Susan Webber (1874 - 1952) MP

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Nicknames: "Susie"
Place of Burial: Cornwall
Birthplace: Vale House, North Tamerton, Cornwall
Death: Died in 3 Forest Street, Rocky Hill, Hartford County, Connecticut
Managed by: Anne-Marie Healy-Kalishoek (C)
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Susan Webber

Susie Webber

  • Name: Miss Susan Webber
  • Born: Thursday 2nd July 1874
  • Age: 37 years
  • Last Residence: in Bude England
  • 2nd Class passenger
  • First Embarked: Southampton on Wednesday 10th April 1912
  • Ticket No. 27267 , £13
  • Cabin No.: E101
  • Destination: Hartford Connecticut United States
  • Rescued (boat 12)
  • Disembarked Carpathia: New York City on Thursday 18th April 1912
  • Died: Tuesday 29th January 1952
  • Cause of Death: Heart Failure / Disease
  • Buried: Center Cemetery Rocky Hill Connecticut United States

Miss Susan Webber, 36, known as "Susie", was born on 2nd July 1874, the daughter of Mr Richard Webber, (Farmer and Carpenter) and Mrs Elizabeth Webber (nee Chapman) of Vale House, North Tamerton, Cornwall. She was sister to Maud, Ernest and Ann.

Her passage to the USA was obtained through Mr Hawking, Booking Agent of Bude, Cornwall. The evening prior to her departure, amidst much excitement, a family farewell was held at her home, at which friends from nearby, Lewis and Owen Braund attended. They too were to travel on Titanic, albeit in third class.

Susie embarked the Titanic at Southampton. She occupied second class cabin E-101 which she shared with Miss Edwina C. Troutt and Nora Keane. Her ticket was #27267 and cost £13.

Susan Webber survived the disaster on board lifeboat 12. She had been travelling on Titanic to emigrate to her nephew Charles E Webber of Hartford, Connecticut. She remained in the USA living with him and his wife, Kathleen, at 3 Forest Street, Rocky Hill, Hartford County, Connecticut, acting as their housekeeper for the rest of her life. She became an active member of the Grange and the Congregational Church.

At the age of 77 she was admitted to the Hartford Hospital, after suffering from coronary complications. She passed away on 29 January 1952.

-------------------- Otherwise "Susie". Titanic survivor. Miss Susan Webber, 36, known as "Susie", was born on 2nd July 1874, the daughter of Mr Richard Webber, (Farmer and Carpenter) and Mrs Elizabeth Webber (nee Chapman) of Vale House, North Tamerton, Cornwall. She was sister to Maud, Ernest and Ann. Her passage to the USA was obtained through Mr Hawking, Booking Agent of Bude, Cornwall. The evening prior to her departure, amidst much excitement, a family farewell was held at her home, at which friends from nearby, Lewis and Owen Braund attended. They too were to travel on Titanic, albeit in third class. Susie embarked the Titanic at Southampton. She occupied second class cabin E-101 which she shared with Miss Edwina C. Troutt and Nora Keane. Her ticket was #27267 and cost �13. Susan Webber survived the disaster on board lifeboat 12. She had been travelling on Titanic to emigrate to her nephew Charles E Webber of Hartford, Connecticut. She remained in the USA living with him and his wife, Kathleen, at 3 Forest Street, Rocky Hill, Hartford County, Connecticut, acting as their housekeeper for the rest of her life. She became an active member of the Grange and the Congregational Church. At the age of 77 she was admitted to the Hartford Hospital, after suffering from coronary complications. She passed away on 29 January 1952. DEVON LADY Tells her Story of “Titanic” Disaster Western Times Monday 13th May 1912 EXCITING TIME Miss Susie Webber, second cabin passenger, who was rescued from the “Titanic” send us the following account of her experiences: I started from a railway station in Devonshire to sail on the “Titanic” for Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. Everything went well up to Sunday, April 14th, at twenty minutes to twelve. I was in my bed asleep when an awful crash woke me. The engines had stopped. Miss Troutt, who shared my cabin, went up on deck, and on returning said the “Titanic” had struck an iceberg, but there was no danger. The steward also gave us a similar assurance. Then I went back to bed again, as it was bitterly cold. Some little time after, the steward came along and said, “All hands on deck; all put on your lifebelts; hurry as quickly as possible.” I partly clothed myself and rushed on deck, and saw them lowering the boats. A gentleman standing by kindly handed me into a lifeboat(No. 10), which contained women and children. After it was launched, full of women, accompanied by one sailor, a foreigner jumped from the boat deck and landed in the boat just before it struck the water. Our English people were very brave. I am sure they realised the “Titanic” was going down. We rowed away from her with only two men. I was facing the “Titanic” and could see her going down. I saw the lights go out deck after deck. When the water got into the engine-room there was an explosion, and then I saw the leviathan part in the middle. The stern rose high in the air; the bow less high. Then she went down slowly amid heartrending cries for help of hundreds of doomed men and women. I feel that I cannot praise too highly the bravery of the many who were left on deck. We were floating in mid-ocean among the icebergs for six hours. The night was bitterly cold, but very calm. At last we saw the lights of the “Carpathia” coming to our aid; this was a welcome sight. We were taken on her and treated with every kindness, both passengers and crew doing everything they could for the survivors. As we came off the “Carpathia” at New York, many brave men stood with tears in their eyes, and everybody was silent. Here again, all survivors were shown great kindness, and one could see many anxious faces looking for friends, many alas, to be terribly disappointed. A committee of kind ladies awaited the arrival of the “Carpathia” to provide those who were scantily clad with necessary clothing and ambulance for the maimed. Then I was taken to the Junior LeagueHouse, at 541, East Seventy-eight-street, New York. My nephew (Mr. Charles E. Webber, of 61. Heath-street, Hartford, Conn.), arrived at New York to meet me two hours after the “Carpathia” docked, and with difficulty found me at four o’clock the next day, through the aid of the Cunard Line officials.

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Susan Webber's Timeline

1874
July 2, 1874
Cornwall
1891
April 5, 1891
Age 16
Cornwall

Aged 17 years.

1952
January 29, 1952
Age 77
3 Forest Street, Rocky Hill, Hartford County, Connecticut