Simon Seigneur de Joinville, seigneur de Joinville (c.1175 - 1233)

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Birthplace: Joinville, France
Death: Died in or May 1233
Occupation: Seigneur de Joinville, Seneschal of Champagne
Managed by: Ernesto Álvarez Uriondo
Last Updated:

About Simon Seigneur de Joinville, seigneur de Joinville

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#GeoffroyJoinvilledied1190

GEOFFROY [IV] de Joinville, son of GEOFFROY [III] Seigneur de Joinville & his wife Félicité de Brienne (-Acre Aug 1190). ... Seigneur de Joinville. m HELVIDE de Dampierre, daughter of GUY [I] de Dampierre Seigneur de Dampierre, de Saint-Dizier et de Moeslain, Vicomte de Troyes & his wife Helvide de Baudémont. ... Geoffroy [IV] & his wife had seven children:

  • 1. GEOFFROY [V] de Joinville (-Krak des Hospitaliers [1203/04]). ... Seigneur de Joinville. Seneschal of Champagne.
  • 2. ROBERT de Joinville (-Apulia [1205]). ... Seigneur de Sailly.
  • 3. GUILLAUME de Joinville (-6 Nov 1226). ... Bishop of Langres 1208. Archbishop of Reims 1219.
  • 4. SIMON de Joinville (-May 1233). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridus, Robertus, Symon et Guido milites et Guilelmus clericus" as five brothers "apud Ionevillam", recording that Simon obtained Joinville[1213]. Seigneur de Joinville. - see below. ►
  • 5. FELICITE de Joinville (-1240 or after). ... m ([1200]) PIERRE Sire de Bourlémont, son of SIMON Sire de Bourlémont & his wife Agnes de Broyes (-[1225/27]).
  • 6. GUY de Joinville (-1248 or after). ... m firstly AGNES, daughter of ---. ... m secondly (before 1221) PERRENELLE de Chappes dame de Jully et de Chanlot, sister of Eudes Ragot, daughter of ---. ... - SEIGNEURS de SAILLY, de DONJEUX et de JULLY[1217].
  • 7. ANDRE de Joinville ... Knight Templar.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#SimonJoinvilledied1233

SIMON de Joinville, son of GEOFFROI [IV] Sire de Joinville & his wife Helvide de Dampierre (-May 1233). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Gaufridus, Robertus, Symon et Guido milites et Guilelmus clericus" as five brothers "apud Ionevillam", recording that Simon obtained Joinville[1219]. "Geofroi V Trouillard Sire de Joinville senechal de Champagne" donated property to the abbey of Boulancourt with the consent of his mother Helvide de Dampierre and his brothers Guillaume archdeacon of Chalons, Robert and Simon by charter dated 1191[1220]. Seigneur de Joinville. "Simon de Joinville" confirmed his father's previous donations to the monastery at Mathons by charter dated 1206[1221]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that Erard de Brienne captured the castle of Joinville from Simon in early 1216[1222]. Other disputes between Simon de Joinville and the count of Champagne were settled by agreement dated 7 Jun 1218, under which Simon pledged to help Thibaut IV Comte de Champagne and his mother Ctss Blanche against Erard de Brienne, in return for recognition of his hereditary right to the sénéchaussée de Champagne[1223]. Seneschal of Champagne.

m firstly ([1205/before 1209]) ERMENGARDE de Montclair, daughter of JEAN de Walcourt dit de Montclair & his wife --- (-after 23 Jul 1218). "Simon Sire de Joinville frère et successeur de Geoffroi V Trouillart" donated property to the abbey of Boulancourt with the consent of his wife Ermengarde dame de Monteclere by charter dated 1 Aug 1210[1224]. The primary source which confirms the name of her father has not yet been identified. She was heiress of the château de Montclair, which passed to her son. "Simon seigneur de Joinville, sénéchal de Champagne" donated property to Clairvaux, with the consent of "sa femme Ermengart, de son fils Geoffroy, de ses filles Isabelle et Béatrix", by charter dated 1216[1225]. “Ermengardis domina Montisclari” constituted “medietati totius terræ mariti sui Simonis domini Joinvillæ, Campaniæ senescalli…in dotalitio", naming "Gaufridus filius suus primogenitus", by charter dated 6 Jul 1218[1226]. "Simon seigneur de Montclair et Ermengart sa femme" relinquished rights to the abbey of Mettlach, by charter dated 23 Jul 1218[1227].

m secondly (before 1224) as her second husband, BEATRIX d'Auxonne, divorced wife of AIMON [II] Sire de Faucigny, daughter of ETIENNE [III] Comte d'Auxonne [Bourgogne-Comté] & his wife Beatrix de Chalon (-11 Apr 1260). Her first and second marriages are indicated by the testament of her daughter "Agnetis dominæ Fuciniaci", dated 9 Aug 1268, which made bequests to "dominæ Beatrici dominæ de Thoria et Villario sorori suæ et filiis suis…Simoni de Joinville dom. de Jaiz fratri suo"[1228]. Her parentage is indicated by the charter dated Jul 1225 under which "Simon seigneur de Joinville, sénéchal de Champagne" reached an agreement with "Jean de Chalon son beau-frère", by charter dated Jul 1225[1229]. It is confirmed by the charter dated 1227 under which "Simon de Joinville, comme mari de Béatrix, fille d'Etienne comte d'Auxonne et de Béatrix comtesse de Chalon" swore homage to the duke of Burgundy for the château de Marnay[1230]. Dame de Marnay. "Simon seigneur de Joinville, sénéchal de Champagne" donated property to Molesme, with the consent of "sa femme Béatrix", by charter dated 1224[1231]. "Beatrix dame de Joinville executrice testamentaire de Simon sire de Joinville son mari mort l'année précédente" donated property to the abbey of Boulancourt by charter dated Feb 1235[1232]. “Jehans cuens de Bourgoingne et sires de Salins” confirmed the donation to the abbey of la Charité made by “Beatris ma suer dame de Marnay” and by “Simon son fil seignour de Jays” by charter dated Dec 1255[1233]. Simon & his first wife had three children:

  • 1. GEOFFROY de Joinville (-[1232/May 1233, bur Abbaye d'Ecurey). ... m ([Aug 1230], divorced 1232) as her second husband, MARIE de Garlande, widow of HENRI [IV] Comte de Grandpré, daughter of GUILLAUME [V] de Garlande Seigneur de Livry & his wife Adela de Châtillon (-after 1259). ...
  • 2. ISABELLE de Joinville (-1268 or after). ... m SIMON de Clefmont (-1242 or before).
  • 3. BEATRIX de Joinville (-before May 1249). ... m GUERMOND Vidame de Châlons .

Simon & his second wife had six children:

  • 4. JEAN de Joinville ([1224/25]-24 Dec 1317, bur Saint-Laurent de Joinville). ... Seigneur de Joinville. - see below.
  • 5. GEOFFROY de Joinville (-Trim 21 Oct 1314). ... Sire de Vaucouleurs. - see below.
  • 6. SIMON de Joinville (-3 Jun 1276). ... Sire de Marnay. Sire de Gex. ... m (Jan 1252) LEONETE de Gex, daughter of AMEDEE Sire de Gex [Genève] & his wife Beatrix de Bâgé (-16 Nov 1302). ... - SEIGNEURS de GEX, SEIGNEURS de MARNAY[1251].
  • 7. GUILLAUME de Joinville (-1268 or after). ...
  • 8. MARIE [Simonette] de Joinville (-after Jun 1256). ... m (before Dec 1246) JEAN de Thil-Châtel (-after Jun 1256).
  • 9. HELOISE de Joinville (-after 21 Oct 1312, bur monastery of Montigny). ... m (Feb 1255) JEAN Seigneur de Faucogney Vicomte de Vesoul, son of AIMON Seigneur de Faucogney Vicomte de Vesoul & his wife --- (-before 24 Apr 1301).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

http://genealogiequebec.info/testphp/info.php?no=23449

Simon Ier, seigneur de Joinville , Vaucouleurs et Sailly 1, 2 (1175 - 1233)

Il est le fils de Geoffroi IV, seigneur de Joinville 1 et Helvide de Dampierre 1.

Il nait en 1175 1. Il épouse Ermengarde de Montecler en 1206 1. Il épouse Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay, fille de Étienne III, comte d' Auxonne et Béatrix de Thiern, comtesse de Chalon-sur-Saône en 1215 1. Il est sénéchal de Champagne 1. Il décède en avril 1233 1.

Liste de ses enfants connus:

  • 1. Helvis de Joinville 2 (de Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay)

  • 2. Marie Simone de Joinville 2 (de Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay)

  • 3. Simon de Joinville, seigneur de Gez 2 (de Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay)

  • 4. Geoffroi de Joinville, seigneur de Montecler (1207 - 1232) 1 (de Ermengarde de Montecler)

  • + 5. Sire Jean de Joinville (1224 - 1317) 2 (de Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay)

  • + 6. Geoffroi de Joinville, seigneur de Vaucouleurs et Meath (1230 - 1314) 1, 2 (de Dame Béatrix de Bourgogne-Comté de Marnay)

------------------

Simon de Joinville, who died in 1233, is a Lord of Joinville

His fourth son of Geoffroy IV, Simon, lord of Sailly, became lord of Joinville in the death of his brother Geoffrey V Holy Land. This is evidenced in June 1204 by acts of charity and it relies on the anniversary thereof.

During the early years of his arrival, Simon was engaged upon the administration of his estate, and donations to monasteries in the neighborhood. It seemed less inclined to war than its ancestors, while many opportunities presented themselves.

The year of his first marriage, he took the cross against the Albigenses. Between June 1209 and March 1210, we reported in the region of Montsegur.

The title of Seneschal of Champagne appears for the first time in May 1206.  Eight years would pass before he took it again.  The hereditary title for Joinville was not admitted.  He had many battles and circumstances for it to become hereditary for Simon and his successors, after long struggles between sly and brutal Blanche of Navarre, Countess of Champagne, and the counts of Brienne, Duke of Lorraine (including Simon was an ally), the Archbishop of Trier, Renard de Choiseul, to mention only the most important protagonists.  

The fighting was hard despite truce: the Duke of Lorraine and Simon gave each a truce to Blanche of Navarre in 1218. The Countess of Champagne then made an alliance with Frederick II, and subsequently defeated the Duke of Lorraine and Simon de Joinville. Simon Also had to be assisted by men of the abbey of Saint-Urbain-Maconcourt to defend his castle of Joinville in battle.

In the treaty that followed, Simon said that not having rebelled because Champagne unfairly refused to recognize his hereditary right to the Seneschal. On the other hand, Champagne, for fear of Joinville and their allies, powerful nobles, Joinville to recognize the title of seneschal, as hereditary, with a promise of fidelity.

Some compensation in rebates fiefs came to seal the treaty: mowing, Geoffrey Cirey, and Arnulf of Reynel, for example. The act recognizes this as hereditary Seneschal will be signed until July 28 1226.

Meanwhile, Simon, too, old family tradition requires, is excommunicated once, and twice: by the pope and the bishop of Chalons, for his attitude in the conflict against the Counts of Champagne, like all supporters Comte de Brienne elsewhere. The Episcopal sentence was revoked in July 1218, with the obligation to return what was looted in Thonnance and Suzannecourt: wine, wheat, fodder and furnishings. The papal anathema was lifted in December of that year.

Simon had crossed since July 1218, he was careful to leave his wife the usufruct of all his possessions, except the castle of Joinville, that even men of Joinville were kept up to fifteen years of his son Geoffrey .

We know little about him in the Holy Land, if it is to Damietta in April 1219. After the siege of that city in November of that year, his stay in Egypt did not last: Had he returned to Joinville in September 1220.

As a steward, he arbitrated a dispute between the White Countess of Champagne and the Count of Rethel Hughes in 1221.  

A widower, he married Beatrice, daughter of Stephen III Auxonne. Their son John was the chronicle of St. Louis. The chroniclers mention children's first and second bed s'accordèrent well, and they last much of their wealth to the marriage relationship as one of their sister had a contract with the House of Savoy.

Simon then experiences financial difficulties and dis not hesitate to borrow from the monks of Clairvaux 400 pounds and 500 pounds at the bishop of Chalons, the Count of Champagne on signing the document security. These are substantial for the time.

The young Count Thibaut IV, who had previously questioned the nomination of Simon as hereditary Seneschal of Champagne granted by his mother Blanche of Navarre, later came to discuss his lease. Many dealings "of power" took place between vassals and overlords of the region: Guillaume de Joinville, Bishop of Langres, brother of Simon, who had to commit himself to repay the loan from his brother. In 1226, Count of Champagne is Criticized by King Louis VIII himself on his conduct at the siege of Avignon.

Beginning 1227, Simon joined the barons who rebelled against Blanche of Castile. A little later, following the example of his overlords and Champagne Bar, he approaches her, participating in a truce and surrenders. In March of that year, he returned to Joinville.

Again the barons revolted, and Hostilities recommenced late 1229.  Simon, combined with Lorraine and Champagne Bar and the cons Boulogne saved Troyes in 1230 with his horsemen, after a long night march and attack the invaders in the early morning.  
At the same time, Simon was Noted by Letters Patent of Thibaut IV conventions of a marriage between the eldest son of his second marriage, John (later Sir John, Chronicler of St.  Louis) with Alix de Grandpre.  

This is the last important act of Simon, which the rest of his life devoted himself to the government of its fields. He founded two new cities, and in 1208 Mathons Briey-la-Cote in 1222. He was very liberal to religious institutions, including the collegiate church of Saint-Laurent, enclosed within the walls of his castle of Joinville. This observation must be qualified because vis-à-vis the abbeys of Saint-Urbain and Montier-en-Der, the family tradition is perpetuated. Challenges at every turn, claims unjust, unfair contributions levied on the abbey lands, violence committed by the manorial officers, these are the reasons which led, again, to a sentence of excommunication by the Bishop of Toul ally to Henry II Bar, during the War of 1229 to 1230.

Under Jean de Joinville, however, known for its high religious sentiments, King Louis IX had to intervene about similar cases: the bailiff of Chaumont finally forced the pious sire to get rid of his adversion to the King, Lord Dominant.

In March 1233, the Count of Champagne Thibaut IV, renewed the charter by which he declared hereditary Seneschal of Champagne for Joinville. All his life, Simon had fought for the final consecration. He died two months later, and his widow Beatrice then took the title of "Senescalissa Campania," Sir John was only nine years. He would be educated at the court of Champagne.

Simon de Joinville, mort en 1233, est un seigneur de Joinville.

Quatrième fils de Geoffroy IV, Simon, seigneur de Sailly, devient seigneur de Joinville à la mort de son frère Geoffroy V en Terre Sainte.

--------------------

Simon de Joinville, who died in 1233, is a Lord of Joinville

His fourth son of Geoffroy IV, Simon, lord of Sailly, became lord of Joinville in the death of his brother Geoffrey V Holy Land. This is evidenced in June 1204 by acts of charity and it relies on the anniversary thereof.

During the early years of his arrival, Simon was engaged upon the administration of his estate, and donations to monasteries in the neighborhood. It seemed less inclined to war than its ancestors, while many opportunities presented themselves.

The year of his first marriage, he took the cross against the Albigenses. Between June 1209 and March 1210, we reported in the region of Montsegur.

The title of Seneschal of Champagne appears for the first time in May 1206.  Eight years would pass before he took it again.  The hereditary title for Joinville was not admitted.  He had many battles and circumstances for it to become hereditary for Simon and his successors, after long struggles between sly and brutal Blanche of Navarre, Countess of Champagne, and the counts of Brienne, Duke of Lorraine (including Simon was an ally), the Archbishop of Trier, Renard de Choiseul, to mention only the most important protagonists.  

The fighting was hard despite truce: the Duke of Lorraine and Simon gave each a truce to Blanche of Navarre in 1218. The Countess of Champagne then made an alliance with Frederick II, and subsequently defeated the Duke of Lorraine and Simon de Joinville. Simon Also had to be assisted by men of the abbey of Saint-Urbain-Maconcourt to defend his castle of Joinville in battle.

In the treaty that followed, Simon said that not having rebelled because Champagne unfairly refused to recognize his hereditary right to the Seneschal. On the other hand, Champagne, for fear of Joinville and their allies, powerful nobles, Joinville to recognize the title of seneschal, as hereditary, with a promise of fidelity.

Some compensation in rebates fiefs came to seal the treaty: mowing, Geoffrey Cirey, and Arnulf of Reynel, for example. The act recognizes this as hereditary Seneschal will be signed until July 28 1226.

Meanwhile, Simon, too, old family tradition requires, is excommunicated once, and twice: by the pope and the bishop of Chalons, for his attitude in the conflict against the Counts of Champagne, like all supporters Comte de Brienne elsewhere. The Episcopal sentence was revoked in July 1218, with the obligation to return what was looted in Thonnance and Suzannecourt: wine, wheat, fodder and furnishings. The papal anathema was lifted in December of that year.

Simon had crossed since July 1218, he was careful to leave his wife the usufruct of all his possessions, except the castle of Joinville, that even men of Joinville were kept up to fifteen years of his son Geoffrey .

We know little about him in the Holy Land, if it is to Damietta in April 1219. After the siege of that city in November of that year, his stay in Egypt did not last: Had he returned to Joinville in September 1220.

As a steward, he arbitrated a dispute between the White Countess of Champagne and the Count of Rethel Hughes in 1221.  

A widower, he married Beatrice, daughter of Stephen III Auxonne. Their son John was the chronicle of St. Louis. The chroniclers mention children's first and second bed s'accordèrent well, and they last much of their wealth to the marriage relationship as one of their sister had a contract with the House of Savoy.

Simon then experiences financial difficulties and dis not hesitate to borrow from the monks of Clairvaux 400 pounds and 500 pounds at the bishop of Chalons, the Count of Champagne on signing the document security. These are substantial for the time.

The young Count Thibaut IV, who had previously questioned the nomination of Simon as hereditary Seneschal of Champagne granted by his mother Blanche of Navarre, later came to discuss his lease. Many dealings "of power" took place between vassals and overlords of the region: Guillaume de Joinville, Bishop of Langres, brother of Simon, who had to commit himself to repay the loan from his brother. In 1226, Count of Champagne is Criticized by King Louis VIII himself on his conduct at the siege of Avignon.

Beginning 1227, Simon joined the barons who rebelled against Blanche of Castile. A little later, following the example of his overlords and Champagne Bar, he approaches her, participating in a truce and surrenders. In March of that year, he returned to Joinville.

Again the barons revolted, and Hostilities recommenced late 1229.  Simon, combined with Lorraine and Champagne Bar and the cons Boulogne saved Troyes in 1230 with his horsemen, after a long night march and attack the invaders in the early morning.  
At the same time, Simon was Noted by Letters Patent of Thibaut IV conventions of a marriage between the eldest son of his second marriage, John (later Sir John, Chronicler of St.  Louis) with Alix de Grandpre.  

This is the last important act of Simon, which the rest of his life devoted himself to the government of its fields. He founded two new cities, and in 1208 Mathons Briey-la-Cote in 1222. He was very liberal to religious institutions, including the collegiate church of Saint-Laurent, enclosed within the walls of his castle of Joinville. This observation must be qualified because vis-à-vis the abbeys of Saint-Urbain and Montier-en-Der, the family tradition is perpetuated. Challenges at every turn, claims unjust, unfair contributions levied on the abbey lands, violence committed by the manorial officers, these are the reasons which led, again, to a sentence of excommunication by the Bishop of Toul ally to Henry II Bar, during the War of 1229 to 1230.

Under Jean de Joinville, however, known for its high religious sentiments, King Louis IX had to intervene about similar cases: the bailiff of Chaumont finally forced the pious sire to get rid of his adversion to the King, Lord Dominant.

In March 1233, the Count of Champagne Thibaut IV, renewed the charter by which he declared hereditary Seneschal of Champagne for Joinville. All his life, Simon had fought for the final consecration. He died two months later, and his widow Beatrice then took the title of "Senescalissa Campania," Sir John was only nine years. He would be educated at the court of Champagne.

Simon de Joinville, mort en 1233, est un seigneur de Joinville.

Quatrième fils de Geoffroy IV, Simon, seigneur de Sailly, devient seigneur de Joinville à la mort de son frère Geoffroy V en Terre Sainte.

--------------------

Simon de Joinville, who died in 1233, is a Lord of Joinville

His fourth son of Geoffroy IV, Simon, lord of Sailly, became lord of Joinville in the death of his brother Geoffrey V Holy Land. This is evidenced in June 1204 by acts of charity and it relies on the anniversary thereof.

During the early years of his arrival, Simon was engaged upon the administration of his estate, and donations to monasteries in the neighborhood. It seemed less inclined to war than its ancestors, while many opportunities presented themselves.

The year of his first marriage, he took the cross against the Albigenses. Between June 1209 and March 1210, we reported in the region of Montsegur.

The title of Seneschal of Champagne appears for the first time in May 1206.  Eight years would pass before he took it again.  The hereditary title for Joinville was not admitted.  He had many battles and circumstances for it to become hereditary for Simon and his successors, after long struggles between sly and brutal Blanche of Navarre, Countess of Champagne, and the counts of Brienne, Duke of Lorraine (including Simon was an ally), the Archbishop of Trier, Renard de Choiseul, to mention only the most important protagonists.  

The fighting was hard despite truce: the Duke of Lorraine and Simon gave each a truce to Blanche of Navarre in 1218. The Countess of Champagne then made an alliance with Frederick II, and subsequently defeated the Duke of Lorraine and Simon de Joinville. Simon Also had to be assisted by men of the abbey of Saint-Urbain-Maconcourt to defend his castle of Joinville in battle.

In the treaty that followed, Simon said that not having rebelled because Champagne unfairly refused to recognize his hereditary right to the Seneschal. On the other hand, Champagne, for fear of Joinville and their allies, powerful nobles, Joinville to recognize the title of seneschal, as hereditary, with a promise of fidelity.

Some compensation in rebates fiefs came to seal the treaty: mowing, Geoffrey Cirey, and Arnulf of Reynel, for example. The act recognizes this as hereditary Seneschal will be signed until July 28 1226.

Meanwhile, Simon, too, old family tradition requires, is excommunicated once, and twice: by the pope and the bishop of Chalons, for his attitude in the conflict against the Counts of Champagne, like all supporters Comte de Brienne elsewhere. The Episcopal sentence was revoked in July 1218, with the obligation to return what was looted in Thonnance and Suzannecourt: wine, wheat, fodder and furnishings. The papal anathema was lifted in December of that year.

Simon had crossed since July 1218, he was careful to leave his wife the usufruct of all his possessions, except the castle of Joinville, that even men of Joinville were kept up to fifteen years of his son Geoffrey .

We know little about him in the Holy Land, if it is to Damietta in April 1219. After the siege of that city in November of that year, his stay in Egypt did not last: Had he returned to Joinville in September 1220.

As a steward, he arbitrated a dispute between the White Countess of Champagne and the Count of Rethel Hughes in 1221.  

A widower, he married Beatrice, daughter of Stephen III Auxonne. Their son John was the chronicle of St. Louis. The chroniclers mention children's first and second bed s'accordèrent well, and they last much of their wealth to the marriage relationship as one of their sister had a contract with the House of Savoy.

Simon then experiences financial difficulties and dis not hesitate to borrow from the monks of Clairvaux 400 pounds and 500 pounds at the bishop of Chalons, the Count of Champagne on signing the document security. These are substantial for the time.

The young Count Thibaut IV, who had previously questioned the nomination of Simon as hereditary Seneschal of Champagne granted by his mother Blanche of Navarre, later came to discuss his lease. Many dealings "of power" took place between vassals and overlords of the region: Guillaume de Joinville, Bishop of Langres, brother of Simon, who had to commit himself to repay the loan from his brother. In 1226, Count of Champagne is Criticized by King Louis VIII himself on his conduct at the siege of Avignon.

Beginning 1227, Simon joined the barons who rebelled against Blanche of Castile. A little later, following the example of his overlords and Champagne Bar, he approaches her, participating in a truce and surrenders. In March of that year, he returned to Joinville.

Again the barons revolted, and Hostilities recommenced late 1229.  Simon, combined with Lorraine and Champagne Bar and the cons Boulogne saved Troyes in 1230 with his horsemen, after a long night march and attack the invaders in the early morning.  
At the same time, Simon was Noted by Letters Patent of Thibaut IV conventions of a marriage between the eldest son of his second marriage, John (later Sir John, Chronicler of St.  Louis) with Alix de Grandpre.  

This is the last important act of Simon, which the rest of his life devoted himself to the government of its fields. He founded two new cities, and in 1208 Mathons Briey-la-Cote in 1222. He was very liberal to religious institutions, including the collegiate church of Saint-Laurent, enclosed within the walls of his castle of Joinville. This observation must be qualified because vis-à-vis the abbeys of Saint-Urbain and Montier-en-Der, the family tradition is perpetuated. Challenges at every turn, claims unjust, unfair contributions levied on the abbey lands, violence committed by the manorial officers, these are the reasons which led, again, to a sentence of excommunication by the Bishop of Toul ally to Henry II Bar, during the War of 1229 to 1230.

Under Jean de Joinville, however, known for its high religious sentiments, King Louis IX had to intervene about similar cases: the bailiff of Chaumont finally forced the pious sire to get rid of his adversion to the King, Lord Dominant.

In March 1233, the Count of Champagne Thibaut IV, renewed the charter by which he declared hereditary Seneschal of Champagne for Joinville. All his life, Simon had fought for the final consecration. He died two months later, and his widow Beatrice then took the title of "Senescalissa Campania," Sir John was only nine years. He would be educated at the court of Champagne.

Simon de Joinville, mort en 1233, est un seigneur de Joinville.

Quatrième fils de Geoffroy IV, Simon, seigneur de Sailly, devient seigneur de Joinville à la mort de son frère Geoffroy V en Terre Sainte.

--------------------

Simon de Joinville, who died in 1233, is a Lord of Joinville

His fourth son of Geoffroy IV, Simon, lord of Sailly, became lord of Joinville in the death of his brother Geoffrey V Holy Land. This is evidenced in June 1204 by acts of charity and it relies on the anniversary thereof.

During the early years of his arrival, Simon was engaged upon the administration of his estate, and donations to monasteries in the neighborhood. It seemed less inclined to war than its ancestors, while many opportunities presented themselves.

The year of his first marriage, he took the cross against the Albigenses. Between June 1209 and March 1210, we reported in the region of Montsegur.

The title of Seneschal of Champagne appears for the first time in May 1206.  Eight years would pass before he took it again.  The hereditary title for Joinville was not admitted.  He had many battles and circumstances for it to become hereditary for Simon and his successors, after long struggles between sly and brutal Blanche of Navarre, Countess of Champagne, and the counts of Brienne, Duke of Lorraine (including Simon was an ally), the Archbishop of Trier, Renard de Choiseul, to mention only the most important protagonists.  

The fighting was hard despite truce: the Duke of Lorraine and Simon gave each a truce to Blanche of Navarre in 1218. The Countess of Champagne then made an alliance with Frederick II, and subsequently defeated the Duke of Lorraine and Simon de Joinville. Simon Also had to be assisted by men of the abbey of Saint-Urbain-Maconcourt to defend his castle of Joinville in battle.

In the treaty that followed, Simon said that not having rebelled because Champagne unfairly refused to recognize his hereditary right to the Seneschal. On the other hand, Champagne, for fear of Joinville and their allies, powerful nobles, Joinville to recognize the title of seneschal, as hereditary, with a promise of fidelity.

Some compensation in rebates fiefs came to seal the treaty: mowing, Geoffrey Cirey, and Arnulf of Reynel, for example. The act recognizes this as hereditary Seneschal will be signed until July 28 1226.

Meanwhile, Simon, too, old family tradition requires, is excommunicated once, and twice: by the pope and the bishop of Chalons, for his attitude in the conflict against the Counts of Champagne, like all supporters Comte de Brienne elsewhere. The Episcopal sentence was revoked in July 1218, with the obligation to return what was looted in Thonnance and Suzannecourt: wine, wheat, fodder and furnishings. The papal anathema was lifted in December of that year.

Simon had crossed since July 1218, he was careful to leave his wife the usufruct of all his possessions, except the castle of Joinville, that even men of Joinville were kept up to fifteen years of his son Geoffrey .

We know little about him in the Holy Land, if it is to Damietta in April 1219. After the siege of that city in November of that year, his stay in Egypt did not last: Had he returned to Joinville in September 1220.

As a steward, he arbitrated a dispute between the White Countess of Champagne and the Count of Rethel Hughes in 1221.  

A widower, he married Beatrice, daughter of Stephen III Auxonne. Their son John was the chronicle of St. Louis. The chroniclers mention children's first and second bed s'accordèrent well, and they last much of their wealth to the marriage relationship as one of their sister had a contract with the House of Savoy.

Simon then experiences financial difficulties and dis not hesitate to borrow from the monks of Clairvaux 400 pounds and 500 pounds at the bishop of Chalons, the Count of Champagne on signing the document security. These are substantial for the time.

The young Count Thibaut IV, who had previously questioned the nomination of Simon as hereditary Seneschal of Champagne granted by his mother Blanche of Navarre, later came to discuss his lease. Many dealings "of power" took place between vassals and overlords of the region: Guillaume de Joinville, Bishop of Langres, brother of Simon, who had to commit himself to repay the loan from his brother. In 1226, Count of Champagne is Criticized by King Louis VIII himself on his conduct at the siege of Avignon.

Beginning 1227, Simon joined the barons who rebelled against Blanche of Castile. A little later, following the example of his overlords and Champagne Bar, he approaches her, participating in a truce and surrenders. In March of that year, he returned to Joinville.

Again the barons revolted, and Hostilities recommenced late 1229.  Simon, combined with Lorraine and Champagne Bar and the cons Boulogne saved Troyes in 1230 with his horsemen, after a long night march and attack the invaders in the early morning.  
At the same time, Simon was Noted by Letters Patent of Thibaut IV conventions of a marriage between the eldest son of his second marriage, John (later Sir John, Chronicler of St.  Louis) with Alix de Grandpre.  

This is the last important act of Simon, which the rest of his life devoted himself to the government of its fields. He founded two new cities, and in 1208 Mathons Briey-la-Cote in 1222. He was very liberal to religious institutions, including the collegiate church of Saint-Laurent, enclosed within the walls of his castle of Joinville. This observation must be qualified because vis-à-vis the abbeys of Saint-Urbain and Montier-en-Der, the family tradition is perpetuated. Challenges at every turn, claims unjust, unfair contributions levied on the abbey lands, violence committed by the manorial officers, these are the reasons which led, again, to a sentence of excommunication by the Bishop of Toul ally to Henry II Bar, during the War of 1229 to 1230.

Under Jean de Joinville, however, known for its high religious sentiments, King Louis IX had to intervene about similar cases: the bailiff of Chaumont finally forced the pious sire to get rid of his adversion to the King, Lord Dominant.

In March 1233, the Count of Champagne Thibaut IV, renewed the charter by which he declared hereditary Seneschal of Champagne for Joinville. All his life, Simon had fought for the final consecration. He died two months later, and his widow Beatrice then took the title of "Senescalissa Campania," Sir John was only nine years. He would be educated at the court of Champagne.

Simon de Joinville, mort en 1233, est un seigneur de Joinville.

Quatrième fils de Geoffroy IV, Simon, seigneur de Sailly, devient seigneur de Joinville à la mort de son frère Geoffroy V en Terre Sainte.

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Simon de Joinville, Sénéchal de Champagne's Timeline

1175
1175
Joinville, France
1209
1209
Age 34
or 1206
1212
1212
Age 37
France
1215
1215
Age 40
Bourgogne, France
1225
May 1, 1225
Age 50
Champagne, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1225
Age 50
France
1228
1228
Age 53
Dublin, Ireland
1231
1231
Age 56
France
1233
May 1, 1233
Age 58
or May 1233
1235
1235
Age 58
France