Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr (1803 - 1883)

‹ Back to Dunn surname

Is your surname Dunn?

Research the Dunn family

Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Place of Burial: Salt Lake, Utah, United States
Birthplace: Groveland, Livingston, New York, USA
Death: Died in Brigham City, Box Elder, UT, USA
Occupation: Mormon Elder
Managed by: Della Dale Smith-Pistelli
Last Updated:
view all 47

Immediate Family

About Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr

Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr. (son of Simeon Dunn and Sally Bath of Williamstown, Ontario county, now Groveland, Livingston county, N. Y.) was born Aug. 7, 1803, at Williamstown. He came to Utah Sept. 27, 1848, in the Brigham Young company. Simeon married Adeline Rawson July 3, 1828 (daughter of Amariah Rawson and Betsy Carpenter), who was born Nov. 27, 1811. Their children were : Adeline b. June 11, 1830, m. Alpheus Haws 1845; Francis b. Dec. 5, 1831. d. 1834; Mary b. Nov. 2, 1833, m. Martin Luther Ensign; Maria b. March 3, 1836; Moslah D. and Amariah b. Feb. 19, 1837; Betsy b. May 22, 1840, Alpheus P. Haws. The family home was in Nauvoo. Simeon was left a widower with three young daughters when Adaline died October 22, 1841, in Nauvoo, Illinois. They were sealed 22 January, 1846, in the Nauvoo temple after her death the same day Simeon was sealed to his second wife in life.

He next married Margaret Snyder June 19, 1842, Nauvoo, (daughter of Jacob Snyder and Hannah Anderson), who was born March 12, 1812. Their children were: Susanna b. May 6, 1842, m. Allen Hunsaker April 24, 1859; Simeon b. Feb. 9, 1846, died May 6, 1946, Nauvoo, Illinois.

He then married Jane Caldwell. She was born March27, 1808, Steubenville, Jefferson, Ohio, and died September 27, 1892, Bountiful, Davis, Utah (daughter of Joseph Caldwell and Mary Benett). She married first John Waite, about 1831. He died about 1851 in St. Louis, Missouri. It is not known if he had ever been in Nauvoo. Their children were Jane Waite, John Anson Waite, Martha Waite, Margaret Waite, and Rebecca Waite.

Jane married second Eli Brazee Kelsey, Febrary 7, 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, who was born October 27, 1819, Portsmouth, Scioto, Ohio, and died March 27, 1885, Salt Lake City. Eli Brazee had other wives, Letitia Sheets, Mary Forsythe, Mary Ann McIntyre, Emma Boys, and Jane Sarah Morris. Eli left on a mission from Nauvoo, and Jane believed him to be dead when she married the third time to Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr. They had one child, Joseph Moroni Dunn, b. Feb. 12, 1847, Winter Quarters, Douglas, Nebraska or Council Bluffs, Iowa, died August 3, 1912, Tooele, Tooele, Utah. Not knowing his father, Joseph was raised by his mother and Eli B. Kelsey. He married Susanna E. White Dec. 27, 1866, and was sealed int he endowment house. They had nine children.

Next Simeon was married to Harriet Atwood Silver, January 3, 1847, Winter Quarters, Iowa, by President Brigham Young. She was the daughter of Arad Silver and Sophia Nichols, who was born July 22, 1818, in Bloomfield, Essex, Vermont. They were sealed December 7, 1857, in the St. George Temple.

Harriet crossed the plains with and cared for Simeon's motherless daughters. The first of her seven children was born after reaching Salt Lake City. Harriet cared for the family during Simeon's mission to the Society Islands, 1848-1850. During his mission, Harriet's first child, Sarah Sophia, was born in Salt Lake City in 1849, and a second child was born in Salt Lake City, in 1851. Simeon's oldest child, Adaline Dunn Haws died in 1852. The next five children were born in Brigham City, Utah.

Their children were:

Sarah Sophia b. July 8, 1849, m. John Dunn Jan. 12, 1867;

Simeon Adams b. Jan. 13, 1851, m. Eunice E. Harmon Nov. 6, 1876;

Emeline Silver (twin) married Francis R. Cantwell. She was born September 12, 1853, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, and died October 9, 1914, Ely, White Pine, Nevada;

Her twin, Eveline Silver, married M. Allen Collins Hunsacker, and died October 8, 1914, Logan, Cache, Utah;

Charles Oscar b. Oct. 13, 1855, in Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, and died October 8, 1914, in Nibley, Cache, Utah; m. Letitia Smith, October 18, 1876, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah; m. Martha Jane Welch; Harriet S. and Henry S. born Dec. 31, 1857. Family home Brigham City, Utah.

Harriet Silver Dunn, twin, infant, born December 31, 1857, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, died December 31, 1857, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah.

Henry Silver Dunn, twin, infant, born December 31, 1857, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah, died April 12, 1858, Brigham city, Box Elder, Utah.

They arrived in Utah September 28, 1848, and established their home in Brigham City. On December 31, 1857, to their family were added twin babies, Harriett and Henry Silver. The tiny girl died shortly after birth, and two days later, on January 2, 1858, the mother, Harriett, closed her eyes in death, having given her life for her family and the religion she had espoused.

Twice before, this good husband and father had been called upon to lay away a devoted wife and companion. This time his heart was almost broken as he placed the form of his lovely young wife in the crude, home-made casket and laid her lifeless baby daughter in her arms.

Three months later, in April 1858, the call came for all Saints to leave their homes in northern Utah, and journey southward. Simeon Adams Dunn loaded a few provisions and household effects into his covered wagon, assisted his motherless children to their place in the wagon box, and cracking his long whip over the backs of his oxen, commenced his journey. He had also provided a wagon for his eldest daughter [Mary Dunn Ensign] and her three little girls, and they traveled together. The husband and father of this little family, Martin Luther Ensign, at that time was serving as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. As they proceeded on their way, baby Henry became very ill and they saw the life depart from their lovely three-month-old baby son and brother. Simeon made his little family as safe and comfortable as possible in this temporary camp, and with a sad and heavy heart slowly wended his way back to the lonely grave in the Brigham City Cemetery. Very near to it he dug a very small, new grave, and in it tenderly laid the remains of his baby boy. (From the Journal of Charles Oscar Dunn.)

He found the town empty, except for a few men who had remained behind, ready at a moment's notice to touch a match to the homes and buildings if the enemy should enter the city. He went into his house, expecting to spend the night there, but it was so quiet and lonely it was more than he could endure, so he went to the stable, laid down by his faithful oxen, and spent the night near them. Early the next morning he was on his way to rejoin his family. He found them safe and well and they continued their journey as far south as Payson, where they made their camp and remained until the Saints were counseled by the Church leader to return to their homes.

From the diary of Charles Oscar Dunn, who was four years old at the time of the move, "On our return home we passed the soldiers at the oint of the mountain. It was a great sight to see them march by us. As we watched them pass, the wind blew my hat off and it rolled down a steep dugway and into the Jordan River, so I had to go on home without a hat, which made me very sad. We reached home alright but found all of our possessions gone and our house empty.

Abigail Brandon (b.21 Apr 1802 Knoxville, Knox, Tennessee - d.unknown) married first Lyman Stoddard 11 July 1842. They had no children. She married second Simeon Adams Dunn for time only 31 July 1858. She and Simeon were divorced 4 Apr 1864. Abigail is listed in the household of Simeon Adams Dunn in the 1860 Census.

Keziah Fowler daughter of George H. Fowler and Rebecca Stilwell (b.19 Jun 1815 - d.3 Feb 1899 Centerville, Davis, UT) married first: George Washington Brandon (Brother of Abigail Brandon Stoddard) 6 Oct 1831. They several children. Keziah married Second Simeon Adams Dunn for time only 14 Jan 1860 in the Endowment House. "I wonder how much time she and Simeon actually lived together. In the 1860 Census she is listed in Brigham City with three of her children. I have not found her in the 1870 Census. In the 1880 Census she was living in Ophir, Tooele County. She died in Centerville." (Paula Paradis)

Elizabeth Wickham (b.Feb. 14, 1836 East Wickham, Greater London, England - d.Oct. 21, 1881 North Ogden,Weber, Utah) Married first Alfred Cottenden 17 Aug 1863. Married second Simeon Adams Dunn sealed 15 Apr 1865. Probably divorced. Although the temple record does not show a cancellation of sealing, the temple department indicates we should assume the sealing was cancelled. Elizabeth and Simeon had two children: Ephraim Wickham Dunn, b.27 Mar 1866 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah - d. 17 Mar 1927 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah; Ephraim married Marian Whitney 12 Jun 1889, they had 4 children. (Ephraim was raised in Brigham City by his father.) Lorenzo Wickham Dunn, (baby) b.Mar. 11, 1868, Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah - d. Aug. 3, 1869 Brigham City, Box Elder, Utah. Elizabeth Wickham third married and was sealed to Richard Jones 8 Feb 1870. They had 7 children.

Married Mary McRee daughter of Charles William McRee and Mary Corkins (b.17 Oct 1819 Copiah, Mississippi - d.1 Nov 1907 at 3:40 pm of pneumonia at 501 13th Street, Ogden, Weber, Utah, at the age of 88.) She married first: December 19, 1827, George David Black who died in 1845 of Malaria in Nauvoo. She married second James Brown July 16, 1846, in Council Bluffs, Iowa. James Brown was the Captain of Company C of the Mormon Batallion. Mary crossed the plains with the Mormon Batallion. They had 5 children. Third she married Simeon Adams Dunn for time only 22 Feb 1868, in the endowment house. She is listed with Simeon and his family in the 1870 census. She is not listed with Simeon in the 1880 Census, so she probably returned to living with one of her children.

Simeon was the President 15th quorum seventies 1845; missionary to Canada 1841; to New York 1844; Society Islands 1848-51; to Eastern states 1872. Settled at Brigham City, Utah, 1853.

SOURCE: http://larkturnthehearts.blogspot.com/2010/10/families-of-simeon-adams-dunn

___________________

From FindAGrave.com:

The Dunn Family--My grandparents, Simeon Adams Dunn and Harriett Atwood Silver were married at Winter Quarters, January 3, 1847, by President Brigham Young. They arrived in Utah September 28, 1848, and established their home in Brigham City. On December 31, 1857, to their family were added twin babies, Harriett and Henry Silver. The tiny girl died shortly after birth, and two days later, on January 2, 1858, the mother, Harriett, closed her eyes in death, having given her life for her family and the religion she had espoused. Twice before, this good husband and father had been called upon to lay away a devoted wife and .companion. This time his heart was almost broken as he placed the form of his lovely young wife in the crude, home-made casket and laid her lifeless baby daughter in her arms.

Three months later, in April 1858, the call came for all Saints to leave their homes in northern Utah, and journey southward. Simeon Adams Dunn loaded a few provisions and household effects into his covered wagon, assisted his motherless children to their place in the wagon box, and cracking his long whip over the backs of his oxen, commenced his journey. He had also provided a wagon for his eldest daughter and her three little girls, and they traveled together. The husband and father of this little family, Martin Luther Ensign, at that time was serving as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

As they proceeded on their way, baby Henry became very ill. They camped on Kay's Creek, (now Kaysville) and there they saw the life depart from their lovely three-months-old baby son and brother. The father made his little family as safe and comfortable as possible in this temporary camp, and with a sad and heavy heart slowly wended his way back to the lonely grave in the Brigham City Cemetery. Very near to it he dug a very small, new grave, and in it tenderly laid the remains of his baby boy.

He found the town empty, except for a few men who had remained behind, ready at a moment's notice to touch a match to the homes and buildings if the enemy should enter the city. He went into his house, expecting to spend the night there, but it was so quiet and lonely it was more than he could endure, so he went to the stable, laid down by his faithful oxen, and spent the night near them. Early the next morning he was on his way to rejoin his family. He found them safe and well and they continued their journey as far south as Payson, where they made their camp and remained until the Saints were counseled by the Church leader, to return to their homes.

From the diary of my father, Charles Oscar Dunn, who was four years old at the time of the move, I quote: "On our return home we passed the soldiers at the point of the mountain. It was a great sight to see them march by us. As we watched them pass, the wind blew my hat off and it rolled down a steep dugway and into the Jordan River, so I had to go on home without a hat, which made me very sad. We reached home alright but found all of our possessions gone, and our house empty." -- Eva Dunn Snow. ______________________________________

Letter from Simeon A. Dunn to Brigham Young about the progress of his mission:

Front Page: Brigham Young G. S. L. City, U. S.

Sept 5, 1850 Simeon A. Dunn to B. Young/ progress of his mission

San Francisco Sept. 5, 1850

To the Presidency of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Dear Brethren:

Feeling a desire to let you know how we get a long on our mission, I take of communicating to you the same . We have got here with our lives. We had a prosperous journey over the mountains peace harmony and good will resulted in our midst. My health improves. All the way we had no sickness in our camp except Br. Moses has had a bout of the mountain fever. We are all in San Francisco with the exception of Br. Powell. We have not heard of since our arrival. We are all well at present or in a fare way to get well. Br Busby & I have been sick since we arrived at this place. I was confined to my room two weeks with the bloody flux and am quite feeble at this time. You may know by shape of my letter, but at the same time I am better as to my bodily health than I have been for two years past and by the blessings of the Lord and the prayers of my Brethren I can say that my mind never has been so free, my understanding clear on things past, present and to have as at the present my mind seems to be continually on this train. I enjoy my self first rate not withstanding my way seemed to be hedged up for a time as it respected means to preventing my mission not able to work and without means and in a strange land amongst strangers. I tell you if I ever felt my dependence on my Heavenly father it was about this time, but the cloud has begun to brake and the way seems to open for us to resume our journey means has began to roll into our hands and we expect to set sale for the islands on Monday the 19th.

Dear Brethren I can say that I never realized the Society of the Saints at head quarters so sensible as at the present time not withstanding, I feel perfectly free and disencumbered of every thing that would lend to hinder the free intercourse of the spirit of God to enlighten my mind, my purpose is onward until I shall have accomplished that that the Lord has desired for me to accomplish on the earth and by the help of the Lord and the prayers of my Brethren I shall be enabled to over come all things not withstanding I feel my own weakness and nothingness. With out the help of the Lord and I do feel the need of the faith and prayers of the first presidency and the Church at large for which I shall ever pray.

The Brethren here have shown themselves. Be to us indeed their hospitalities have been extended to us with all the freedom good feelings of Saints. Their liberalities have been extended towards us with a liberal hand in general and the Lord will bless them for I feel in my heart to bless them. They are in a state of coldness and indifference and dissension one with each other in this place but I find some brands that has some fire yet remaining in them. It makes one think of a log heap that has burned down whilst the others have gone out and if the husbandman comes along and picks them up and puts them in a pile together they will all catch fire again whereas if they ware left in a scattered condition they might all go out if not those that retained the fire would burn up by themselves. Now if I can see by the spirit. The pony is saddled, the rider, or the husbandman, is mounted and the pony on the jump and seems to be taking a circuitous route and my impression is that if the rider holds on.

Give my love to Sisters Young and family and all the inquiring Saints. Remember in turn my wife and family also Sister Busby and family and they must continue to remember us at the throne of grace. San Francisco is growing very fast but prospering is on the wane as fast. There is a considerable excitement here now about San Diego being a place of speculation, and according to the papers the Colorado is a point of considerable moment in the use of speculators, people forseeing themselves in there from the U. S. and having considerable difficulty with the Indians. I have had some conversation with a Cap. King respecting California bay or gulf . He says he has been up that gulf a considerable distance and as far as he was up it was a beautiful country and good sailing, but he said that he did not go so high as to see the most beautiful country. He says that on the Colorado where it forks is the hart of California and a great place for farming purposes and is bound to be a great place and he further stated that the people of the United States were wakening up to the subject of steeling that country. Having written so much I must close by subscribing myself your Brother and fellow labor in the covenant.

(signed) Simeon A. Dunn

I should be pleased and esteem it a great favor to receive a letter from your hands as soon as circumstances would permit in wisdom for I tell you that a word of consolation from you would be like pouring in the oil and the wine it would gladden the heart and cheer my self in such manner that I may never incur the displeasure of my God nor my good Brethren. Peace be with you all. Amen.

A subsequent letter...written two days after the one above...

San Francisco September 7th 1850

Dear Brother

I or We have received a letter from Brother Addison Pratt this day. Since this letter was sealed and I thought I would drop a few lines to you respecting it tho I have not saw it yet my self tho. Brother Murray received it and he gave me a history of it. He had a pleasant passage over. He left this place the last of April and James Brown with him 33 days at sea. Landed at Tahiti found the state of affairs as it respects the Church in that Country at a low Ebb. The missionaries had been amongst them and told them that Pratt would never return and that the Mormons had been driven to the four winds and there was nothing more of them and it was nothing any how so they was about discouraged. But when they saw Br. Addison got there they saw that they had lied to them consequently they came swarming around him and their faith was strengthened at it. A Brother E. Woldzell of this place is very anxious to go to Australia to preach. I told him he better go to Salt Lake. I did not tell him to go there and learn something first, but that so, Brother Rich is here with us today.

Yours respectfully, Simeon Dunn ___________________________

Brigham City June 10, 1860, Simeon A. Dunn to B. Young

Wishes to know if he has or has not forfeited the privileges of being counseled as a son.

Recd. June 18, 1860, Answered June 18, 1860

Brigham City June 10th 1860

Pres. Brigham Young Dear Sir:

I avale my self of this opertunity to communicate to you some of my feelings. Having for a long time had a desire to talk with you, but having but few opertunities to even take you by the hand much less to talk with you. You will pleas(e) to pardon me for my thus interrupting you. I still remember of coventing with you before the Lord in his house at Nauvoo to receive your council as a Father and you to Council me as a son. Now this is what I wish to know if I have or have not forfeited that Covnent in your estimation. I have never disobeyed your Council directly to me but once to my recollection and I have repented of that with sorrowing ever since. That was in relation to accompanying you to these vallies with the pioneers, if any other time I am not aware of it. Now Bro Brigham for this offense I conceive that you are intitled to my humble acknowledgement which I tender you sincerely—and if there is anything else that I have done to injure your feelings, I pray you to forgive me. I will say if there is anything that I have said or done it has been threw ignorance not feeling the responsibility that I was under. Now I will tell you my reasons why I address you this letter.

Ever since we have been in the vallies I never had four to approach you with that freedom that I did in times before. The reasons which I have never been able to solve which has given me a great many unpleasant feelings. Sometimes I try to attribute it to a spirit of jealousy. I think when I approach you and Bro Kimble there is a spirit of repulsion, If I am correct in my feelings I wish to know the cause of this affect. If I have commited any sin that I have not repented of or any that cannot be repented of is a fact that I have not ascertained as yet. Therefore, if I have not entirely forfeited my right to your council if you will inform me on this point, and do feel free to give me a few words of comfort with your council what correct a person. It will be received with thankfulness and as a preshus jewel. When I imbraced this gospel it was for the truth sake. I have never altered my mind, but I desire a full and compleat Salvation, and I am just as willing to comply with any requisition of the gospel pertaining to my everlasting Salvation as I was to enter into baptism for the remission of my sins. My determination is by the help of the Lord and my good brethren to strive (not withstanding my many weaknesses) to be worthy to stand the test and gain a celestial glory, not withstanding I may come far short. At the time of the reformation I made all things strait on my part as far as I was able with my brethren and have strove since to live my religion notwithstanding I find I have come far short of my privilege and come short of the blessings where(?) No more at this time. I am your friend and brother in the everlasting gospel. signed: Simeon A Dunn, Pres. Brigham Young Pleas write if you feel free so to do.

Reply from Brigham Young:

GSL City June 18, 1860

Elder Simeon A. Dunn,

Brigham City, Box Elder Co, U.T.

Dear Brother,

I was not in the least aware of the state of your feelings as expressed in your letter of the 10th inst., neither do I know why they are so. There neither is nor has been any feeling on my part toward you to cause the feelings you describe, for I have ever deemed that you have striven and are striving to do the best you can, and know of nothing prejudicial to your course and conduct in well doing. No counsel occurs to me at present, further than for you to continue to strive to live your religion as you have hitherto done; and when temptations assail redouble, if possible, your vigilance, and, so far as I know, no evil power can overcome you or cause you to come short of the glory you have in view. Hear (here) harbor no suspicions nor jealous feelings, for there is no ground for them on my part and be so kind as to ever meet me, and communicate with the friendship of old which is felt and will be cordially reciprocated by Your Brother in the Gospel.

(signed) Brigham Young ____________________

Another letter sent to President Brigham Young:

Buffalo April 2nd, 1874

Recd April 22

Pr. Brigham Young

Dear Brother feeling a duty obligatory upon me I will offer a few reflections by way of pen and paper, feeling that it is your privilege to receive and rite to expect occasionally communication from the Elders abroad, I therefore avale my self of this privilege of thus writing. I wish to bare my testimony how I look at things in the world where I have traveled that it may be handed down from generation to generation of those that shall be raised in Zion. The spirit manifesteth itself to me expressly that it is not worth the while of the Elders of Israel to spend their pressus time in looking for any of the lost sheep of the house of Israel on this Continent amongst the gentiles. They have killed the prophets and shed the blood of the Saints of the most high God and have virtually said we will not have this man Christ to rule over us. What are they good for , you know, (here lieth the patience of the Saints.) Inasmuch as the old mother of abomination has shorn her self of her eyes, ears (and I might say with propriety, her brains) tongue, mouth, hart and life. What can we expect of her children. I agree with my friend, supposing a man should pluck out his eye would he have a perfect body, they say no. Well then suppose he pluck out the rest of his sensitive members, then his hart also, they say he would be dead. I say yes, he would be a dead fool. Well there is the Christian world. The children of this generation is born without ears and it is not to be wondered at that they should follow in generations after their mother. When talking to my blood relatives I tell them they are razing their children for the levening, and to suffer the great Calamities that are coming on the earth, and at the same time tell them how they can escape those calamities and save themselves from this untoward generation. They ask when will this take place. I say your children will see it before they are as old as I am at the present. O how good it is to sow to the spirits that we may reap ever lasting lives. Well this is my testimony and that will cover all the testimony that is necessary in relation to the kingdom of God. I am well in body life and in spirit. I left all of my worldly cares in Utah. They do not trouble me. My hole sole is for my mission and I believe I feel the power of it. I shall do a great deal of good although I may not baptize one they never will forget old Simeon. I will sow the seed in the valley. I shall gather it after many days. I still hang on to Joseph’s promise that I should have power to save my father’s house. I calculate to exercise that power. I have every opportunity for contiplation. I am alone here and yet I am not alone, God is with me in every time of need.

Bro Young except of my very best regards with your honored family and all. The Israil of God, Zion is my chief joy. If you should have a word of counsel or reproof for your humble servant it would be graciously received. I think of starting to Vermont the first of next week if the Lord wills. My address will be Bloomfield, Essex County, Vermont. I am after some more Silver from that Country. Perhaps I can turn some into gold, if I should get you to say the word it would be Dunn. I need not ask for the prayers of the Saints for I know that I have them. I have prolonged my letter beyond my expectation. You will please look over my essay. I am one of the weak ones, that God has chosen as ever your son by adoption, and brother in the gospel of the ever last Covenant.

Signed: S. A. Dunn ________________

April 14, 1874 North Stratford, N. H.

Recd. April 21, Pr Brigham Young

Dear Brother,

You will notice by this my present whereabouts, I arrived here on the 10th when writing the other sheet. I was in Canada and calculating to mail at Buffalo having not put it in the envelope. I laid it in my note book and going from Buffalo in some what of a hurry I forgot to mail after I wrote the first I began to see some of the fruits of my labors in Canada to one of my brothers sons confessed their conviction of the truth of the gospel and circumstance was such that I that (thought) it would be wise to not make a public thing of it and they went to work to arrange their business for to migrate to Utah. They thought they would be there next fall. I have got 1 appointment out here and as far as I can see things look very favorable. I am no wise discouraged as yet. When I get my work done here I expect to go to Newark New Jersey or more especially where the spirit directs. According to my appointment on my mission is to stay as long as I feel and return when I feel disposed to if not I am subject to your order. My present PO will (be) North Stratford N. H. on the Grand Trunk R. R.

As ever your Humble servant and Bro in the Gospel of peace.

S. A. Dunn Senior

Bottom: April 2 and 13

Simeon A. Dunn about his missionary travels in the states. ________________________________________________

"HIS CHURCH RECORD" (copied from his "Personal Journal" by his Grand-daughter, Mrs. Eva Dunn Snow in 1962, since which time the Journal has been used by others of his descendants, and at the present time, cannot be located)

"I was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, on the 3rd Monday (the 15th) of April, 1839 by my Brother, Elder James Dunn, in the town of Van Buren, Wayne County, Michigan, in the Hurph River. I was the first man ever baptized in that River, by authority from Heaven, and he, the first Elder that I ever saw. My wife Adaline was baptized a week after I was, she being the second person baptized in the River.

I was ordained to the office of Priest by Elder Stephen Post on the 22nd of July, 1839. I officiated in that calling. In June 1840 I was ordained an Elder by Elders Post and Franklin, in Van Buren, Wayne County, Michigan. In June, 1840 I started for Nauvoo, on foot and alone, 500 miles distant. On June 20, 1840, I arrived in Nauvoo, and for the first time in this life mine eyes beheld an acknowledged Prophet of God. On June 22, 1840, I visited the first Patriarch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and he, Joseph Smith Senior, blessed me with a Father's blessing, and explained to me the history of Abraham, from the Scripture.

On July 10, 1840 I started and returned to my home in Michigan, bearing my testimony of the ever lasting gospel, going and coming, with much rejoicing. On June 20, 1841, I set off with my family, to gather with the Saints in Nauvoo. We arrived in Nauvoo August 5, 1841, settled and lived in that City until the saints left for the mountains.

In April, 1844 I was ordained one of the Seventies, under the hands of Levi Hancock. In May 1844 I was sent on a mission to the State of New York, to advocate the Prophet's claim to the Presidency of the United States of America. On January 26, 1845, I was ordained and set apart to be the Senior President of the 15th Quorum of Seventies, under the direction of President Joseph Young, Senior President of all the Seventies. In December 1843, I was chosen by the Prophet Joseph, as one of the forty-three policemen, to guard the City and the Temple of the Lord. In September, 1841, I was sent to West Canada, on a mission to preach the gospel.

December 27, 1845, I and my wife Margaret, received our endowments in the Temple of the Lord, City of Nauvoo, Illinois. On January 21, 1846, I was called and worked as a hand in the Temple. Worked sixteen days. On January 22, 1846, I was called and had sealed to me, Adeline Rawson and Margaret Sneider - Adaline having died on the 22nd day of October, 1841. On February 6, 1846, I was called with my wife Margaret, and received our second annointings, and sealed on us all the blessings thereof, under the hands of Zebedee Coltran. On February 9, 1846 the Twelve Apostles left Nauvoo and crossed the Mississippi River for the wilderness. On May 18th I left Nauvoo to follow in their wake, and shared in all the toils and sufferings of the Saints, until November 20th.

After laying out a City called Winter Quarters, on the west bank of the Missouri River, I was appointed one of a company of police to guard the City, I remained in Omaha until May 16, 1848, when I, with my family, set off for Salt Lake Valley, where we arrived September 28,1848. I remained there until I was called to go to the South Sea Isles, On May 7, 1850 I set off on a mission to the South Pacific Sea Isles.

On April 21, 1852, I arrived home, having been gone two years. In May, 1852, I settled in Box Eider County, and then Weber County. In April 1858, I fled south with the rest of the Saints, from Johnston's Army, to elude their grasp. On July 25th I broke for home again, Brigham City, by the wise leadership of President Lorenzo Snow, under God. We have been wonderfully blessed, both temporally and spiritually.

On October 19, 1871, I left Brigham City for the States, on a mission to look up the genealogy of my dead friends, which proved to be a very successful mission. I returned home the 19th of July, 1874, having traveled 10,0000 miles on rail and on the U.S.Seal. On November 1, 1877, I was privileged with a mission to St. George, Utah, to officiate for my dead in the Holy Temple of our God.

On January 27, 1878, I returned home, having accomplished the desire of my heart for this time, in this direction. February 11, 1878 - this year I am seventy-five years old. I have had born to me nineteen children, thirty-nine grandchildren, ten great- grandchildren, and they are all within the vales of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I can say in my heart, "God Bless You".

SIMEON ADAMS DUNN, Elder, in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints." This was transcribed from a separate document but seems to be the similar information.

Here under the wise leadership of President Lorenzo Snow one of the twelve apostles, we have been greatly blessed both temporally and spiritually.

19 October 1879 I left Brigham City on a mission to the States to hunt up genealogy of my relatives which proved a very successful mission. I returned … July ’74 having traveled 10,000 miles by rale and bote all in the N America. 1 Nov 1877 – I was privileged with a mission to St. George Utah to officiate for my dead friends in the Holy Temple of our God;

27 Jan 1878 – I returned home having accomplished the desire of my heart for the present, in this direction for the time being I am now 75 years old.

August 7 1878 – I have had born to me 19 children, 40 grandchildren 16 great grand children, and they are all within the pales of the Church; I can say in my heart god bless Zion; my testimony to this world is, and to all humanity, that inasmuch as they will subscribe to the ordinances of this Latter day Church they will never be made ashamed, and they will be raised up at the last day; but those that heed not, I have no promises for them; but those that fight against this work I know that who awaits them;

Elder S. A. Dunn

The following is written in a shaky hand and added later.

Before you is redeemed will suffer hardship and persecution. Mortals must return to the dust. Within the veil, anchored companionship. Dominion, kingdom power & principalities; I go away and prepare a place. It is an order everyone of you together. Don’t know how long we may survive but feel to bless and do good. Mod how by Welch then more…

[I feel the above was written by Simeon just prior to his death.]

-------------------- Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847–1868 Brigham Young Company (1848) Age 43


Departure: 5 June 1848 Arrival: 20-24 September 1848

Find a Grave

Birth: Aug. 7, 1803 Groveland Livingston County New York, USA

Death: Feb. 20, 1883 Brigham City Box Elder County Utah, USA

Son of Simeon Adams Dunn and Sarah (Sally) Bath

Married Adeline Rawson, 11 Jul 1828, Rawsonville, Wayne, Michigan; died Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Married Margaret Snyder, 19 Jun 1842, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Married Jane Caldwell, May 1846, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Married Harriet Atwood Silver, 3 Jan 1847, Omaha, Douglas, Nebraska

Married Elizabeth Wickham, 1865

Heart Throbs of the West, Kate B. Carter, Vol. 10, p. 259

The Dunn Family--My grandparents, Simeon Adams Dunn and Harriett Atwood Silver were married at Winter Quarters, January 3, 1847, by President Brigham Young. They arrived in Utah September 28, 1848, and established their home in Brigham City. On December 31, 1857, to their family were added twin babies, Harriett and Henry Silver. The tiny girl died shortly after birth, and two days later, on January 2, 1858, the mother, Harriett, closed her eyes in death, having given her life for her family and the religion she had espoused. Twice before, this good husband and father had been called upon to lay away a devoted wife and .companion. This time his heart was almost broken as he placed the form of his lovely young wife in the crude, home-made casket and laid her lifeless baby daughter in her arms.

Three months later, in April 1858, the call came for all Saints to leave their homes in northern Utah, and journey southward. Simeon Adams Dunn loaded a few provisions and household effects into his covered wagon, assisted his motherless children to their place in the wagon box, and cracking his long whip over the backs of his oxen, commenced his journey. He had also provided a wagon for his eldest daughter and her three little girls, and they traveled together. The husband and father of this little family, Martin Luther Ensign, at that time was serving as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

As they proceeded on their way, baby Henry became very ill. They camped on Kay's Creek, (now Kaysville) and there they saw the life depart from their lovely three-months-old baby son and brother. The father made his little family as safe and comfortable as possible in this temporary camp, and with a sad and heavy heart slowly wended his way back to the lonely grave in the Brigham City Cemetery. Very near to it he dug a very small, new grave, and in it tenderly laid the remains of his baby boy.

He found the town empty, except for a few men who had remained behind, ready at a moment's notice to touch a match to the homes and buildings if the enemy should enter the city. He went into his house, expecting to spend the night there, but it was so quiet and lonely it was more than he could endure, so he went to the stable, laid down by his faithful oxen, and spent the night near them. Early the next morning he was on his way to rejoin his family. He found them safe and well and they continued their journey as far south as Payson, where they made their camp and remained until the Saints were counseled by the Church leader, to return to their homes.

From the diary of my father, Charles Oscar Dunn, who was four years old at the time of the move, I quote: "On our return home we passed the soldiers at the point of the mountain. It was a great sight to see them march by us. As we watched them pass, the wind blew my hat off and it rolled down a steep dugway and into the Jordan River, so I had to go on home without a hat, which made me very sad. We reached home alright but found all of our possessions gone, and our house empty." -- Eva Dunn Snow.


Family links:

Spouses:
  • Jane Caldwell Waite (1808 - 1891)
  • Adeline Rawson Dunn (1811 - 1842)*
  • Elizabeth Wickham Dunn (1836 - 1881)*
  • Margaret Snyder Dunn (1812 - 1846)*
  • Harriet Atwood Silver Dunn (1818 - 1858)*
Children:
  • Mary Dunn Ensign (1833 - 1920)*
  • Susannah Dunn Hunsaker (1843 - 1921)*
  • Simeon Dunn (1846 - 1846)*
  • Joseph Moroni Dunn (1847 - 1912)*
  • Sarah Sophia Dunn Dunn (1849 - 1923)*
  • Simeon Adams Dunn (1851 - 1935)*
  • Eveline Silver Dunn Hunsaker (1853 - 1919)*
  • Emeline Silver Dunn Cantwell (1853 - 1914)*
  • Charles Oscar Dunn (1855 - 1939)*
  • Harriet Silver Dunn (1857 - 1857)*
  • Henry Silver Dunn (1857 - 1858)*
  • Lorenzo Wickham Dunn (1868 - 1869)*

Burial: Brigham City Cemetery Brigham City Box Elder County Utah, USA Plot: B-36-14-6

view all 44

Simeon Adams Dunn, Jr's Timeline

1803
August 7, 1803
Groveland, Livingston, New York, USA
1828
July 11, 1828
Age 24
Rawsonville, Wayne, Michigan
1830
June 19, 1830
Age 26
Van Buren Charter Township, Wayne, MI, USA
June 19, 1830
Age 26
Belleville, Wayne, Michigan, MI
1832
December 5, 1832
Age 29
Rawsonville, Wayne, Michigan
December 5, 1832
Age 29
Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw, MI, USA
1836
March 3, 1836
Age 32
Wayne, Michigan
March 3, 1836
Age 32
Belleville, Wayne, MI, USA
1836
Age 32
Bellville, Wayne, Michigan
1837
February 19, 1837
Age 33
Belleville, Wayne, Michigan