, as the 19th Bishop of Tours after St. Martin, an election approved by King Sigibert, in 573.7 Sigibertus I, rex Austrasii died in November 575 at Vitry, France, at age 40 years. Assassinated in a family blood-fued by his brother Chilperic. Chilperic had his wife, Galswintha, murdered so he could marry her maid. Sigebert was married to Brunhild, sister of Galswintha. On Sigebert's death, Brunhild continued seeking revenge.2,8

Family

Brunechildis the Visigoth b. 543, d. 13 October 613

Children

Ingonde des Francs+ b. c 5599

Chlodoswinthe des Francs+ b. 5696,8

Childeberthus II, King of Austrasia and Burgundy+ b. 570, d. 5966,1,2,8

-------------------- b. 535

d. , November? 575, Vitry, near Arras, Fr.

Frankish king of the Merovingian dynasty, son of Chlotar I and Ingund; he successfully pursued a civil war against his half brother, Chilperic I.

When Chlotar I died in 561, his kingdom was divided, in accordance with Frankish custom, among his four sons; Sigebert became king of the northeastern portion, known as Austrasia, to which he added further territory on the death of his brother, Charibert I, in 567 or 568. Incursions by the Avars, a fierce nomadic tribe related to the Huns, compelled him to move his capital from Reims to Metz; he had twice to repel their attacks (562 and c. 568). About 567 he married Brunhild, daughter of the Visigothic king Athanagild, whose other daughter, Galswintha, married Chilperic. When Chilperic had Galswintha murdered in order to marry Fredegund, Sigebert was obliged to seek revenge. The two brothers had already fought each other, but this hostility was elevated by the incident into a long and bitter war that was continued by the descendants of both. Sigebert defeated Chilperic, conquered most of his kingdom, and compelled him to hide in Tournai. But at his moment of triumph, when he had just been acclaimed king by Chilperic's subjects at Vitry, he was struck down by two assassins in the service of Fredegund.

Copyright c 1994-2001 Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. -------------------- REI DA AUSTRÁSIA-LORENA, em França

http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigeberto_I

Sigeberto I (◊ 535 † 575) foi rei da Austrásia da morte de seu pai em 561 até sua própria morte. Foi o terceiro filho sobrevivente de dentre os quatro de Clotário I e Ingunda. Seu reinado foi principalmente ocupado com uma bem sucedida guerra civil contra seu meio irmão Chilperico I.

Quando Clotário I morreu em 561, seu reino foi dividido, de acordo com o costume franco, entre seus quatro filhos: Sigeberto tornou-se rei da porção nordeste, conhecida como Austrásia, com sua capital em Reims, território adicionado aos seus domínios posteriormente após a morte de su irmão, Cariberto, em 567 ou 568; Cariberto havia recebido o reino centralizado em Paris; Guntram recebeu o reino da Borgonha com capital em Orleães; e o seu irmão mais jovem, Chilperico, recebeu Soissons, que se tornou a Nêustria quando ele recebeu sua parte do reino de Cariberto. Incursões dos ávaros, uma feroz tribo nômade ligada aos hunos, motivou Sigeberto a mover sua capital de Reims para Metz. Ele repeliu os ataques ávaros duas vezes, em 562 e c.568.


O assassinato de Sigeberto, de Jean Fouquet. Grandes Chroniques de France, século XIV.Por volta de 567 ele casou-se com Brunilda, filha do rei visigodo Atanagildo. Este casamento, se nós tomarmos o principal cronista da época, Gregório de Tours, em suas palavras, revela algo sobre o caráter superior de Sigeberto naquela época violenta e lasciva. Conforme Gregório:

Agora quando o rei Sigeberto viu que seus irmãos estavam tomando esposas indignas deles, e para suas desgraças estavam na verdade casando-se com mulheres escravas, ele enviou uma embaixada à Espanha e com muitos presentes pediu a mão de Brunilda, filha do rei Atanagildo. Ela era uma bela donzela, de aparência agradável, virtuosa e prendada, com bom senso e bem nascida. Seu pai não recusou, e a enviou ao rei que eu citei com grandes tesouros. E o rei juntou seus principais homens, preparou um banquete, e a tomou como sua esposa em meio a grandes felicidades e alegrias. E apesar de que ela fosse uma seguidora da le ariana, ela foi convertida pela pregação dos bispos pela advertência do próprio rei, e ela confessou a união da Santíssima Trindade, e acreditou e foi batizada. E ela permaneceu católica em nome de Cristo. [1]

Ao saber disto, Chilperico, o mais vil dos irmãos de Sigeberto, enviou um pedido a Atanagildo pela mão de sua outra filha. Esta filha, Galswintha, foi dada a ele, que abandonou suas outras esposas. No entanto, ele logo se cansou dela e a assassinou para se casar com Fredegund, e Sigeberto pediu por vingança. Os dois irmãos já tinham entrado em guerra, mas suas hostilidades agora se transformaram numa longa e amarga guerra que foi continuada pelos descendentes de ambos.

Em 573, Sigeberto tomou posse de Poitiers e Touraine, conquistando a maior parte do reino do irmão. Chilperico então se escondeu em Tournai. Mas no momento de triunfo de Sigeberto, quando ele havia justamente sudo declarado rei pelos súditos de Chilperico em Vitry, ele foi golpeado por dois assassinos a mando de Fredegund.

Ele foi sucedido por seu filho Childeberto sob a regência de Brunilda. Brunilda e Childeberto rapidamente se colocaram sob a proteção de Guntram, que finalmente adotou adotou Childeberto como seu próprio filho e herdeiro.

view all 12

Siegbert I, King of Austrasia's Timeline

535
535
Metz,Neustria,,
550
550
Age 15
Metz, Moselle, Lorraine, Austrasia
565
565
Age 30
King of, Mentz
565
Age 30
King of, Mentz
565
Age 30
King of, Mentz
566
566
Age 31
Metz, 57463, Moselle, Lorraine, France,
570
March 6, 570
Age 35
Metz,Moselle,Lorraine,France
575
November 575
Age 40
Vitry-sur-Seine, Île-de-France, France
575
Age 40
590
590
Age 40
France