Sir James Tyrrell, Kt.

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James Tyrrell, Kt.

Nicknames: "James Tirrell", "James Tyrel", "James Terrell", "James Tirrel", "James Terell", "James Teril", "James Thurold", "James Turold"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Gipping Hall, Stowmarket, Suffolk, England
Death: Died in City of London, Middlesex, England
Cause of death: Beheaded on the order of King Henry VII
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir William Tyrrell, Kt. of Gipping and Margaret Tyrrell
Husband of Anne Tyrrell
Father of Sir Thomas Tyrrell; Anne Wentworth; James Tyrrell, of Colombine Hall and Margery Garneys
Brother of Dorothy Boteler and Eleanor Knyvett

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About James Tyrrell, Kt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Tyrrell

Sir James Tyrell (c. 1450 – May 6, 1502) was an English knight, a trusted servant of King Richard III of England. He is known for 'confessing' to the murders of the Princes in the Tower under Richard's orders. However, his statement was taken under torture, so the confession can easily be discredited. (Nevertheless, William Shakespeare portrays Tyrrell as man who organises the princes' murderer in Richard III.)

Tyrrell was the eldest son of Sir William Tyrell (c. 1415-February 22, 1461) and Margaret Darcy (c. 1425), married in 1444. Like his father before him, a loyal Yorkist, James was knighted in 1471. He married Anne Arundell on March 9, 1483. They would later have a son also named James Tyrrell.

James was in France in 1485 and played no part in the Battle of Bosworth Field which signalled the start of the Tudor dynasty.

In the following year, he returned to England and was pardoned by King Henry VII, who reappointed him governor of Guisnes (in the English possession of Calais). However, in 1501, Tyrrell lent his support to Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, now the leading Yorkist claimant to the English throne, who was in voluntary exile. When Henry heard of this, Tyrrell was recalled, accused of treason, and tortured. Thomas More wrote that, during his examination, Tyrrell made his confession as to the murders of Edward V and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York and implicating two other men; despite further questioning, however, he was unable to say where the bodies were, claiming that they had been moved. He was beheaded on May 6, 1502.

http://www.wordiq.com/definition/James_Tyrrell

He was beheaded on May 6, 1502, and his confession, if it happened, was never made public.

Although serious historians have never given much credence to the Tyrrell story, Ricardians have exploited the confusion over the date of the pardon in order to point the finger at King Henry.

Was there anything sinister about Tyrrell's pardon?

Thomas B. Costain and others have made much of Henry VII's pardoning Tyrrell in 1486, because he seems to have done so twice: There are records of a "general pardon" on 16 June (as was customary for someone clearing up his records when leaving office) and another one on 16 July. If that is not some clerical error and there really were two pardons a month apart, the question arises of what Tyrrell did during that month to make him want another pardon. It has been suggested that Henry made a deal to pardon Tyrrell and restore him to office if he would kill the princes, or that he pardoned Tyrrell again and held the knowledge of his guilt in reserve in case he ever wanted to use it against him later.

This explanation in itself begs several questions. Given that Henry was ruthless and clever enough to murder the princes, the question arises of why he would he have waited a whole year after his accession to do so, and why he would he have selected a dyed-in-the-wool Yorkist as his instrument.

Archbishop John Morton is said to have been the source of the information in Sir Thomas More's The History of Richard III, which is where the story of the "confession" of Tyrrell appears. According to More's account, King Richard first sent a man named John Green to Robert Brackenbury, keeper of the Tower, with a written order to kill the two princes. When Brackenbury refused, Richard sent Tyrrell to Brackenbury with a written order to deliver the keys to the Tower to Tyrrell for one night, which he did. Tyrrell killed the boys that night, and Brackenbury's priest moved the bodies from where Tyrrell buried them.

On the other hand, if Henry had murdered the princes, it is inexplicable that he should have missed the opportunity of making Tyrrell his scapegoat by publishing his confession at the time of his execution. More's account suggests that Henry's reason for suppressing the confession was that he feared that his earlier pardoning of Tyrrell would lead to his being blamed for the murder. Morton, apparently the source of this information, was dead by the time of Tyrrell's supposed confession, thus none of the content of More's book was contemporary with the events described. It is now accepted that More's book was an exercise in rhetoric and was never meant to be taken as historical fact; however, for a while, it became good propaganda for the Tudor dynasty.

http://en.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enwiki/64934

Legend

He is a participiant in the legend of the Horndon Worm from East Horndon which he slew using highly polished armour. Because of this he has made an appearance in the "2000AD" story called "London Falling". In this he is brutally killed by the character Black Shuck.

External links

Family Group Record FamilySearch™ Ancestral File v4.19

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Husband's Name

James TYRELL (AFN:8Q45-JM)  Pedigree  

Born:  Abt 1443  Place:  Of, Gipping, Suffolk, England   
Died:  Aft 1483  Place:     
Married:  9 Mar 1483  Place:  Of, Arundell, Sussex, England   

Father:  William TYRRELL (AFN:9GFH-BD)  Family  
Mother:  Margaret DARCY (AFN:9GFH-CK)   

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Wife's Name

Anne ARUNDELL (AFN:95L0-6J)  Pedigree  

Born:  Abt 1445  Place:  Of, Lanhern, Cornwall, England   
Married:  9 Mar 1483  Place:  Of, Arundell, Sussex, England   

Father:  John ARUNDELL ;VII (AFN:95L0-5C)  Family  
Mother:  Elizabeth MORLEY (AFN:95L0-46)   

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Children

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1.  Sex  Name    
 F Anne TYRRELL (AFN:TH38-R8)  Pedigree  

   Born:  1479   Place:  Of, Gipping, Suffolk, England  

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Tyrrell

Sir James Tyrrell (c.1455 – 6 May 1502) was an English knight, a trusted servant of King Richard III of England. He is known for confessing to the murders of the Princes in the Tower under Richard's orders. However, his statement may have been taken under torture, so the confession might not be genuine. William Shakespeare portrays Tyrrell as the man who organizes the princes' murder in Richard III.

Family

James Tyrrell was the eldest son of William Tyrrell of Gipping, Suffolk, and Margaret Darcy, the daughter of Robert Darcy of Maldon, Essex, and the grandson of Sir John Tyrrell.

Career

Tyrrell's father was beheaded on Tower Hill on 23 February 1462, together with Sir Thomas Tuddenham and John Montgomery. John de Vere, 12th Earl of Oxford, and his eldest son and heir, Aubrey, were beheaded on 26 February and 20 February, respectively, after the discovery of an alleged plot to murder Edward IV. No records of the trials of the alleged conspirators have survived to shed light on what part, if any, Tyrrell's father played in the alleged conspiracy. He was not attainted, and his eldest son and heir's wardship and the custody of his lands were granted to Cecily Neville, Duchess of York, who sold them to William Tyrrell's widow in March 1463 for £50.

James Tyrrell fought on the Yorkist side at the Battle of Tewkesbury on 4 May 1471, and was knighted there by Edward IV. A few months later he entered the service of the future Richard III, then Duke of Gloucester. After Richard III assumed power, he was appointed High Sheriff of Cornwall in 1484. He was in France in 1485, and played no part in the Battle of Bosworth Field which signalled the end of the Yorkists and the start of the Tudor dynasty.

In the following year, he returned to England and was pardoned by King Henry VII, who reappointed him governor of Guînes (in the English possession of Calais). However, in 1501, Tyrrell lent his support to Edmund de la Pole, 3rd Duke of Suffolk, now the leading Yorkist claimant to the English throne, who was in voluntary exile. In the spring of 1501 Henry VII sent Thomas Lovell to Guines arrest Tyrrell and others, including Tyrrell's son, Thomas.

Tyrrell was charged with treason and tortured. Sir Thomas More wrote that during his examination Tyrrell confessed to the murders of King Edward V of England and his brother Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York. He also implicated two other men. Despite further questioning, however, he was unable to say where the bodies were, claiming that they had been moved.

Tyrrell was tried and convicted of treason at the Guildhall in London on 2 May 1502 and executed four days later, on 6 May, together with one of his accomplices in aiding Suffolk, Sir John Wyndham. He was buried at the church of the Austin Friars, London. He was attainted on 25 January 1504; however the attainder was reversed three years later, on 19 April 1507.

Marriage and issue

In 1469 Tyrrell married Anne Arundel, the daughter of John Arundel of Lanherne, Cornwall, by his first wife, Elizabeth Morley, daughter of Thomas, Lord Morley, by whom he had three sons and a daughter:

Sir Thomas Tyrrell (d.1551) of Gipping, Suffolk, who married firstly Margaret Willoughby, daughter of Christopher Willoughby, 10th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, by whom he had a son, Sir John Tyrrell (d.1574), who married Elizabeth Munday, the daughter of Sir John Munday (d.1537), Lord Mayor of London, and a daughter, Anne Tyrrell, who married Sir John Clere of Ormesby, Norfolk.

James Tyrrell (d.1539) of Columbine Hall in Stowupland, Suffolk, who married Anne Hotoft

William Tyrrell.

Anne Tyrrell, who married Sir Richard Wentworth (d.1528) of Nettlestead, Suffolk, by whom she was the mother of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Baron Wentworth

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Sir James Tyrrell, Kt.'s Timeline

1450
1450
Stowmarket, Suffolk, England
1475
1475
Age 25
Gipping, Suffolk, UK
1480
1480
Age 30
Stowmarket, Suffolk, England
1483
March 9, 1483
Age 33
Arundel, Sussex, England
1502
May 6, 1502
Age 52
City of London, Middlesex, England
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