Sir John Savage, of Stainesby

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John Savage, Knight

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Cheadle, Cheshire, England
Death: Died in Cheadle, Cheshire, England
Place of Burial: St Michael's Church, Macclesfield, Cheshire East, England, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Robert de Savage and Amicia Savage
Husband of Margaret Savage and Margaret Danyers
Father of Isabella Covert; Isabella Covert; Sir John Savage II, of Clifton; Elizabeth Savage; Mary Savage and 13 others
Brother of Joan de St. Leger

Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About John Savage, Knight

• Background Information. Through his marriage John Savage seems to have succeeded to the royal favour granted to his father-in-law, Sir Thomas Danyer, for in 1397 Henry III appointed him bailiff of the Royal Forest of Macclesfield. Although Clifton long remained the home of the Savages, they had close ties with Macclesfield and Congleton, and are buried in the Parish Church at Macclesfield.

The first Sir John Savage died in 1386.

718 Sir John Savage, of Stainesby, Knight, was living in 49 Edward II (1375/76). He married Margaret, daughter and heiress of Sir Thomas Danyers (Daniers/Daniels) Knight, de Bradley. By this marriage, Clifton, Cheshire, came into the possession of the Savage family.

The manor of Chedle belonged to a family of that name in the 12th century. A grandson of the possessor, Sir Roger, left two daughters, one who was named Clemence. Clemence married William de Bagaly, and they had a daughter named Isabel. Isabel married Thomas Danyers. Their daughter married, about 49 Edward III, John Savage as her second husband. Clemence, on of the co-heiresses of Sir Roger de Chedle, had Slifton and divers lands in Chedle by inheritance, which descended to his grand daughter Margaret and John Savage in the right of his wife, he became Lord of Chedle.

Children of Sir John and Margaret Danyers were along with comparision to the Savage entries in Boyer's The Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell.  721: • John Savage, son and heir of William Savage, Boyer agrees with this placing, p. 213 • Arthur Savage, whose son was named John and was of Edwall, living 1 Edward IV (Not shown by Boyers or may be Arnuld shown in next generation). • Roger Savage (Boyer's The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell places him as the son of the following John Savage, p. 214. • George Savage The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell places him as the son of the following John Savage, p. 214. • Petronel Savage, married to Reginald Leigh of Blackbrook, Boyer's The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell places her as the daughter of the following John Savage, p. 214. • Elizabeth Savage, married 1st to Sir John Macclesfield, and 2nd to Randle Mainwaring of Carengham, Boyer also places Elizabeth here as well, but he does not identify a husband. • Isabella Savage, who became a nun, shown by Boyer, but he doesn't idetify her as a nun. • Margaret Savage, married to John Dutton, Esquire, 2nd son of Sir Piers Dutton, 6 Henry V, later to be the heir to his father Sir Piers, Boyer says she is a possible daughter of this John Savage. • Dowse Savage, married to Sir Henry Bold, Knight, Boyer's The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell calls her Alice and places her as the daughter of the following John Savage, pg 214 • Mary or Maud Savage, married to John Leigh of Boothes, Boyer's The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell calls her Maud and places her as the daughter of the following John Savage, p. 214 • Lucy Savage, married to Hamlet Carrington, (Not shown by Boyers) • Ann Savage, married to Charles Noel, Esquire of Dalby (Boyer's The Medieval Ancestors of Robert Abell places her as the daughter of the following John Savage, p. 214) • Eleanor Savage, married to Jofrey Warberton, Esquire of Arley( Not shown by Boyers) • Blanch Savage, married to Thomas Carrington, Esquire, shown by Boyer, but no husband is named. • Dorothy Savage, married to Robert Needham, Esquire of Sherington (Not shown by Boyers)

Sir John Savage, died in 1386 and was succeeded by his eldest son also named Sir John Savage. ~The Ancient and Noble Family of Savage, pg. 15-17

ID: I116168

Name: John [I >] de Savage

Sex: M

Birth: ABT 1343 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England

Death: 1386

Father: Sir Robert [>] de Savage b: 1318 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England

Mother: Amicia [>] Walkington b: 1322 in Stainesby, Derbyshire, England

Marriage 1 Margaret [@ >] de Danyers b: 1347 in Cheadle, Cheshire, England

Married: 1365 in Contract, Cheadle, Cheshire, England

Married: 1365 in Chedle, Cheshire, England

Children

Dorothy [@ <] Savage b: ABT 1366 in Clifton, Cheshire, England
John [II @ >] de Savage b: 1375 in Clifton, Cheshire, England
 

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Sir John was Esquire of Clifton, Cheshire England. He built Bradshaw Manor during the reign of King Henry. He was the possessor of several houses and in comparison Bradshaw was a very modest building. Sir John Savage, an extremely wealthy man, was engaged in building a magnificent mansion for himself at Clifton, near Frodsham, which when completed in 1568 was named Rocksavage. Unfortunately this hall fell into decay at an early date and the only likeness now remaining is Brereton Hall, built as a replica of Rocksavage by Sir John's son-in-law, Sir William Brereton. Bradshaw Hall thus outlived Rocksavage by almost two centuries. It was in 1877 that Bradshaw Hall was demolished and replaced by the present buildings, and until that date it had stood in somewhat solitary splendour for over 400 years. As was usual with local halls, in its later years it had considerably diminished in size and undergone several transformations in the name of modernisation - only the external shape and the porch with its date-stone recalled its pre-Elizabethan origins.

The Savage family were Lords over half of Cheadle Township.

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From:

http://www.stepneyrobarts.co.uk/15252.htm

William the Conqueror's nephew, Hugh Lupus, received the County of Chester and most of North Wales, together with other special privileges. He in turn found it expedient to divide the greater part of his possessions amongst his own friends, and Nigell or Niell received the barony of Halton. Nigell had five brothers, though whether they were actually related to him of whether they were merely close friends or retainers is not certain. They were called Odard (or Hudard), Edard, Womere, Horswyne, and Wolfaith. Odard seems to have received the township of Dutton, or Duntune as it was called, and he became known as Hugh de Dutton.

About 100 years later there is a record of the village of Clifton being given to Galfrid or Geoffrey of Dutton, a son of the then Lord of Dutton, by John the Baron and Constable of Chester.In due course this branch of the Dutton family lapsed and the two daughters of Sir Roger de Cheadle were the co-heirs. The elder daughter named Clemence chose Clifton as part of her share of the estate and later married Raufe de Baggiley. Their daughter Isobel married Sir Thomas Danyers of Bradley and Appleton who greatly distinguished himself at the battle of Cressy in 1346 by rescuing the Royal Standard of the Black Prince and also capturing the Chamberlain of France. For this service the Black Prince granted him an annuity charged on his Royal Manor of Frodsham.

Sir Thomas and Lady Isobel had a daughter, Margaret, who married Sir John Savage in 1357. She received as her dowry her mother's lands and lived with her husband at the Old Hall at Clifton. It is possible that it may have been erected as part of the dowry, as there is no mention of it before this time.The name "Clifton" is interesting, and may derive from the fact that the township was founded on a steep rocky slope rising from the flat land that was covered in those days with water - hence Cliff-Town - Clifton.Through his marriage John Savage seems to have succeeded to the royal favour granted to his father-in-law, Sir Thomas Danyer, for in 1397 Henry III appointed him bailiff of the Royal Forest of Macclesfield. Although Clifton long remained the home of the Savages, they had close ties with Macclesfield and Congleton, and are buried in the Parish Church at Macclesfield

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Sir John Savage, of Stainesby's Timeline

1343
1343
Cheadle, Cheshire, England
1343
1360
1360
Age 17
Clifton, Cheshire, , England
1365
April 1365
Age 22
England
1370
1370
Age 27
Clifton, Runcorn, Cheshire, England
1372
1372
Age 29
Over Peover, Cheshire, England, United Kingdom
1372
Age 29
Cheadle, Cheshire, England
1373
1373
Age 30
Cheadle, Cheshire, , England
1374
1374
Age 31
Clifton, Cheshire, England
1375
1375
Age 32
Clifton, Cheshire, England