Sir William Gascoigne, Lord Chief Justice

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William Gascoigne, Lord Chief Justice

Also Known As: "William Casoigne"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Gawthorpe Hall, Harewood, Yorkshire
Death: Died in Harewood, Yorkshire, England
Place of Burial: Harewood, Yorkshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of William Gascoigne, IX and Margaret Agnes Franke
Husband of Elizabeth Gascoigne; Anne Lysley and Johanna Pickering
Father of Sir William Gascoigne, of Gawthorpe, Knt. valet of the Crown; Margaret Gascoigne; Agnes Constable; James Gascoigne; Richard Gascoigne and 4 others
Brother of Elizabeth Gascoigne; John Gascoigne; Thomas Gascoigne; Anne Gascoigne; Mary Gascoigne and 3 others

Occupation: Knight, Chief Justice of England, Lord Chief Justice, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench until 1413
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Sir William Gascoigne, Lord Chief Justice

William Gascoigne

Sir William Gascoigne (c. 1350 – 17 December 1419) was Chief Justice of England during the reign of King Henry IV.

Gascoigne's (alternately spelled Gascoyne[1]) reputation is that of a great lawyer who in times of doubt and danger asserted the principle that the head of state is subject to law, and that the traditional practice of public officers, or the expressed voice of the nation in parliament, and not the will of the monarch or any part of the legislature, must guide the tribunals of the country.

He was a descendant of an ancient Yorkshire family. Though he is said to have studied at the University of Cambridge his name is not found in any university or college records.[2] It appears from the year-books that he practised as an advocate in the reigns of Edward III and Richard II. When Henry of Lancaster was banished by Richard II, Gascoigne was appointed one of his attorneys, and soon after Henry's accession to the throne was made chief justice of the court of King's Bench. After the suppression of the rising in the north in 1405, Henry eagerly pressed the chief justice to pronounce sentence upon Lord Scrope, the Archbishop of York, and the Earl Marshal Thomas Mowbray, who had been implicated in the revolt. This he absolutely refused to do, asserting the right of the prisoners to be tried by their peers. Although both were later executed, the chief justice had no part in this. It has been doubted whether Gascoigne could have displayed such independence of action without prompt punishment or removal from office.

The popular tale of his committing the Prince of Wales (the future Henry V) to prison must also be regarded as unauthentic, though it is both picturesque and characteristic. It is said that the judge had directed the punishment of one of the prince's riotous companions, and the prince, who was present and enraged at the sentence, struck or grossly insulted the judge. Gascoigne immediately committed him to prison, and gave the prince a dressing-down that caused him to acknowledge the justice of the sentence. The king is said to have approved of the act, but it appears that Gascoigne was removed from his post or resigned soon after the accession of Henry V. He died in 1419, and was buried in All Saints' Church, the parish church of Harewood in Yorkshire. (This even attracted gazetteers in the 19th century, suggesting his tomb amongst places worthy of visit.[3] [4] ) Some biographies of the judge have stated that he died in 1412, but this is disproved by Edward Foss in his Lives of the Judges. Although it is clear that Gascoigne did not hold office long under Henry V, it is not impossible that the scene in the fifth act of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 2, (in which Henry V is crowned king, and assures Gascoigne that he shall continue to hold his post), could have some historical basis, and that the judge's resignation shortly thereafter was voluntary.

He was born in Gawthorp,[5] in the valley below Harewood House, and later the area was flooded to facilitate the landscape at Harewood, not Gawthorpe W-Riding, Yorks, to Sir William Gascoigne and Agnes Franke. In 1369, Gascoigne married firstly Elizabeth de Mowbray (1350–1396), granddaughter of Alexander Mowbray, son of Roger de Mowbray, 1st Baron Mowbray. Some sources show an alternate ancestry for Elizabeth Mowbray.[6][7] He married secondly Joan de Pickering, widow of Henry de Greystock.

Issue[8] by first marriage

  • Sir William Gascoigne II (1370–1422) m. Joan Wyman. Their descendant, William Gascoigne V, married Lady Margaret Percy and became ancestor to many notable persons. William V's uncle (William III's younger son), John Gascoigne, was ancestor of William Gascoigne.[9] William III's daughter Margaret married William Scargill III and became ancestress of Martin Frobisher.[10] William V's sister Margaret was ancestress of Mary Ward.[11]
  • Elizabeth Gascoigne m. John Aske
  • Margaret Gascoigne m. Robert Hansard

Issue[8][12][13] by second marriage

  • Sir Christopher Gascoigne (born 1407)
  • James Gascoigne (born 1404) great-great-grandfather of George Gascoigne,[9] poet
  • Agnes Gascoigne (c. 1401 – after 1466) m. Robert Constable. They were great-grandparents of Sir Robert Constable.
  • Robert Gascoigne (born c. 1410)
  • Richard Gascoigne (born c. 1413)

His brother, Nicholas Gascoigne, was ancestor of the Gascoigne baronets.[14][15] Another brother, Richard (c. 1365 – 1423), married Beatrice Ellis,[16] and was possibly the father of Thomas Gascoigne,[17] Chancellor of Oxford University. William Gascoigne's sister, Johanna, married Sir John Scargill[18] and became ancestress of George Gascoigne and Martin Frobisher.[10]

His Great Grandson, also called Sir William Gascoigne, married Joan Neville. Their son, also Sir William, married Lady Margaret Percy, the daughter of Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland and Eleanor de Poynings, Baroness de Poynings.[19] They had a daughter Agnes (or Anne) Gascoigne, who in turn became the wife of Sir Thomas Fairfax, who is the ancestor of Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge.[20]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gascoigne

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  • Sir William Gascoigne, Chief Justice of the King's Bench1,2,3
  • M, #16693, b. circa 1350, d. 17 December 1419
  • Father William Gascoigne d. a 1372
  • Mother Agnes Franke
  • Sir William Gascoigne, Chief Justice of the King's Bench was born circa 1350 at Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England. He married Jane Pickering, daughter of William Pickering, circa 1369. Sir William Gascoigne, Chief Justice of the King's Bench married Elizabeth Mowbray, daughter of Alexander Mowbray and Margaret Chamond, between 1386 and 1387. Sir William Gascoigne, Chief Justice of the King's Bench died on 17 December 1419.
  • Family 1 Elizabeth Mowbray
  • Children
    • Agnes Gascoigne+2,3 d. bt 7 Jan 1466 - 5 Feb 1466
    • Sir William Gascoigne+ d. 28 Mar 1422
    • Elizabeth Gascoigne+4 b. c 1390, d. 1434
  • Family 2 Jane Pickering
  • Children
    • Anne Gascoigne+ b. c 1370
    • James Gascoigne+4 b. c 1382
  • Citations
  • [S4837] Unknown author, The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, by Ronny O. Bodine, 62; Wallop Family, Vol. 4, line 436.
  • [S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 527.
  • [S4] Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry, Vol. II, p. 284.
  • [S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, Family History Archives, SLC.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p556.htm#i16693

______________________________

  • William Gascoigne1
  • M, #158178, b. circa 1335, d. 17 December 1419
  • Last Edited=17 Aug 2005
  • William Gascoigne was born circa 1335 at Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England.1 He was the son of William Gascoigne and Agnes Franke.1 He married Elizabeth Mowbray, daughter of Alexander Mowbray and Elizabeth Musters.1 He died on 17 December 1419 at Harewood, Yorkshire, England.1
  • Child of William Gascoigne and Elizabeth Mowbray
    • William Gascoigne+1 b. c 1366, d. 28 Mar 1422
  • Citations
  • [S125] Richard Glanville-Brown, online <e-mail address>, Richard Glanville-Brown (RR 2, Milton, Ontario, Canada), downloaded 17 August 2005.
  • From: http://www.thepeerage.com/p15818.htm#i158178

__________________

  • Dictionary of National Biography, 1885-1900, Volume 21
  • Gascoigne, William (1350?-1419) by James McMullen Rigg
  • GASCOIGNE, Sir WILLIAM (1350?–1419), judge, eldest son of William Gascoigne, by Agnes, daughter of Nicholas Frank, was born at Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, about 1350. He is said to have studied at Cambridge and the Inner Temple, and he is included in Segar's list of readers at Gray's Inn, though the date of his reading is not given. From the year-books it appears that he argued a case in Hilary term 1374, and he figures not unfrequently as a pleader in Bellewe's ‘Ans du Roy Richard le Second.’ He became one of the king's serjeants in 1397, and was appointed by letters patent attorney to the Duke of Hereford on his banishment, for whom he also held an estate in Yorkshire in trust. His patent of king's serjeant was renewed on Hereford's accession to the throne in 1399, and he was created chief justice of the king's bench on 15 Nov. 1400 (Dugdale, Chron. Ser. p. 55; Douthwaite, Gray's Inn, p. 45; Nicolas, Testamenta Vetusta, p. 144). He was a trier of petitions in parliament between 1400–1 and 1403–4. In July 1403 he was commissioned to raise forces against the insurgent Earl of Northumberland, and in April 1405 to receive the submission of the earl's adherents, with power to impose fines. The prime movers in the insurrection were put to death, among them being Thomas Mowbray, the earl marshal, and Richard Scrope, archbishop of York, both of whom were executed on 8 June 1405 at Bishopsthorpe, near York. Walsingham, who records the fact of the execution, is silent as to the constitution of the court by which sentence was passed (Hist. Anglic. Rolls Ser. ii. 270). Capgrave, however (Chron. of England, Rolls Ser. p. 291), states that it consisted of the Earl of Arundel [see Fitzalan, Thomas], Sir Thomas Beaufort [q. v.], and Gascoigne, and this statement is to some extent corroborated by a royal writ dated Bishopsthorpe 6 June 1405, by which Arundel and Beaufort are commissioned to execute the offices of constable and marshal of England (Rymer, Fœdera, ed. Holmes, viii. 399). The author of the ‘Annales Henrici Quarti’ (Trokelowe et Anon. Chron. Rolls Ser. p. 409) makes no mention of Gascoigne, but states that sentence was passed by Arundel and Beaufort. According to the ‘English Chronicle,’ 1377–1461, Camd. Soc. pp. 32–3, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Arundel, advised Henry to reserve Scrope for the judgment of the pope, or at least of the parliament; the names of the judges are not given. Clement Maidstone (Wharton, Anglia Sacra, ii. 369–370) asserts that Gascoigne was to have tried the archbishop, but that he refused to do so on the ground that he had no jurisdiction over spiritual persons; that therefore the king commissioned Sir William Fulthorp, ‘a knight and not a judge,’ to try the case; and that he it was who passed sentence on the archbishop. With this account Sloane MS. 1776, f. 44, agrees, adding that Thomas Arundel, archbishop of Canterbury, concurred with Gascoigne, and that one Ralph Everis, also a knight, was joined with Fulthorp in the special commission. The life of Scrope, printed in ‘Historians of the Church of York’ (Rolls Ser.), ii. 428–33, is silent as to Gascoigne's refusal to sit, but states that the trial took place before Sir William Fulforde ‘juris et literarum peritus.’ This account appears to be of later date than any before cited, and is the one which was followed by Stow and most subsequent historians. That Sir William Fulthorp, though not a regular justice, nevertheless tried some of the insurgents, is clear from ‘Parl. Roll,’ iii. 633, but it is extremely unlikely that he should have tried a spiritual peer on a capital charge, and the evidence of clerical chroniclers must be received with caution on account of the strong temptation under which they lay to falsify facts in order to obtain the high authority of Gascoigne for the privileges of their order. Moreover, if Gascoigne had really made the signal display of independence attributed to him, he would probably have been punished either by removal or suspension from his office. That he was not removed is clear; for we find him in the following Michaelmas term trying cases as usual at Westminster, and it is very improbable that in the interval he had been suspended. It appears, indeed, from ‘Parl. Roll,’ iii. 578 a, that on 19 June he was still ‘hors de courte,’ and was not expected to return for some time, for his colleagues were authorised to proceed with certain legal business in his absence. But this seems merely to indicate that he was detained in the north longer than had been anticipated. On the whole the balance of probability seems to incline distinctly against the hitherto received account of his conduct in the case of Scrope, and in favour of Capgrave's explicit statement that he took part in the trial. With the story of his committing Prince Henry to prison, and of that prince's magnanimous behaviour towards him on his accession to the throne, it fares still worse. For the committal there is no evidence; the latter part of the story is demonstrably untrue. The committal to gaol for contempt of the heir-apparent to the crown would have been an event of such dramatic interest as could not fail, if it occurred, to have been recorded by some contemporary writer, and duly noted as a precedent by the lawyers. In fact, however, no contemporary authority, lay or legal, knows anything of such an occurrence, the earliest account of it being found in Sir Thomas Elyot's ‘Governour’ (1531), a work designed for the instruction and edification of princes, and in particular of Henry VIII, of no historical pretensions, but abounding in anecdotes drawn from various sources, introduced as illustrations of ethical or political maxims. (An exhaustive discussion of the question will be found in a paper by Mr. F. Solly Flood, Q.C., in the Royal Historical Society's Transactions, new ser. iii. pt. i.) From Elyot's ‘Governour’ the story passed into Hall's ‘Chronicle’ with the material additions, (1) that the contempt in question consisted in the prince's striking the chief justice a blow on the face with his fist, (2) that the king, so far from resenting Gascoigne's conduct, dismissed the prince from the privy council, and banished him the court (Hall, Henry V, ad init.) Both Elyot and Hall agree that the occasion of the prince's action was the arraignment of one of his servants before the chief justice, but Elyot represents the prince as at first merely protesting, and, when protest proved unavailing, endeavouring to rescue the prisoner. He says nothing of the assault, nor, though he states that the king approved of Gascoigne's conduct, does he hint that he endorsed it by adding any punishment of his own. Shakespeare, who drew on both accounts, identifies the servant with Bardolph (Henry IV, pt. ii. act i. sc. 2. Page: ‘Sir, here comes the nobleman that committed the prince for striking him about Bardolph’). The later scene (act v. sc. 2), where the new king calls upon the chief justice to show cause why he should not hate him, and after hearing his defence bids him ‘still bear the balance and the sword,’ is not only unfounded in, but is inconsistent with, historical fact. Gascoigne was indeed summoned as lord chief justice to the first parliament of Henry V, notwithstanding that his patent had determined by the death of the late king; but he had already either resigned or been removed from office when that parliament met on 15 May 1413, as the patent of his successor, Sir William Hankford, is dated the 29th of the preceding March (Foss, Lives of the Judges, iv. 169). His salary was paid down to 7 July, and by royal warrant dated 24 Nov. 1414 he received a grant of four bucks and does annually from the forest of Pontefract for the term of his life (Devon, Issues of the Exchequer, p. 322; Tyler, Life of Hen. V, i. 379). It therefore seems probable that Henry's first intention was to continue him in his office, but that at his own request his patent was not renewed. His will, dated ‘Friday after St. Lucy's day’ (i.e. 15 Dec.) 1419, was proved in the prerogative court of Yorkshire on the 23rd of the same month. Fuller (Worthies) gives Sunday 17 Dec. 1412 as the date of his death. If we suppose that, though wrong about the year, he was right about the day of the week, then, as 17 Dec. 1419 happens to have been a Sunday, we may conclude that he died on that day. He was buried in the parish church of Harewood, Yorkshire, under a monument representing him in his robes and hood, his head resting on a double cushion supported by angels, a lion couchant at his feet. Foss remarks that he is the first English judge of whom we have any personal anecdotes. How little credit can be attached to these has already been shown; their character, however, evinces the profound respect in which Gascoigne was held by the people. He was clearly regarded as the ideal of a just judge, possessed with a high sense of the dignity of his office, and absolutely indifferent in the discharge of his duty to his personal interest and even safety.
  • Gascoigne married, first, Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Mowbray of Kirklington, Yorkshire; secondly, Joan, daughter of Sir William Pickering, and relict of Sir Ralph Greystock, baron of the exchequer. By his first wife he had one son, William, who married Jane, daughter of Sir Henry Wyman. Their son, Sir William Gascoigne, served with distinction under Henry V in his French campaigns, and was high sheriff of Yorkshire in 1442, and his son William was created a knight of the Bath by Henry VII at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth in 1487. A descendant, Sir William Gascoigne, held the manor of Gawthorpe in the reign of Elizabeth; but on his death without male issue, it devolved on his heiress, Margaret, who by her marriage with Thomas Wentworth, high sheriff of Yorkshire in 1582, became the grandmother of Thomas Wentworth, earl of Strafford. By his second wife Gascoigne had one son, James, who acquired by marriage an estate at Cardington, Bedfordshire, where his posterity were settled for some generations.
  • [Gough's Sepulchral Monuments, ii. pt. ii. 37; Thoresby's Leeds (Whittaker), ii. 179; Drake's Eboracum, pp. 353, 354; Hunter's South Yorkshire, p. 484; Dugdale's Warwickshire (Thomas), ii. 856; Walsingham's Hist. Angl. (Rolls Ser.), ii. 334; Gest. Abb. Mon. Sanct. Alb. (Rolls Ser.), iii. 509; Coll. Top. et Gen. i. 302, 311, v. 4, vi. 394; Lysons' Mag. Brit. i. 64; Addit. MS. 28206, f. 13 b; Biog. Brit.; Campbell's Lives of the Chief Justices; Foss's Lives of the Judges.]
  • From: https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Gascoigne,_William_(1350%3F-1419)_(DNB00)
  • https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati21stepuoft#page/45/mode/1up to https://archive.org/stream/dictionaryofnati21stepuoft#page/47/mode/1up

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  • Sir William Gascoigne
  • Birth: 1350
  • Death: 1419
  • Sir William Gascoigne (c. 1350 – December 17, 1419) was Chief Justice of England during the reign of King Henry IV. His reputation is that of a great lawyer who in times of doubt and danger asserted the principle that the head of state is subject to law, and that the traditional practice of public officers, or the expressed voice of the nation in parliament, and not the will of the monarch or any part of the legislature, must guide the tribunals of the country.
  • He was a descendant of an ancient Yorkshire family. The date of his birth is uncertain, and though he is said to have studied at the University of Cambridge his name is not found in any university or college records.[1] It appears from the year-books that he practised as an advocate in the reigns of Edward III and Richard II. When Henry of Lancaster was banished by Richard II, Gascoigne was appointed one of his attorneys, and soon after Henry's accession to the throne was made chief justice of the court of King's Bench. After the suppression of the rising in the north in 1405, Henry eagerly pressed the chief justice to pronounce sentence upon Lord Scrope, the Archbishop of York, and the Earl Marshal Thomas Mowbray, who had been implicated in the revolt. This he absolutely refused to do, asserting the right of the prisoners to be tried by their peers. Although both were later executed, the chief justice had no part in this. It has been doubted whether Gascoigne could have displayed such independence of action without prompt punishment or removal from office.
  • The popular tale of his committing the Prince of Wales (the future Henry V) to prison must also be regarded as unauthentic, though it is both picturesque and characteristic. It is said that the judge had directed the punishment of one of the prince's riotous companions, and the prince, who was present and enraged at the sentence, struck or grossly insulted the judge. Gascoigne immediately committed him to prison, and gave the prince a dressing-down that caused him to acknowledge the justice of the sentence. The king is said to have approved of the act, but it appears that Gascoigne was removed from his post or resigned soon after the accession of Henry V. He died in 1419, and was buried in All Saints' Church, the parish church of Harewood in Yorkshire. Some biographies of the judge have stated that he died in 1412, but this is disproved by Edward Foss in his Lives of the Judges. Although it is clear that Gascoigne did not hold office long under Henry V, it is not impossible that the scene in the fifth act of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Part 2, (in which Henry V is crowned king, and assures Gascoigne that he shall continue to hold his post), could have some historical basis, and that the judge's resignation shortly thereafter was voluntary.
  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.
  • Family links:
  • Spouse:
  • Elizabeth Mowbray Gascoigne (1340 - 1391)
  • Children:
    • Agnes Gascoigne Constable (____ - 1467)*
    • William VI Gascoigne (1387 - 1422)*
  • Burial: Harewood, All Saint's Church, Harewood, Metropolitan Borough of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England
  • Plot: Nave.
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 55117840
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=55117840

_________________________

This book lists his death as 17 Dec. 1413

_________________

  1. ID: I045802
  2. Name: William Gaskin , X ;[SIR KNIGHT]
  3. Sex: M
  4. ALIA: William /Gascoigne/, X ;[SIR KNIGHT]
  5. Birth: ABT 1333 in Cardington, Bedford, England
  6. Death: 17 DEC 1419 in Harewood, Yorkshire, England

Father: William Gaskin , IX ;[SIR KNIGHT] b: 1293 in Of, Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England

Mother: Margaret Agnes Franke b: ABT 1312 in Alwoodley, Yorkshire, England

Marriage 1 Elizabeth de Mowbray b: ABT 1340

   * Married: 

Children

  1. William Gaskin , XI ;[SIR KNIGHT] b: ABT 1366 in Prob., Harwood, Yorkshire, England
  2. Anne Or Agnes Gascoigne b: ABT 1389 in Of, Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England

Marriage 2 Anne Lysley b: ABT 1337 in Gawthorpe, Bishop Wilton, East Riding, Yorkshire, Eng

   * Married: ABT 1352 in Harewood, West Riding, Yorkshire, England

Children

  1. James Gascoigne b: ABT 1353 in Of, Cardington, Bedfordshire, England

Marriage 3 Joan de Pickering b: ABT 1365 in Harewood, West Riding, Yorkshire, England

   * Married: ABT 1389

___________________

William GASCOIGNE

    (VIII)
    Born:  Yorks. abt. 1335    Died:  1419

U.S. President's 10-Great Grandfather. HRH Charles's 17-Great Grandfather. PM Churchill's 17-Great Grandfather. Lady Diana's 16-Great Grandfather. HRH Albert II's 19-Great Grandfather.

Wife/Partner:       Elizabeth (de) MOWBRAY 
Child:       William (Sir; of GAWTHORP) GASCOIGNE
Possible Children:       Agnes GASCOIGNE   ;   William (II; Knight) GASCOIGNE 
Alternative Fathers of Possible Children:       William (VII; Sir) GASCOIGNE   ;   William (Sir; of GAWTHORP) GASCOIGNE

William Gascoigne

b.abt.1335 of Gawthorpe, Yorkshire, England; d/o William and Margaret/Agnes (Franke) Gascoigne

d.Dec. 17, 1419 Harewood, Yorkshire, England

m.Elizabeth Mowbray

b.abt.1340 of Kirklington, Yorkshire, England; d/o Alexander and Elizabeth (Musters) Mowbray

d.abt.1391 of Harewood, Yorkshire, England

CHILDREN included:

William Gascoigne b.abt.1366 d.March 28, 1422

Agnes (Wentworth) Gascoigne b.abt.1389 of Gawthrope Hall, Harewood, Yorkshire, England d.aft.1466

William GASCOIGNE Chief Justice (-1419) [Pedigree]

Son of William GASCOIGNE (-1373) and Agnes FRANKE

      REF YorkshireP. Lord Chief Justice of England.
      Sent Prince Henry (later Henry V) to prison for contempt.
   d. 6 Dec 1419

Married Elizabeth MOWBRAY

Children:

Sir William GASCOIGNE Kt. (-1422) m. Joan WYMAN

Elizabeth GASCOIGNE m. John ASKE

References: [YorkshireP],[YorkshireV]

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_IV,_Part_2

Character in a Shakespeare play

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view all 33

Sir William Gascoigne, Lord Chief Justice's Timeline

1350
1350
Gawthorpe Hall, Harewood, Yorkshire
1360
1360
Age 10
England
1365
1365
Age 15
Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom
1366
1366
Age 16
Harewood, Yorkshire, England
1373
1373
Age 23
Cardington, Bedford, England, United Kingdom
1378
1378
Age 28
Harewood, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
1380
1380
Age 30
Harewood, West Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
1385
1385
Age 35
1387
1387
Age 37
Yorkshire, England
1389
1389
Age 39
Leeds, Yorkshire, UK