Sir Geoffrey de Lutterell, Kt.

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Geoffrey de Lutterell, Kt.

Nicknames: "Luttrell"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Gamsted, Retford, Nottinghamshire, England
Death: Died in Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Alfred de Luttrell and Wife of Alfred de Luttrell
Husband of Frethaesant Paynell
Father of Margaret Lutterell and Andrew de Luttrell, 1st Baron of Irnham
Brother of John de Luttrell

Occupation: supporter of King John
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Geoffrey de Lutterell, Kt.

http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/LUTTRELL.htm#Geoffrey De LUTEREL1

  • Born: ABT 1158 / 1175, Gamsten, Nottinghamshire, England
  • Died: 1217, England

Notes: 1215 sole agent in Queen Berengaria negotiations. Baron Luterel by Writ of Summons, dated 24 Jun, 1295. Lineage. The noble family claimed descent from one of the Norman Chiefs who accompanied William the Conqueror to England. There has been some doubt expressed by antiquarians as to when the Luttrell family first came to England. Was one Robert Luttrell, and other Osbert Luttrell, mentioned as living in Normandy previous to the Conquest of England, and as being extensive landowners, and to this day families of the name are found in different parts of France. The name is not mentioned in the Doomsday Book, although it is mentioned in the Roll of Battle Abbey, vol. II (Abbey lists in the British Museum), although doubt is now being cast upon the authenticity of the records. The unquestioned respect in which the Rolls have been held by antiquarians is due to the fact that for many families they are the only proof for a claim to an existence at that early period.

A branch of this ancient family appears to have settled in Ireland so early as the reign of King John, when Sir Geoffrey Luttrell obtained from that Prince a grant of the lands of Luttrellstown, Co. Dublin. Both Sir John and Sir Geoffrey Luttrell served under King John in Ireland. (1996 family tree by, Juanita L Berrian)

It is not certain whether the head of the Irish branch was a son or a brother of this Sir Geoffrey, but it is reasonable that he bore either the one or the other relation, for the reason that the lands of Luttrellstown secured by royal grant by Sir Geoffrey were from this time [of Geoffrey's death] owned by Sir Robert Luttrell, head of the Irish branch, who lived at Lucan, near Dublin, and that it remained in the family until the early part of the nineteenth century. In the time of Richard I, the lands of Sir Geoffrey De Luterel, in the counties of Nottingham and Derby, were seized by the Crown, for his adherence to the Earl of Moreton, but he was compensated, upon the accession of the Earl to the Throne as King John, by extensive territorial and other grants. He was also stationed in Ireland in 1204, and in 1215, when he possessed large administrative powers. In 1215 King John appointed him to be his sole agent in the negotiations concerning the dower of Queen Berengaria, commissioning him at the same time to join with the Archbishops of Bordeaux and Dublin in denouncing to the Pope the rebellious barons who had recently extorted the Great Charter of English liberties. In one of these documents he is styled "Nobilis vir." His mission was so far successful that Pope Innocent III annulled the Charter, suspended the Archbishop of Canterbury and excommunicated the barons, but it is uncertain whether it was Sir Geoffrey who conveyed the papal bull from Rome to England. He is supposed to have died in 1216 or in 1217. As a reward for his services he was granted lands in Yorkshire, Northamptonshire, and at Croxton, in Leicestershire. In consideration of twenty ounces of gold he was still further rewarded with a large estate, known as Luttrellstown to the present day, and situated on the banks of the Liffey, about eight miles out from Dublin. He married Frethesant, 2nd daughter of William Paganal, Lord of Irnham. His marriage was of more enduring importance for the family fortune was founded upon her inheritance, through this marriage was also heir to certain lands of Maurice De Gaunt, and his descendants, in direct line from William the Conqueror's brother, Robert. And by her had a son and heir, Andrew. Sir Geoffrey died in the 2nd year of Henry III (1218) and was succeeded by his son, Sir Andrew De Luterel, of Iraham, County.

The descendants of Sir Geoffrey were afterwards feudal barons of Irnham, and one of those barons, Robert De Luttrell, had summons to parliament on the 24th Jun, and 2nd Nov, 1295. (See Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage.)

Married: Frethesant PAGANEL BET Feb 1202/3 - 1205 Children:

1. Andrew De LUTTRELL (1º B. Irnham) 2. Margaret De LUTTRELL -------------------- Supporter of King John that married an Yorkshire heiress. The marriage bought substantial estates in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire and Somerset to the son Andrew

The following is an account from DUNSTER AND ITS LORDS by H. C. Maxwell-Lyte, 1882

"During the absence of Richard I in Palestine, this Geoffrey Luttrell took part in the unsuccessful rebellion of John, Earl of Mortain, and was consequently deprived of his estates in the county of Nottingham. He was reinstated, however, on the accession of the Earl of Mortain to the English throne, and from that time until his death he seems to have been constantly employed in the King's service.

In 1201, he was appointed one of the overseers of the expenses incurred in the enclosure of the royal park of Bolsover. In 1204, he was sent into Ireland with a recommendatory letter to the archbishops and bishops, and received ten pounds for his maintenance. In the following year he went to Poictiers in charge of the King's treasure, and in 1210, he held the responsible office of paymaster of the navy. In 1215, he was sent on an embassy to Pope Innocent III, partly to explain the arrangement that had been made about the dower of Queen Berengaria, and partly to denounce the barons who had extorted Magna Charta from the reluctant king. In one of these commissions he is styled 'nobilis vir'. He received several grants of land from his royal patron, but the real foundation of the future wealth of the Luttrell family was laid by his marriage with Frethesant, daughter and coheiress of William Paganel." Her inheritance included property in the counties of York, Nottingham and Lincoln.

Sir Geoffrey Luttrell appears to have died on his journey to Rome in 1216, leaving a widow and a son named Andrew, who was under age at the time."


From John Burke's "A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland", Vol. 1.  Henry Colburn, Page 142.

The family of LUTTRELL, or LOTERELL, was established in England by one of the chiefs in the Norman Conquest, whose name is to be found in the Roll of Battel Abbey.

In the reigns of HENRY I.* and King Stephen*, Sir John Luttrell held, in capite, the manor of Hoton Pagnel, in Yorkshire, which vested in his male descendants until the time of HENRY V*. when it devolved upon an heiress, who espoused John Scott, feudal lord of Calverley, and steward of the household to the Empress MAUD.

The estates of Sir Geoffry Luttrell, knt. in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and York, were confiscated in the reign of RICHARD I. for his adhesion to John, Earl of Morton, but they were restored upon the accession of that prince to the throne, as King JOHN. Sir Geoffry subsequently accompanied the king into Ireland, and obtained from the crown a grant of Luttrellstown, in that kingdom. The descendants of Sir Geoffry were afterwards feudal barons of Irnham, and one of those barons, ROBERT DE LUTTRELL, had summons to parliament on the 24th June, and 2nd November, 1295. (See Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage.)

  • Webmaster's note: Henry I died 1135 A. D. The reign of Stephen was 1135-1154. The reign of Henry V was 1413-1422.
 

From Ball's "A History of the County Dublin, Parish of Clonsilla"

"Luttrell's connection with Ireland appears to have begun in the year 1204. In the beginning of that year he was appointed on a commission to settle the disputes then existing in Ireland between the justiciary and the Anglo-Norman magnates of this country, and before its close he was named as a member of an advisory commission sent to this country with an injunction to the authorities to place undoubted reliance on all that the commissioners might expound concerning the King's Irish affairs.

Six years later, in the summer of 1210, he accompanied King John on that monarch's visit to Ireland, when we find him acting as one of the paymasters of the mariners and galleymen employed in the large fleet required for the expedition, and forming one of the King's train at Kells, Carlingford, and Holywood, as well as at Dublin.

Hardly had the King returned to England when Sir Geoffrey Luttrell was once more sent to this country on a mission of state, and during the next few years we find him corresponding from this country with the King by means of a trusty messenger whom the King rewarded with liberality for his arduous services.

In 1215 he was again in England in attendance on the King's person, advising King John in all matters relating to his Irish kingdom and witnessing many acts of the fling concerning this country. Luttrell received several marks of royal favour, including the honour of knighthood, and as a culminating proof of the trust reposed in him was sent on an embassy to the Pope. While on this mission his death took place.

There is little doubt that from Sir Geoffrey Luttrell the Irish, as well as the Somersetshire Luttrells are descended either in a direct or collateral line. His only son is said to have succeded to his English estates, and in connection with his Irish property a daughter, who was given by the King in marriage to Philip Marc, is mentioned as his heir, but he purchased in Ireland shortly before his death the marriage of the second daughter of Hugh de Tuit, whose hand he probably conferred on some male representative of his family in this country."


  

On the National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons webpage, http://www.magnacharta.org/magna_charta_barons_at_runnymede.htm,

Geoffrey de Luttrell is listed as "one of the Barons in arms to procure the Great Charter of Liberties from King John A.D.1215".

Webmaster's note: Is this realistic considering the close relationship Geoffrey had with King John for many years (see above references)?

If it is true that Geoffrey Luttrell was one of those at Runnymede in support of Magna Charta (opposed to the King), would King John have subsequently sent him on the "embassy to the Pope" (the Pope sided with King John and ex-communicated all of the Barons who forced the King to sign the Magna Charta)?

Could Geoffrey Luttrell's death, while on this "embassy to the Pope" be a result of his support for Magna Charta, in defiance of King John?


Sir Geoffrey de Luterel of Gamston and Bridgeford

Geoffrey de Luterel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_de_Luterel

Sir Geoffrey de Luterel (died c. 1216) was a courtier and confidante of King John, whom he served as a minister.

He married Frethesant Paynel (sometimes spelt Paganel) in about 1200 and by that marriage acquired estates at Irnham, Lincolnshire, East Quantockshead, Somerset, and in Yorkshire.

He travelled with the King on missions to Ireland and Italy and in about 1210 was granted lands near Dublin, Ireland where he established the township of Luttrellstown.

He was head of the three main branches of the Luttrell family. The Irnham branch became extinct in about 1418 but Luttrellstown and Luttrellstown Castle were held by his descendants for almost 600 years. The East Quantockshead family went on to acquire Dunster Castle in 1376 and held it until it became a National Trust property in 1976.

---------------------------

Luterel-Baron Luterel. by Writ of Summons, dated 24 June, 1295. Lineage.

The noble family claimed descent from one of the Norman Chiefs who accompanied the Conqueror to England.

Luttrell-Earl and Viscount CarHampton and Baron Irnham.

Irish Barony, by Letters Patent, dated 13, October, 1768.

Irish Viscounty, by Letters Patent, dated 9 January, 1781.

Irish Earldom, &c, by Letters Patent, dated 23 June, 1785.

A branch of this ancient family appears to have settled in Ireland so early as the reign of King John, when Sir Geoffrey Luttrell obtained from that Prince a grant of the lands of Luttrellstown, County Dublin. Perhaps this was the same person who is mentioned in the preceding article. Both Sir John and Sir Geoffrey Luttrell served under King John in Ireland. (1996 family tree by, Juanita L Berrian)

We do not find any history of Sir John Luttrell, he had a daughter that m. John Scott. Sir John's daughter name is unknown at this time.

Be this as it may, certain it is that the Luttrells of Dunster Castle, and the Luttrells, Earls of Carhampton were of the old baronial stock of Irnham. See Sir Andrew Luttrell, of Chiton, M. Lady Elizabeth 2nd dau. of Hugh Courtenay.

----------------------

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume IV. Richmond, VA, n.p., 1915

It is not certain whether the head of the Irish branch was a son or a brother of this Sir Geoffrey, but it is reasonable that he bore either the one or the other relation, for the reason that the lands of Luttrellstown secured by royal grant by Sir Geoffrey were from this time [of Geoffrey's death] owned by Sir Robert Luttrell, head of the Irish branch, who lived at Lucan, near Dublin, and that it remained in the family until the early part of the nineteenth century. In the time of Richard I, the lands of Sir Geoffrey De Luterel, in the counties of Nottingham and Derby, were seized by the Crown, for his adherence to the Earl of Moreton, but he was compensated, upon the accession of the Earl to the Throne as King John, by extensive territorial and other grants. He married Frethesanta, 2nd daughter of William Paganal, Lord of Irnham, and by her had a son and heir, Andrew. Sir Geoffrey died in the 2nd year of Henry III (1218) and was succeeded by his son, Sir Andrew De Luterel, of Iraham, County.

The origin of the Luttrell's may be France, for the name derives from the French word Loutre meaning an otter. A certain Osbert Lutrel is recorded as owning property at Argues in Normandy in 1180. His contemporary, Sir Geoffrey can be regarded as the founder of the family in England. King John sent him on diplomatic missions to Europe and gave him many useful sinecures. His marriage to the heiress, Frethesant Paynell of Pagnel was of more enduring importance for the family fortune was founded upon her inheritance.

----------------------

History of West Virginia and Its People, Volume 2. Charleston, WV: Lewis Historical Publishing County, 1913.

There has been some doubt expressed by antiquarians as to when the Luttrell family first came to England. We find one by the name of Robert Luttrell, and another Osbert Luttrell, mentioned as living in Normandy previous to the Conquest of England, and as being extensive landowners, and to this day families of the name are found in different parts of France. The name is not mentioned in the Doomsday Book, although it is mentioned in the Roll of Battle Abbey, vol. II (Abbey lists in the British Museum), although doubt is now being cast upon the authenticity of the records. The unquestioned respect in which the Rolls have been held by antiquarians is due to the fact that for many families they are the only proof for a claim to an existence at that early period.

Like many names of very old families there have been found many variations, appearing as Loutrel, Loutrell, Lotrell, Lotrel, Lutterell and Luttrell. For the sake of convenience the one form of Luttrell will be adhered to in the present account of the family. If they did not come to England with the Conqueror, they came at some time during his reign, probably near the beginning. The great prominence of the family when the records first make mention of them, shows conclusively that they had already played an important part in affairs. It is recorded that Sir John Luttrell, Knight, held in capite the manor of Hooten-Paynel in Yorkshire, in the reigns of Henry the First and of Stephen, by service of 4 1/2 Knights Fees, as did his posterity in the male line, until the reign of Henry the Fifth. This Sir John had a daughter who married John Scott, Lord of Calverlay, and Steward of the Household to Maud the Empress. Sir Andrew Luttrell, Knight, in the time of Henry the Second founded the Abbey of Croxton-Kyriel, in Leicestershire, and in this abbey were deposited the ashes of King John who died in the vicinity.

In the reign of King Richard the First the estates of Sir Geoffrey Luttrell, Knight, in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham and York were confiscated, he being one of the barons who sided with John, Earl of Montaigue, but the lands were restored after the death of King Richard. This Sir Geoffrey Luttrell, Knight, attended King John into Ireland, and for a time had the authority to issue writs in the king's name. He was also stationed in Ireland in 1204, and in 1215, when he possessed large administrative powers. In 1215 King John appointed him to be his sole agent in the negotiations concerning the dower of Queen Berengaria, commissioning him at the same time to join with the Archbishops of Bordeaux and Dublin in denouncing to the Pope the rebellious barons who had recently extorted the Great Charter of English liberties. In one of these documents he is styled "Nobilis vir." His mission was so far successful that Pope Innocent the Third annulled the Charter, suspended the Archbishop of Canterbury and excommunicated the barons, but it is uncertain whether it was Sir Geoffrey Luttrell who conveyed the papal bull from Rome to England. He is supposed to have died in 1216 or in 1217. As a reward for his services he was granted lands in Yorkshire, Northamptonshire, and at Croxton, in Leicestershire. In consideration of twenty ounces of gold he was still further rewarded with a large estate, known as Luttrellstown to the present day, and situated on the banks of the Liffey, about eight miles out from Dublin.

As the American line is descended from this Irish branch of the family it will be necessary merely to follow the later history of these Luttrells. But before leaving the English branch we should mention something further of their later chronicles. It is not certain whether the head of the Irish branch was a son or a brother of this Sir Geoffrey, but it is reasonable that he bore either the one or the other relation, for the reason that the lands of Luttrellstown, secured by royal grant by Sir Geoffrey, were from this time owned by Sir Robert Luttrell, head of the Irish branch, who lived at Lucan, near Dublin, and that they remained in the family until the early part of the nineteenth century.

This Sir Geoffrey Luttrell married Frethesant, a daughter of and co-heiress with William Pagnel, a scion of a great family in Normandy, and through this marriage was also heir to certain lands of Maurice de Gaunt, and his descendants, in direct line from William the Conqueror's brother, Robert. (If Sir Robert, mentioned above, was a son of Sir Geoffrey this same connection would apply as well to the Irish branch). The first of the Gaunts who came to England was a nephew of King William, and son of Baldwin, Count of Flanders, by a daughter of Robert, King of France. The emperor of Constantinople and Jerusalem towards the end of the twelfth century was of the same paternal lineage. A daughter of the Earl of Lincoln conveyed in marriage the barony of Irnham to Simon St. Liz, Earl of Huntington, who dying without issue, Robert de Berkeley succeeded thereto, and assumed the name of Gaunt from his mother. Maurice, the son and heir of Robert, leaving no children, the estates devolved on the eldest son of Sir Geoffrey Luttrell, whose name was Andrew, and this portion of it known as the Manor of East Quantockshead in Somerset has remained in the family name to this day, a rare instance of land ownership in England. In this connection might be mentioned the fact that Dunster Castle in Somerset has belonged to but two families since the Conquest, the Mohuns and the Luttrells, and the present owner, Captain Alexander Luttrell, is a direct descendant of both families. The estate at this early period was considered as worth $1,250.00, but without any additions it is valued to-day at about $5,000,000.00.

The Luttrells of East Quantockshead and Dunster Castle, and their collateral branches, quartered the arms of the ancient English Barons, Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham, Duke of Norfolk, Lords Hussie, Wake D'Ein Court and Tateshall.

-------------------------

Burke, John., A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Vol. 1. London: Henry Colburn, n.d., Call Number: R929.725 B95 v.1, Page 142.

The family of LUTTRELL, or LOTERELL, was established in England by one of the chiefs in the Norman Conquest, whose name is to be found in the Roll of Battel Abbey.

In the reigns of HENRY I. and King Stephen, Sir John Luttrell held, in capite, the manor of Hoton Pagnel, in Yorkshire, which vested in his male descendants until the time of HENRY V. when it devolved upon an heiress, who espoused John Scott, feudal lord of Calverley, and steward of the household to the Empress MAUD.

The estates of Sir Geoffry Luttrell, knt. in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and York, were confiscated in the reign of RICHARD I. for his adhesion to John, Earl of Morton, but they were restored upon the accession of that prince to the throne, as King JOHN. Sir Geoffry subsequently accompanied the king into Ireland, and obtained from the crown a grant of Luttrellstown, in that kingdom. The descendants of Sir Geoffry were afterwards feudal barons of Irnham, and one of those barons, ROBERT DE LUTTRELL, had summons to parliament on the 24th June, and 2nd November, 1295. (See Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage.)

-------------------------

Lyte, Sir Henry Churchill Maxwell, A History of Dunster, and of the families of Mohun & Luttrell, (London : St. Catherine Press, Ltd., 1909), Pages 59-61.

http://www.archive.org/details/historyofdunster01lyte

Geof frey Luttrell, acquired a small property at Gamston and Bridgeford in Nottinghamshire in the later part of the twelfth century. During the absence of Richard the First in Palestine, this Geoffrey Luttrell took part in the unsuccessful rebellion of John, Count of Mortain, and was consequently deprived of his lands. He was, however, reinstated after the accession of the Count to the throne of England, and from 1204 to 1215 he seems to have been continuously employed in public business in one capacity or another. Many royal charters of the period were witnessed by him as a person in frequent personal attendance upon the King. For a time, he had authority to issue writs in the King's name with regard to wine. He afterwards became paymaster of the King's ships. In 1204 and again in 1215, he was in Ireland with large administrative powers. In 1206, he was in Poitou and Gascony as one of the King's treasurers.

In 1215, John appointed Sir Geoffrey Luttrell to be his sole agent in negotiations with regard to the dower of Queen Berengaria, commissioning him at the same time to join with the Archbishops of Bordeaux and Dublin in denouncing to the Pope the rebellious barons who had recently extorted the Great Charter of English Liberties. In one of the documents connected with this business, he is styled ‘nobilis vir’. His mission was so far successful that Innocent the Third annulled the Charter, suspended the Archbishop of Canterbury, and excommunicated the barons, but it is uncertain whether Sir Geoffrey Luttrell was one of those who conveyed the papal bull from Rome to England. The exact date of his death, which must have taken place in 1216, or at the latest in 1217, is not recorded.

As a reward for personal services, Sir Geoffrey Luttrell received from King John grants for life of the houses of the Jew, Isaac of York, at Oxford and Northampton, and those of another Jew named Bonnechose at the former place. The King also granted to him some land at Croxton, in Leicestershire. In consideration, moreover, of twenty ounces of gold, he obtained property at Cratelach in Thomond.

The real foundation of the subsequent prosperity of the Luttrell family was laid by the marriage of Sir Geoffrey to a daughter and coheiress of William Paynell, whose singular Christian name Frethesant is apparently a continental form of the English name Frideswyde. Although this lady's father was only a younger scion of the great family of Paynell, she and her sister, Isabel Bastard, inherited from him no less than fifteen knights’ fees, for the most part situated in Yorkshire.

In 1217, Henry of Newmarch paid 40 marks to the King for license to marry Frethesant the relict of Sir Geoffrey Luttrell if she would consent, and the marriage duly took place.

Luttrell Psalter (British LibraryBritish Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is based in London and is one of the world's largest List of Research libraries, holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats; books, journals, newspapers, magazines, Sound recording, patents, databases, maps, stamps, Printmaking, drawings and much mor...

, Add. MS 42130) is an illuminated manuscriptIlluminated manuscript

An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript in which the Writing is supplemented by the addition of decoration, such as decorated initials, borders and Miniature ....

written and illustrated circa 1325 - 1335, by anonymous scribes and artists. It was commissioned by Sir Geoffrey LuttrellGeoffrey Luttrell

Sir Geoffrey Luttrell was a great great grandson of Sir Geoffrey de Luterel. His family seat was Irnham Hall at Irnham in Lincolnshire and he was referred to as the 2nd Lord of Irnham....

(died 1345), a wealthy English landowner who lived at IrnhamIrnham

Irnham is a village in Lincolnshire in South Kesteven about ten miles south east of Grantham, which is famous as the former home of the Luttrell Psalter....

, LincolnshireLincolnshire

Lincolnshire is a Counties of England in the east of England. It borders Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Rutland, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, South Yorkshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire....

.

Along with the psalmsPsalms

Psalms is a book of the Hebrew Bible , included in the collected works known as the "Writings" or Ketuvim....

(beginning on 13 recto), the book contains a calendar (1 r), canticleCanticle

A canticle is a hymn taken from the Bible. The term is often expanded to include ancient non-biblical hymns such as the Te Deum and certain psalms used liturgy....

s (259 verso), the MassMass

In physical science, mass refers to the degree of acceleration a body acquires when subject to a force: bodies with greater mass are accelerated less by the same force....

(283 v) and an antiphonAntiphon

An antiphon is a response, usually sung in Gregorian chant, to a psalm or some other part of a religious service, such as at Vespers or at a mass ....

for the dead (295 r). The pages vary in their degree of illumination but many are richly covered with both decorated text and marginal pictures of saints and Bible stories, of rural life, farming, cooking, doctoring, spouses squabbling, musicians playing, etc. It is considered by some to be one of the richest sources for visual depictions of everyday rural life in EnglandEngland

native_name =|conventional_long_name = England|common_name = England|image_flag = Flag of England.svg|image_coat = England COA.svg|symbol_type = Royal Coat of Arms...

of the Middle AgesMiddle Ages

File:Karl 1 mit papst gelasius gregor1 sacramentar v karl d kahlen.jpgThe Middle Ages of European history are a period in history which lasted for roughly a millennium, commonly dated from the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century to the beginning of the Early Modern Period in the 16th century, marked by the division of Western Christi...

.

The illustrations also include very many strange combinations of parts of animal and human figures. Most remain obscure but some can be related to the text beside which they are painted and this helps a little, towards giving an insight into the symbolism of the similarly strange creatures found carved into the stonework of some church buildings of the book's period.

The British LibraryBritish Library

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. It is based in London and is one of the world's largest List of Research libraries, holding over 150 million items in all known languages and formats; books, journals, newspapers, magazines, Sound recording, patents, databases, maps, stamps, Printmaking, drawings and much mor...

published a facsimile of the Psalter in 2006.

The first owner

In medieval times, the creation of magnificent illuminated manuscripts was both a demonstration of piety and a symbol of the great wealth and power of the kings or lords who commissioned them. Sir Geoffrey Luttrell (1276-1345) was a knight and baron whose wealth, dynastic alliances and military record placed him firmly among the English elite. His family Psalter was begun in the year 1332 and appears to have taken over ten years to complete. Sir Geoffrey Luttrell's ancestor Geoffrey de LuterelGeoffrey de Luterel

Sir Geoffrey de Luterel was a courtier and confidante of John of England, whom he served as a minister.He married Frethesant Paynel in about 1200 and by that marriage acquired estates at Irnham, Lincolnshire, East Quantockshead, Somerset, and in Yorkshire....

had been a close associate of King JohnJohn of England

John reigned as List of English monarchs from 6 April 1199, until his death. He succeeded to the throne as the younger brother of King Richard I of England, who died without issue....

, and the family had negotiated successfully the troubled reign of Edward IIEdward II of England

Edward II, of Caernarfon, was Kingdom of England from 1307 until he was deposition in January 1327. His tendency to ignore his nobility in favour of low-born favourites led to constant political unrest and his eventual deposition....

and cemented lands and alliances under Edward IIIEdward III of England

Edward III was one of the most successful List of the monarchs of the Kingdom of Englands of the Britain in the Middle Ages. Restoring royal authority after the disastrous reign of his father, Edward II of England, Edward III went on to transform the Kingdom of England into the most efficient military power in Europe....

. By the time of his death, Sir Geoffrey owned estates in YorkshireYorkshire

Yorkshire is a Historic counties of England of northern England and the largest in Great Britain. Because of its great size, over time functions were increasingly undertaken by its subdivisions, which have been subject to History of local government in Yorkshire....

, LeicestershireLeicestershire

Leicestershire County Hall, situated in Glenfield, Leicestershire, about 3 miles northwest of Leicester city centre, is the seat of Leicestershire County Council and the headquarters of the county authority....

, LincolnshireLincolnshire

Lincolnshire is a Counties of England in the east of England. It borders Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Rutland, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire, South Yorkshire, and the East Riding of Yorkshire....

and NottinghamshireNottinghamshire

Nottinghamshire is an Counties of England in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. The county town is traditionally Nottingham, though the council is now based in West Bridgford, a suburb of Greater Nottingham ....

, and the emphasis of the manuscript on rural scenes reflects this great land-holding. Indeed, the illustrations may even commemorate actual events, like Sir Geoffrey's building of a watermillWatermill

A watermill is a structure that uses a water wheel or water turbine to drive a mechanical process such as flour, lumber or textile production, or metal shaping ....

at Bridgeford. Many have claimed that the Luttrell Psalter shows how medieval people used to work, what tools they used, and what they used to wear, although Michael Camille rejects such ideas, proposing instead that the manuscript created reality, rather than mirroring it.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_de_Luterel

Sources:

Lyte, Sir H.C. Maxwell, K.C.B. A History of Dunster and of the Families of Mohun & Luttrell. The St. Catherine Press, London, 1909. pp. 58-61.

Woodger, Bev. Dunster Castle: The People and the Place. Diggory Press, 2006.

Family and Estate papers of the Luttrell family of Dunster, Somerset Record Office reference DD/L and also via National Archives, Access to Archives online.

-------------------- The noble family of Lutterell was established in England by one of the chiefs of the Norman Conquest, whose name is to be found in the Roll of Battle Abbey. Sir John Lutterell held the manor of Hoton Pagnel in Yorkshire. The estates of Sir Geoffrey Lutterell, Knight, in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and York were confiscated in the reign of Richard I for his adhesion to John, Earl of Morton, but were restored upon the accession of that prince to the throne as King. Sir Geoffrey accompanied the new King to Ireland and obtained from the crown a grant of Luttrellstown in that kingdom. The descendents of Sir Geoffrey were afterwards feudal Barons of Irnham.

Sir Geoffrey died in the 2nd year of Henry III (1218) and wass succeeded by his son, Sir Andrew De Lutterell of Iraham county. Perhaps this was the sam person who is mentioned of Dunster Castle, and the Luttrells, the Earls of Carhampton, were of the old baronial stock of Iranham. The origin of the Luttrell's may be France, for the name derives from the French word "loutre" meaning an otter. Sir Geoffrey can be regarded as the founder of the family in England. King John sent him on diplomatic missions to Europe and gave him many useful sinecures. His marriage to the heiress, Frethesant Paynell of Pagnell was of more enduring importance for the family fortune was founded upon her inheritance.[91502.ftw]

The noble family of Lutterell was established in England by one of the chiefs of the Norman Conquest, whose name is to be found in the Roll of Battle Abbey. Sir John Lutterell held the manor of Hoton Pagnel in Yorkshire. The estates of Sir Geoffrey Lutterell, Knight, in the counties of Derby, Leicester, Nottingham, and York were confiscated in the reign of Richard I for his adhesion to John, Earl of Morton, but were restored upon the accession of that prince to the throne as King. Sir Geoffrey accompanied the new King to Ireland and obtained from the crown a grant of Luttrellstown in that kingdom. The descendents of Sir Geoffrey were afterwards feudal Barons of Irnham.

Sir Geoffrey died in the 2nd year of Henry III (1218) and wass succeeded by his son, Sir Andrew De Lutterell of Iraham county. Perhaps this was the sam person who is mentioned of Dunster Castle, and the Luttrells, the Earls of Carhampton, were of the old baronial stock of Iranham. The origin of the Luttrell's may be France, for the name derives from the French word "loutre" meaning an otter. Sir Geoffrey can be regarded as the founder of the family in England. King John sent him on diplomatic missions to Europe and gave him many useful sinecures. His marriage to the heiress, Frethesant Paynell of Pagnell was of more enduring importance for the family fortune was founded upon her inheritance. -------------------- 1215 was sole agent in Queen Berengaria negotiations. Baron Luterel by Writ of Summons, dated 24 Jun, 1295.

The noble family claimed descent from one of the Norman Chiefs who accompanied William the Conqueror to England. There has been some doubt expressed by antiquarians as to when the Luttrell family first came to England. Were Robert Luttrell and Osbert Luttrell, mentioned as living in Normandy previous to the Conquest of England and as being extensive landowners and to this day families of the name are found in different parts of France, his forebears. The name is not mentioned in the Domesday Book although it is mentioned in the Roll of Battle Abbey, vol. II (Abbey lists in the British Museum)but doubt is now being cast upon the authenticity of the records. The unquestioned respect in which the Rolls have been held by antiquarians is due to the fact that for many families they are the only proof for a claim to an existence at that early period.

A branch of this ancient family appears to have settled in Ireland as early as the reign of John when Sir Geoffrey Luttrell obtained from that Prince a grant of the lands of Luttrellstown, Co. Dublin. Both Sir John and Sir Geoffrey Luttrell served under John in Ireland (1996 family tree by, Juanita L Berrian).

It is not certain whether the head of the Irish branch was a son or a brother of this Sir Geoffrey but it is reasonable that he bore either the one or the other relation for the reason that the lands of Luttrellstown secured by royal grant by Sir Geoffrey were from the time of Geoffrey's death owned by Sir Robert Luttrell, head of the Irish branch, who lived at Lucan, near Dublin and that it remained in the family until the early part of the nineteenth century. In the time of Richard I the lands of Sir Geoffrey De Luterel in the counties of Nottingham and Derby were seized by the Crown for his adherence to the Earl of Moreton but he was compensated upon the accession of the Earl to the Throne as King John by extensive territorial and other grants. He was also stationed in Ireland in 1204 and in 1215 when he possessed large administrative powers.

In 1215 John appointed him to be his sole agent in the negotiations concerning the dower of Queen Berengaria commissioning him at the same time to join with the Archbishops of Bordeaux and Dublin in denouncing to the Pope the rebellious barons who had recently extorted the Great Charter of English liberties. In one of these documents he is styled "Nobilis vir." His mission was successful in that Innocent III annulled the Charter, suspended the Archbishop of Canterbury and excommunicated the barons but it is uncertain whether it was Sir Geoffrey who conveyed the papal bull from Rome to England.

He is supposed to have died in 1216 or in 1217. As a reward for his services he was granted lands in Yorkshire, Northamptonshire and at Croxton, in Leicestershire. In consideration of twenty ounces of gold he was still further rewarded with a large estate known as Luttrellstown to the present day and situated on the banks of the Liffey about eight miles out from Dublin. He married Frethesant, 2nd daughter of William Paganal, Lord of Irnham. His marriage was of enduring importance for the family fortune was founded upon her inheritance, through this marriage he was heir to certain lands of Maurice De Gaunt and his descendants in direct line from William the Conqueror's brother, Robert. And by her had a son and heir, Andrew. Sir Geoffrey died in the 2nd year of Henry III (1218) and was succeeded by his son, Sir Andrew De Luterel, of Irnham.

The descendants of Sir Geoffrey were afterwards feudal barons of Irnham and one of those barons, Robert De Luttrell, had summons to parliament on the 24th Jun and 2nd Nov, 1295. (See Burke's Extinct and Dormant Peerage.)

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Sir Geoffrey de Lutterell, Kt.'s Timeline

1158
1158
Retford, Nottinghamshire, England
1181
1181
Age 23
Tideswell, Derbyshire, England
1204
February 26, 1204
Age 46
Yorkshire, England
1204
Age 46
1206
1206
Age 48

Served as the King's treasurer.

1208
October 8, 1208
Age 50
Hooton Pagnell,West Riding,Yorkshire,England
1210
1210
Age 52

Accompanied King John to Ireland as Paymaster of the King's Fleet

1215
1215
Age 57
1215
Age 57
1217
1217
Age 59
Croxton Kerrial, Leicestershire, England