Sir John Perrot, MP

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John Perrot, MP

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Haroldston, Pembroke, England
Death: Died in London, Tower of London, Middlesex, England
Place of Burial: London, Tower of London, Middlesex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Thomas Perrott and Mary Pughe
Husband of Anne Perrot and Jane Perrot
Father of Sir Thomas Perrot, MP; Lettitia / Lettice Perrot; Anne Phillips; William Perrot; Elizabeth Butler and 2 others
Brother of Jane Phillips and Elizabeth Price
Half brother of Eleanor Rhys; Sir Henry Johns; Richard Jones, MP; Catherine Jones and James Jones

Occupation: Captain, Knight
Managed by: Patricia Norton Chong
Last Updated:

About John Perrot, MP

Family and Education b. 1528/9, reputed illegit. s. of Henry VIII by Mary, da. of James Berkeley of Thornbury, Glos., w. of Thomas Perrot of Islington, Mdx. and Haroldston; half-bro. of Sir Henry and Richard Jones. educ. St. Davids. m. (1) Anne (d. Sept. 1553), da. of Sir Thomas Cheyne(y)† of Shurland, Kent, 1s. Sir Thomas; (2) by 1566, Jane, da. of Hugh Prust of Hartland, Devon, wid. of Sir Lewis Pollard of Oakford, Devon, 1s. 2da.; at least 1s. illegit. James 2da. illegit. suc. Thomas Perrot 1531. Kntd. 17 Nov. 1549.2

Offices Held

Sheriff, Pemb. 1551-2; commr. goods of churches and fraternities, Pemb. 1553, concealed lands 1561, armour 1569; commr. musters Pemb. 1570, Denb. 1580, Haverfordwest 1581, piracy Card., Carm. 1575, Pemb. 1577; j.p. Pemb. 1555-8, q. Card., Carm., Pemb. 1559-d., q. all Welsh counties 1579-d., marcher counties 1582; steward, manors of Carew, Coedraeth and Narberth, Pemb., and St. Clears, Carm. 1559, lordship of Cilgerran, Pemb. 1570; constable, Narberth and Tenby castles, Pemb. 1559; gaoler, Haverfordwest 1559; mayor, Haverfordwest 1560-1, 1570-1, 1575-6; custos rot. Pemb. by 1562; pres. of Munster 1570-3; member, council in the marches of Wales by 1574; ld. dep. Ireland 1584-8; dep. lt. Pemb. in 1587; PC 10 Feb. 1589.3

Biography In both the Marian Parliaments in which he sat, Perrot opposed government measures, and he was one of the ‘right protestants’ who met at ‘Harondayles home’ to discuss parliamentary tactics in 1555. He sheltered protestants at Haroldston, and served under the 1st Earl of Pembroke at St. Quentin in 1557. Upon Elizabeth’s accession he became a favoured courtier. Freed from a sentence of outlawry for non-appearance at court on an attachment for debt (which he expiated in the Marshalsea), Perrot rapidly became a key man in the administration of his own shire and the recipient of profitable crown offices there, as well as grants of land and advowsons both there and in England. His commissionership for concealed lands brought into his net some of the former lands of the dissolved priory of Haverfordwest—not without violent quarrels, carried into Star Chamber in 1561, with those whose titles were challenged. He also made a successful bid for some of the lands forfeited to the Crown 30 years earlier by the attainder of his stepfather’s great kinsman Sir Rhys ap Gruffydd. The grant made on his petition in 1554 (for his ‘service heretofore and hereafter to be done’) of Rhys’s old lordship and castle of Carew does not seem to have become effective, since it was only in 1559 that he received the stewardship and not until 1562-6 that a succession of crown leases rounded off his control of the lordship. The castle he largely rebuilt, and eventually made his principal seat.4

Perrot was returned to the 1559 Parliament for Wareham, presumably through pressure exerted on the Rogers family by the 2nd Earl of Bedford, his former commander. In the next Parliament he came in for Pembrokeshire, and was appointed to the succession committee, 31 Oct. 1566. He was one of 30 MPs summoned on 5 Nov. to hear the Queen’s message on the succession. His mayoralty of Haverfordwest in 1570 gave him control of the borough machinery, and although his departure for Ireland enabled an anti-Parrot faction to put up a candidate for the borough in the 1571 parliamentary election, the pro-Parrot sheriff fraudulently returned his patron’s man, John Garnons. By 1572 the opposing faction controlled the borough and was able to return its man, Alban Stepneth, but Perrot’s partisans (Wogans and Bowens) kept up a running faction fight with Stepneth’s family group (Philipps of Picton, Owen of Henllys and Barlow of Slebech) in the streets of Haverfordwest for most of the year, with soldiers recruited for Perrot’s bodyguard in Ireland, or returning thence as deserters, to add to the turmoil. Perrot came home from Ireland in 1573, and settled in Pembrokeshire. He had been replaced as vice-admiral by Sir William Morgan of Pencoed with Richard Vaughan of Whitland as his deputy in the west. But Perrot was himself one of the Pembrokeshire commissioners for piracy, and there were conflicts of jurisdiction and mutual accusations of trafficking with the pirates. In 1579 Perrot was entrusted with a squadron of ships to clear the seas not only of pirates, but of Spanish vessels making for Ireland. In this, to the glee of his enemies, he had no great success, nor did he make much progress in his allotted task of fortifying Milford Haven. In a different sphere, he was one of a commission appointed in 1581 by the Privy Council to inquire into irregularities in the diocese of St. David’s, with whose bishops he was on chronically bad terms.5

During the years 1583-4 he was consolidating his influence round Haverfordwest by obtaining the lease of further rectories and granges in the former priory lands, extending it eastwards by acquisitions across the Carmarthenshire border, and exploiting what he already possessed by rack-renting and encroachments, all in face of a deteriorating financial situation. Several disputes arising out of these transactions came before Star Chamber in 1583. Now that he was a member of the council in the marches of Wales, the Privy Council would not allow his suits to be heard there, but referred them to the local assizes. In one quarrel (with Griffith Rice of Newton in 1581) the Council itself intervened. In general, however, it protected this ‘inward favourite of the Earl of Leicester’ from his many detractors, two of whom served sentences of imprisonment for slander before Perrot’s return to Ireland in 1584.6

His lord deputyship proved as stormy as his presidency of Munster, and included a spectacular brawl (before members of the Irish Council) with old Sir Nicholas Bagnall the marshal. In 1588 Perrot returned to Pembrokeshire, living in the renovated Carew castle. In this critical Armada year the Earl of Pembroke as president of the council in the marches of Wales chose him as his deputy while he was busy elsewhere. Bent on reasserting himself in his old sphere of influence, he put up successfully for Haverfordwest at the 1588 election, receiving wages for the ensuing Parliament. Early in 1589 he became a Privy Councillor, and with this added prestige took a more active part than hitherto in the business of the House. On 18 Feb. 1589 he was given charge of the bill for reforming abuses in the Exchequer. Two days later he asked for more time in committee, and on 25 Feb. he took the bill to the Lords, asking them to expedite its passage. On 6 Mar. he was summoned to discuss it with the Queen. He was added to the committee of the Hartlepool harbour bill (1 Mar.), and reported this to the House (12 Mar.) He served on a committee about fish (l 2 (11 Mar.), on another concerned with Lincoln (15 Mar.), took a bill about forestallers to the Lords (28 Mar.), and spoke on an unrecorded subject (29 Mar). A bill to amend the law relating to the hue and cry was committed to him (18 Mar.), and the next day he reported that the committee recommended no change. On 26 Mar. he reported that the Queen had told him that she needed a bill against the embezzling of her armour and weapons; this was read three times and he took it to the Lords. As a Privy Councillor Perrot was appointed to committees on the subsidy (11 Feb.), purveyors (15, 27 Feb.), Dover harbour (5 Mar.), forestallers (5 Mar.), captains and soldiers (19 Mar.), husbandry and tillage (25 Mar.) and a declaration of war with Spain (29 Mar.).7

By this time, Perrot’s star was falling. Leicester was dead; Essex, though his sister had married Perrot’s son, lent his weight in west Wales to the anti-Perrot faction; and Hatton, whose daughter Perrot was reported to have seduced, bore him a personal grudge. A concerted attack by his enemies resulted in charges of treason which may have had no more solid basis than his own intemperate speeches. In 1591 he was imprisoned in the Tower. Sending home for money for his defence, he raised without difficulty £1,500 from current rents alone, without resort to the iron chest in which he kept his (possibly less legitimate) reserves at Carew.8

Volume 72 of the Lansdowne manuscripts in the British Library is largely concerned with Perrot, his lands, quarrels with the Welsh gentry, demands for his trial, and a long account of it. Attainted on 17 Apr. 1592, he died in the Tower, an inquisition post mortem being taken on 26 Sept. His estates included 15 or more well stocked manors. The town of Haverfordwest still benefits from the ‘Perrot Trust’ he endowed in 3579 for municipal improvement. His son Sir Thomas Perrot was restored in blood within six months of the father’s death, and was thus able to inherit Haroldston; Carew was granted by the Queen for a term of years to Sir John’s widow. Both Sir Thomas and his father’s illegitimate son James Perrot represented the shire in Parliament, but with the latter’s death the family came to an end.9

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603 Author: A.H.D. Notes 1. Did not serve for the full duration of the Parliament. 2. DNB; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 108-29; xii. 312-25, 337-9, 478-81, 484-7; Wards 9/129, f. 164; Dwnn, Vis. Wales , i. 89, 134; C142/119/114; Lit. Rem. Edw. VI , i. p. ccvii. 3. DNB; DWB; CPR, 1553, p. 418; 1558-60, p. 45; 1560-3, pp. 445, 447; 1563-6, pp. 30, 317; 1569-72, p. 252; St. Ch. 5/P8/32; Flenley, Cal. Reg. Council, Marches of Wales, 60-9, 216; APC, ix. 267-8; xii. 364; xvii. 76; Arch. Camb. loc. cit. and (ser. 5), xiii. 195; P. H. Williams, Council in the Marches of Wales, 60-9, 354-7; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 537-41, 615; HMC Foljambe, 26; Haverfordwest Recs. 30, 184. 4. SP11/4 nos. 22-3; 11/8 no. 35; CPR, 1558-60, pp. 45, 136, 239, 305; 1560-3, pp. 222, 608; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 266, 615; Augmentations, ed. E. A. Lewis and J. C. Davies (Univ. Wales Bd. of Celtic Studies, Hist. and Law ser. xiii), 477, 479, 481-3, 488, 502-3; St. Ch. 5/P8/32; Arch. Camb. (ser. 5), iii. 27-41; xiv. 309-18; Spurrell, Hist. Carew, 9-11, 36-42. 5. D’Ewes, 126-7; Camb. Univ. Lib. Gg. iii. 34, p. 209; EHR, lxi. 18-27; Arch. Camb. (ser. 5), xiii. 193-211; xiv. 318-23; xv. 298-311; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 398, 406, 414, 517-19, 541, 590-1, 629, 631, 636-7, 695; St. Ch. 5/G12/25; APC, ix. 267-8; x. 231, 262; xiii. 142. 6. Augmentations, 245, 257, 487, 499; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 454, 522; St. Ch. 5/P50/21, P53/14, W69/30; APC, x. 283, 297; xii. 24; xiii. 88, 118; J. Wynn, Gwydir Fam. ed. Ballinger, 64; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 112-13. 7. Cal. Wynn Pprs. 115; NLW Jnl. ix. 170; D’Ewes, 430, 431, 432, 434, 436, 437, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 445, 446, 448, 453, 454; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 21. 8. P. H. Williams, 239, 282; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 124-5. 9. Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 116-25; D’Ewes, 510-11; LJ, ii. 182-3; DWB, 749; Exchequer, ed. T. I. J. Jones (Univ. Wales Bd. of Celtic Studies, Hist. and Law ser. xv), 303-4, 306, 308-9.

http://www.1066.co.nz/library/battle_abbey_roll3/chap00.htm

Perot :

The genealogy of this family, as given by Burke, is among the choicest curiosities of its genus: and Banks very justly apprehends it to be the fruit of a disordered mind. It is taken from a pedigree drawn up c. 1650 by a Welsh herald named Owen Griffiths; and prefaced by the amazing assertion that it had been "collected from the British Annals, which will bear record of the truth, and that it is no fiction, to latest posterity."—It is further dedicated "To the most Noble and Puissant Prince, Sir James Perrot, Marquess of Marbeth, Earl and Viscount Carew, and Baron Perrot:"—titles that never had any existence except in Owen's own deluded brain; and commences with William de Perrott, who built "Castel Perrott" near a town of that name in Brittany, and came over to England a.d. 957. He obtained some lands in Somerset, where he gave his name to the river Parrott (now the Parret) and laid the foundations of North and South Perrot. He was "constrained to leave the infant city" and return home; but his grandson accompanied the Conqueror, having married the latter's "nearest relative, Blanche, daughter of Ramiro, King of Arragon," recovered the estate in Somersetshire, and completed the long-interrupted building. In the next generation, Sir Stephen had to wife "the celebrated Princess Ellyn, daughter of Howell Dha, King of Wales, the Lycurgus or lawgiver of that land;" and their son Andrew, as "the descendant of a numerous race of kings, monarchs of Britain," claimed the kingdom, but graciously consented to cede his rights to the King of England, on receiving a sum of money, and the grant of a tract of twenty miles of country. He married "Jonet, daughter of Ralph, Lord Mortimer by Gladdis Dee, daughter of Llewellyn:" and "Lord Mortimer's mother was Maud, daughter of William the Conqueror." As Ralph, Lord Mortimer, died in 1246, this princess, at the time of his birth, cannot possibly have been less than one hundred and twenty or one hundred and thirty years of age. His only daughter Isolda was twice married, but on neither occasion to Sir Andrew Perrott.

The etymologists declare that Perrott simply represents the French diminutive of Peter. "Prince Edward used to call the favourite, Piers Gaveston, by the familiar title of 'Perot.' Perot Gruer is mentioned in the Rolls of Parliament. Henry Perot in the Writs of Parliament."—Bardsley's English Surnames. See also Lower. "Peret forestarius" is written in Domesday as the name of a Hampshire baron, but apparently only the Christian name. No Perrots occur in the county history of Somerset, where I only find that the river Parret "was anciently called the Pedred."—In Norfolk, Alan Pirot held six knights' fees under William de Albini; and in 1165 Ralph Pirot (no doubt his son) was the tenant of Robert de Albini of Cainho. (Liber Niger). At the same date, a Ralph Pirot held two knights' fees of the Bishop of Ely in Cambridgeshire, four of Geoffrey de Vere, and four of Henry Fitz Gerald in Essex. "If these knights' fees, amounting in the aggregate to fifteen, were holden by one and the same person, they point him out as one of considerable estate and consequence."—Banks. His descendant of the same name still held land in Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire of the barony of Cainho in the time of Henry III; as well as Lindsell Hall in Essex; Sauston in Cambridgeshire; and two knights' fees in Kent. One of his sons, Henry Perot, had the custody of the county of Kent 6 Ed. I: "to hold during the King's pleasure:" and Henry's nephew Ralph was among "the Barons made att the Parliament holden at Salesbury 25 Ed. 1." But it does not appear that Ralph's son and heir Simon, who succeeded him 33 Ed. I., ever was summoned to parliament; nor can I find any further notice of his posterity. A Reginald Perrot held Plateford and some other manors in Wiltshire in 1370.

This baronial house is never alluded to in the preposterous pedigree already quoted, which treats exclusively of the Welsh family of this name. It was seated at Iystington in Pembrokeshire, till Hester, daughter and heir of Sir Herbert Perrott of Haroldstone, brought the estates to her husband Sir John Pakington, of Westwood in Worcestershire, who died in 1727. Two junior branches remained; one in Brecknockshire; the other at Gellygare in Glamorganshire; and this latter only became extinct in 1779.

One of this Pembrokeshire house, Sir John Perrott, Lord Deputy of Ireland 1583-88, is supposed to have been an illegitimate son of Henry VIII. "If," writes Sir Robert Maunton, in his Fragmenta Regalia, "we compare his picture, his qualities, gesture and voice, with those of the King, they will plead strongly" in favour of this suggestion. "His first appearance at Court was early in the reign of Ed. VI. He was arraigned of high treason at Westminster in 1592, and received sentence of death, but did not suffer, for he died five months after in the Tower. He left one son, Sir Thomas, who married Dorothy, sister to the favourite Earl of Essex, by whom he had one or more daughters."—Nash's Worcestershire. He had governed Ireland victoriously and successfully; and was "brought unawares to ruin," says Camden, "by some envious persons, who were too powerful for him, together with the licentiousness of his own tongue, for he had thrown out some words against his Sovereign." Leland includes in this family the celebrated William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, and Lord High Chancellor under Edward III., the priest "who was so in favour with the King, that everything was done by him, and nothing was done without him." He says in his Notes concerning William of Wickham: "William Perrot, alias Wikam, because he was born at Wikam in Hampshire. Some suppose that he was a Bastard, Perot the Parish-Clark's Son of Wikam." His biographers, I observe, do not accept this statement, but assert that "his patronymic, if such indeed he had, was Longe." At all events, he was of humble origin. ============================================================================= http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~parrott/pembrokeshire.shtml

14. Sir John Perrot (b between 7 & 11 Nov 1528 - 3 November 1592; will dated 3 May 1592)

•Probably born at Haroldston,near Haverfordwest •Completes secondary education at Cathedral school at St. David's •1546- moves to London, as apprentice to Sir William Paulet, Lord Treasurer of England •1549- courtier in the royal Court •Knighted 1549 •1551- becomes sheriff of Pembrokeshire •1558- is given Carew Castle •1560/1, 1570/1 & 1575/6 - is mayor of Haverfordwest •1571-3 appointed Lord President of Munster •1574- appointed to the Council of Wales and the Marches •1584-8 appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland •1589- appointed to the Privy Council •1591- arrested for treason and taken to Tower of London •Buried 10 Nov 1592, Tower of London, church of St. Peter Ad Vincula •Married (ca 1550) first Anne Cheyney (d September 1553, due to childbirth), the daughter of Sir Thomas Cheyney (d 1558), Lord Warden of the Cinque Portes and sister to Lord Henry Cheyney. Thomas Cheyney also served as Privy Councillor and treasurer to the household of Henry VIII •Son Thomas, see #15 below •Daughter Elsbeth, married Alban Lloyd (b ~1570) of Trefeugan, Llanhywel, Pembrokeshire, Wales •Marries second Jane, widow of Sir Lewis Pollard and daughter of Hugh Pruet/Prust of Thorney, Devonshire, England •Second son William (died unmarried at St Thomas Court, near Dublin on 8th July 1597) •Daughter Lettice, who married, first, Rowland Lacharn of Sain Ffred, Pembrokeshire, Wales; secondly, Walter Vaughan (d 1597) of Y Gelli-aur Golden Groves), Llanfihangel Aberbythych, Carmarthenshire, Wales; and thirdly, Sir Arthur Chichester, Baron Chichester of Belfast, Antrim, Northern Ireland, and Lord Deputy of Ireland •Daughter Ann, married Sir John Philips, nephew of William Phillips, and first baronet of Picton. Their daughter married Sir Francis Annesley Viscount Valentia and Baron MountNorris. The Annesley family descends from four of the six sons of Edward III. In the biographies of Sir Francis Annesley it is stated that he was firstly butler to Sir Arthur Chichester then later a very good friend (and nephew by marriage) to Dorothy Phillips, the niece of Arthur Chichester and Lettice Perrott. •Besides these he had a number of illegitimate children. Some of the others were: •With Sybil Jones(ferch Rhys): •James, see #16 below, son of •Mary, who married Dafydd Morgan of Y Fenni, Monmouthshire, Wales, described as a gentleman •John, b ~1565. In the Inner Temple Register, there is an entry, dated 5 June 1583--"John Perot, of Haryve, Co. Pembroke, 3rd son of John Perot, Knight". Possibly also the son of Sybil Jones. He died without issue. •With Elizabeth, daughter of Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Christopher Hatton [later enemy of Sir John] •Elsbeth, who married Hugh (Huw) Butler of Johnston, Pembrokeshire, Wales

Perrot also fathered at least four illegitimate children. Elizabeth, who married Hugh Butler of Johnston, was the granddaughter of Sir Christopher Hatton, a favourite of Elizabeth I and enemy of Sir John (the source of their hostility being Sir John's relationship with Sir Christopher's unmarried illegitimate daughter, also named Elizabeth).[14]

Sir John Perrot (7–11 November 1528 – 3 November 1592) served as Lord Deputy of Ireland under Queen Elizabeth I of England during the Tudor conquest of Ireland. He is alleged to have been the son of King Henry VIII,[1] in an account written by Sir Robert Naunton, who had married Sir John's granddaughter, Penelope.[2]

http://mellenpress.com/mellenpress.cfm?bookid=5008&pc=9

It has been claimed that Perrot was the illegitimate son of Henry VIII, whom he is said to have notoriously resembled in both temperament and physical appearance.[4] However according to the historian Roger Turvey the allegation of Henry VIII's fatherhood originated with http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Naunton Sir Robert Naunton (1563–1635),[5][6] who never knew Perrott, and who used second-hand accounts of his person and character, together with a series of historically inaccurate events, to reach his conclusion as to Perrot's paternity.

Family and Education b. 1528/9, reputed illegit. s. of Henry VIII by Mary, da. of James Berkeley of Thornbury, Glos., w. of Thomas Perrot of Islington, Mdx. and Haroldston; half-bro. of Sir Henry and Richard Jones. educ. St. Davids. m. (1) Anne (d. Sept. 1553), da. of Sir Thomas Cheyne(y)† of Shurland, Kent, 1s. Sir Thomas; (2) by 1566, Jane, da. of Hugh Prust of Hartland, Devon, wid. of Sir Lewis Pollard of Oakford, Devon, 1s. 2da.; at least 1s. illegit. James 2da. illegit. suc. Thomas Perrot 1531. Kntd. 17 Nov. 1549.2

Offices Held

Sheriff, Pemb. 1551-2; commr. goods of churches and fraternities, Pemb. 1553, concealed lands 1561, armour 1569; commr. musters Pemb. 1570, Denb. 1580, Haverfordwest 1581, piracy Card., Carm. 1575, Pemb. 1577; j.p. Pemb. 1555-8, q. Card., Carm., Pemb. 1559-d., q. all Welsh counties 1579-d., marcher counties 1582; steward, manors of Carew, Coedraeth and Narberth, Pemb., and St. Clears, Carm. 1559, lordship of Cilgerran, Pemb. 1570; constable, Narberth and Tenby castles, Pemb. 1559; gaoler, Haverfordwest 1559; mayor, Haverfordwest 1560-1, 1570-1, 1575-6; custos rot. Pemb. by 1562; pres. of Munster 1570-3; member, council in the marches of Wales by 1574; ld. dep. Ireland 1584-8; dep. lt. Pemb. in 1587; PC 10 Feb. 1589.3

Biography In both the Marian Parliaments in which he sat, Perrot opposed government measures, and he was one of the ‘right protestants’ who met at ‘Harondayles home’ to discuss parliamentary tactics in 1555. He sheltered protestants at Haroldston, and served under the 1st Earl of Pembroke at St. Quentin in 1557. Upon Elizabeth’s accession he became a favoured courtier. Freed from a sentence of outlawry for non-appearance at court on an attachment for debt (which he expiated in the Marshalsea), Perrot rapidly became a key man in the administration of his own shire and the recipient of profitable crown offices there, as well as grants of land and advowsons both there and in England. His commissionership for concealed lands brought into his net some of the former lands of the dissolved priory of Haverfordwest—not without violent quarrels, carried into Star Chamber in 1561, with those whose titles were challenged. He also made a successful bid for some of the lands forfeited to the Crown 30 years earlier by the attainder of his stepfather’s great kinsman Sir Rhys ap Gruffydd. The grant made on his petition in 1554 (for his ‘service heretofore and hereafter to be done’) of Rhys’s old lordship and castle of Carew does not seem to have become effective, since it was only in 1559 that he received the stewardship and not until 1562-6 that a succession of crown leases rounded off his control of the lordship. The castle he largely rebuilt, and eventually made his principal seat.4

Perrot was returned to the 1559 Parliament for Wareham, presumably through pressure exerted on the Rogers family by the 2nd Earl of Bedford, his former commander. In the next Parliament he came in for Pembrokeshire, and was appointed to the succession committee, 31 Oct. 1566. He was one of 30 MPs summoned on 5 Nov. to hear the Queen’s message on the succession. His mayoralty of Haverfordwest in 1570 gave him control of the borough machinery, and although his departure for Ireland enabled an anti-Parrot faction to put up a candidate for the borough in the 1571 parliamentary election, the pro-Parrot sheriff fraudulently returned his patron’s man, John Garnons. By 1572 the opposing faction controlled the borough and was able to return its man, Alban Stepneth, but Perrot’s partisans (Wogans and Bowens) kept up a running faction fight with Stepneth’s family group (Philipps of Picton, Owen of Henllys and Barlow of Slebech) in the streets of Haverfordwest for most of the year, with soldiers recruited for Perrot’s bodyguard in Ireland, or returning thence as deserters, to add to the turmoil. Perrot came home from Ireland in 1573, and settled in Pembrokeshire. He had been replaced as vice-admiral by Sir William Morgan of Pencoed with Richard Vaughan of Whitland as his deputy in the west. But Perrot was himself one of the Pembrokeshire commissioners for piracy, and there were conflicts of jurisdiction and mutual accusations of trafficking with the pirates. In 1579 Perrot was entrusted with a squadron of ships to clear the seas not only of pirates, but of Spanish vessels making for Ireland. In this, to the glee of his enemies, he had no great success, nor did he make much progress in his allotted task of fortifying Milford Haven. In a different sphere, he was one of a commission appointed in 1581 by the Privy Council to inquire into irregularities in the diocese of St. David’s, with whose bishops he was on chronically bad terms.5

During the years 1583-4 he was consolidating his influence round Haverfordwest by obtaining the lease of further rectories and granges in the former priory lands, extending it eastwards by acquisitions across the Carmarthenshire border, and exploiting what he already possessed by rack-renting and encroachments, all in face of a deteriorating financial situation. Several disputes arising out of these transactions came before Star Chamber in 1583. Now that he was a member of the council in the marches of Wales, the Privy Council would not allow his suits to be heard there, but referred them to the local assizes. In one quarrel (with Griffith Rice of Newton in 1581) the Council itself intervened. In general, however, it protected this ‘inward favourite of the Earl of Leicester’ from his many detractors, two of whom served sentences of imprisonment for slander before Perrot’s return to Ireland in 1584.6

His lord deputyship proved as stormy as his presidency of Munster, and included a spectacular brawl (before members of the Irish Council) with old Sir Nicholas Bagnall the marshal. In 1588 Perrot returned to Pembrokeshire, living in the renovated Carew castle. In this critical Armada year the Earl of Pembroke as president of the council in the marches of Wales chose him as his deputy while he was busy elsewhere. Bent on reasserting himself in his old sphere of influence, he put up successfully for Haverfordwest at the 1588 election, receiving wages for the ensuing Parliament. Early in 1589 he became a Privy Councillor, and with this added prestige took a more active part than hitherto in the business of the House. On 18 Feb. 1589 he was given charge of the bill for reforming abuses in the Exchequer. Two days later he asked for more time in committee, and on 25 Feb. he took the bill to the Lords, asking them to expedite its passage. On 6 Mar. he was summoned to discuss it with the Queen. He was added to the committee of the Hartlepool harbour bill (1 Mar.), and reported this to the House (12 Mar.) He served on a committee about fish (l 2 (11 Mar.), on another concerned with Lincoln (15 Mar.), took a bill about forestallers to the Lords (28 Mar.), and spoke on an unrecorded subject (29 Mar). A bill to amend the law relating to the hue and cry was committed to him (18 Mar.), and the next day he reported that the committee recommended no change. On 26 Mar. he reported that the Queen had told him that she needed a bill against the embezzling of her armour and weapons; this was read three times and he took it to the Lords. As a Privy Councillor Perrot was appointed to committees on the subsidy (11 Feb.), purveyors (15, 27 Feb.), Dover harbour (5 Mar.), forestallers (5 Mar.), captains and soldiers (19 Mar.), husbandry and tillage (25 Mar.) and a declaration of war with Spain (29 Mar.).7

By this time, Perrot’s star was falling. Leicester was dead; Essex, though his sister had married Perrot’s son, lent his weight in west Wales to the anti-Perrot faction; and Hatton, whose daughter Perrot was reported to have seduced, bore him a personal grudge. A concerted attack by his enemies resulted in charges of treason which may have had no more solid basis than his own intemperate speeches. In 1591 he was imprisoned in the Tower. Sending home for money for his defence, he raised without difficulty £1,500 from current rents alone, without resort to the iron chest in which he kept his (possibly less legitimate) reserves at Carew.8

Volume 72 of the Lansdowne manuscripts in the British Library is largely concerned with Perrot, his lands, quarrels with the Welsh gentry, demands for his trial, and a long account of it. Attainted on 17 Apr. 1592, he died in the Tower, an inquisition post mortem being taken on 26 Sept. His estates included 15 or more well stocked manors. The town of Haverfordwest still benefits from the ‘Perrot Trust’ he endowed in 3579 for municipal improvement. His son Sir Thomas Perrot was restored in blood within six months of the father’s death, and was thus able to inherit Haroldston; Carew was granted by the Queen for a term of years to Sir John’s widow. Both Sir Thomas and his father’s illegitimate son James Perrot represented the shire in Parliament, but with the latter’s death the family came to an end.9

Ref Volumes: 1558-1603 Author: A.H.D. Notes 1. Did not serve for the full duration of the Parliament. 2. DNB; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 108-29; xii. 312-25, 337-9, 478-81, 484-7; Wards 9/129, f. 164; Dwnn, Vis. Wales , i. 89, 134; C142/119/114; Lit. Rem. Edw. VI , i. p. ccvii. 3. DNB; DWB; CPR, 1553, p. 418; 1558-60, p. 45; 1560-3, pp. 445, 447; 1563-6, pp. 30, 317; 1569-72, p. 252; St. Ch. 5/P8/32; Flenley, Cal. Reg. Council, Marches of Wales, 60-9, 216; APC, ix. 267-8; xii. 364; xvii. 76; Arch. Camb. loc. cit. and (ser. 5), xiii. 195; P. H. Williams, Council in the Marches of Wales, 60-9, 354-7; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 537-41, 615; HMC Foljambe, 26; Haverfordwest Recs. 30, 184. 4. SP11/4 nos. 22-3; 11/8 no. 35; CPR, 1558-60, pp. 45, 136, 239, 305; 1560-3, pp. 222, 608; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 266, 615; Augmentations, ed. E. A. Lewis and J. C. Davies (Univ. Wales Bd. of Celtic Studies, Hist. and Law ser. xiii), 477, 479, 481-3, 488, 502-3; St. Ch. 5/P8/32; Arch. Camb. (ser. 5), iii. 27-41; xiv. 309-18; Spurrell, Hist. Carew, 9-11, 36-42. 5. D’Ewes, 126-7; Camb. Univ. Lib. Gg. iii. 34, p. 209; EHR, lxi. 18-27; Arch. Camb. (ser. 5), xiii. 193-211; xiv. 318-23; xv. 298-311; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 398, 406, 414, 517-19, 541, 590-1, 629, 631, 636-7, 695; St. Ch. 5/G12/25; APC, ix. 267-8; x. 231, 262; xiii. 142. 6. Augmentations, 245, 257, 487, 499; CSP Dom. 1547-80, pp. 454, 522; St. Ch. 5/P50/21, P53/14, W69/30; APC, x. 283, 297; xii. 24; xiii. 88, 118; J. Wynn, Gwydir Fam. ed. Ballinger, 64; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 112-13. 7. Cal. Wynn Pprs. 115; NLW Jnl. ix. 170; D’Ewes, 430, 431, 432, 434, 436, 437, 439, 440, 441, 442, 443, 445, 446, 448, 453, 454; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 21. 8. P. H. Williams, 239, 282; Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 124-5. 9. Arch. Camb. (ser. 3), xi. 116-25; D’Ewes, 510-11; LJ, ii. 182-3; DWB, 749; Exchequer, ed. T. I. J. Jones (Univ. Wales Bd. of Celtic Studies, Hist. and Law ser. xv), 303-4, 306, 308-9

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Perrot

John Perrott was lord deputy of Ireland under Queen Elizabeth I of England and is best known for his part in the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland. He was reputed to be an illegitimate son of Henry VIII of England.

Perrott was born at Haroldston St Issells, near Haverfordwest, Wales, to Mary Berkley--who soon afterwards married Thomas Perrott, a Pembrokeshire gentleman--and was reputed to be a son of Henry VIII (whom he was said to resemble in temperament and appearance). He was attached to the household of William Paulet, 1st Marquess of Winchester, and thereby gained his introduction to the king. Before the promise of advancement could be fulfilled, the king died, but Perrott did receive a knighthood at the coronation of the king's successor, Edward VI.

In June 1551 Perrott visited France in the train of William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton, which had been sent to arrange the marriage of the king to Elizabeth of Valois, the infant daughter of Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici. His skill as a knight and in the hunt fascinated the French king, who sought to retain him for reward, but Perrott declined and on his return to England his debts were paid by Edward VI.

During the reign of Mary I of England, Perrott suffered a brief imprisonment in the Fleet with his uncle, Robert Perrott, on a charge of sheltering heretics at his house in Wales. Following his release, he declined to assist William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, in seeking out heretics in south Wales, but went on to serve with him at the capture of St Quentin in 1557. In spite of his Protestantism, Perrott was granted the castle and lordship of Carew in Pembrokeshire, and at the beginning of Queen Elizabeth's reign the naval defence of South Wales was entrusted to his care.

Munster

In 1570 Perrot reluctantly accepted the newly created post of lord president of the Irish province of Munster, which was then undergoing the first of the Desmond Rebellions. He landed at the port of Waterford in February of the following year and, during the course of a vigorous campaign in which he pursued the rebel James Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald, the province was reduced to peace. In one grisly incident, after his forces had slain fifty rebels, Perrot sought to awe the Geraldine loyalists by having the heads of the dead men fixed to the market cross in Kilmallock. Fitzmaurice remained elusive and, out of frustration, Perrot issued him with a challenge to single combat, which the rebel declined with the comment, "For if I should kill Sir John Perrot the Queen of England can send another president into this province; but if he do kill me there is none other to succeed me or to command as I do." However gallant the offer, it provoked mutterings from the more level-headed servants of the crown, and Perrot's reputation for rashness grew. Soon after, he was ambushed by the rebels, who outnumbered his force ten to one, but was saved when the attackers retired on mistaking a small cavalry company for the advance party of a larger crown force. After a second and successful siege of the Geraldine stronghold of Castlemaine, Perrot had the satisfaction of receiving Fitzmaurice's submission in 1572.

Perrot's presidency was marked by over 800 hangings - most of them by martial law - but it can be judged overall as fairly successful. The reinstatement after the rebellion of the chief nobleman of Munster, Gerald Fitzgerald, 15th Earl of Desmond, was criticised by Perrot and, having vainly sought his own recall, he departed Ireland without leave in July 1573. Upon presenting himself at court he was permitted to resign his office, in which he was succeeded by Sir William Drury.

Perrot returned to his Welsh home, where he became fully occupied with his duties as vice-admiral of the Welsh seas and as a member of the Council of the Marches. In 1578 he was accused by the deputy-admiral, Richard Vaughan, of tyranny, subversion of justice and of dealings with pirates; but he evidently retained the confidence of the crown, for he was made commissioner for piracy in Pembrokeshire in 1578, and in the following year was put in command of a naval squadron charged with the interception of Spanish ships on the Irish coast.

Lord Deputy of Ireland

In 1582, the recall of Arthur Grey, 14th Baron Grey de Wilton, left vacant the office of lord Deputy of Ireland, to which Perrott was appointed in 1584; at about the same time, Sir Richard Bingham was appointed governor of Connaught. Perrott's chief instructions concerned the Plantation of Munster, by the terms of which the confiscated estates of the defeated Earl of Desmond - some 600,000 acres (2,400 km²) - were to be parcelled out at nominal rents, on condition that the undertakers of the plantation establish English farmers and labourers to build towns and work the land.

Before his government had time to embark on the plantation enterprise, Perrott got wind of raids into Ulster by the Highland clans of Maclean and MacDonnell at the invitation of Sorley Boy MacDonnell, the Scoto-Irish constable of Dunluce Castle. In response the lord deputy marched into the northern province at the head of an army, but Sorley Boy escaped him and crossed over to Scotland, only to return later with reinforcements. Perrott was roundly abused by Elizabeth for launching such an unadvised campaign, but by 1586 Sorley Boy had been brought to a mutually beneficial submission by the somewhat abashed lord deputy. At about this time Perrott also sanctioned the rather crafty kidnapping of Hugh Roe O'Donnell (who was lured to a wine tasting on a merchant ship and then sealed in a cabin and brought to Dublin), a move which gave the crown authority some leverage in western Ulster. A further achievement in his Ulster strategy came with the submission of Hugh Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh.

The establishment of the plantation of Munster was to prove a painfully slow affair, but in 1585 Perrott did enjoy success on the perfecting of the composition of Connaught, an unusually even-handed contract between the crown and the landholders of that province, by which the queen was to receive certain rents in return for settling land titles and tenant dues. Of similar significance in that same year was the opening of parliament at Dublin, the first since 1569; the spectacle was enhanced by the attendance of many Gaelic lords, and high hopes were held for the coming sessions. Even though the act for the attainder of Desmond (which rendered the rebel's estates at the disposal of the crown) was passed, Perrot's legislative programme soon ran into difficulty, particularly over the suspension of Poynings Law, and at the close of parliament in 1587 he was so utterly frustrated with the influence of factions within both chambers of the house (orchestrated to a large degree by Sir Thomas Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormonde) that he sought a recall to England, which was eventually granted.

As lord deputy, Perrott had established peace and deserved well of Elizabeth; but his rash and violent temper, coupled with unsparing criticism, not to say abuse, of his associates, had made him numerous enemies. A hastily conceived plan for the conversion of the revenues of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin to fund the erection of two colleges led to a sustained quarrel with Adam Loftus, archbishop of Dublin, which Perrott wilfully aggravated by his interference with the authority of Loftus as lord chancellor. Perrott also interfered in Bingham's government of Connaught, and in May 1587 be actually struck Sir Nicholas Bagenal, the elderly knight marshal, in the council chamber at Dublin (an incident blamed on the deputy's drunken temper).

Elizabeth decided to supersede him in January 1588, and six months later his successor, the experienced Sir William Fitzwilliam, arrived in Dublin. After his return to England, Perrott's enemies continued to work his ruin, which was precipitated by a treacherous intrigue, of the kind that marred the final decade of the queen's reign.

Ruin

Perrott was appointed to the privy council upon his return to England, where he maintained his interest in Irish affairs through correspondences with several members of the council at Dublin. During the period after the defeat of the Spanish Armada it was not difficult to raise suspicions over a man's loyalty, with vague suggestions about his religion and his closeness to Spanish authority; when it came to Perrott, the suggestions were anything but vague, since a former priest and condemned prisoner, Dennis O'Roghan, presented Fitzwilliam with correspondence purportedly addressed by Perrott during his time as lord deputy (with his signature attached) to King Philip II of Spain and the Duke of Parma, in which certain treasonable promises and bargains were put forward concerning the future of England, Wales and Ireland.

Fitzwilliam set up an investigation, but the prisoner's record for forgery was quickly exposed, and it seemed that the allegations would run into the sand. Rather than let the matter lie, it was decided (probably at Perrott's urging) to pursue an inquiry into the manner in which the allegations had been raised in the first place, a process that would tend to embarrass Fitzwilliam. Accordingly, a commission was established, including several of Perrott's favourites on the Irish council, who set about their interrogation of the prisoner.

It was at this point that the affair took a wretched twist: the prisoner made allegations of torture against the commission members, and before long Fitzwilliam was directed to resume his own investigation with strict instructions from the queen to forward the findings to the Privy Council in London, where a decision would be taken on how to proceed. For Perrott it was the moment of crisis, and further allegations were soon made, most notably by his former secretary, of his frequent use in private conversation of violent language against the queen; allegations were also made about his prior knowledge of the rebellion in 1589 of Sir Brian O'Rourke (later extradited from Scotland and hanged at London), which had occurred under the government of Bingham in Connaught.

Perrott was confined to the Tower, and his trial before a special commission on charges of high treason came on in 1592. The forged letters and the evidence concerning the O'Rourke rebellion played their part in the prosecution case, but it was the evidence of his remarks about Elizabeth that really determined the outcome of the jury's deliberation. He was said to have called the queen a "base bastard piskitchin", and to have made many disparaging remarks on her legitimacy. Perrott protested his loyalty and, in reaction to a hectoring prosecution counsel, eloquently cried out, "You win men's lives away with words". But his defence fell into confused blustering, and a verdict of guilty was returned. His sentencing was put off for some months, in the expectation of a royal pardon, but Perrott died while in custody in the Tower in September 1592.

Whether or not there was a guiding hand in these events, their consequence was that several experienced native-born members of the Irish council, who had been allied in some degree with Perrott, were replaced with English members, who fully equated the protestant cause with the state and were inclined to take a harder line in dealing with Gaelic Ireland. Fitzwilliam was thus free to pursue a policy opposed in crucial aspects to Perrott's, and the northern lords (including Hugh O'Neill) found themselves subjected to increasing government encroachment on their territories, which resulted in the outbreak of the Nine Years War (1595-1603).

Family

Perrott was twice married, to Anne Chayney of Kent who bore his son and heir Thomas, and to Jane Pruet of Devonshire who bore him three children. After his death the attainder on his property was lifted so that his son could inherit. Perrott also fathered several bastard children, including Sir James Perrott (1571-1637), whose manuscript A life of Sir John Perrott was published in 1728.

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Sir John Perrot (c. 1527 - September, 1592) served as Lord Deputy of Ireland under Queen Elizabeth I of England, and is best known for his part in the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland. Some historians have regarded him as an illegitimate son of King Henry VIII of England.[1]

Early life

Perrot was born at Haroldston St Issells, near Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire as the third son of Mary Berkeley and Thomas Perrott, Esquire of Haroldston. Perrot was rumoured to be the son of Henry VIII, whom he allegedly resembled in temperament and appearance.[2] However, these reports are erroneous.[citation needed] The allegation of Henry VIII's fatherhood originated with Sir Robert Naunton, John's enemy and husband to his granddaughter, Penelope.[3].[Need quotation on talk to verify]

Perrott was attached to the household of William Paulet, 1st Marquess of Winchester, and thereby gained his introduction to the king. Before the promise of advancement could progress, the king died (January 1547), but Perrot did receive a knighthood at the coronation of Henry's successor, King Edward VI (February 1547).

In June 1551 Perrot visited France in the train of William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton. The Marquess travelled to arrange the marriage of the king to Elizabeth of Valois, the infant daughter of Henry II of France and of Catherine de' Medici. Perrot's skill as a knight and in the hunt fascinated the French king, who sought to retain him for reward, but Perrot declined and on his return to England Edward VI paid his debts.

During the reign of Mary I of England (1553-1558), Perrot suffered a brief imprisonment in the Fleet with his uncle, Robert Perrott, on a charge of sheltering heretics at his house in Wales. Following his release, he declined to assist William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke in seeking out heretics in south Wales, but went on to serve with him at the capture of Saint-Quentin in 1557. In spite of his Protestantism, Perrot was granted the castle and lordship of Carew in Pembrokeshire, and at the beginning of Queen Elizabeth's reign the naval defence of South Wales was entrusted to his care.

Munster

In 1570 Perrot reluctantly accepted the newly-created post of Lord President of Munster in Ireland, then undergoing the first of the Desmond Rebellions. He landed at the port of Waterford in February of the following year and, during the course of a vigorous campaign in which he pursued the rebel James Fitzmaurice Fitzgerald, reduced the province to peace. In one grisly incident, after his forces had slain fifty rebels, Perrot sought to awe the Geraldine loyalists by having the heads of the dead men fixed to the market cross in Kilmallock. Fitzmaurice remained elusive and, out of frustration, Perrot issued him with a challenge to single combat, which the rebel declined with the comment, "For if I should kill Sir John Perrot the Queen of England can send another president into this province; but if he do kill me there is none other to succeed me or to command as I do." However gallant the offer, it provoked mutterings from the more level-headed servants of the crown, and Perrot's reputation for rashness grew. Soon after, he was ambushed by the rebels, who outnumbered his force ten to one, but was saved when the attackers retired on mistaking a small cavalry company for the advance party of a larger crown force. After a second and successful siege of the Geraldine stronghold of Castlemaine, Perrot had the satisfaction of receiving Fitzmaurice's submission in 1572.

Perrot's presidency saw over 800 hangings - most of them by martial law - but it can be judged[by whom?] overall as fairly successful. Perrot criticised the reinstatement after the rebellion of the chief nobleman of Munster, Gerald Fitzgerald, 15th Earl of Desmond, and having vainly sought his own recall, he departed Ireland without leave in July 1573. Upon presenting himself at court he was permitted to resign his office, in which he was succeeded by Sir William Drury.

Perrot returned to his Welsh home, where he became fully occupied with his duties as vice-admiral of the Welsh seas and as a member of the Council of the Marches. In 1578 the deputy-admiral, Richard Vaughan, accused him of tyranny, of subversion of justice and of dealings with pirates; but Perrot evidently retained the confidence of the Crown, for he became commissioner for piracy in Pembrokeshire in 1578, and in the following year received the command of a naval squadron charged with the interception of Spanish ships on the Irish coast.

[edit]Lord Deputy of Ireland

In 1582, the recall of Arthur Grey, 14th Baron Grey de Wilton, left vacant the office of Lord Deputy of Ireland, to which Perrot was appointed in 1584; at about the same time, Sir Richard Bingham was appointed as governor of Connaught. Perrot's chief instructions concerned the Plantation of Munster, by the terms of which the confiscated estates of the defeated Earl of Desmond - some 600,000 acres (2,400 km²) - were to be parcelled out at nominal rents, on condition that the undertakers of the plantation establish English farmers and labourers to build towns and work the land.

Before his government had had time to embark on the plantation enterprise, Perrot got wind of raids into Ulster by the Highland clans of Maclean and MacDonnell at the invitation of Sorley Boy MacDonnell, the Scoto-Irish constable of Dunluce Castle. In response, the Lord Deputy marched into the northern province at the head of an army, but Sorley Boy escaped him and crossed over to Scotland, only to return later with reinforcements. Queen Elizabeth roundly abused Perrot for launching such an unadvised campaign, but by 1586 Sorley Boy had been brought to a mutually beneficial submission by the somewhat abashed lord deputy. At about this time Perrot also sanctioned the rather crafty kidnapping of Hugh Roe O'Donnell (who was lured to a wine tasting on a merchant ship and then sealed in a cabin and brought to Dublin), a move which gave the crown authority some leverage in western Ulster. A further achievement in his Ulster strategy came with the submission of Hugh Maguire, Lord of Fermanagh.

The establishment of the plantation of Munster would prove a painfully slow affair, but in 1585 Perrot did enjoy success on the perfecting of the Composition of Connaught, an unusually even-handed contract between the crown and the landholders of that province, by which the queen was to receive certain rents in return for settling land titles and tenant dues. Of similar significance in that same year was the opening of parliament at Dublin, the first since 1569; the spectacle was enhanced by the attendance of many Gaelic lords, and high hopes were held for the coming sessions. Even though the act for the attainder of Desmond (which rendered the rebel's estates at the disposal of the crown) was passed, Perrot's legislative programme soon ran into difficulty, particularly over the suspension of Poynings Law, and at the close of parliament in 1587 he was so utterly frustrated with the influence of factions within both chambers of the house (orchestrated to a large degree by Sir Thomas Butler, 10th Earl of Ormond) that he sought a recall to England, which was eventually granted.

As Lord Deputy, Perrot had established peace and deserved well of Elizabeth; but his rash and violent temper, coupled with unsparing criticism, not to say abuse, of his associates, had made him numerous enemies. A hastily conceived plan for the conversion of the revenues of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin to fund the erection of two colleges led to a sustained quarrel with Adam Loftus, archbishop of Dublin, which Perrot wilfully aggravated by his interference with the authority of Loftus as Lord Chancellor. Perrot also interfered in Bingham's government of Connaught, and in May 1587 be actually struck Sir Nicholas Bagenal, the elderly knight marshal, in the council chamber at Dublin (an incident blamed on the deputy's drunken temper).

Elizabeth decided to supersede him in January 1588, and six months later his successor, the experienced Sir William Fitzwilliam, arrived in Dublin. After his return to England, Perrot's enemies continued to work his ruin, precipitated by a treacherous intrigue of the kind that marred the final decade of the queen's reign.

[edit]Ruin

Perrot was appointed to the Privy Council upon his return to England, where he maintained his interest in Irish affairs through correspondence with several members of the council in Dublin. In the heated politics following the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588, Perrot found himself accused of treason in Dublin on the basis of certain allegations presented by a former priest and condemned prisoner, Dennis O'Roghan. The evidence was contained in correspondence purportedly addressed by Perrot during his time as lord deputy (with his signature attached) to King Philip II of Spain and the Duke of Parma, in which certain treasonable promises and bargains were put forward concerning the future of England, Wales and Ireland.

Fitzwilliam set up an investigation, but O'Roghan's record of forgery soon emerged, and it seemed that the allegations would run into the sand.[clarification needed] Rather than let the matter lie, it was decided (probably at Perrot's urging) to pursue an inquiry into the manner in which the allegations had arisen in the first place, a process that was likely to embarrass Fitzwilliam. Accordingly, a commission was established, including several of Perrot's favourites on the Irish council, who set about their interrogation of the prisoner.

The prisoner made allegations of torture against the commission members, and Fitzwilliam was directed[by whom?] to resume his own investigation with strict instructions from the queen to forward the findings to the Privy Council in London, which would determine how to proceed. Perrot faced a moment of crisis, and further allegations were made - most notably by his former secretary - of his frequent use in private conversation of violent language against the queen. Allegations were also made of his prior knowledge of the rebellion in 1589 of Sir Brian O'Rourke (later extradited from Scotland and hanged at London), which had occurred under the government of Bingham in Connaught.

The authorities confined Perrot to the Tower, and in 1592 he was tried before a special commission on charges of high treason. The forged letters and the evidence concerning the O'Rourke rebellion played their part in the prosecution case, but the evidence of his remarks about Elizabeth guided the jury's deliberations. He was said to have called the queen a "base bastard piskitchin", and to have made many disparaging remarks on her legitimacy. Perrot protested his loyalty and, in reaction to a hectoring prosecution counsel, eloquently cried out, "You win men's lives away with words". But his defence fell into confused blustering, and a verdict of guilty was returned. His sentencing was put off for some months, in the expectation of a royal pardon, but Perrot died while in custody in the Tower in September 1592.

Following Perrot's arraignment several of his allies who had sat on the commission to inquire into O'Roghan's allegations were replaced[by whom?] with English members, who fully equated the Protestant cause with the state and inclined to take a harder line in dealing with Gaelic Ireland. Fitzwilliam was thus free to pursue a policy opposed in crucial aspects to Perrot's, and the northern lords (including Hugh O'Neill) found themselves subjected to increasing government encroachment on their territories, which resulted in the outbreak of the Nine Years War (1595-1603).

[edit]Family

Perrot married twice; first to Anne Chayney of Kent, who bore his son and heir Thomas, and later to Jane Pruet [Prust] of Hartland in Devonshire. Pruet bore him a son, William Perrot, and two daughters: Anne, who married Sir John Phillips, 1st Baronet, of Picton Castle, ancestor of the Viscount St Davids and Lettice, who married Sir Arthur Chichester.

After his death the attainder on his property was lifted so that his son Thomas - who had married a daughter of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex - could inherit.

Perrot also fathered bastard children. The best known is Sir James Perrott (1571-1637), whose manuscript The life, deedes and death of Sir John Perrott, knight was published in 1728. A son John, born about 1565, appears in an entry in the Inner Temple Register dated 5 June 1583: "John Perot, of Haryve, Co. Pembroke, 3rd son of John Perot, Knight"[4]. A daughter Elizabeth, who married Hugh Butler of Johnston, was the granddaughter of Sir Christopher Hatton, later enemy of Sir John.

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Died in The tower 1583

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See also:

___________________________________________________________________________________ From Rootsweb The Perrots were originally said to be at Iestynton (Eastington). About 10 generations later the Pembrokeshire Perrot's also became known as the Haroldstons. Haroldsone is adjacent to the town of Haverfordwest, and sometimes these two names are used interchangably in the genealogy. According to Barnwell, "Peter Perrot, son and heir of John, is sometimes called knight and sometimes esquire. He married Alice, daughter and heir of Sir Richard Harold, knight, of Haroldston, which probably became the primary residence of the family ... The relicts of Haroldston (see right) are still to be seen near Haverfordwest, and consist of some walls and a tower called ‘the Steward’s Tower,’ .... This tower is the oldest portion that presently remains, but later than the time of Alice Harold, through whom the property came into the Perrot family. Haroldston appears from this time to have been their favourite residence, and formed a portion of the marriage settlement of Mary Barclay, the mother of the Lord Deputy [Sir John Perrott]; but was afterwards surrendered to him, on certain terms, by an agreement dated 4 Edward VI." However, it was John's grandson, Thomas, who moved the family to from Instington to Haroldstone sometime after 1442. They were in Popton prior to Instington (Eastington). Sir John Perrot, the most well known of the lineage, made Haroldston his home until Queen Mary granted him Carew Castle. Again, Barnwell writes, "The subsequent history of the place is obscure. It probably was returned, with the rest of the estates, to Thomas, the Lord Deputy's son, on whose decease the estates were resumed by the crown. It became, however, by some means, the property and residence of Sir James Perrot, the illegitimate son of Sir John, who [lacking male heirs] bequeathed it to Sir Herbert Perrot. It seems to have been subsequently sold by Sir Herbert Perrot or his descendants, as it at present forms no portion of the land inherited from that family by the present Sir John Packington of Westwood.” Barnwell's comments not withstanding, Herbert was a distant cousin of Sir James on the Perrot side, and a second cousin once removed of Sir James' wife. Herbert's father, Robert Perrot of Morton in Herefordshire was Oxford-educated, and produced an "impressively large genealogical chart for which Sir James supplied references pertinent to his own branch of the family."

Barnwell notes that Sir Thomas [the legitimate son of Sir John] was the "last of the Haroldston line," having no male heirs, which would explain why Haroldstone was returned to the crown upon his decease.

More on the family, from Barnwell: "There was however, a genuine branch of the Pembrokeshire line, which seems to have settled in England in the time of Henry VII. As the house of Haroldstone was a zealous supporter of that king, it is not improbable some of its younger sons may have followed him into England, after the battle of Bosworth Field [Next to last battle of War of the Roses, when Henry Tudor defeated Richard III; 22 August 1485; Sir Thomas Perrott of Haroldston, Pembrokeshire, fought on the Lancastrian side], with a view to improve their fortunes. The identical connecting link, however, cannot be made out satisfactorily from the Welsh or other visitations. In the English ones this family is simply described as of the Pembrokeshire line. In Lee's Oxfordshire visitation, it is given 'Owen Perrot, a third brother of the house of Pembrokeshire.' This family finally settled at North Leigh, near Oxford, where William, the last of the line, died in 1765."

"It was however in Pembrokeshire that the family flourished so extensively and so vigorously from a period soon after the Norman invasion till the reign of Elizabeth. By marriages considerable estates were successfully acquired; in which judicious practice they were followed by others of the same class..."

Why pears? The arms (i.e., the depictions placed in the central shield in a coat of arms) used by Perrot family members for at least 600 years is described as "gules three pears or on a chief argent a demi-lion rampant issuant sable armed and langued gules" -- that is, 3 golden pears on a red background, below a silver (white) area with the top half of a black lion standing on his hind legs, and showing a red tongue. As arms came into common use, one of the predominant ways designs were chosen was to pick objects that phonetically resembled the name of the bearer. In this case, a golden pear (pear or) sounds like the French pronunciation of Perrot, the 't' of which is silent. The practice was known as canting arms, and the Perrot arms are one of the best examples. This practice was particularly useful in the days when illiteracy ran high.

Along with the arms of the 3 pears, the family motto was "Amo ut invenio" - 'I love to discover' or 'I love as I find.' Here are some sample coats, showing the different ways the traditional Perrot shield and crest were incorporated into the coats of arms of different Perrot individuals across the ages.

The main lineage

Transcript and copy of a pedigree written ~1500. [MS 227 British Museum]

00. Adam "le Perot" (b ~1030 in Normandy)

Corresponds to the Pirot who settled in Kent Partipated in the Norman conquest of 1066 The 1st 4 generations below are almost certainly fictitious 01. Stephen Perrot (b ~1070, Pembrokeshire, Wales; d aft 1112) Called Trevor in some pedigrees; said to be the son of either Richard or Adam, but no proof Married Ellynor (b ~1100), Lady of Iestynton, Rhoscrowdder, Pembrokeshire, Wales, daughter and co-heir of Meirchion Ap Rhys, fourth in descent from Howel Dda (King of Wales, died 948). Her sister Alice married Sir Matthew Wogan Daughter Eleanor, who married Einion Vawr of Coed Son, Andrew, see #2 below 02. Sir Andrew Perrot (b ~1130, Iestyngton)

Married Janett Mortimer, daughter of Ralph Mortimer (d 1246), lord of Wigmore, Justice of Gwynedd, and Gwladys, daughter of the Princess Joan and Llewelyn ap Yorwerth (d 1240), King of South Wales Janet Mortimer was granddaughter of Joan, illegitimate daughter of King John. Joan married Llwelyn ap Yorwerth in 1202, which means Janet would not have been of marriageable age before 1235-40. This would require more than a century between the marriage of Stephen, and that of his son, Andrew. According to Barnwell, "This difficulty, it has been suggested, may partially be removed by supposing that one generation has been omitted, and that Andrew was the grandson, not the son of Stephen; but there appears to be no authority for such a statement, or any other grounds than the difficulty presented by the dates." Said to have built Narbeth castle More details on Narberth & the Perrot role there, by Fenton, R. 1811. A Historical Tour through Pembrokeshire. Pp 306-309. Children: Daughter Catrin (Catherine). Marries her cousin, Caradog (Cradoc) ap Howell of Newton, near Milford in Rhos. Sir Richard Newton, 7th in descent from this marriage, marries Emma, daughter of Sir Thomas Perrot and Alice Picton, his wife. Daughter Elsbeth (Elizabeth), marries Dafydd (David) Wynter, b ~1250, Caerfyrddin Sain Pedr, Carmarthenshire, Wales Son William, see #3 below. 03. William Perrot (b ~1170, Iestynton)

Married Margaret, a daughter and coheir of Sir Walter Hereford/Hartford, and who is said have brought to her husband nine inheritances Other accounts have his wife as Jane Son Peter, see #4 below. 04. Peter Perrot (b ~1200, Iestynton)

Married Mabli (Mary), a daughter and co-heir of Harry Kynaston (Caniston), in the county of Pembroke Son Stephen, see #5 below.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

The historical record starts here. Prior generations lack documentation (as per Owen, 1902, and Turvey, 2002). Although they are undocumented, they are nonetheless mentioned in Lewys Dwnn's Heraldic Visitations of Wales and Part of the Marches Between 1586 and 1613, volume 1, pp 74, 89, 90, 134, 135, 165, & 168.

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

05. Stephen Perrot (b ~1230 - d ~1338) of Popton (Popetown)


Birthdate comes from trying to fit him to a ficticious father! He was probably b ~1260. More likely he was the son of Sir Ralph Perot V (~1236-1305) from Kent, who "served in the campaign in Wales under Henry III in 1257, attended the King in France in 1259, and was summoned for service in Wales in 1263." 1307- is a juror at Pembroke 1324- held half a knight's fee at Popton for the earl 1327- indicted for conspiracy against Richard de Barri Turvey: "One of around a dozen principal fief holders of the Earl of Pembroke, established himself and his family by virtue of an advantageous marriage with Mabli, daughter and heiress of John Castle(de Castro/Castell) of Castleton, though whom he inherited, what later was to form the nucleus of the Perrot estates, the house and manor of Popton." Oldest son, John- see #6 below Son Richard-- 19 acres of land in Graveshill granted to him by his father Son Peter moves to Scotsborough, giving rise to that line of Perrots. "This property, situated near Tenby, probably came by marriage. The line, however, ceased [after 9 generations] in Catherine, sole heiress, who married Thomas ap Rhys of Richardstone, high sheriff of Pembrokeshire in 1582. A branch of this line became the Herefordshire Perrots. Daughter Joan, married William Benegar. Daughter Letis (Lettys), married John ap Gronwy of Kil y sant (Ieuan ap Goronwy, b ~1300) of Llethr Neuadd, Llanllawddog, Carmarthenshire, Wales. Daughter Catherine, married to Evan ap Gwylym (Ieuan ap Gwilym, b ~1230) of Cemais cantref, Pembrokeshire, Wales. 06. John Perrot (b ~1270; d 13 January 1349) of Popton

Turvey: May have been one of the first victims of the Black Death Married Jane/Janet/Joanna Joyce, daughter of Sir John Joyce, of Prendergast, sheriff of Pembrokeshire in 1333 Son Peter - #7 below Daughter (or granddaughter?) Alice married Stephen Malefant Daughter Isolda married William Benegar. She was guardian during Peter's minority to a messuage [house with its land and outbuildings] and a carucate [the amount of land a team of eight oxen could plow in a year] of land held by socage tenure [land held in return for produce or service] at Eastington. Peter sued in 1373 to get the profits from that land. 07. Peter Perrot (b ~1300; d 1378)

Turvey: "was most likely responsible for the building and relocation, of the family to Eastington (Istington), a fortified manor house near the shore of Angle Bay." Referred to as both esquire and knight Married Ales (Alice) daughter of Sir Richard Harold of Haroldston and Eleanor Hill Son Stephen - #8 below Daughter Catherine (b ~1330), married Owain ap Robert (~1300 - aft 1363) of Cemais cantref, Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Joan (b ~1330), married Thomas Wogan (b ~1330) of Cas-wis, Pembrokeshire, Wales 08. Stephen Perrot (b ~1350; d ~1428) of Eastington

Upon death of his father, his uncle John Harold (d 1839) became his guardian. Married Ellen (b ~1365), daughter heir of Sir John Howell of Woodstock, Ambleston, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Son Thomas- #9 below. Daughter Annes (b ~1380), either married William White (b ~1370) of Rhos cantref, Pembrokeshire, Wales; or was second wife of Roger Marychurch. His first wife was Jane, daughter of David Perrot of Scottsborough Daughter Alice (b ~1380), married Henry Malefaunt/Malephant (b ~1350) of Cydweli, Carmarthenshire, Wales Next married Margaret, daughter of Stephen Stepney Son Henry From Barnwell "Stephen Perrot was alive, and father of an adult son, in 1403, as he and John Castlemartin are named in Sir Francis A'Court's commission to be receivers of money raised for Owen Glendowers [the medieval Welsh nationalist leader who disappeared in about 1415] benefit." I.e., (Turvey): "He remained loyal to the Crown during the Welsh rebellion led by Owain Glyndwr, with whom he negotiated on behalf of the people of Pembrokeshire, a truce in 1405." 09. Sir Thomas Perrot (cal 1382 - 10 April 1460 in Bristol) of Eastington and Haroldston

Moved family to Haroldston sometime after 1442 Turvey: "Knighted sometime between 1442 and 1446, Perrot occupied high office in the earldom for more than twenty years, serving as sheriff and steward of the county." Either he or his son was employed as one of the councillors of Jasper Tudor. Note that although Sir Thomas was said to be in the battle of Mortimer's Cross, 2 February 1461, he was already dead, so it had to be his son, Thomas, who appears in the roster. Barnwell: "To this Sir Thomas, in connexion with Henry Malefant, a commission (14 Nov., 4 Hen. IV) was issued by Sir Francis A'Court to raise certain sums in Carew and other places, and to pay £200 in silver to Owen Glendwr, on condition of a cessation of hostilities. The money was first to be transferred to Stephen Perrot and John Castlemartin. The Henry Malefant here mentioned is probably the nephew of Stephen Malefant, who married Alice Perrot. Married Alice (b ~1400; d 31 April 1441), daughter of Sir John ap William ap Thomas ap Sir William Picton (aka John Picton, d 1440) ca 1440, by whom diverse descents of inheritance came to the Perrot family Next married Joane, daughter of John Arnold and widow of Llywelyn Warren of Warren. Her deed is dated 1465. Son Thomas- see #10 below. Son Stephen, d 20 June 1461. Daughter Emma, wife of Sir Richard Newton (aka Cradock; d 1444), of Newton Noyes, Llanstadwel, Pembrokeshire, Wales, who became Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in 1439 Daughter Margaret, second wife of Gruffydd ap Nicholas, who died during the battle of Mortimer's cross, fighting for the Yorkists. She next married John Vytere. Daughter Joan 1st, married Gruffudd ap Nicolas (b ~1400) of Llandeilo Fawr, Carmarthenshire, Wales; d. 2 Feb 1461, Battle of Mortimer's Cross, Herefordshire, England. Daughter Joan 2nd, married Sir Harry Wogan of Cas-wis, Pembrokeshire, Wales; d 1469, Battle of Edgecote Field, Banbury, Oxfordshire, England. Daughter Jane/Jonet, married Philip Eliot of Erwer, Amroth, Pembrokeshire, Wales. There were 3 Jane Perrots from 3 straight generations who married into the Elliott family, generating confusion. Daughter Annes, married Hywel ap Dafydd (b ~1400) of Gwernant, Troed-yr-aur, Cardiganshire, Wales. Daughter Agnes, married William Warren of Warrington Daughter Ellen, maried first Richard Wyriott of Orielton, Hundleton, Pembrokeshire, Wales; then Lewis Davy Son John, possibly married to Ellen; fate unknown. Turvey (1990) thinks is the John who founded the Perrot family in Woodstock. Son Henry- owned Caervoriog. Married Isabella Laugharne of Pembrokeshire, Wales. His widow returned it to Haroldston. Daughter Annes (b ~1430) married William Waring, (b ~1400; d 1484) of Tre-wern, Nyfer, Pembrokeshire, Wales Son William of Tallacharn in Caemarthenshire. His existence is known because there was an inquisition into his possessions in 2 Elizabeth. A descendant of this line might be the John Perrot of Haverfordwest who matriculated in Oxford in 1772. Perhaps other descendants of this branch are still around. Son Stephen Perrot 10. Thomas Perrot (b ~1398; d 23 July 1474), Esquire of Istingston and Haroldston

Since Sir Thomas was already dead by the time the battle of Mortimer´s Cross took place on 2 February 1461, this must be the Thomas Perrot listed in the battle roster. Mortimer´s Cross was one of the battles of the Wars of the Roses. The Yorkists, led by Edward Mortimer, earl of March, defeated the Lancastrian forces led at the request of the queen, Margaret of Anjou, by Jasper Tudor, son of the earl of Pembroke. Mortimer´s Cross is located in the county of Herefordshire, on the border between Wales and England. First married Janet/Joan, daughter of John Gwys (Wise/Guise), Esq. Son William, see #11 below Daughter Jane/Jonet, married John Elliott (b ~1450) of Erwer, Amroth, Pembrokeshire, Wales Next married Isabella, daughter of Sir Henry Wogan (d 1475) of Cas-wis (Wiston), Pembrokeshire, Wales 1644- dispute with Priory of Haverfordwest, over services at church of Haroldston, resolved in his favor. 1645- is awarded lands in the Lordship of Haverford Son Mathew-- probably the (illegitimate?) son who lived in Cheriton Son John-and his son John, moved to Woodstock and then Haverford West. The younger John had been said to have founded the branch in Herefordshire, but the discovery of the NWL 135 pedigree roll makes it clear that the John who moved to Herefordshire was the son of a William Perrot from Scotsborough. Instead, John of Woodstock is the most likely person to have given rise to one of the Perrot families of Northleigh. 11. Sir William Perrot (~1433 - 7 June 1503) of Haroldston 1496- appointed sheriff within the Lordship of Haverford by Henry, Duke of York, Earl of Pembroke and Lord of Haverford (and later king) Knighted 1501, following marriage of Prince Arthur Married Joanna (b ~1430; d 11 November 1504), daughter of Sir Henry Wogan of Wiston, whose mother was a sister of William Herbert, the 1st Earl of Pembroke by that name. Son Owen- #12 below Son Jankyn (Jenkin/John) Perrot of Caervoriog, inherits lands of Henry Perrot of Caervoriog. He was married to Elsbeth Wiriot (Elizabeth Wyrriot). Jane Perrot (b ~1500). Married Sir James Bowen (James ab Owain), Knight, of Pentre Ieuan, Nyfer, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Alice Perrot (b ~1500). Married John Lloyd (John ap Jenkin "Llwyd Fychan"), of Dinbych-y-Pysgod, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Anne Perrot (b ~1500). Married Thomas White of Rhos cantref, Pembrokeshire, Wales. Daughter Mawd/Maude (b ~1459) - married ~1485 to William Adams,(b ~1455) of Patrickchurch, St. Mary, Penfro, Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Joyce- married Janbyn ap Howell (Jenkin ap Hywel), Jr. of of, Trefdraeth (Newark), Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Anne- Daughter Isabella- Daughter Alicia- married Richard Tucker (b ~1470) of Sealyham, Llandudoch, Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Margred/Margaret- married William Vaughn (William ap Gruffudd "Fychan") of Cilgerran (Kilgerran), Pembrokeshire, Wales Has granddaughter Jane, who married John Perrot, the last of the Scotsborough Perrots, and who was sheriff in 1551. Their daughter was Catherine who passed on the Scotsborough estate to John ap Rhys of Richardstone He and wife are buried in the Priory Church of St. Thomas the Martyr at Haverford Will proved 7 June 1503 12. Sir Owain (Owen) Perrot (d 1521) of Haroldston

Married Catherine Poyntz, daughter of Sir Robert Poyntz of Iron Acton, Gloucestershire, whose mother was a daughter of Anthony Wydeville, Baron Scales (1460) and the Earl of Rivers and Scales (1569). He was brother in law to Edward IV. Knighted 1513 Oldest son Robert, heir, died young (d 1522) & with no issue. As his father died while Robert was a minor, Robert was placed in the custody of 2 knights. Son Thomas, see #13 below Daughter Mary, first wife of Gryffyth (Gruffudd) White White, of Henllan, Rhoscrowdder, Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Elizabeth (Elsbeth, b 1517), married ~1538 to Thomas Audley (b ~1513) of St. Ives, Cornwall, England (not listed by Turvey) Richard of Brook near Claymore - had illegitimate son, Richard 4th son, John Perrot (d ~1560s) started the family branch in Carmarthen, Rys (Rice/Richard) Perrott (d. 1571), who lived in Sandwitch, Kent. Tutored King Edward VI in Greek. Became a bailiff of Sandwich in 1557, its M.P. in 1563, then its mayor 1565-66. He was also bailiff and verger for Sir Thomas Cheyney. A son Edward is sometimes listed 13. Thomas Perrot (b 1505; d Sep 1531), Esquire of Haroldston

Turvey: Upon death of Sir Owen and his son Robert, the teenage Thomas and his younger brother Edward, "became, upon purchase from the Crown, the wards of Maurice, Lord Berkeley. Berkeley subsequently arranged a match between his own niece and ward Mary, with Thomas, and in event of his death, with Edward." 1526 - Married Mary (b 1510/11), a daughter and heir of James Berkeley, Esq., the second son of Lord Maurice Berkeley, squire of King Henry VIII Daughter Jane (b ~1525), marries William Phillips (b ~1525; d 14 Mar 1572/3) of Picton, Slebets, Pembrokeshire, Wales Daughter Elizabeth married John Price/Pryse (John "Wyn" ap Richard),of Gogerddan in Trefeurig, Llanbadarn Fawr, Cardiganshire, Wales Son John, see #14 below 14. Sir John Perrot (b between 7 & 11 Nov 1528 - 3 November 1592; will dated 3 May 1592)


Probably born at Haroldston,near Haverfordwest Completes secondary education at Cathedral school at St. David's 1546- moves to London, as apprentice to Sir William Paulet, Lord Treasurer of England 1549- courtier in the royal Court Knighted 1549 1551- becomes sheriff of Pembrokeshire 1558- is given Carew Castle 1560/1, 1570/1 & 1575/6 - is mayor of Haverfordwest 1571-3 appointed Lord President of Munster 1574- appointed to the Council of Wales and the Marches 1584-8 appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland 1589- appointed to the Privy Council 1591- arrested for treason and taken to Tower of London Buried 10 Nov 1592, Tower of London, church of St. Peter Ad Vincula Married (ca 1550) first Anne Cheyney (d September 1553, due to childbirth), the daughter of Sir Thomas Cheyney (d 1558), Lord Warden of the Cinque Portes and sister to Lord Henry Cheyney. Thomas Cheyney also served as Privy Councillor and treasurer to the household of Henry VIII Son Thomas, see #15 below Daughter Elsbeth, married Alban Lloyd (b ~1570) of Trefeugan, Llanhywel, Pembrokeshire, Wales Marries second Jane, widow of Sir Lewis Pollard and daughter of Hugh Pruet/Prust of Thorney, Devonshire, England Second son William (died unmarried at St Thomas Court, near Dublin on 8th July 1597) Daughter Lettice, who married, first, Rowland Lacharn of Sain Ffred, Pembrokeshire, Wales; secondly, Walter Vaughan (d 1597) of Y Gelli-aur Golden Groves), Llanfihangel Aberbythych, Carmarthenshire, Wales; and thirdly, Sir Arthur Chichester, Baron Chichester of Belfast, Antrim, Northern Ireland, and Lord Deputy of Ireland Daughter Ann, married Sir John Philips, nephew of William Phillips, and first baronet of Picton. Their daughter married Sir Francis Annesley Viscount Valentia and Baron MountNorris. The Annesley family descends from four of the six sons of Edward III. In the biographies of Sir Francis Annesley it is stated that he was firstly butler to Sir Arthur Chichester then later a very good friend (and nephew by marriage) to Dorothy Phillips, the niece of Arthur Chichester and Lettice Perrott. Besides these he had a number of illegitimate children. Some of the others were: With Sybil Jones(ferch Rhys): James, see #16 below, son of Mary, who married Dafydd Morgan of Y Fenni, Monmouthshire, Wales, described as a gentleman John, b ~1565. In the Inner Temple Register, there is an entry, dated 5 June 1583--"John Perot, of Haryve, Co. Pembroke, 3rd son of John Perot, Knight". Possibly also the son of Sybil Jones. He died without issue. With Elizabeth, daughter of Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Christopher Hatton [later enemy of Sir John] Elsbeth, who married Hugh (Huw) Butler of Johnston, Pembrokeshire, Wales 15. Sir Thomas Perrot (Sep 1553 - 1594)


Knighted in Ireland 1578/9 by Sir William Drury Mayor for Haverfordwest in 1586 M.P. for the county in 1593 Married 1583 to Lady Dorothy Devereaux (c 1565 - 1619), who died 3 August 1619 (pictured with her sister, Penelope. Dorothy is on the left). She was a sister of Robert, second earl of Essex (1567 - 1601, and favorite of Queen Elizabeth I), and daughter of Walter Devereaux (1514 - 1576), first earl of Essex. Apparently the marriage took place against the Queen's wishes Son Roland or Robert (b ~1590 - d bef 1597) Daughter Dorothy-- her existence is certainly fictional. She is said to have married her father's kinsman, James Perrot of Wallingford, another fictional character. Daughter Penelope. First married famed astronomer Sir William Lower in 1601, and second, Sir Robert Naughton (d Mar 1634/5), one of the biographers of Sir John, and Secretary of State to James I. Barnwell: "With Penelope Perrot terminated the main line of the Pembrokeshire Perrots." 16. Sir James Perrot (1571 - 4 February 1636)

Knighted in 1603 Illegitimate half-brother to Sir Thomas, and son of Sibil Jones of Radnorshire. One of the original investors for the Virginia Company, which settled Jamestown Married Mary (d May 1639), daughter of Sir Thomas Ashfield of Buckinghamshire. Daughter Cicil. James Perrott, Knight, and Cicil, daughter of James Perrott, are among the folks cited as "freehold tentants of this town, because they did not appear at the Court of View of Frankpledge but defaulted, are amerced seven shillings each" on 3 May 1604 in Newport, Pembrokshire. Wills his estate to Sir Herbert Perrot (d 1683) of Morton-on-Lugg, in Herefordshire, a distant relative of Sir James, and son of Robert Perrot (d 1658) of Morton in Herefordshire. Sir Herbert's mother (Fortuna Tompkyns) and Sir James' wife, Mary Ashleigh, were 1st cousins 1x removed. Buried in St. Mary's chapel, Haverfordwest

Source: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~parrott/pembrokeshire.shtml

http://books.google.com/books?id=rxg6AAAAcAAJ&pg=PA39&dq=History+of+Sir+John+Perrot&hl=en&sa=X&ei=s0V5U5O2McjhoATB7ICgAQ&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=History%20of%20Sir%20John%20Perrot&f=false

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Sir John Perrot, MP's Timeline

1528
November 1528
Haroldston, Pembroke, England
1538
1538
Age 9
1553
1553
Age 24
1559
1559
Age 30
Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom
1560
1560
Age 31
Haroldstone, Pembroke, Wales
1570
1570
Age 41
Ireland
1571
1571
Age 42
England
1590
1590
Age 61
Pembroke, in Haroldstone, Wales
1592
1592
Age 63
London, Tower of London, Middlesex, England
1592
Age 63
London, Tower of London, Middlesex, England