Sir Ralph Vane, MP

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Ralph Vane, MP

Also Known As: "Fane"
Birthdate:
Death: Died in London, Greater London, UK
Cause of death: hanged for felony in treason
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Fane and Alice Vane
Husband of Elizabeth Clerke / Vane
Half brother of Richard Fane

Managed by: Woodman Mark Lowes Dickinson, OBE
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Sir Ralph Vane, MP

Ralph Vane

Sir Ralph Vane, also known as Ralph Fane (died 26 February 1552) was a supporter of Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset,and hanged on Tower Hill as a result of factional strife.

Ralph Fane (or Vane as he also signed his name) was born at the manor of Badsell in Tudely, Kent in the reign of Henry VIII. He was a descendant of Sir John Fane who had received extensive estates in Kent as his reward for capturing John II king of France at the Battle of Poitiers in 1356.[citation needed] He was only son of Henry Fane or Vane of Hadlow, Kent, who was sheriff of Kent in 1508, and grandson of Henry Fane or Vane of Hildenborough, Tunbridge. He distinguished himself at the siege of Boulogne in 1544, when he was knighted.[1]

He was nominated under Henry VIII's will steward (with Sir William Goring) of Lord Lincoln's lands. He took part in the Scottish campaign of 1547 under the Protector Somerset, and after the battle of Pinkie Cleugh at Musselburgh was created Knight banneret. Two others so honoured were Sir Francis Bryan and Sir Ralph Sadler, and Fane was one of the last three soldiers ever to be so knighted on the field of combat.[citation needed] As a supporter of the Protector he shared the favour of Edward VI, and received from him in 1550, a grant of the mansion and estates of Penshurst Place and manor of Lyghe, the forfeited property of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham.[1] He also received the Manor of Tonge, Kent.[2]

In October 1551, when John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland moved against Somerset and his supporters, Fane was one of those charged with conspiring to murder Northumberland. He was arrested in a stable in Lambeth and sent to the Tower of London. On 27 January 1552 he was put on his trial on the treasonable charge of conspiring to kill various privy councillors. In spite of his appeals to his military services and his strong denial of guilt, he was sentenced to death. The king described him at the trial as "answering like a ruffian". A warrant was signed by Edward, 25 February, and Fane was hanged the next day on Tower Hill. On the scaffold Fane repeated his plea of innocence.[1] Of three companions also executed on 26 February 1552, Sir Miles Partridge was hanged, and the other two, Sir Thomas Arundell and Sir Michael Stanhope, were beheaded.[3][1]

Fane's forfeited manor of Penshurst was given the same year to Sir William Sidney, and all the goods and chattels found in Fane's house at Westminster to Sir John Gate, a follower of Northumberland. John Strype states that Elizabeth Brugge (daughter of Rouland Brugge d. 1540 and Margery Kelom), Lady Fane or Vane, a benefactor to Protestants under Queen Mary, and corresponded with Philpot and John Bradford, was Fane's widow. She died in Holborn, London, in 1568.[1]

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Vane

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  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 18
  • Fane, Ralph by Sidney Lee
  • FANE or VANE, Sir RALPH (d. 1552), executed for alleged conspiracy, was only son of Henry Fane or Vane of Hadlow, Kent, who was sheriff of Kent in 1508, and grandson of Henry Fane or Vane of Hildenborough, Tunbridge. He distinguished himself at the siege of Boulogne in 1544, when he was knighted; was nominated under Henry VIII's will steward (with Sir William Goring) of ‘all my lord of Lincolnes lands,’ and, after fighting under the protector Somerset at Musselburgh in 1547, was created a knight-banneret. As a supporter of the protector he shared the favour of Edward VI, and received from him in 1550 a grant of the manors of Penshurst and Lyghe, the forfeited property of Edward Stafford, duke of Buckingham. In October 1551, when the Duke of Northumberland had resolved on the destruction of Somerset and his supporters, Fane was one of those charged with conspiring to murder Northumberland. He was arrested ‘in a stable of his man's at Lambeth under the straw,’ and sent to the Tower (Edward VI's Journal, 16 Oct.) On 27 Jan. 1551–2 he was put on his trial on the treasonable charge of conspiring to kill various privy councillors, and, in spite of his appeals to his past military services and his strong denial of guilt, he was sentenced to death. The king described him at the trial as ‘answering like a ruffian’ (ib. 27 Jan.). A warrant was signed by Edward, 25 Feb., and Fane was hanged the next day on Tower Hill. Of three companions executed at the same time, Sir Miles Partridge was hanged, and the other two, Sir Thomas Arundell and Sir Michael Stanhope, were beheaded. On the scaffold Fane repeated his plea of innocence, and is said to have added: ‘My blood shall be the duke's bolster as long as he liveth’ (Camden, Remains, quoting ‘Gallica Relatio,’ ed. 1870, pp. 307–8; Heylyn, Reformation, 1674, p. 117). Fane's forfeited manor of Penshurst was immediately bestowed on Sir William Sidney, and all the goods and chattels found in Fane's house at Westminster on Sir John Gate, a creature of Northumberland. Strype states that Elizabeth, Lady Fane or Vane, who proved ‘a liberal benefactor of God's saints’ during the Marian persecution, and often corresponded with Philpot and Bradford, was Fane's widow. She died in Holborn, London, in 1568 (Foxe, Acts and Monuments, 1842, vii. 234; Strype, Eccl. Mem. vol. iii. pt. i. p. 226).
  • [Nichols's Literary Remains of Edward VI (Roxburghe Club); Hayward's Life of Edward VI; Hasted's Kent, i. 411, 422; Collins's Peerage, ed. Brydges, iii. 284; Bradford's Works (Parker Soc.), vol. ii.; Philpot's Writings (Parker Soc.); Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1547–80.]
  • From: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Fane,_Ralph_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionarynatio23stepgoog#page/n191/mode/1up

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  • VANE (FANE), Sir Ralph (by 1510-52), of Hadlow, nr. Tonbridge, Kent.
  • b. by 1510, o.s. of Henry Vane of Hadlow by Alice Fisher of Hadlow. m. by 1540, Elizabeth, da. and h. of Roland Brydges of Clerkenwell, Mdx. and The Ley, Weobley, Herefs., s.p. suc. fa. 1533. Kntd. 30 Sept. 1544, kt. banneret 18/25 Sept. 1547.2
  • Offices Held
    • Servant of Cromwell by 1531; gent. pens. 1540, lt. by 1545-d.; chief gov. Cage and Postern parks, Kent, and Tonbridge warrens 1542; keeper, North Leigh park, Kent 1546; j.p. Kent 1547; commr. sewers 1540, chantries 1548, relief 1550.3
  • Biography
  • Sir Ralph Vane’s Membership of the Parliament of 1547 is known from a reference in the Journal, recording that on 14 Jan. 1549 privilege was granted to John Keysar, ‘servant to Sir Ralph Vane’. His name does not occur on the list of Members for the final session in 1552, although he was only indicted of treason the day before its opening and he was not executed until a month later. Presumably he was replaced as a Member shortly after his arrest in the previous autumn. His attainder was confirmed by an Act (5 and 6 Edw. VI, no. 37) passed before the dissolution. His constituency remains a matter for speculation but as one close to the Protector Somerset with experience of court and war he could have been found a place almost anywhere.4
  • Sprung from a family established at Tonbridge, Vane inherited a house and other property at Hadlow. As a young man he attached himself to Cromwell who in 1538 recommended his transfer to the royal service. During Wyatt’s embassy to Charles V between 1537 and 1540 Vane was several times the bearer of despatches between the minister and the ambassador. Named to the King’s new bodyguard early in 1540 he attended the reception of Anne of Cleves at Blackheath. Unharmed by the palace revolution which destroyed Cromwell he kept his post in the Household and obtained two manors and three rectories in Kent in 1541 and the lease of demesne lands at Hadlow a year later. He served in the continental campaigns of 1543 and 1544, being knighted by Henry VIII at the fall of Boulogne, and was then charged with three others to hire mercenaries in Germany for the army. After being relieved of that task he travelled to the Neherlands to help raise he money to pay the mercenaries.5
  • It was presumably as a gentleman pensioner involved in the war effort that Vane became familiar with the Earl of Hertford, later the Protector Somerset. As one of Henry VIII’s executors Somerset designated him as one of the unnamed royal servants to be beneficiaries under the King’s will, and as a consequence in October 1547 Vane received a new grant of the rectory at Hadlow, with that of Tonbridge, as well as several manors. He attended the obsequies in memory of the King, was put on the Kent bench in the spring and went with Somerset to Scotland in the summer, capturing the Earl of Huntley at the Pinkie and being made a knight banneret at Roxburgh. In reward for capturing Huntley and other services in Scotland he received somewhat belatedly in July 1550 the former chapel and college of St. Stephen, Westminster (save for the upper chapel already given by Edward VI to the Commons for its use) and various of the college properties. Nothing has been discovered about his part in the coup d’état against Somerset in 1549 but when Somerset was arrested in October 1551 Vane fled. Found hiding under straw in a Lambeth stable and taken to the Tower with other adherents of Somerset he was accused of conspiring to kill the Earl of Warwick, with whom he was at variance over rights at Postern in Kent. Condemned of felony in treason in January 1552, although protesting his innocence like a ‘ruffian’, he was hanged on Tower Hill on the 26th of the following month.6
  • From: http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/vane-%28fane%29-sir-ralph-1510-52

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Sir Ralph Vane, MP's Timeline

1508
1508
1552
February 26, 1552
Age 44
London, Greater London, UK
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