Isabel 'la Santa' de Aragón, reina consorte de Portugal (1271 - 1336) MP

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Nicknames: "Sainte Isabelle", ""Santa Isabel de Portugal""
Birthplace: Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
Death: Died in Estremoz, Convento DE Santa Clara, Évora, Portugal
Occupation: Queen of Aragón, Infanta de Aragao, Infanta de Aragón - Reina consorte de Portugal
Managed by: Gustavo Latorre (c)
Last Updated:

About Isabel 'la Santa' de Aragón, reina consorte de Portugal

Born in 1271, Queen Isabel was married to King Diniz (or Dinis). King Diniz was ruling over Portugal when the Templars escaping from France came to him in search of sanctuary; later King Diniz would establish the Order of Christ with the same posessions and knights as the Templars, with the permission of Rome. His wife Isabel was extremely devoted to the Pentecost and the celebration of the Holy Ghost (where a child is put into the thrown as Emperor of the World, accomplishing the Fifth Age or Empire as related in the dream of Nabucodanossor explained by the Prophet Daniel). Like her great-aunt Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, for whom she was named, Saint Isabel of Portugal dedicated her life to the poor. She established orphanages and provided shelter for the homeless. She also founded a convent in Coimbra. There are many versions of the story of Queen Isabel’s miracle of turning bread into roses, but they are all fundamentally the same. She is said to have been forbidden by her unfaithful husband to give to the poor. Having hid bread to give away in her apron, she encountered King Diniz, who asked her what she was carrying. Not wanting to let on that the contents of her apron were meant for the poor, she responded that they were roses. The bread was transformed into roses, and King Dinis, who could not understand how she could have possession of fresh roses in January, did not punish his wife. A similar legend is told about her great-aunt Elizabeth of Hungary.

Known for settling disputes, Queen Isabel was called the Peacemaker. When her son Affonso (or Afonso) declared war on his father, jealous of the attention being paid by Diniz to his illegitimate sons, she rode between the armies, reconciling the two sides. On another occasion, she rode to Estremoz despite being ill to keep the army of Affonso, by then Affonso IV, from fighting that of Castile. Affonso, angry at the mistreatment his daughter Maria was suffering at the hands of her husband, the king of Castile, had ordered an attack. Isabel stopped the fighting, but the exertion proved to be too much for her and she fell ill, dying shortly thereafter.

Isabel was buried in Coimbra. She was canonized in 1625 by Urban VIII, and her feast day is July 8. Many Portuguese and Portuguese-American organizations bear her name. -------------------- Saint Elizabeth of Portugal also known as Elizabeth of Aragon (1271 – 4 July 1336) (Elisabet in Catalan, Isabel in both Portuguese and Spanish) was queen consort of Portugal and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Biography Marriage

Saint Elizabeth showed an early enthusiasm for religion: she said the full Divine Office daily, fasted and did other penances, and attended twice daily choral masses.

Elizabeth was married when she was 12 years old to King Denis of Portugal , a poet, and known as Rei Lavrador, or the farmer king, because he planted a large pine forest, near Leiria. The wood from these trees would later be used to make the ships during the discoveries. Elizabeth quietly pursued the regular religious practices of her maidenhood, and was devoted to the poor and sick. Naturally, such a life was a reproach to many around her, and caused ill will in some quarters. A popular story is told of how her husband's jealousy was roused by an evil-speaking page; of how he condemned the queen's supposed guilty accomplice to a cruel death; and was finally convinced of her innocence by the strange accidental substitution of her accuser for the intended victim.

They had two children, a daughter named Constance, who married King Ferdinand IV of Castile, and a son Afonso who later became King Afonso IV of Portugal. The latter so greatly resented the favors shown to the king's illegitimate sons that he rebelled, and in the year 1323 war was declared between him and his father. Elizabeth, however, reconciled her husband and son, and is known in consequence as the "peacemaker." Dowager Queen

King Denis died in the year 1325, and his son Afonso succeeded him. Elizabeth then retired to the convent of the Poor Clares (now known as the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha) which she had founded in the year 1314 at Coimbra. She took the habit of the Franciscan Order, wishing to devote the rest of her life to the poor and sick in obscurity. But she was called forth to act once more as peacemaker. In 1336 Afonso IV marched his troops against the Alfonso XI of Castile, to whom he had married his daughter Maria, and who had neglected and ill-treated her. In spite of age and weakness, the queen dowager insisted on hurrying to Estremoz, where the two kings' armies were drawn up. She again stopped the fighting and caused terms of peace to be arranged. But the exertion brought on her final illness; and as soon as her mission was fulfilled she died of a fever on July 4, 1336 at Estremoz Castle.

St Elizabeth was buried at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra, in a magnificent Gothic sarcophagus. In the early 17th century, her remains were transferred to a new sarcophagus made of silver and glass. After the monastery was abandoned due to frequent floods, her tomb was transferred to the new Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Nova, Coimbra, where it can be visited today. Canonization and Feast Day

Miracles were said to have followed upon her death. She was canonized by Pope Urban VIII on 25 May 1625, and her feast was inserted in the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints for celebration on 4 July. In the year 1694 Pope Innocent XII moved her feast to 8 July, so it would not conflict with the celebration of the Octave of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles.[4] In 1955 Pope Pius XII abolished this octave. The 1962 Roman Missal changed the rank of the feast from "Double" to "Third-Class Feast".[6] The 1969 reform of the Calendar classified the celebration as an optional "Memorial" and restored it to the date of 4 July. Family and Ancestors

She was named after her great-aunt Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, but was known in Portuguese and Spanish as "Isabel." She was the younger sister of King Alfonso III of Aragon and King James II of Aragon. She was also the older sister of King Frederick III of Sicily. -------------------- Elizabeth of Aragon From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

St. Elisabeth of Aragon (1271–4 July 1336) (Elisabet in Catalan, Isabel in Portuguese) was queen consort of Portugal and is, like her great-aunt St. Elisabeth of Hungary who had been canonized in 1235 for her miracles in Thuringia (Germany), a Saint of the Roman Catholic Church. She is also known as Rainha Santa Isabel in Portuguese (Queen Saint Elisabeth).

Marriage

She showed an early enthusiasm for religion: she said the full Divine Office daily, fasted and did other penances, and attended twice daily choral masses. Elizabeth was married very early to Denis of Portugal, a poet, and known as Rei Lavrador, or the farmer king, because he planted a large pine forest, near Leiria. The wood from these trees would later be used to make the boats during the discoveries. Elizabeth quietly pursued the regular religious practices of her maidenhood, and was devoted to the poor and sick. Naturally, such a life was a reproach to many around her, and caused ill will in some quarters. A popular story is told of how her husband's jealousy was roused by an evil-speaking page; of how he condemned the queen's supposed guilty accomplice to a cruel death; and was finally convinced of her innocence by the strange accidental substitution of her accuser for the intended victim. They had two children, a daughter Constance, who married Ferdinand IV of Castile, and a son Afonso (later Afonso IV of Portugal). The latter so greatly resented the favours shown to the king's illegitimate sons that he rebelled, and in 1323 war was declared between him and his father. Elisabeth, however, reconciled her husband and son, and is known in consequence as the "peacemaker". [edit]Dowager Queen

Denis died in 1325, his son succeeding him. Elisabeth then retired to a convent of the Poor Clares (now known as Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha) which she had founded in 1314 at Coimbra. She took the habit of the Franciscan Order, wishing to devote the rest of her life to the poor and sick in obscurity. But she was called forth to act once more as peacemaker. In 1336 Afonso IV marched his troops against the Alfonso XI of Castile, to whom he had married his daughter Maria, and who had neglected and ill-treated her. In spite of age and weakness, the queen dowager insisted on hurrying to Estremoz, where the two kings' armies were drawn up. She again stopped the fighting and caused terms of peace to be arranged. But the exertion brought on her final illness; and as soon as her mission was fulfilled she died of a fever on 8 July 1336 at Estremoz Castle. Elizabeth was buried at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra, in a magnificent Gothic sarcophag. In the early 17th century, her remains were transferred to a new sarcophagus made of silver and glass. After the monastery was abandoned due to frequent floods, her tomb was transferred to the new Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Nova, were it can be visited today. Miracles were said to have followed her death. She was canonized by Pope Urban VIII on 25 May 1625,[1] and her feast is kept on 4 July, the day of her death and the date on which her feast was initially celebrated in the Roman Catholic calendar of saints. In 1694 the feast was moved to 8 July, outside the Octave of Saints Peter and Paul;[2] but in 1969 it was restored to its original date. [edit]Family and Ancestors

She was named after her great-aunt St. Elisabeth of Hungary, but is known in Portuguese by "Isabel". She was a younger sister of Alfonso III of Aragon and James II of Aragon. She was also an older sister of Frederick III of Sicily.

References

^ Ott, Michael T. (1912). "Pope Urban VIII". The Catholic Encyclopedia XV. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved on 2007-09-07. ^ Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 96 This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

-------------------- Saint Elizabeth of Portugal[2] also known as Elizabeth of Aragon (1271 – 4 July 1336) (Elisabet in Catalan, Isabel in both Portuguese and Spanish) was queen consort of Portugal and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church.

Contents [hide] 1 Biography 1.1 Marriage 1.2 Dowager Queen 1.3 Canonization and Feast Day 1.4 Family and Ancestors 2 References


[edit] Biography [edit] Marriage Saint Elizabeth showed an early enthusiasm for religion: she said the full Divine Office daily, fasted and did other penances, and attended twice daily choral masses.

Elizabeth was married when she was 12 years old to King Denis of Portugal, a poet, and known as Rei Lavrador, or the farmer king, because he planted a large pine forest, near Leiria. The wood from these trees would later be used to make the ships during the discoveries. Elizabeth quietly pursued the regular religious practices of her maidenhood, and was devoted to the poor and sick. Naturally, such a life was a reproach to many around her, and caused ill will in some quarters. A popular story is told of how her husband's jealousy was roused by an evil-speaking page; of how he condemned the queen's supposed guilty accomplice to a cruel death; and was finally convinced of her innocence by the strange accidental substitution of her accuser for the intended victim.

They had two children, a daughter named Constance, who married King Ferdinand IV of Castile, and a son Afonso who later became King Afonso IV of Portugal. The latter so greatly resented the favors shown to the king's illegitimate sons that he rebelled, and in the year 1323 war was declared between him and his father. Elizabeth, however, reconciled her husband and son, and is known in consequence as the "peacemaker."

[edit] Dowager Queen King Denis died in the year 1325, and his son Afonso succeeded him. Elizabeth then retired to the convent of the Poor Clares (now known as the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha) which she had founded in the year 1314 at Coimbra. She took the habit of the Franciscan Order, wishing to devote the rest of her life to the poor and sick in obscurity. But she was called forth to act once more as peacemaker. In 1336 Afonso IV marched his troops against the Alfonso XI of Castile, to whom he had married his daughter Maria, and who had neglected and ill-treated her. In spite of age and weakness, the queen dowager insisted on hurrying to Estremoz, where the two kings' armies were drawn up. She again stopped the fighting and caused terms of peace to be arranged. But the exertion brought on her final illness; and as soon as her mission was fulfilled she died of a fever on July 4, 1336 at Estremoz Castle.

St Elizabeth was buried at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra, in a magnificent Gothic sarcophagus. In the early 17th century, her remains were transferred to a new sarcophagus made of silver and glass. After the monastery was abandoned due to frequent floods, her tomb was transferred to the new Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Nova, Coimbra, where it can be visited today.


Elizabeth of Aragon, Museo Colonial de San Francisco. Santiago, Chile[edit] Canonization and Feast Day Miracles were said to have followed upon her death. She was canonized by Pope Urban VIII on 25 May 1625,[3] and her feast was inserted in the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints for celebration on 4 July. In the year 1694 Pope Innocent XII moved her feast to 8 July, so it would not conflict with the celebration of the Octave of Saints Peter and Paul, Apostles.[4] In 1955 Pope Pius XII abolished this octave.[5] The 1962 Roman Missal changed the rank of the feast from "Double" to "Third-Class Feast".[6] The 1969 reform of the Calendar classified the celebration as an optional "Memorial" and restored it to the date of 4 July.

[edit] Family and Ancestors She was named after her great-aunt Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, but was known in Portuguese and Spanish as "Isabel." She was the younger sister of King Alfonso III of Aragon and King James II of Aragon. She was also the older sister of King Frederick III of Sicily.

         Alfonso II of Aragon 
 
 Peter II of Aragon     
   
   Sancha of Castile 
 
 James I of Aragon     
   
   William VIII of Montpellier 
 
 Marie of Montpellier     
   
   Eudokia Komnene 
 
 Peter III of Aragon     
   
   Béla III of Hungary 
 
 Andrew II of Hungary     
   
   Agnes of Antioch 
 
 Violant of Hungary     
   
   Peter II of Courtenay 
 
 Yolande de Courtenay     
   
   Yolanda of Flanders 
 

Elizabeth of Aragon

 
   Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor 
 
 Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor     
   
   Constance of Sicily 
 
 Manfred of Sicily     
   
   Manfred II Lanza (?) 
 
 Bianca, Countess of Lancia     
   
   Bianca Maletta (?) 
 
 Constantia of Hohenstaufen     
   
   Thomas I, Count of Savoy 
 
 Amadeus IV of Savoy     
   
   Marguerite of Geneva 
 
 Beatrice of Savoy     
   
   Hugh III, Duke of Burgundy 
 
 Anne of Burgundy     
   
   Béatrice of Albon 
 

Preceded by Beatrice of Castile Queen Consort of Portugal 1282-1325 Succeeded by Beatrice of Castile [show]v • d • eInfantas of Aragon


1st Generation Sancha, Countess of Urgell · Infanta Urraca · Teresa, Countess of Provence


2nd Generation none


3rd Generation Infanta Isabella · Petronila


4th Generation Dulce, Queen of Portugal


5th Generation Constance, Holy Roman Empress · Eleanor, Countess of Toulouse · Infanta Dulce


6th Generation Infanta Sancha


7th Generation Violant, Queen of Castile · Constance, Infanta Juan Manuel of Castile · Infanta Sancha · Isabella, Queen of France · Infanta Maria · Infanta Eleanor


8th Generation Elizabeth, Queen of Portugal · Yolanda, Duchess of Calabria · Sancha, Queen of Naples* · Infanta Isabella* · Infanta Blanca of Ayerbe · Teresa, Lady of Fraga


9th Generation Maria, Infanta Peter of Castile · Constance, Duchess of Peñafiel · Isabella, Duchess of Austria · Infanta Blanca · Violante, Lady of Segorbe · Constance, Princess of Antioch** · Elisabeth, Duchess of Bavaria** · Infanta Catherine** · Margaret, Countess Palatine of the Rhine** · Beatrice, Lady of Marchena · Maria, Countess of Ampurias · Infanta Teresa of Jérica · Infanta Constanza of Ayerbe · Maria, Laby of Ayerbe


10th Generation Constance, Queen of Majorca · Infanta Isabella · Eleanor, Queen of Cyprus · Juana, Infanta Fernando Manuel of Castile · Blanca, Countess of Cardona · Eleanor, Queen of Aragon** · Beatrice, Countess Palatine of the Rhine** · Infanta Constance** · Infanta Euphemia** · Infanta Violante** · Blanca, Countess of Ampurias** · Eleonor, Countess of Caltabellotta** · Infanta Constance** · Isabella, Marchioness of Montferrat* · Infanta Esclaramunda* · Alice, Countess of Ibelin* · Beatrice, Lady of Cocentaina · Ventura, Viscountess of Illa and Canet · Elsa, Lady of Almonacid · Juana, Countess of Carrión


11th Generation Constance, Queen of Sicily · Joanna, Countess of Ampurias · Infanta Maria · Infanta Beatrice · Eleanor, Queen of Castile · Isabella, Countess of Urgell · Isabella, Countess of Cardona · Infanta Blanca of Ribagorza · Joanna, Countess of Cardona · Violante, Countess of Prades · Infanta Joanna of Prades · Infanta Constance of Prades · Infanta Eleanor of Prades · Timbor, Viscountess of Cabrera · Infanta Eleanor of Ampurias · Mary of Sicily**


12th Generation Joanna, Countess of Foix · Yolande, Duchess of Anjou · Infanta Eleanor · Infanta Antonia · Infanta Margaret · Infanta Beatrice of Urgell · Infanta Eleanor of Urgell · Cecilia, Countess of Modica · Infanta Isabella of Urgell · Infanta Eleanor of Prades · Infanta Isabella of Prades · Joanna, Countess of Prades · Margarida, Queen of Aragon · Infanta Timbor of Prades


13th Generation Isabella of Urgell, Duchess of Coimbra · Eleanor, Princess of Salerno · Joanna, Countess of Cardona · Infanta Catherine of Urgell


14th Generation Maria, Queen of Castile · Eleanor, Queen of Portugal


15th Generation Blanche II of Navarre · Infanta Maria · Eleanor of Navarre · Joanna, Queen of Naples


16th Generation Isabella, Queen of Portugal · Joanna · Maria, Queen of Portugal · Catherine, Queen of England


17th Generation Eleanor, Queen of France · Isabella, Queen of Denmark-Norway · Mary, Queen of Hungary · Catherine, Queen of Portugal


  • also a princess of Majorca
    • also a princess of Sicily

[edit] References 1.^ a b "Lives of the Saints, For Every Day of the Year," edited by Rev. Hugo Hoever, S.O.Cist.,Ph.D., New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1955, p.257 2.^ The name given to her in the Roman Missal 3.^ Ott, Michael T. (1912). "Pope Urban VIII". The Catholic Encyclopedia. XV. New York: Robert Appleton Company. http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15218b.htm. Retrieved 2007-09-07. 4.^ "Calendarium Romanum" (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 96 5.^ General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII 6.^ 3rd Class "Lives of the Saints, For Every Day of the Year," edited by Rev. Hugo Hoever, S.O.Cist., Ph.D., New York: Catholic Book Publishing Co., 1955, pp 511 This article incorporates text from the entry St. Elizabeth of Portugal in the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913. Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_Aragon" Categories: 1271 births | 1336 deaths | Portuguese queens consort | Portuguese Roman Catholic saints | Women of medieval Spain | Women of medieval Portugal | House of Aragon | 14th-century Christian female saints -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_of_Aragon -------------------- A verdadeira lenda do milagre das rosas é muito conhecida e uma das mais belas lendas religiosas. Serve de base a esta que escrevi, sem que se possa considerar uma nova versão, não devendo sequer ser comparadas. Pretendo apenas contar uma estória com algum humor.Nessa manhã a rainha Dona Isabel tinha distribuído pão e algum dinheiro pelos pobres, como era seu hábito, aproveitando a ausência de seu marido, o Rei D. Dinis. regressava ao palácio, depois da sua benfeitora visita.Dona Isabel caminhou para o palácio e estava já a chegar, quando para lá se dirigia também um cavaleiro. Rapidamente alcançou a rainha. Era D. Dinis que regressava de Leiria.

Ele tinha proibido a rainha de dar esmolas aos pobres, mas sempre desconfiou que ela o fazia quando ele se ausentava e, agora vendo o volumoso regaço achou que a tinha apanhado em flagrante. Provavelmente levaria pão e algumas moedas, pensava ele. Perguntou-lhe:

“- Que levais no regaço, minha mui nobre esposa?

- São rosas, senhor, são rosas. – Respondeu a rainha, deixando o rei irado, já com a certeza da desobediência da rainha. Era impossível haver rosas naquela época do ano.

- Podeis mostrar-me essas rosas de Janeiro? – Perguntou D. Dinis ironicamente.

- Se só vendo acreditais na minha palavra... – Dizendo isto abriu o regaço e surgiram as lindas rosas, que deixaram o rei, incrédulo, a exclamar:

- Milagre! Milagre! Em Janeiro não há rosas, só pode ser um milagre. Milagre!

-------------------- Elizabeth of Aragon, Saint Elizabeth of Portugal

Born 1271, Aljafería Palace, Zaragoza, Kingdom of Aragon

Died 4 July 1336, Estremoz Castle in Estremoz, Alentejo, Kingdom of Portugal

Canonized 25 May 1625, Rome by Pope Urban VIII


Saint Elizabeth of Portugal also known as Elizabeth of Aragon (1271–4 July 1336) (Elisabet in Catalan, Isabel in both Portuguese and Spanish) was queen consort of Portugal and is a saint of the Roman Catholic Church.

Saint Elizabeth showed an early enthusiasm for religion: she said the full Divine Office daily, fasted and did other penances, and attended twice daily choral masses.

Elizabeth was married very early to King Denis of Portugal, a poet, and known as Rei Lavrador, or the farmer king, because he planted a large pine forest, near Leiria. The wood from these trees would later be used to make the ships during the discoveries. Elizabeth quietly pursued the regular religious practices of her maidenhood, and was devoted to the poor and sick. Naturally, such a life was a reproach to many around her, and caused ill will in some quarters. A popular story is told of how her husband's jealousy was roused by an evil-speaking page; of how he condemned the queen's supposed guilty accomplice to a cruel death; and was finally convinced of her innocence by the strange accidental substitution of her accuser for the intended victim.

They had two children, a daughter named Constance, who married King Ferdinand IV of Castile, and a son Afonso who later became King Afonso IV of Portugal. The latter so greatly resented the favors shown to the king's illegitimate sons that he rebelled, and in the year 1323 war was declared between him and his father. Elizabeth, however, reconciled her husband and son, and is known in consequence as the "peacemaker."

King Denis died in the year 1325, and his son Afonso succeeded him. Elizabeth then retired to the convent of the Poor Clares (now known as the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha) which she had founded in the year 1314 at Coimbra. She took the habit of the Franciscan Order, wishing to devote the rest of her life to the poor and sick in obscurity. But she was called forth to act once more as peacemaker. In 1336 Afonso IV marched his troops against the Alfonso XI of Castile, to whom he had married his daughter Maria, and who had neglected and ill-treated her. In spite of age and weakness, the queen dowager insisted on hurrying to Estremoz, where the two kings' armies were drawn up. She again stopped the fighting and caused terms of peace to be arranged. But the exertion brought on her final illness; and as soon as her mission was fulfilled she died of a fever on July 4, 1336 at Estremoz Castle.

St Elizabeth was buried at the Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Velha in Coimbra, in a magnificent Gothic sarcophagus. In the early 17th century, her remains were transferred to a new sarcophagus made of silver and glass. After the monastery was abandoned due to frequent floods, her tomb was transferred to the new Monastery of Santa Clara-a-Nova, Coimbra, were it can be visited today.

Miracles were said to have followed upon her death. She was canonized by Pope Urban VIII on 25 May 1625, and her feast was inserted in the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints for celebration on 4 July.

 
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Sta. Isabel de Aragão, rainha consorte de Portugal's Timeline

1271
1271
Saragossa, Aragon, Spain
1282
June 24, 1282
Age 11
Trancoso, Guarda, Portugal
1285
December 6, 1285
Age 14
Coimbra, Coimbra District, Portugal
1291
February 8, 1291
Age 20
Lisbon, Portugal
1336
July 4, 1336
Age 65
Estremoz, Convento DE Santa Clara, Évora, Portugal
1991
September 12, 1991
Age 65
1992
February 11, 1992
Age 65
February 18, 1992
Age 65
September 9, 1992
Age 65
October 1, 1992
Age 65