Sir Francis Bryan

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Francis Bryan, Sr.

Nicknames: "Bryant", "Bryan", "III"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: County Claire, Ireland
Death: Died in Belfast, Antrim Co., Ireland
Place of Burial: Belfast, Ireland
Immediate Family:

Son of William Smith Bryan; Catherine Bryan and Lady Catherine (Countess of Ormond) Bryan
Husband of Lady Sarah O'Bryan and Sarah A. Bryan
Father of Sir Cornelius Joseph Bryant; Lewis Bryan, Sr.; Captain Morgan Bryan; William Bryan, II; Francis Bryan, Jr. and 2 others
Brother of Thomas Bryan, Sr.; Morgan Bryant, I; David Bryant, Sr.; John Smith Bryan; Edmund Bryant and 7 others

Occupation: Returned to Ireland to reclaim land in County Clare but was forced to flee to Denmark
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Francis Bryan, Sr.

Merge data to be resolved: Birth Location Glouster Co, Virginia OR County Clare, Ireland. --------------------

Francis Bryan III , eldest son of William Smith Bryan and Catherine Morgan, was born about 1630 in Virginia. He returned to Ireland in 1667 and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker of Denmark (a cousin to the Princess of Orange) and was an ancestor of Rebecca Bryan who married Daniel Boone . He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694. He had two sons, William, born in Ireland, and Morgan, born in Demark. Both came to America.

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William Smith Bryan died in 1667 in Virginia and eldest son, Francis Bryan III, returned to England to reclaim family titles and estates (Cromwell and the Republic were gone and the monarchy under Charles II had been restored).

Francis III got into political difficulties with the Crown and fled to the court of William of Orange in The Hague. There he married Sarah Brinker ca. 1670, a Hollander, and moved to her family's property in Denmark. In late 1671, Morgan Bryan was born there, as were four or five subsequent children. Charles II of England was succeeded on the throne by James II. This allowed Francis Bryan III to return to England. However, James II also refused to restore the Bryan family lands and titles to Francis III so he opted to join the movement to replace the unpopular Catholic James II with his Protestant sister Mary Tudor and her husband, William of Orange.

Francis Bryan III and son Morgan, fought in the Battle of Boyne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Boyne) and at the Siege of Limerick [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Limerick_(1690)] in Ireland with adherents of William of Orange. Although King James II was ousted and he was succeeded by William III and Mary, Francis Bryan III again failed to win Crown support for the recovery of family property. He died in 1694 and was buried in Belfast. Morgan and several purported siblings subsequently came to America.

Ms. Hewlett's posting of May 5, 2007, may be a scrambled version of an event described in a family history written in 1830 by a grandson of Morgan and Martha Strode Bryan. - Martha Strode and her two brothers were small children when they sailed with their parents for Philadelphia from Holland in company with a group of Huguenots. The parents, both English, were political refugees. Both died en route and those aboard ship arranged to have their children bound out upon making port. After serving her indenture, Martha was 21 when she married Morgan Bryan ca. 1718.

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These notes are verbatim as published in the Register of Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 40, No. 132, pp. 318-322. C1974 KY State Historical Society-Frankfort. Edward Bryan, the compiler, is descended from Morgan Bryan. He was born in Louisville, but at the time of the publication, lived in Colorado.

-------------------- Francis Bryan Birth 1630 in Claire, Ireland Death 1 Apr 1693 in Belfast, Antrim, Ireland

Parents: William Smith Bryan (1600 – 1667) and Catherine Morgan (1604 – 1680).

Spouse: Sarah Brinker (1634 – 1698).

Children:

  • William Bryan (1655 – 1742)
  • Lewis Bryan (1660 – 1735)
  • Francis Bryan (1670 – 1763)
  • Morgan Bryan (1671 – 1763)
  • Francis Bryan (1673 – 1763)
  • Cornelius Bryan (1697 – 1751)

Timeline

  • 1630 - Birth Co. Claire, Ireland - 7 source citations, 1667, Age: 37.
  • Marriage to Sarah Brinker - Chester Co., PA - 5 source citations.
  • Death 4/1/1693 at age 63, Belfast, Antrim, Ireland.

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U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Frances Bryan Name: Frances Bryan SAR Membership: 52386 Birth Date: 1630 Death Date: 1694 Father: Wm Smith Bryan Children: Morgan Bryan

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Francis Bryan


1 - 8 of 8 StoriesAttached toReturn to Ireland Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by katcarrillo to Muller/Hewitt/Bryan/Reid Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 He returned to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker , and became a relation of Rebecca Bryan who married Daniel Boone. Fra... Read more » Francis Bryan Per Family Source Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by sandrac47 to Butler Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Note: Notes for FRANCIS BRYANIII: Standard bearer to William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne August. 12, 1690 .Info from C. Moore P. O. Box 19042, Jacksonville, Fl. 32245In 1667, Francis Bryan III (son of William Smith Bryan) returned to ... Read more » Francis Bryan ABOUT THE BRYAN FAMILY of MORGAN BRYAN Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 25 Oct 2008 THE BRYANS and THE BOONES: Morgan Bryan's Relatives and In-Laws Read more » Francis Bryan Sir Francis BRYAN of the Blackfriars, Ampthill, and Woburn Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 25 Oct 2008 Sir Francis BRYAN, Knight Lord Chief Justice of Ireland Born: ABT 1490, Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England Died: 2 Feb 1549/50, Clonmel, Ireland Buried: Feb 1549/50, Waterford, Ireland Father: Thomas BRYAN (Sir Knight) Mother: Margaret BOURC... Read more » Francis Bryan Deported to america - descendancy Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by antap2 to Anderson, Carol on 25 Oct 2008 DESCENDANTS OF EDMOND BRYANGeneration No. 1 Last updated: July 3, 2004 1. Edmond Bryan was born abt. 1412 in Cheddington, Buck, England. He Married Alice BURES in 1432, she was born 1416. Died ?.


Children of Edmond and Alice Brya... Read more »


Francis Bryan Family and English History Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by ldh555udh to Hurst, Morinelli, Prado, Kincy, Burrows, Shepherd, Lindsey, Emery, Devaney and Family on 25 Oct 2008 McDaniel-King Entries: 48216 Updated: 2007-04-08 22:39:13 UTC (Sun) Contact: Elaine King Kubinski Use this as a starting point only. This database contains unintentional errors. You must do your own research. I am attempting to document everything in t... Read more » Francis Bryan Francis Bryan Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by genevawhite811 to Geneva's Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Name: Francis Bryan Given Name: Francis Surname: Bryan Sex: M Birth: 1630, Claire, Ireland Death: Apr 1693 in Belfast, Ireland Burial: Belfast, Ireland

 Francis III no doubt saw the new world for the first time...  Read more »

Francis Bryan Background Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by nicoleclaesen to Claesen Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Francis Bryan III was born in 1630. Most researchers indica te that he was born in Gloucester, Virginia, but this appea rs to be in error since both of his parents lived in Irelan d until 1650. Francis III no doubt saw the new world for th e first time at... Read more » Francis Bryan


1 - 8 of 8

Per Family Source Per Family Source Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by sandrac47 to Butler Family Tree on 26 Feb 2008 Note: Notes for FRANCIS BRYANIII: Standard bearer to William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne August. 12, 1690 .Info from C. Moore P. O. Box 19042, Jacksonville, Fl. 32245In 1667, Francis Bryan III (son of William Smith Bryan) returned to Ireland inan attempt to regain the family estates in county Claire. Meeting with strongopposition he fled to Denmark where he married Sarah Brinker, said to have beena cousin to the Prince of Orange. Francis was able to return to Ireland afterthe "Bloodless Revolution" about 1683 where he settled in Belfast and lived tothe date of his death in 1694. It was in Belfast 1685, that his second sonWilliam, was born.Historical information obtained from Melise Lyneille Leech of Grand Junction,CO. e-mail address Mleech@gj.netFrancis Bryan III was born in 1630. Most researchers indicate that he was bornin Gloucester, Virginia, but this appears to be in error since both his parentslived in Ireland until 1650. Francis III no doubt saw the new world for the first time at about age 20 when the Bryan family was exiled to the Virginia Colony.We know nothing about the life of Francis in Virginia, but with the end of theCommonwealth and the reestablishment of the Monarchy under Charles II in 1660,he no doubt felt that it was safe to return to Ireland. Thus, in 1667 after 17years in Virginia, he left for Ireland with the intent of reclaiming his father'sestates. He was 37 years old at this time which gives rise to the possibilitythat he could have been married a first time in Virginia.The presence of Francis III in Ireland was anything but welcome by English officials, and in particular by those now in possession of his father's lands.He was so threatened that he fled to Denmark, which had become a haven forpersecuted protestants whose cause had been championed by the Dutch Prince ofOrange. Francis III soon married Sarah Brinker, a cousin of the Prince of Orange, and their first son, Morgan Bryan, was born in Denmark. He was finally permitted to return to Ireland in 1683.A little background history will help explain the future movements of Francis and his family. The Dutch Prince William of Orange married Princess Mary, daughter of King James II of England and though her father was Roman Catholic, she embraced the Protestant cause. The three year rein of James II was one of turmoil and William of Orange and Mary were invited by the protestant controlled Parliament to assume the Throne. On 5 November 1688 William landed at Brixham, Devon, with a sizable army, quickly advanced to London and took the Throne on Christmas Day, forcing James II into exile in France. They officially became King William III and Queen Mary II in February 1689. The deposed King James II did not accept his fate and with the help of the French managed to raise a Catholic Irish army. King William's army met the forces of James II at the Boyne River about 25 miles north of Dublin and here took place the historic "Battle of the Boyne" on 11 July 1690 where the forces of James II were soundly defeated. Francis III was a standard bearer to King William in that battle. When the Battle of the Boyne was fought in Ireland in 1690, between King William II of Orange against James II, Francis Bryan, and his sons William and Morgan served in King William's Color Guard. Francis died in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1694, the country of his birth, and spent much of his adult life fighting to restore his lost heritage. A descendant of the leading families of both England and Ireland, he began his life as a defendant of the Roman Catholic Church and ended as a staunch Protestant. He lived 31 years in Ireland, 17 years in Virginia and 15 years in Denmark. We surmise, that when Francis Bryan III returned to Ireland from his exile in Denmark, all hopes for the restoration of family estates and titles had been given up. Instead, he, or his family, turned to become a part of theScotch-Irish group, which was to play so prominent a part in the New World.We wonder if some influences he came under while exiled in Denmark did not havemuch to do with it. Or it might have been contact with the Protestant Movementin northern Ireland. Any way we now see political titles, offices in the government. landed estates, royal affiliations, all tossed aside and the Bryans as every day common people. But the adventurous spirit of their forefathers was not tossed aside. We find them setting their faces toward a new and hazardous world.

Sir Francis Bryan of Blackfriars, Ampthill, & Woburn Sir Francis BRYAN of the Blackfriars, Ampthill, and Woburn Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 10 Mar 2007 Sir Francis BRYAN, KnightLord Chief Justice of IrelandBorn: ABT 1490, Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England Died: 2 Feb 1549/50, Clonmel, IrelandBuried: Feb 1549/50, Waterford, Ireland Father: Thomas BRYAN (Sir Knight)Mother: Margaret BOURCHIERMarried 1: Phillipa SPICE (dau. of Sir Humphrey Spice of Black Notley) (w. of John Fortescue)Children:1. Edmund BRYAN (Esq.)Married 2: Joan FITZGERALD (C. Ormonde/C. Desmond) ABT 1548, Chidington, Buckshire, England Children: 2. Francis BRYAN (Sir)3. Elizabeth BRYAN-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sir Francis Bryan of the Blackfriars and Ampthill and Woburn (by 1492-1550), first surviving son of Sir Thomas Bryan of Ashridge, Herts. by Margaret, dau. of Sir Humphrey Bourchier (d.1471), son and heir of John, 1st Lord Berners. educ. ?Oxf. Married first, by Mar 1522, Phillippa, dau. and heiress of Humphrey Spice of Black Notley, Essex, widow of John Fortescue of Ponsbourne, Herts.; and after her death, by 29 Aug 1548, Joan, dau. of James Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald, 10th Earl of Desmond, widow of James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond (d.1546); at least 1 son illegit. Auc. family by 31 Jan 1518. Kntd. 2 Jul 1522, banneret Sep 1547. Capt. Margaret Bonaventure 1513; master of the toils 1518-48; constable, Hertford castle, Herts. 1518-34, Harlech castle, Merion. 1521-d., Wallingford castle, Berks. 1536, jt. constable, Warwick castle, Warws. 1528-d.; cipherer, the Household 1520; gent. privy chamber by 1521; esquire of the body by 1522; commr. subsidy, Herts. 1523, Essex 1524, survey lands, Calais 1532, tenths of spiritualities, Beds. 1535, benevolence 1544/45, musters 1546; forester, Enfield Chase, Mdx. 1524-6; v.-adm. 1525, 1543; j.p. Beds. 1525-d., Bucks. 1525-42, Herts. 1526; master of the henchmen 1526-49; custos rot. Bucks. 1528; keeper, Richmond Park, Surr. 1529-46, jt. (with Francis Bulstrode) Brogborough Park, Beds., 1547; Ambassador to France and Rome Aug 1528-Oct 1529, France Oct 1530-Dec 1531, Nov 1535, Apr-Aug 1538, to the Empire Oct-Dec 1543; steward, the Chiltern hundreds 1536, Ewelme and Nuneham Courtnay, Oxon. 1538; chief butler, Eng. 1537-d.; recorder, Bedford c.1548; marshal, Ireland Nov. 1548, ld. justice Dec. 1549. Francis Bryan was born into a family well-endowed by the achievements of his grandfather. Sir Thomas Bryan, chief justice of common pleas, died in 1500 holding lands in Buckinghamshire and seven other counties stretching from Kent to Yorkshire.Sir Thomas Bryan, the judge's son, made his career at court where he was a knight of the body to Henry VII and Henry VIII and vice-chamberlain to Queen Catalina de Aragon: he married into a cultured baronial family prominent at court and his widow, who was something of a blue-stocking, was to become governess to the princesses Mary and Elizabeth, and Prince Edward, and possibly of the King illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond. Francis Bryan may have been the second son of this marriage: he had a brother Thomas who died before 1508 and was buried in Ashridge chapel. There is no reference to either brother in their grandfather's will of 1496, but Francis was almost certainly born before that date: the abbot of Woburn was to describe him in 1538 as ‘now growing in age’. As a boy he may have been placed in the household of Sir Thomas Parr (d.1517), whom in later life he was to call his special patron, and he is thought to have finished his education at Oxford. As the son of one courtier and the protégé of another, Bryan soon found his own place at court, where one of his sisters became the wife of Sir Henry Guildford and the other of Sir Nicholas Carew.The first glimpse of Bryan comes in 1513 when during the admiralty of his kinsman Sir Thomas Howard he held a command in the navy. Within two years he had established himself as a favourite with the King, who was of an age with him: a frequent sharer in the royal pastimes, his enthusiasm for the chase was rewarded by his appointment in 1518 as master of the toils, but in the years that followed he was given posts of greater responsibility. The extent of Bryan's patrimony is not known, but between 1517 and 1523 the King's favour brought him a number of stewardships and bailiwicks in Berkshire and Buckinghamshire. In 1522 he obtained the wardship of Henry Fortescue, whose mother he had already married. Five years later he was assessed for the subsidy in the Household at £400 in lands and fees.Bryan's career overseas began inauspiciously. In 1518, while his uncle John Bourchier, 2nd Lord Berners journeyed to Spain, he visited the French court with several other young men, among them Nicholas Carew. They found such boon companions in France that on returning to England they ‘were all French in eating, drinking and apparel’. Their behaviour led to their dismissal from the court in May 1519 on the ground that ‘after their appetite’ they ‘governed the King’. Carew was removed to Calais, but Bryan kept his post and was in Henry VIII's retinue in 1520, when he doubtless revelled in the Field of the Cloth of Gold. His flair for languages commended him to Wolsey, who in 1521 employed him on a mission to Bruges and the Netherlands and thereafter increasingly on special assignments. In 1522 he served in the expedition against Brittany, and after the fall of Morlaix he received the accolade ‘for hardiness and noble courage’. He came to no harm in battle, but in the mock warfare of the court he was less fortunate, one of his eyes being put out by the ‘shivering’ of a spear.In the summer of 1528 Bryan went to Paris to confer with Francois I and to meet Cardinal Campeggio on his journey to England. Of this mission John Clerk, Wolsey's chaplain, reported a month later that Bryan had ‘right well done his part’, especially in his attentions to Campeggio. Later in the autumn Bryan was appointed Ambassador with Peter Vannes, the King's secretary, to travel by way of Paris to Rome to promote a peace between Francois I and the Emperor and to further the King's divorce. Probably was on that journey that Anthony Denny acompanied Bryan. In the following Jan, when they were joined by Gardiner, Vannes informed Wolsey that Bryan was behaving prudently and was beloved by all. A cousin of Anne Boleyn through their common grandmother Elizabeth Tilney, Bryan was wholly in favour of the divorce: he called Anne ‘my mistress that shall be’ and said that he would not write to her until he could relate what would please her most in the world. Although during the summer he was reporting pessimistically about the mission and asking to return home, he was not recalled until Oct.Bryan undertook special missions in France during 1530 and at the end of that year was appointed resident Ambassador at the French court in place of John Welsborne. He was soon followed by Sir Nicholas Carew, his sister's husband, and at that time as zealous champion of Anne Boleyn as himself. He remained there for the next 12 months and earned the King's approval for his ‘dexterity, diligence and good behaviour’: his only shortcoming was his lack of Latin, and to make this good the King's almoner Edward Fox was sent to join him. Although from 1532 more of Bryan's time was to be spent in England, he served on further missions to France between 1533 and 1538. Between May and Aug 1533 Bryan was travelling with the Duke of Norfolk in France, and he was engaged in similar negotiations, together with Bishop Gardiner and Sir John Wallop, in Dec 1535.As a gentleman of the privy chamber Bryan was expected to be in attendance for alternate periods of six weeks, and when in England he was a central figure at court. His depositions as to certain remarks and actions by Catalina de Aragon were used against her in 1533. Cromwell thought him implicated in the misdeeds of Anne Boleyn and denounced him as ‘vicar of hell’, but when he peremptorily called Bryan before him nothing was proved and in a rearrangement of offices a few days before the execution Bryan became chief gentleman of the privy chamber and bore the King's personal announcement of the event to Jane Seymour. In 1537 he attended the christening of Prince Edward and two years later the reception of Anne of Cleves, where he was noted for his rich apparel and a chain of great worth and strange fashion. Apart from the episode at the time of Anne Boleyn's fall his relations with Cromwell were evidently correct, if not friendly: even then Cromwell had spoken to the King on his behalf, and when he was abroad in 1537 and 1538 he thanked the minister for being good to him, as he learned from Sir John Russell and other friends.During his early married life Bryan may have been domiciled at the Fortescue manor of Faulkbourne, Essex, which was visited several times by the King. For a period from 1539 he lived at Woburn, Bedfordshire, after acquiring a lease of the site of the dissolved abbey there. His fees from court offices were supplemented by his many leases and stewardships in the home counties and the midlands. These brought him nominations to local commissions, especially in Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, but although thrice put forward as sheriff, for Essex and Hertfordshire in 1522 and 1523 and for Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire in 1528, he was never pricked. In 1535 and 1537 he reported to Cromwell on matters of treason heard at the sessions at Brickhill, Bedfordshire, and in 1535 the Bishop of Lincoln commended ‘the good order’ Bryan had taken in Buckinghamshire ‘in redressing the heresies hitherto used in this woody country of Chiltern’.Bryan was not one of the Members originally returned to the Parliament of 1529, but after the list of Members had been revised in the spring of 1532 Cromwell nominated him (in preference to Sir Robert Lee of Quarrendon) for Buckinghamshire, where a vacancy had existed since the translation of Sir Andrew Windsor to the Lords during the first session. It must have been either as Windsor's successor or, if he was passed over for the shire, as a borough Member that Bryan entered the Commons: he was there by the penultimate session, when his name appears on a list of Members thought to have had a particular connexion with the treasons bill then passing through Parliament, perhaps as belonging to a committee. He may have served again for the same constituency in the following Parliament, that of Jun 1536, when the King asked for the re-election of the previous Members, although his connexion with the doomed Queen perhaps told against him on that occasion: the statement that he sat for a borough in this Parliament rests on a misreading of the name of Sir Francis Bigod in a document compiled by the rebels of 1536.On the outbreak of that rebellion Bryan was joined with Sir John Russell and Sir William Parr in mustering the forces of Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire, and his signature appears with theirs and Sir William Fitzwilliam's on reports to the King. In the autumn of 1538 he fell ill and lost favour with the King when he drank too much and committed other ‘follies’ after losing money in Provence, but he recovered both health and favour in time to be elected a knight for Buckinghamshire to the Parliament of the following year. After the dissolution of this Parliament he was sent a letter about the collection of the subsidy he had helped to grant. He reappeared in the following Parliament, that of 1542, this time taking the senior place for the shire: the honour was perhaps a measure of the continuing confidence placed in him by a King who had recently rejected another cousin of his, Catherine Howard. In 1543, on the appointment of John Dudley, Lord Lisle as admiral, Bryan was made vice-admiral because of ‘his experience in sea matters’. An embassy to the Emperor in Oct 1543 was followed in the next year by service in the rearguard of the army in France with a personal muster of some 200 billmen and archers: the despatches sent to England in Jun and Jul bore his signature. These services were rewarded by a grant of the site and demesne lands of the late priory of Taunton, Somerset. In the summer of 1545 he reviewed the defence of the south-west coast in company with Russell, who suggested Bryan to the Council as the most suitable man to deputize for him. It was with Russell's son Francis that in the autumn Bryan was elected for Buckinghamshire in the last Parliament of the reign.With Henry VIII's death Bryan's own career entered its last phase: no longer a court favourite (although his mother was ‘lady mistress’ of the new King's household) he remained a considerable figure, not least by reason of his landed wealth which was assessed for subsidy at £888 a year. In May 1547 he was granted the keepership of six royal parks in Bedfordshire, to be held for life, in each case with one other grantee who probably acted as his deputy. For his part in the Protector Somerset's expedition against Scotland in Sep Bryan was created a knight banneret, and in the following year he was granted the bishop's palace at Norwich and given continued tenancy of extensive parts of the Blackfriars in London. He was not, however, elected to the first Edwardian Parliament, the knighthoods for Buckinghamshire going to Francis Russell and Anthony Lee, with each of whom Bryan had sat earlier.Bryan's marriage to the widow of the 9th Earl of Ormond was probably a political match designed to prevent her marriage to the Desmond heir, a union which in the event it merely postponed. In Nov 1548 Bryan arrived in Dublin to take up the office of lord marshal: a year later he was made lord justice pending the arrival of a new lord deputy to replace Sir Edward Bellingham, who had resented his appointment, but on 2 Feb 1550 he died suddenly at Clonmel from an unknown cause. If he made a will it has not been found and nothing is known of the disposition of his lands, most of which appear to have been held on lease. His son, who is mentioned as carrying a despatch to London in 1548 from the French admiral, was illegitimate.The course of Bryan's career and the witness of his contemporaries show him as a man of character and ability. His cultural interests were fostered especially by his uncle Lord Berners, whose many translations included, at Bryan's request, The golden boke of Marcus Aurelius. In 1548 Bryan himself translated from the French Antonio de Guevara's collection of stories and sayings under the title of A dispraise of the life of a courtier and a commendation of the life of the Labouryng man: in dedicating the work to William Parr, Marquess of Northampton, Bryan explained that he had undertaken it after seeing the marquess reading the book. Intimate with the circle of Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Bryan had a reputation as a poet of almost the same calibre as his friends. He was also a man who, according to the abbot of Woburn, dared to speak his mind to the King; on foreign missions he could on occasion be equally outspoken, if not arrogant. Roger Ascham, who presumably knew him well, described his youthful personality as being maintained even when ‘spent by years’, and one of Wyatt's satires addressed him as:Bryan ... who knows how great a graceIn writing is to counsel man the right.To thee ... that trots still up and downAnd never rests, but running day and nightFrom realm to realm, from city, street and town,Why dost thou wear thy body to the bones?to Bios Page to Family Pageto Peerage Page to Home PageONLINE SOURCE: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/FrancisBryan(JusticeofIreland).htm Additional information about this storyDescription Dateb.abt. 1490-92 Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England//d, 1549/50Conmel and Waterford, IrelandLocationEngland and Ireland

Bryan Family of Morgan Bryan ABOUT THE BRYAN FAMILY of MORGAN BRYAN Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 10 Mar 2007 McMahan/Kilsdonk AncestorsEntries: 19198 Updated: 2004-12-06 00:19:07 UTC (Mon) Contact: Kent McMahan at kmcmahan.louisville at worldnet.att.net ID: I8309 Name: Morgan Bryan Sex: M Birth: ABT 1774 1 Note: He is believed to be the son of a James Bryan. The Bryan family was one ofthe first to settle in the Kentucky territory (1792 statehood), then part ofVirginia. Brothers William, James, and Morgan Bryan, Jr., came with DanielBoone and Squire Boone. Daniel Boone's wife was Rebecca Bryan, the sister ofthe Bryan brothers. William Bryan's wife, Mary Boone, was Daniel Boone'ssister. Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Road trail to Kentucky in 1775.The Bryan's built a stockade fort Bryan Station, near Lexington, in late 1775.Marriage 1 Margaret Ransdell b: ABT 1780 in Fauquier Co., VA Married: BEF 1797 1Sources: William K. Ransdell manuscript "Sifted From The Ashes," 1988. -------------------- Francis Bryan III , eldest son of William Smith Bryan and Catherine Morgan, was born about 1630 in Virginia. He returned to Ireland in 1667 and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker of Denmark and was an ancestor of Rebecca Bryan who married Daniel Boone . Francis Bryan III returned to Ireland about 1683, and died in Belfast in 1694.

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Francis Bryan III, returned to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but being persecuted by the government he was obliged to seek refuge in Denmark.

He was born about 1630, married Sarah Brinker, a cousin to the Princess of Orange.

He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694. He had two sons, William, born in Ireland, and Morgan, born in Demark. Both came to America.

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William Smith Bryan died in 1667 in Virginia and eldest son, Francis Bryan III, returned to England to reclaim family titles and estates (Cromwell and the Republic were gone and the monarchy under Charles II had been restored).

Francis III got into political difficulties with the Crown and fled to the court of William of Orange in The Hague. There he married Sarah Brinker ca1670, a Hollander, and moved to her family's property in Denmark. In late 1671, Morgan Bryan was born there, as were four or five subsequent children. Charles II of England was succeeded on the throne by James II. This allowed Francis Bryan III to return to England. However, James II also refused to restore the Bryan family lands and titles to Francis III so he opted to join the movement to replace the unpopular Catholic James II with his Protestant sister Mary Tudor and her husband, William of Orange.

Francis Bryan III and son Morgan, fought in the Battle of Boyne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Boyne) and at the Siege of Limerick [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Limerick_(1690)] in Ireland with adherents of William of Orange. Although King James II was ousted and he was succeeded by William III and Mary, Francis Bryan III again failed to win Crown support for the recovery of family property. He died in 1694 and was buried in Belfast. Morgan and several purported siblings subsequently came to America.

Ms. Hewlett's posting of May 5, 2007, may be a scrambled version of an event described in a family history written in 1830 by a grandson of Morgan and Martha Strode Bryan.

Martha Strode and her two brothers were small children when they sailed with their parents for Philadelphia from Holland in company with a group of Huguenots. The parents, both English, were political refugees. Both died en route and those aboard ship arranged to have their children bound out upon making port. After serving her indenture, Martha was 21 when she married Morgan Bryan ca1718.

-------------------- Francis Bryan III, returned to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but being persecuted by the government he was obliged to seek refuge in Denmark. He was born about 1630, married Sarah Brinker, a cousin to the Princess of Orange. He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694. He had two sons, William, born in Ireland, and Morgan, born in Demark. Both came to America.

These notes are verbatim as published in the Register of Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 40, No. 132, pp. 318-322. C1974 KY State Historical Society-Frankfort. Edward Bryan, the compiler, is descended from Morgan Bryan. He was born in Louisville, but at the time of the publication, lived in Colorado.

He was permitted to return to Ireland about 1683, and is said to have been standard bearer to William of Orange at the battle of the Boyne. He died in Belfast in 1694 -------------------- Francis Bryan Birth 1630 in Claire, Ireland Death 1 Apr 1693 in Belfast, Antrim, Ireland

Family Members Parents William Smith Bryan 1600 – 1667 Catherine Morgan 1604 – 1680 Spouse & Children Sarah Brinker 1634 – 1698 William Bryan 1655 – 1742 Lewis Bryan 1660 – 1735 Francis Bryan 1670 – 1763 Morgan Bryan 1671 – 1763 Francis Bryan 1673 – 1763 Corneilius Bryan 1697 – 1751

Timeline 1630 Birth Claire, Ireland 7 source citations 1667 Age: 37 Marriage to Sarah Brinker Chester, Pennsylvania, United States 5 source citations 1693 1 Apr Age: 63 Death Belfast, Antrim, Ireland

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U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 about Frances Bryan Name: Frances Bryan SAR Membership: 52386 Birth Date: 1630 Death Date: 1694 Father: Wm Smith Bryan Children: Morgan Bryan

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Francis Bryan

1 - 8 of 8 StoriesAttached toReturn to Ireland Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by katcarrillo to Muller/Hewitt/Bryan/Reid Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 He returned to Ireland and tried to regain the Clare County estates, but was persecuted by the government and forced to seek refuge in Denmark. He married Sarah Brinker , and became a relation of Rebecca Bryan who married Daniel Boone. Fra... Read more » Francis Bryan Per Family Source Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by sandrac47 to Butler Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Note: Notes for FRANCIS BRYANIII: Standard bearer to William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne August. 12, 1690 .Info from C. Moore P. O. Box 19042, Jacksonville, Fl. 32245In 1667, Francis Bryan III (son of William Smith Bryan) returned to ... Read more » Francis Bryan ABOUT THE BRYAN FAMILY of MORGAN BRYAN Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 25 Oct 2008 THE BRYANS and THE BOONES: Morgan Bryan's Relatives and In-Laws Read more » Francis Bryan Sir Francis BRYAN of the Blackfriars, Ampthill, and Woburn Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 25 Oct 2008 Sir Francis BRYAN, Knight Lord Chief Justice of Ireland Born: ABT 1490, Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England Died: 2 Feb 1549/50, Clonmel, Ireland Buried: Feb 1549/50, Waterford, Ireland Father: Thomas BRYAN (Sir Knight) Mother: Margaret BOURC... Read more » Francis Bryan Deported to america - descendancy Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by antap2 to Anderson, Carol on 25 Oct 2008 DESCENDANTS OF EDMOND BRYANGeneration No. 1 Last updated: July 3, 2004 1. Edmond Bryan was born abt. 1412 in Cheddington, Buck, England. He Married Alice BURES in 1432, she was born 1416. Died ?.

Children of Edmond and Alice Brya... Read more »

Francis Bryan Family and English History Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by ldh555udh to Hurst, Morinelli, Prado, Kincy, Burrows, Shepherd, Lindsey, Emery, Devaney and Family on 25 Oct 2008 McDaniel-King Entries: 48216 Updated: 2007-04-08 22:39:13 UTC (Sun) Contact: Elaine King Kubinski Use this as a starting point only. This database contains unintentional errors. You must do your own research. I am attempting to document everything in t... Read more » Francis Bryan Francis Bryan Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by genevawhite811 to Geneva's Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Name: Francis Bryan Given Name: Francis Surname: Bryan Sex: M Birth: 1630, Claire, Ireland Death: Apr 1693 in Belfast, Ireland Burial: Belfast, Ireland

Francis III no doubt saw the new world for the first time... Read more » Francis Bryan Background Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by nicoleclaesen to Claesen Family Tree on 25 Oct 2008 Francis Bryan III was born in 1630. Most researchers indica te that he was born in Gloucester, Virginia, but this appea rs to be in error since both of his parents lived in Irelan d until 1650. Francis III no doubt saw the new world for th e first time at... Read more » Francis Bryan

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Per Family Source Per Family Source Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by sandrac47 to Butler Family Tree on 26 Feb 2008 Note: Notes for FRANCIS BRYANIII: Standard bearer to William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne August. 12, 1690 .Info from C. Moore P. O. Box 19042, Jacksonville, Fl. 32245In 1667, Francis Bryan III (son of William Smith Bryan) returned to Ireland inan attempt to regain the family estates in county Claire. Meeting with strongopposition he fled to Denmark where he married Sarah Brinker, said to have beena cousin to the Prince of Orange. Francis was able to return to Ireland afterthe "Bloodless Revolution" about 1683 where he settled in Belfast and lived tothe date of his death in 1694. It was in Belfast 1685, that his second sonWilliam, was born.Historical information obtained from Melise Lyneille Leech of Grand Junction,CO. e-mail address Mleech@gj.netFrancis Bryan III was born in 1630. Most researchers indicate that he was bornin Gloucester, Virginia, but this appears to be in error since both his parentslived in Ireland until 1650. Francis III no doubt saw the new world for the first time at about age 20 when the Bryan family was exiled to the Virginia Colony.We know nothing about the life of Francis in Virginia, but with the end of theCommonwealth and the reestablishment of the Monarchy under Charles II in 1660,he no doubt felt that it was safe to return to Ireland. Thus, in 1667 after 17years in Virginia, he left for Ireland with the intent of reclaiming his father'sestates. He was 37 years old at this time which gives rise to the possibilitythat he could have been married a first time in Virginia.The presence of Francis III in Ireland was anything but welcome by English officials, and in particular by those now in possession of his father's lands.He was so threatened that he fled to Denmark, which had become a haven forpersecuted protestants whose cause had been championed by the Dutch Prince ofOrange. Francis III soon married Sarah Brinker, a cousin of the Prince of Orange, and their first son, Morgan Bryan, was born in Denmark. He was finally permitted to return to Ireland in 1683.A little background history will help explain the future movements of Francis and his family. The Dutch Prince William of Orange married Princess Mary, daughter of King James II of England and though her father was Roman Catholic, she embraced the Protestant cause. The three year rein of James II was one of turmoil and William of Orange and Mary were invited by the protestant controlled Parliament to assume the Throne. On 5 November 1688 William landed at Brixham, Devon, with a sizable army, quickly advanced to London and took the Throne on Christmas Day, forcing James II into exile in France. They officially became King William III and Queen Mary II in February 1689. The deposed King James II did not accept his fate and with the help of the French managed to raise a Catholic Irish army. King William's army met the forces of James II at the Boyne River about 25 miles north of Dublin and here took place the historic "Battle of the Boyne" on 11 July 1690 where the forces of James II were soundly defeated. Francis III was a standard bearer to King William in that battle. When the Battle of the Boyne was fought in Ireland in 1690, between King William II of Orange against James II, Francis Bryan, and his sons William and Morgan served in King William's Color Guard. Francis died in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1694, the country of his birth, and spent much of his adult life fighting to restore his lost heritage. A descendant of the leading families of both England and Ireland, he began his life as a defendant of the Roman Catholic Church and ended as a staunch Protestant. He lived 31 years in Ireland, 17 years in Virginia and 15 years in Denmark. We surmise, that when Francis Bryan III returned to Ireland from his exile in Denmark, all hopes for the restoration of family estates and titles had been given up. Instead, he, or his family, turned to become a part of theScotch-Irish group, which was to play so prominent a part in the New World.We wonder if some influences he came under while exiled in Denmark did not havemuch to do with it. Or it might have been contact with the Protestant Movementin northern Ireland. Any way we now see political titles, offices in the government. landed estates, royal affiliations, all tossed aside and the Bryans as every day common people. But the adventurous spirit of their forefathers was not tossed aside. We find them setting their faces toward a new and hazardous world.

Sir Francis Bryan of Blackfriars, Ampthill, & Woburn Sir Francis BRYAN of the Blackfriars, Ampthill, and Woburn Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 10 Mar 2007 Sir Francis BRYAN, KnightLord Chief Justice of IrelandBorn: ABT 1490, Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England Died: 2 Feb 1549/50, Clonmel, IrelandBuried: Feb 1549/50, Waterford, Ireland Father: Thomas BRYAN (Sir Knight)Mother: Margaret BOURCHIERMarried 1: Phillipa SPICE (dau. of Sir Humphrey Spice of Black Notley) (w. of John Fortescue)Children:1. Edmund BRYAN (Esq.)Married 2: Joan FITZGERALD (C. Ormonde/C. Desmond) ABT 1548, Chidington, Buckshire, England Children: 2. Francis BRYAN (Sir)3. Elizabeth BRYAN-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sir Francis Bryan of the Blackfriars and Ampthill and Woburn (by 1492-1550), first surviving son of Sir Thomas Bryan of Ashridge, Herts. by Margaret, dau. of Sir Humphrey Bourchier (d.1471), son and heir of John, 1st Lord Berners. educ. ?Oxf. Married first, by Mar 1522, Phillippa, dau. and heiress of Humphrey Spice of Black Notley, Essex, widow of John Fortescue of Ponsbourne, Herts.; and after her death, by 29 Aug 1548, Joan, dau. of James Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald, 10th Earl of Desmond, widow of James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond (d.1546); at least 1 son illegit. Auc. family by 31 Jan 1518. Kntd. 2 Jul 1522, banneret Sep 1547. Capt. Margaret Bonaventure 1513; master of the toils 1518-48; constable, Hertford castle, Herts. 1518-34, Harlech castle, Merion. 1521-d., Wallingford castle, Berks. 1536, jt. constable, Warwick castle, Warws. 1528-d.; cipherer, the Household 1520; gent. privy chamber by 1521; esquire of the body by 1522; commr. subsidy, Herts. 1523, Essex 1524, survey lands, Calais 1532, tenths of spiritualities, Beds. 1535, benevolence 1544/45, musters 1546; forester, Enfield Chase, Mdx. 1524-6; v.-adm. 1525, 1543; j.p. Beds. 1525-d., Bucks. 1525-42, Herts. 1526; master of the henchmen 1526-49; custos rot. Bucks. 1528; keeper, Richmond Park, Surr. 1529-46, jt. (with Francis Bulstrode) Brogborough Park, Beds., 1547; Ambassador to France and Rome Aug 1528-Oct 1529, France Oct 1530-Dec 1531, Nov 1535, Apr-Aug 1538, to the Empire Oct-Dec 1543; steward, the Chiltern hundreds 1536, Ewelme and Nuneham Courtnay, Oxon. 1538; chief butler, Eng. 1537-d.; recorder, Bedford c.1548; marshal, Ireland Nov. 1548, ld. justice Dec. 1549. Francis Bryan was born into a family well-endowed by the achievements of his grandfather. Sir Thomas Bryan, chief justice of common pleas, died in 1500 holding lands in Buckinghamshire and seven other counties stretching from Kent to Yorkshire.Sir Thomas Bryan, the judge's son, made his career at court where he was a knight of the body to Henry VII and Henry VIII and vice-chamberlain to Queen Catalina de Aragon: he married into a cultured baronial family prominent at court and his widow, who was something of a blue-stocking, was to become governess to the princesses Mary and Elizabeth, and Prince Edward, and possibly of the King illegitimate son, Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond. Francis Bryan may have been the second son of this marriage: he had a brother Thomas who died before 1508 and was buried in Ashridge chapel. There is no reference to either brother in their grandfather's will of 1496, but Francis was almost certainly born before that date: the abbot of Woburn was to describe him in 1538 as ‘now growing in age’. As a boy he may have been placed in the household of Sir Thomas Parr (d.1517), whom in later life he was to call his special patron, and he is thought to have finished his education at Oxford. As the son of one courtier and the protégé of another, Bryan soon found his own place at court, where one of his sisters became the wife of Sir Henry Guildford and the other of Sir Nicholas Carew.The first glimpse of Bryan comes in 1513 when during the admiralty of his kinsman Sir Thomas Howard he held a command in the navy. Within two years he had established himself as a favourite with the King, who was of an age with him: a frequent sharer in the royal pastimes, his enthusiasm for the chase was rewarded by his appointment in 1518 as master of the toils, but in the years that followed he was given posts of greater responsibility. The extent of Bryan's patrimony is not known, but between 1517 and 1523 the King's favour brought him a number of stewardships and bailiwicks in Berkshire and Buckinghamshire. In 1522 he obtained the wardship of Henry Fortescue, whose mother he had already married. Five years later he was assessed for the subsidy in the Household at £400 in lands and fees.Bryan's career overseas began inauspiciously. In 1518, while his uncle John Bourchier, 2nd Lord Berners journeyed to Spain, he visited the French court with several other young men, among them Nicholas Carew. They found such boon companions in France that on returning to England they ‘were all French in eating, drinking and apparel’. Their behaviour led to their dismissal from the court in May 1519 on the ground that ‘after their appetite’ they ‘governed the King’. Carew was removed to Calais, but Bryan kept his post and was in Henry VIII's retinue in 1520, when he doubtless revelled in the Field of the Cloth of Gold. His flair for languages commended him to Wolsey, who in 1521 employed him on a mission to Bruges and the Netherlands and thereafter increasingly on special assignments. In 1522 he served in the expedition against Brittany, and after the fall of Morlaix he received the accolade ‘for hardiness and noble courage’. He came to no harm in battle, but in the mock warfare of the court he was less fortunate, one of his eyes being put out by the ‘shivering’ of a spear.In the summer of 1528 Bryan went to Paris to confer with Francois I and to meet Cardinal Campeggio on his journey to England. Of this mission John Clerk, Wolsey's chaplain, reported a month later that Bryan had ‘right well done his part’, especially in his attentions to Campeggio. Later in the autumn Bryan was appointed Ambassador with Peter Vannes, the King's secretary, to travel by way of Paris to Rome to promote a peace between Francois I and the Emperor and to further the King's divorce. Probably was on that journey that Anthony Denny acompanied Bryan. In the following Jan, when they were joined by Gardiner, Vannes informed Wolsey that Bryan was behaving prudently and was beloved by all. A cousin of Anne Boleyn through their common grandmother Elizabeth Tilney, Bryan was wholly in favour of the divorce: he called Anne ‘my mistress that shall be’ and said that he would not write to her until he could relate what would please her most in the world. Although during the summer he was reporting pessimistically about the mission and asking to return home, he was not recalled until Oct.Bryan undertook special missions in France during 1530 and at the end of that year was appointed resident Ambassador at the French court in place of John Welsborne. He was soon followed by Sir Nicholas Carew, his sister's husband, and at that time as zealous champion of Anne Boleyn as himself. He remained there for the next 12 months and earned the King's approval for his ‘dexterity, diligence and good behaviour’: his only shortcoming was his lack of Latin, and to make this good the King's almoner Edward Fox was sent to join him. Although from 1532 more of Bryan's time was to be spent in England, he served on further missions to France between 1533 and 1538. Between May and Aug 1533 Bryan was travelling with the Duke of Norfolk in France, and he was engaged in similar negotiations, together with Bishop Gardiner and Sir John Wallop, in Dec 1535.As a gentleman of the privy chamber Bryan was expected to be in attendance for alternate periods of six weeks, and when in England he was a central figure at court. His depositions as to certain remarks and actions by Catalina de Aragon were used against her in 1533. Cromwell thought him implicated in the misdeeds of Anne Boleyn and denounced him as ‘vicar of hell’, but when he peremptorily called Bryan before him nothing was proved and in a rearrangement of offices a few days before the execution Bryan became chief gentleman of the privy chamber and bore the King's personal announcement of the event to Jane Seymour. In 1537 he attended the christening of Prince Edward and two years later the reception of Anne of Cleves, where he was noted for his rich apparel and a chain of great worth and strange fashion. Apart from the episode at the time of Anne Boleyn's fall his relations with Cromwell were evidently correct, if not friendly: even then Cromwell had spoken to the King on his behalf, and when he was abroad in 1537 and 1538 he thanked the minister for being good to him, as he learned from Sir John Russell and other friends.During his early married life Bryan may have been domiciled at the Fortescue manor of Faulkbourne, Essex, which was visited several times by the King. For a period from 1539 he lived at Woburn, Bedfordshire, after acquiring a lease of the site of the dissolved abbey there. His fees from court offices were supplemented by his many leases and stewardships in the home counties and the midlands. These brought him nominations to local commissions, especially in Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, but although thrice put forward as sheriff, for Essex and Hertfordshire in 1522 and 1523 and for Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire in 1528, he was never pricked. In 1535 and 1537 he reported to Cromwell on matters of treason heard at the sessions at Brickhill, Bedfordshire, and in 1535 the Bishop of Lincoln commended ‘the good order’ Bryan had taken in Buckinghamshire ‘in redressing the heresies hitherto used in this woody country of Chiltern’.Bryan was not one of the Members originally returned to the Parliament of 1529, but after the list of Members had been revised in the spring of 1532 Cromwell nominated him (in preference to Sir Robert Lee of Quarrendon) for Buckinghamshire, where a vacancy had existed since the translation of Sir Andrew Windsor to the Lords during the first session. It must have been either as Windsor's successor or, if he was passed over for the shire, as a borough Member that Bryan entered the Commons: he was there by the penultimate session, when his name appears on a list of Members thought to have had a particular connexion with the treasons bill then passing through Parliament, perhaps as belonging to a committee. He may have served again for the same constituency in the following Parliament, that of Jun 1536, when the King asked for the re-election of the previous Members, although his connexion with the doomed Queen perhaps told against him on that occasion: the statement that he sat for a borough in this Parliament rests on a misreading of the name of Sir Francis Bigod in a document compiled by the rebels of 1536.On the outbreak of that rebellion Bryan was joined with Sir John Russell and Sir William Parr in mustering the forces of Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Northamptonshire, and his signature appears with theirs and Sir William Fitzwilliam's on reports to the King. In the autumn of 1538 he fell ill and lost favour with the King when he drank too much and committed other ‘follies’ after losing money in Provence, but he recovered both health and favour in time to be elected a knight for Buckinghamshire to the Parliament of the following year. After the dissolution of this Parliament he was sent a letter about the collection of the subsidy he had helped to grant. He reappeared in the following Parliament, that of 1542, this time taking the senior place for the shire: the honour was perhaps a measure of the continuing confidence placed in him by a King who had recently rejected another cousin of his, Catherine Howard. In 1543, on the appointment of John Dudley, Lord Lisle as admiral, Bryan was made vice-admiral because of ‘his experience in sea matters’. An embassy to the Emperor in Oct 1543 was followed in the next year by service in the rearguard of the army in France with a personal muster of some 200 billmen and archers: the despatches sent to England in Jun and Jul bore his signature. These services were rewarded by a grant of the site and demesne lands of the late priory of Taunton, Somerset. In the summer of 1545 he reviewed the defence of the south-west coast in company with Russell, who suggested Bryan to the Council as the most suitable man to deputize for him. It was with Russell's son Francis that in the autumn Bryan was elected for Buckinghamshire in the last Parliament of the reign.With Henry VIII's death Bryan's own career entered its last phase: no longer a court favourite (although his mother was ‘lady mistress’ of the new King's household) he remained a considerable figure, not least by reason of his landed wealth which was assessed for subsidy at £888 a year. In May 1547 he was granted the keepership of six royal parks in Bedfordshire, to be held for life, in each case with one other grantee who probably acted as his deputy. For his part in the Protector Somerset's expedition against Scotland in Sep Bryan was created a knight banneret, and in the following year he was granted the bishop's palace at Norwich and given continued tenancy of extensive parts of the Blackfriars in London. He was not, however, elected to the first Edwardian Parliament, the knighthoods for Buckinghamshire going to Francis Russell and Anthony Lee, with each of whom Bryan had sat earlier.Bryan's marriage to the widow of the 9th Earl of Ormond was probably a political match designed to prevent her marriage to the Desmond heir, a union which in the event it merely postponed. In Nov 1548 Bryan arrived in Dublin to take up the office of lord marshal: a year later he was made lord justice pending the arrival of a new lord deputy to replace Sir Edward Bellingham, who had resented his appointment, but on 2 Feb 1550 he died suddenly at Clonmel from an unknown cause. If he made a will it has not been found and nothing is known of the disposition of his lands, most of which appear to have been held on lease. His son, who is mentioned as carrying a despatch to London in 1548 from the French admiral, was illegitimate.The course of Bryan's career and the witness of his contemporaries show him as a man of character and ability. His cultural interests were fostered especially by his uncle Lord Berners, whose many translations included, at Bryan's request, The golden boke of Marcus Aurelius. In 1548 Bryan himself translated from the French Antonio de Guevara's collection of stories and sayings under the title of A dispraise of the life of a courtier and a commendation of the life of the Labouryng man: in dedicating the work to William Parr, Marquess of Northampton, Bryan explained that he had undertaken it after seeing the marquess reading the book. Intimate with the circle of Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Bryan had a reputation as a poet of almost the same calibre as his friends. He was also a man who, according to the abbot of Woburn, dared to speak his mind to the King; on foreign missions he could on occasion be equally outspoken, if not arrogant. Roger Ascham, who presumably knew him well, described his youthful personality as being maintained even when ‘spent by years’, and one of Wyatt's satires addressed him as:Bryan ... who knows how great a graceIn writing is to counsel man the right.To thee ... that trots still up and downAnd never rests, but running day and nightFrom realm to realm, from city, street and town,Why dost thou wear thy body to the bones?to Bios Page to Family Pageto Peerage Page to Home PageONLINE SOURCE: http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/FrancisBryan(JusticeofIreland).htm Additional information about this storyDescription Dateb.abt. 1490-92 Cheddington, Buckinghamshire, England//d, 1549/50Conmel and Waterford, IrelandLocationEngland and Ireland

Bryan Family of Morgan Bryan ABOUT THE BRYAN FAMILY of MORGAN BRYAN Added by patio341 on 25 Oct 2008Originally submitted by vb2268 to JONES and BENNETT on 10 Mar 2007 McMahan/Kilsdonk AncestorsEntries: 19198 Updated: 2004-12-06 00:19:07 UTC (Mon) Contact: Kent McMahan at kmcmahan.louisville at worldnet.att.net ID: I8309 Name: Morgan Bryan Sex: M Birth: ABT 1774 1 Note: He is believed to be the son of a James Bryan. The Bryan family was one ofthe first to settle in the Kentucky territory (1792 statehood), then part ofVirginia. Brothers William, James, and Morgan Bryan, Jr., came with DanielBoone and Squire Boone. Daniel Boone's wife was Rebecca Bryan, the sister ofthe Bryan brothers. William Bryan's wife, Mary Boone, was Daniel Boone'ssister. Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Road trail to Kentucky in 1775.The Bryan's built a stockade fort Bryan Station, near Lexington, in late 1775.Marriage 1 Margaret Ransdell b: ABT 1780 in Fauquier Co., VA Married: BEF 1797 1Sources: William K. Ransdell manuscript "Sifted From The Ashes," 1988.

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Sir Francis Bryan's Timeline

1630
June 1, 1630
County Claire, Ireland
1660
1660
Age 29
Isle of Wight, Virginia, United States
1667
1667
Age 36
Chester, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Colonial America
1670
1670
Age 39
Maribo, Lolland Municipality, Region Zealand, Denmark
1671
June 11, 1671
Age 41
Å, Fyn, Denmark
1685
June 1, 1685
Age 55
Claire, Belfast, Ireland
1689
1689
Age 58
Clare, Ireland
1693
April 1, 1693
Age 62
Belfast, Antrim Co., Ireland
1694
1694
Age 62
Clare, Ireland
1694
Age 62