Sir John Lisle, MP & Regicide

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John Lisle, Knight

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wooton, Isle of Wight, , England
Death: Died in Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
Cause of death: Shot
Place of Burial: Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir William Lisle, of Wootton and Bridget Lisle
Husband of Elizabeth Lisle and Alice Lisle
Father of William Lisle, died young; Margaret Whitaker; Alice Hoare; John Lisle, of Moyle's Court; Bridget Usher and 5 others
Brother of Sir William Lisle; Daniel Lisle, died young; Edward Lisle; Richard Lisle; Mabel Lisle and 1 other

Occupation: lawyer, Chief Lord Justice for Cromwell
Managed by: Stephanie Jeanne Olmstead-Dean
Last Updated:

About Sir John Lisle, MP & Regicide

Lawyer and regicide of Charles l. He escaped abroad at the Restoration but was murdered in Lausanne by Irish Royalist James Cotter (using the alias Thomas Macdonnell) in August 1664. (1)

FROM THE WEBSITE:

http://www.southfrm.demon.co.uk/Murder/JohnL.html

Lisle, John 1610?-1664, regicide, born about 1610, was second son of Sir William Lisle of Wootton, Isle of Wight, by Bridget, daughter of Sir John Hungerford of Down Ampney, Gloucestershire (BERRY, County Genealogies, ‘Hampshire,' p. 174). On 25 Jan. 1625-6 he matriculated as a member of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and graduated B.A. in February 1625-6. He was called to the bar from the Middle Temple in 1633 and became a bencher of his inn in 1649 (FOSTER, Alumni Oxon. 1500-1714, p. 917). He was chosen M.P. for Winchester in March 1639-40, and again in October 1640. He advocated violent measures on the king's removal to the north, and obtained some of the plunder arising from the sale of the crown property.

In 1644-5 he sat on the committee to investigate the charges preferred by Cromwell against the Earl of Manchester (Commons' Journals, iv. 25). He displayed his inveterate hostility to Charles in a speech delivered on 3 July 1645, before the lord mayor and citizens of London, with reference to the discovery of the king's letters at Naseby. It was printed. In December 1647, when the king was confined in the Isle of Wight, Lisle was selected as one of the commissioners to carry to him the four bills which were to divest him of all sovereignty. He spoke in the House of Commons on 28 Sept. 1648 in favour of rescinding the recent vote, that no one proposition in regard to the personal treaty with the king should be binding if the treaty broke off upon another; and again, some days later, urged a discontinuance of the negotiation with Charles. He took a prominent part in the king's trial. He was one of the managers, was present every day, and drew up the form of the sentence. He was appointed on 8 Feb. 1648-9 one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state.

Lisle became one of Cromwell's creatures. He not only concurred in December 1653 in nominating Cromwell protector, but administered the oath to him; and having been reappointed lord commissioner, was elected member in the new parliament, on 12 July 1654, both for Southampton, of which town he was recorder, and for the Isle of Wight. He selected to sit for Southampton. In June previously he had been constituted president of the high court of justice, and in August he was appointed one of the commissioners of the exchequer. Lisle alone of his colleagues proposed to execute the ordinance for the better regulation of the court of chancery, which was submitted to the keepers of the seal, and owing to his subservience to Cromwell was continued in his office on the removal of his colleagues in June 1655. He was again confirmed in it in October 1656 by Cromwell's third parliament, to which he was re-elected by Southampton. In December 1657 Cromwell summoned Lisle to his newly established house of peers. Richard Cromwell preserved him in his place; but when the Long parliament met again in May 1659, he was compelled to retire. The house, however, named him on 28 Jan. 1660 a commissioner of the admiralty and navy (ib. vii. 825).

When the Restoration was inevitable Lisle escaped to Switzerland establishing himself first at Vevay and afterwards at Lausanne, where he is said to have ‘charmed the Swiss by his devotion’ (Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1663-4), and was treated with much respect and ceremony. There he was shot dead on 11 Aug. 1664, on his way to church, by an Irishman known as Thomas Macdonnell. Macdonnell escaped, and Lisle was buried in the church of the city.

Leonard Hoar, son of Charles and Joanna ( Hincksman) Hoar, of England, was president of Harvard College from 1672 until shortly before his death in 1675. He married Bridget Lisle, daughter of John Lord Lisle. Her father was president of the High Court of Justice in England under Cromwell, and drew the indictment and sentence of King Charles I. He was murdered in Lausanne;" Switzerland. August n. 1664, being shot in the back as he was on his way to church, by two Irish ruffians who were inspired by the hope of reward from some member of the Royal family in England. Bridget Lisle's mother was the Lady Alicia Lisle.

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Sir John Lisle (1610 – 14 September 1664) was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1659. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War and was one of the Regicides of King Charles I of England.[1] He was assassinated by an agent of the crown while in exile in Switzerland.

Lisle was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford and was awarded BA in 1626. He was called to the bar at Middle Temple in 1633.[2] In April 1640 he was elected Member of Parliament for Winchester in the Short Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Winchester for the Long Parliament in November 1640.[3] He was master of St Cross Hospital, Winchester from 1644 to 1649.[2]

Lisle was a member of the Rump Parliament and was one of the managers in the trial of Charles I's trial in 1649. He was appointed one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state in 1649. He also became a bencher of his Inn in 1649.[2] In 1654 he was elected MP for Southampton for the First Protectorate Parliament and was re-elected for the seat in 1656 for the Second Protectorate Parliament.[3] He held various offices in parliaments between 1654 and 1659 when he sat in the Restored Rump. In 1660, he was commissioner of the admiralty and navy.[2]

At the Restoration of the monarchy Lisle fled to Switzerland. He was assassinated in a churchyard in Lausanne on 14 September 1664 by Sir James Fitz Edmond Cotter an Irish soldier and Royalist agent who tracked down regicides and who is said to have used the alias Thomas Macdonnell.[2]

Lisle married as his second wife Alice Beconshaw daughter of Sir White Beconshaw of Moyles Court at Ellingham in Hampshire and his wife, Edith, daughter of William Bond of Blackmanston, Steeple, Dorset.[2] Alice was subsequently executed on a charge of harbouring fugitives after the Battle of Sedgemoor.

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-------------------- Sir John Lisle (1610 – 14 September 1664) was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1640 and 1659. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War and was one of the Regicides of King Charles I of England.[1] He was assassinated by an agent of the crown while in exile in Switzerland.

Lisle was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford and was awarded BA in 1626. He was called to the bar at Middle Temple in 1633.[2] In April 1640 he was elected Member of Parliament for Winchester in the Short Parliament. He was re-elected MP for Winchester for the Long Parliament in November 1640.[3] He was master of St Cross Hospital, Winchester from 1644 to 1649.[2]

Lisle was a member of the Rump Parliament and was one of the managers in the trial of Charles I's trial in 1649. He was appointed one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state in 1649. He also became a bencher of his Inn in 1649.[2] In 1654 he was elected MP for Southampton for the First Protectorate Parliament and was re-elected for the seat in 1656 for the Second Protectorate Parliament.[3] He held various offices in parliaments between 1654 and 1659 when he sat in the Restored Rump. In 1660, he was commissioner of the admiralty and navy.[2]

At the Restoration of the monarchy Lisle fled to Switzerland. He was assassinated in a churchyard in Lausanne on 14 September 1664 by Sir James Fitz Edmond Cotter an Irish soldier and Royalist agent who tracked down regicides and who is said to have used the alias Thomas Macdonnell.[2]

Lisle married as his second wife Alice Beconshaw daughter of Sir White Beconshaw of Moyles Court at Ellingham in Hampshire and his wife, Edith, daughter of William Bond of Blackmanston, Steeple, Dorset.[2] Alice was subsequently executed on a charge of harbouring fugitives after the Battle of Sedgemoor.

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2nd son of William Lisle of Wooton Isle of Wight county of Hampshire in England

Education .. Matriculated, Magdalen Hall, Oxford, Graduated B.A. Feb 1625-6 Called to the Bar from Middle Temple 1633 and became a Bencher of his Inn in 1649 Twice MP for Winchester Made Master of St Cross Hospital, near Winchester until June 1649. He took a major part in the Kings' trial and drew up the form of sentance. born about 1610, was second son of Sir William Lisle of Wootton, Isle of Wight,

Lisle, John 1610?-1664, regicide, born about 1610, was second son of Sir William Lisle of Wootton, Isle of Wight, by Bridget, daughter of Sir John Hungerford of Down Ampney, Gloucestershire (BERRY, County Genealogies, ‘Hampshire,' p. 174). On 25 Jan. 1625-6 he matriculated as a member of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and graduated B.A. in February 1625-6. He was called to the bar from the Middle Temple in 1633 and became a bencher of his inn in 1649 (FOSTER, Alumni Oxon. 1500-1714, p. 917). He was chosen M.P. for Winchester in March 1639-40, and again in October 1640. He advocated violent measures on the king's removal to the north, and obtained some of the plunder arising from the sale of the crown property. To the fund opened on 9 April 1642 for the ‘speedy reducing of the rebels’ in Ireland, Lisle contributed 600l. (RUSHWORTH, Hist. Coll. pt. iii. vol. i. p. 565). On the eviction of Dr. William Lewis (1592-1667) [q.v.] in November 1644 he was made master of St. Cross Hospital, near Winchester, and retained the office until June 1649. In 1644-5 he sat on the committee to investigate the charges preferred by Cromwell against the Earl of Manchester (Commons' Journals, iv. 25). He displayed his inveterate hostility to Charles in a speech delivered on 3 July 1645, before the lord mayor and citizens of London, with reference to the discovery of the king's letters at Naseby. It was printed. In December 1647, when the king was confined in the Isle of Wight, Lisle was selected as one of the commissioners to carry to him the four bills which were to divest him of all sovereignty. He spoke in the House of Commons on 28 Sept. 1648 in favour of rescinding the recent vote, that no one proposition in regard to the personal treaty with the king should be binding if the treaty broke off upon another; and again, some days later, urged a discontinuance of the negotiation with Charles. He took a prominent part in the king's trial. He was one of the managers, was present every day, and drew up the form of the sentence. He was appointed on 8 Feb. 1648-9 one of the commissioners of the great seal, and was placed on the council of state. Lisle became one of Cromwell's creatures. He not only concurred in December 1653 in nominating Cromwell protector, but administered the oath to him; and having been reappointed lord commissioner, was elected member in the new parliament, on 12 July 1654, both for Southampton, of which town he was recorder, and for the Isle of Wight. He selected to sit for Southampton. In June previously he had been constituted president of the high court of justice, and in August he was appointed one of the commissioners of the exchequer. Lisle alone of his colleagues proposed to execute the ordinance for the better regulation of the court of chancery, which was submitted to the keepers of the seal, and owing to his subserviency to Cromwell was continued in his office on the removal of his colleagues in June 1655. He was again confirmed in it in October 1656 by Cromwell's third parliament, to which he was re-elected by Southampton. In December 1657 Cromwell summoned Lisle to his newly established house of peers. Richard Cromwell preserved him in his place; but when the Long parliament met again in May 1659, he was compelled to retire. The house, however, named him on 28 Jan. 1660 a commissioner of the admiralty and navy (ib. vii. 825). When the Restoration was inevitable Lisle escaped to Switzerland establishing himself first at Vevay and afterwards at Lausanne, where he is said to have ‘charmed the Swiss by his devotion’ (Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1663-4), and was treated with much respect and ceremony. There he was shot dead on 11 Aug. 1664, on his way to church, by an Irishman known as Thomas Macdonnell [see art. Maccartain, William]. Macdonnell escaped, and Lisle was buried in the church of the city. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Henry Hobart, chief justice of the common pleas. His second wife Alice [q.v.] is noticed separately. With other issue he had two sons, John (d. 1709), of Dibden, Hampshire, and William, who adhered to the king and married the daughter of Lady Katherine Hyde (ib. 1660-1, p. 341).

On 25 Jan. 1625-6 he matriculated as a member of Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and graduated B.A. in February 1625-6. He was called to the bar from the Middle Temple in 1633 and became a bencher of his inn in 1649 (FOSTER, Alumni Oxon. 1500-1714, p. 917). He was chosen M.P. for Winchester in March 1639-40, and again in October 1640. He advocated violent measures on the king's removal to the north, and obtained some of the plunder arising from the sale of the crown property. To the fund opened on 9 April 1642 for the 'speedy reducing of the rebels' in Ireland, Lisle contributed 600l. In December 1657 Cromwell summoned Lisle to his newly established house of peers. Richard Cromwell preserved him in his place; but when the Long parliament met again in May 1659, he was compelled to retire. The house, however, named him on 28 Jan. 1660 a commissioner of the admiralty and navy (ib. vii. 825).

When the Restoration was inevitable Lisle escaped to Switzerland establishing himself first at Vevay and afterwards at Lausanne, where he is said to have 'charmed the Swiss by his devotion' (Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1663-4), and was treated with much respect and ceremony. There he was shot dead on 11 Aug. 1664, on his way to church, by an Irishman known as Thomas Macdonnell [see art. Maccartain, William]. Macdonnell escaped, and Lisle was buried in the church of the city. His first wife was a daughter of Sir Henry Hobart, chief justice of the common pleas. His second wife Alice [q.v.] is noticed separately. With other issue he had two sons, John (d. 1709), of Dibden, Hampshire, and William, who adhered to the king and married the daughter of Lady Katherine Hyde (ib. 1660-1, p. 341).The Complete Peerage article on John Lord Lisle - (Vol IV, Appx G, p.622)

The regicide of Charles I of England[edit] See also: List of regicides of Charles I and High Court of Justice for the trial of Charles I After the First English Civil War, King Charles I was a prisoner of the Parliamentarians. They tried to negotiate a compromise with him, but he stuck steadfastly to his view that he was King by Divine Right and attempted in secret to raise an army to fight against them. It became obvious to the leaders of the Parliamentarians that they could not negotiate a settlement with him and they could not trust him to refrain from raising an army against them; they reluctantly came to the conclusion that he would have to be put to death. On 13 December 1648, the House of Commons broke off negotiations with the King. Two days later, the Council of Officers of the New Model Army voted that the King be moved from the Isle of Wight, where he was prisoner, to Windsor "in order to the bringing of him speedily to justice".[2] In the middle of December, the King was moved from Windsor to London. The House of Commons of the Rump Parliament passed a Bill setting up a High Court of Justice in order to try Charles I for high treason in the name of the people of England. From a Royalist and post-restoration perspective this Bill was not lawful, since the House of Lords refused to pass it and it failed to receive Royal Assent. However, the Parliamentary leaders and the Army pressed on with the trial anyway.

At his trial in front of The High Court of Justice on Saturday 20 January 1649 in Westminster Hall, Charles asked "I would know by what power I am called hither. I would know by what authority, I mean lawful".[3] In view of the historic issues involved, both sides based themselves on surprisingly technical legal grounds. Charles did not dispute that Parliament as a whole did have some judicial powers, but he maintained that the House of Commons on its own could not try anybody, and so he refused to plead. At that time under English law if a prisoner refused to plead then this was treated as a plea of guilty (This has since been changed; a refusal to plead now is interpreted as a not-guilty plea).[4]

He was found guilty on Saturday 27 January 1649, and his death warrant was signed by 59 Commissioners. To show their agreement with the sentence of death, all of the Commissioners who were present rose to their feet.

This contemporary print depicts Charles I's decapitation. On the day of his execution, 30 January 1649, Charles dressed in two shirts so that he would not shiver from the cold, in case it was said that he was shivering from fear. His execution was delayed by several hours so that the House of Commons could pass an emergency bill to make it an offence to proclaim a new King, and to declare the representatives of the people, the House of Commons, as the source of all just power. Charles was then escorted through the Banqueting House in the Palace of Whitehall to a scaffold. He forgave those who had passed sentence on him and gave instructions to his enemies that they should learn to "know their duty to God, the King - that is, my successors - and the people".[5] He then gave a brief speech outlining his unchanged views of the relationship between the monarchy and the monarch's subjects, ending with the words "I am the martyr of the people".[6] His head was severed from his body with one blow.

One week later, the Rump, sitting in the House of Commons, passed a bill abolishing the monarchy. Ardent Royalists refused to accept it on the basis that there could never be a vacancy of the Crown. Others refused because, as the bill had not passed the House of Lords and did not have Royal Assent, it could not become an Act of Parliament.

The Declaration of Breda 11 years later paved the way for the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. At the restoration, thirty-one of the fifty-nine Commissioners who had signed the death warrant were living. A general pardon was given by Charles II and Parliament to his opponents, but the regicides were excluded. A number fled the country. Some, such as Daniel Blagrave, fled to continental Europe, while others like John Dixwell, Edward Whalley, and William Goffe fled to New Haven, Connecticut. Those who were still available were put on trial. Six regicides were found guilty and suffered the fate of being hanged, drawn and quartered: Thomas Harrison, John Jones, Adrian Scroope, John Carew, Thomas Scot, and Gregory Clement. The captain of the guard at the trial, Daniel Axtell who encouraged his men to barrack the King when he tried to speak in his own defence, an influential preacher Hugh Peters, and the leading prosecutor at the trial John Cook were executed in a similar manner. Colonel Francis Hacker who signed the order to the executioner of the king and commanded the guard around the scaffold and at the trial was hanged. Concern amongst the royal ministers over the negative impact on popular sentiment of these public tortures and executions led to jail sentences being substituted for the remaining regicides.[7]

Some regicides, such as Richard Ingoldsby were pardoned, while a further nineteen served life imprisonment. The bodies of the regicides Cromwell, Bradshaw and Ireton which had been buried in Westminster Abbey were disinterred and hanged, drawn and quartered in posthumous executions. In 1662, three more regicides John Okey, John Barkstead and Miles Corbet were also hanged, drawn and quartered. The officers of the court that tried Charles I, those who prosecuted him and those who signed his death warrant, have been known ever since the restoration as regicides.

The Parliamentary Archives in the Palace of Westminster, London, holds the original death warrant of Charles I.

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Sir John Lisle, MP & Regicide's Timeline

1610
1610
Wooton, Isle of Wight, , England
1630
1630
Age 20
Antrim, County Antrim, Ulster, Ireland
1633
1633
Age 23
England
1634
1634
Age 24
Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
1634
Age 24
1634
Age 24
Moyles Court, Hampshire, England
1636
October 23, 1636
Age 26
Ellingham, Hampshire, , England
1640
1640
Age 30
England
1648
1648
Age 38
Hampshire , England
1664
August 11, 1664
Age 54
Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland