Sigmund Völsungsson (c.695 - 734) MP

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Birthplace: Ringerike, Buskerud, Norway
Death: Died in Norway
Occupation: Konge - Ringerike, Buskerud, Norway
Managed by: Arnhildur Ásdís Kolbeins
Last Updated:

About Sigmund Völsungsson

In Norse mythology, Sigmund is a hero whose story is told in Volsunga saga. He and his sister, Signy, are the children of Volsung and his wife Ljod. Sigmund is best known as the father of Sigurd the dragon-slayer, though Sigurd's tale has almost no connections to the Volsung tales.

In the Volsung Saga, Signy marries Siggeir, the king of Gautland (modern Västergötland). Volsung and Sigmund are attending the wedding feast (which lasted for some time before and after the marriage), when Odin, in the guise of a beggar, plunges a sword into the living tree around which Volsung's hall is built. The disguised Odin announces that the man who can remove the sword will have it as a gift. Only Sigmund is able to free the sword.

Siggeir is smitten with envy and desire for the sword. Siggeir invites Sigmund, his father Völsung and Sigmund's nine brothers to a visit in Gautland to see the newlyweds three months later. When the Völsung clan arrive they are attacked by the Gauts; king Völsung is killed and his sons captured. Signy beseeches her husband to spare her brothers and to put them in stocks instead of killing them. As Siggeir thinks that the brothers deserve to be tortured before they are killed, he agrees.

He then lets his shape-shifting mother turn into a wolf and devour one of the brothers each night , until only Sigmund remains. Signy has a servant smear honey on Sigmund's face and when the she-wolf arrives she starts licking the honey off Sigmund's face. She licks and sticks her tongue into Sigmund's mouth whereupon Sigmund bites her tongue off, killing her. Sigmund then hides in the forests of Gautland and Signy brings him everything he needs.

Sigmund escapes his bonds and lives underground in the wilderness on Siggeir's lands. While he is in hiding, Signy comes to him in the guise of a Völva (sorceress) and conceives a child by him, Sinfjötli (the Fitela of Beowulf). Bent on revenge for their father's death, Signy sends her sons to Sigmund in the wilderness, one by one, to be tested. As each fails, Signy urges Sigmund to kill them. Finally, Sinfjötli (born of the incest between Signy and Sigmund) passes the test.

Sigmund and his son/nephew, Sinfjötli, grow wealthy as outlaws. In their wanderings, they come upon men sleeping in cursed wolf skins. Upon killing the men and wearing the wolf skins, Sigmund and Sinfjötli are cursed to a type of lycanthropy. Eventually, Sinfjötli and Sigmund avenge the death of Volsung.

After the death of Signy, Sigmund and Sinfjötli go harrying together. Sigmund marries a woman named Borghild and has two sons, one of them named Helgi. Helgi and Sinfjötli rule a kingdom jointly. Helgi marries a woman named Sigrun after killing her father. Sinfjötli later killes Sigrun's brother in battle and Sigrun avenges her brother by poisoning Sinfjötli.

Later, Sigmund marries a woman named Hjördís. After a short time of peace, Sigmund's lands are attacked by King Lyngi. While in battle, Sigmund matches up against an old man (Odin in disguise). Odin shatters Sigmund's sword, and Sigmund falls at the hands of others. Dying, Sigmund tells Hjördís that she is pregnant and that her son will one day make a great weapon out of the fragments of his sword. That son was Sigurd. Sigurd himself had a son named Sigmund who was killed when he was three years old by a vengeful Brynhild.

Sigmund's story may be based on older material than that found in the Sigurd story and it is more directly involved in matters of family descent and the conquest of lands. If there is a historical person behind the Sigmund stories, it is probably a chieftain from the time of the first great Germanic migration in the second and third centuries CE.

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Född: omkring 705

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In Norse mythology, Sigmund is a hero whose story is told in the Volsunga saga. He and his sister, Signy, are the children of Völsung and his wife Ljod. Sigmund is best known as the father of Sigurd the dragon-slayer, though Sigurd's tale has almost no connections to the Völsung cycle.

In the Völsunga saga, Signy marries Siggeir, the king of Gautland (modern Västergötland). Volsung and Sigmund are attending the wedding feast (which lasted for some time before and after the marriage), when Odin, in the guise of a beggar, plunges a sword into the living tree Barnstokk ("offspring-trunk"[1]) around which Volsung's hall is built. The disguised Odin announces that the man who can remove the sword will have it as a gift. Only Sigmund is able to free the sword.

Siggeir is smitten with envy and desire for the sword. Siggeir invites Sigmund, his father Völsung and Sigmund's nine brothers to visit him in in Gautland to see the newlyweds three months later. When the Völsung clan arrive they are attacked by the Gauts; king Völsung is killed and his sons captured. Signy beseeches her husband to spare her brothers and to put them in stocks instead of killing them. As Siggeir thinks that the brothers deserve to be tortured before they are killed, he agrees.

He then lets his shape-shifting mother turn into a wolf and devour one of the brothers each night. During that time, Signy tries various ruses but fails every time until only Sigmund remains. The ninth night, she has a servant smear honey on Sigmund's face and when the she-wolf arrives she starts licking the honey off Sigmund's face. She licks and sticks her tongue into Sigmund's mouth whereupon Sigmund bites her tongue off, killing her. Sigmund then hides in the forests of Gautland and Signy brings him everything he needs.

Sigmund escapes his bonds and lives underground in the wilderness on Siggeir's lands. While he is in hiding, Signy comes to him in the guise of a Völva (sorceress) and conceives a child by him, Sinfjötli (the Fitela of Beowulf). Bent on revenge for their father's death, Signy sends her sons to Sigmund in the wilderness, one by one, to be tested. As each fails, Signy urges Sigmund to kill them. Finally, Sinfjötli (born of the incest between Signy and Sigmund) passes the test.

Sigmund and his son/nephew, Sinfjötli, grow wealthy as outlaws. In their wanderings, they come upon men sleeping in cursed wolf skins. Upon killing the men and wearing the wolf skins, Sigmund and Sinfjötli are cursed to a type of lycanthropy. Eventually, Sinfjötli and Sigmund avenge the death of Volsung.

After the death of Signy, Sigmund and Sinfjötli go harrying together. Sigmund marries a woman named Borghild and has two sons, one of them named Helgi. Helgi and Sinfjötli rule a kingdom jointly. Helgi marries a woman named Sigrun after killing her father. Sinfjötli later killes Sigrun's brother in battle and Sigrun avenges her brother by poisoning Sinfjötli.

Later, Sigmund marries a woman named Hjördís. After a short time of peace, Sigmund's lands are attacked by King Lyngi. While in battle, Sigmund matches up against an old man (Odin in disguise). Odin shatters Sigmund's sword, and Sigmund falls at the hands of others. Dying, Sigmund tells Hjördís that she is pregnant and that her son will one day make a great weapon out of the fragments of his sword. That son was to be Sigurd. Sigurd himself had a son named Sigmund who was killed when he was three years old by a vengeful Brynhild.

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Sigmund

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Sigmund er en nordisk sagnfigur. Ifølge sagnet var han søn af Vølsung og Ljod og dermed én af vølsungerne. Han blev far til Sinfjølte, som han fik med sin tvillingesøster Signe.

Hans første hustru var Brynhild, den anden Hjørdis. Med Hjørdis har han sønnen Sigurd, som senere fik tilnavnet Fafnersbane.

Sigmund blev efter sin død én af Einherjerne sammen med sin søn.

-------------------- Sigmund var en hjälte i nordisk mytologi, son till Völsung.

Det berättas i Völsungasagan att när Sigmunds syster Signe gifte sig med Siggeir, och hennes bror och fader kom till bröllopsfesten, kom även Oden dit, förklädd som en tiggare. Den förklädde Oden tog upp ett svärd och spetsade det levande trädet runt vilket Völsungs hem var byggt. Oden meddelade att den som kunde dra ut svärdet skulle få det som en gåva. Enbart Sigmund kunde avlägsna svärdet.

Siggeir, som själv ville ha svärdet blev då avundsjuk på Sigmund. Han bjöd in Sigmund och hans nio bröder samt Völsung på besök. När de hade anlänt blev de attackerade, Völsung dödades i strid och hans bröder torterades senare till döds. Enbart Sigmund överlevde, och lyckades fly till skogs. Under sitt liv i skogen fick han tillsammans med Signe (förklädd till en völva) sonen Sinfjotle. När Sigmund och Sinfjotle klädde sig i förtrollade vargskinn förvandlades de till varulvar. Dessa två hämnades senare Völsungs död.

Sigmunds första hustru hette Brynhild, senare gifte han sig med Hjördis. När Sigmund blev attackerad av Kung Lyngi, hamnade Sigmund i strid med en gammal man (återigen Oden i förklädnad). Oden krossade Sigmunds svärd, varefter Sigmund dödades av andra. Döendes talade Sigmund om för Hjördis att hon var gravid och att hennes son en dag skulle tillverka ett mäktigt vapen av skärvorna efter hans eget svärd. Sonen var Sigurd Fafnesbane.

Sigmund blev efter sin död en av Einhärjarna tillsammas med sin son.

Paralleller till Sigmunds utdragande av svärdet från trädet kan hittas i andra mytologier (i synnerhet legenden om kung Artur). Tolkien hämtade troligtvis inspiration från Völsungasagan när han skapade sin egen version av det brutna svärdet som gjuts på nytt.

Denna artikel är helt eller delvis baserad på material från Nordisk familjebok, 1904–1926 (Not) 

Denna artikel är helt eller delvis baserad på material från engelskspråkiga Wikipedia

The Völsunga saga is a legendary saga, a late 13th century Icelandic prose rendition of the origin and decline of the Volsung clan (including the story of Sigurd and Brynhild and destruction of the Burgundians). It is largely based on epic poetry. The earliest known representation of this tradition is in pictoral form as the Ramsund carving, Sweden, which was created c. 1000 AD.

The matter is considerably older, however, and it is loosely based on real events in Central Europe during the 5th century and the 6th century.

The Middle High German epic poem Nibelungenlied is based largely on the old stories, which were commonly known in all of the Germanic lands from the early Middle Ages on, but reworks the material into a courtly medieval setting.

A story based on the Volsunga Saga was written by Melvin Burgess, called Bloodtide. Many of the features in the original saga make an appearance, with a few differences in characters, settings and story.