Sir Uvedale Price (c.1747 - 1829) MP

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About Sir Uvedale Price

Sir Uvedale Price 1st Baronet

Birth date: c 1747

Birth Place: Foxley, Yazor, Herefordshire, Engand

Baptism: 14 April 1747

Date of Death: 14 Sep 1829 Foxley, Yazor, Herefordshire, Engand

Place of Death: Foxley, Herefordshire, England

Parents:


Father: Robert Price - amateur artist Mother: Lady Sarah Barrington

Marriage: Lady Caroline Price; Caroline Carpenter, daughter of John Shute Barrington, 1st Viscount Barrington.

Earl Life:

Educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, Price inherited the family estate of Foxley (in Yazor) when he came of age in 1768, a few years after the death of his father in 1761 and of his grandfather (Uvedale Tomkins Price) in 1764. As a young man Price was a figure on London's social scene, and was once described as the "macaroni of his age," but with his inheritance and his marriage to Lady Caroline Carpenter, daughter of George Carpenter, 1st Earl of Tyrconnel, he settled down at Foxley to tend to the estate and develop his theories on landscape, as well as equally controversial work on the pronunciation of the Classical languages. [2]

Occupation:

Landowner and author; garden designer; British landscape designer who, with the writer-artist William Gilpin and Richard Payne Knight, was one of the chief aestheticians of the Picturesque movement in landscaping.

Career:

Like Richard Payne Knight, Sir Uvedale Price criticized the smoothness of Lancelot Brown's designs. Price's own garden was at Foxley. Uvedale Price stated that 'Picturesqueness, therefore, appears to to hold a station between beauty and sublimity'. Price's views on estate layout were summarised by Blomfield: 'Price advocated a threefold division - the garden immediately round the house was to be formal, the garden beyond to be in the landscape style, and the park to be left to itself. His idea was that the transition should be gradual, and this idea was worked upon by Sir Charles Barry in laying out the gardens of Trentham Hall'. [1] Gardens designed by Sir Uvedale Price Foxley

Publications:

Best known for his Essays on the Picturesque (1794-1801) which were influential throughout the nineteenth century. [1]

Other Notes:

During his life, Price was befriended by Sir George Beaumont and his wife Margaret Beaumont, with whom he corresponded extensively. He was also a lifetime friend of Charles James Fox, an associate of William Wordsworth, and in later life, a correspondent of Elizabeth Barrett Browning. He died in 1829 having been created a baronet the previous year, and having finally printed his work on Greek and Latin pronunciation. His only son Robert succeeded as 2nd (and last) baronet. Price was particularly contemptuous of the style popularized by Lancelot “Capability” Brown. He encouraged landscape-gardeners to study the works of celebrated landscape-painters for precedents.

Notes, References, Sources/Links, Family Trees etc

[1] http://www.gardenvisit.com/biography/sir_uvedale_price#ixzz1IGAKmtUc

[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Uvedale_Price,_1st_Baronet

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