Teresa Alfonso, condesa de Portugal (c.1083 - 1130) MP

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Nicknames: "Theresa", "of Castile /Theresa/", "Mathilde of Portugal Teresa of León", "Queen Theresa of Portugal", "Countess of Portugal", "(Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa", "Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León)"
Death: Died
Occupation: Condessa de Portugal, Condesa de Portugal, Reine, Reina de Portugal, Infanta de Castilla, Infanta de León, condessa de Portugal
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Teresa Alfonso, condesa de Portugal

Theresa de Castilla, Infanta de Castilla http://www.thepeerage.com/p11429.htm#i114284

Theresa, Countess of Portugal http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa,_Countess_of_Portugal

Teresa de León http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa_de_Le%C3%B3n

Teresa de Leão http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa_de_Le%C3%A3o

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Queen Theresa of Portugal, Countess of Portugal, (Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León) (1080 – November 11, 1130), illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, was Theresa's dowry, establishing Henry as Regent in the County of Portugal, her personal fief, till her coming of age.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was a very young widow, maybe aged eighteen years, and left to deal with the military and political situation. The Queen took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River.

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Queen Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Queen Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Queen Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and lead her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

Historian Marsilio Cassotti refers that the pope, the authority morale of medieval Christian Europe, already referred to Theresa as "Queen". She was first grated that title by pope Pascoal II after she defended Coimbra, important city in the border between Christian Europe and Islam. In 1117 there's a document that clearly refers to her as "Queen". Theresa, given the fact, that the pope referred to her as "Queen", she reaffirmed herself as such and wrote down in documents "Daughter of Alphonso and elected by God", thus justifying her godly right to rule.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa,_Countess_of_Portugal

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Teresa de León

De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre


Teresa de LeónTeresa de León (1080 - Monasterio de Montederramo (Galicia) o Póvoa de Lanhoso,11 de noviembre de 1130), infanta de León y posteriormente, condesa de Portugal.

Hija ilegítima del rey Alfonso VI de León y Castilla, fue dada en casamiento en el año 1093, con Enrique de Borgoña, trayendo consigo el señorío del Condado de Portugal. De Enrique tuvo varios hijos, pero sólo Alfonso Enriques sobrevivió a la infancia. Después de la muerte de Enrique en 1112, Teresa gobernó el condado tras la minoría de su hijo (con el título de reina) y se encariñó del poder.

Atacada por las fuerzas de su media-hermana, la reina Urraca de León y Castilla, retrocedieron las de Teresa desde el margen izquierdo del río Miño, derrotadas y dispersas, hasta que la propia Teresa se refugió en el Castillo de Lanhoso, donde sufrió el cerco que le fue impuesto por Urraca (1121). Aunque en posición de inferioridad, Teresa consiguió negociar el Tratado de Lanhoso, por el cual consiguió salvar su gobierno del Condado Portucalense.

Su alianza y conexión con el gallego Fernando Pérez, conde de Traba, puso contra ella los nobles portucalenses y a su propio hijo. En la minoría de Alfonso Enriques, Teresa rechazó entregarle el control de la herencia paterna. En breve madre y hijo entraron en guerra abierta, siendo las fuerzas de Teresa derrotadas en la batalla de San Mamede en 1128.

Obligada de ese modo a dejar la gobernación, algunos autores defienden que fue detenida por el propio hijo en el Castillo de Lanhoso, otros que se exilió en un convento de Póvoa de Lanhoso, donde falleció en 1130. Modernamente, sin embargo, se argumenta que, después de la batalla y ya en fuga, ella y el conde Fernando Pérez fueron aprisionados e inmediatamente expulsados de Portugal. La condesa sobrevivió al desastre, falleciendo en Galicia a finales de 1130.

Sus restos mortales fueron traídos más tarde para la Catedral de Braga, donde aún hoy reposan junto a la tumba de su primer marido, el conde Enrique de Borgoña.

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Theresa, Countess of Portugal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Theresa, Countess of Portugal - portrait dating from the RenaissanceQueen Theresa of Portugal, Countess of Portugal, (Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León) (1080 – November 11, 1130), illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, was Theresa's dowry, establishing Henry as Regent in the County of Portugal, her personal fief, till her coming of age.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was a very young widow, maybe aged eighteen years, and left to deal with the military and political situation. She took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River. In recognizing her victory in defending Coimbra, she was called "Queen" by pope Paschal II and in light of this recognition, she appears in her documents as "Daughter of Alphonso and elected by God", explicitly being called queen in an 1117 document, leading some to refer to her as the first monarch of Portugal. [1]

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and lead her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

--------------------

Theresa, Countess of Portugal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Queen Theresa of Portugal, Countess of Portugal, (Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León) (1080 – November 11, 1130), illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, was Theresa's dowry, establishing Henry as Regent in the County of Portugal, her personal fief, till her coming of age.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was a very young widow, maybe aged eighteen years, and left to deal with the military and political situation. The Queen took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River.

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Queen Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Queen Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Queen Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the eclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and lead her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

[edit]

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Theresa of Portugal (in Galician-Portuguese, Tareja) (1080 – 11 November 1130), known in Portuguese as Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal, was the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile by Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, had been granted to Raymond of Burgundy, but was transferred to Theresa's husband Henry in 1096.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was left to deal with the military and political situation. She took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River. In recognizing her victory in defending Coimbra, she was called "Queen" by pope Paschal II and in light of this recognition, she appears in her documents as "Daughter of Alphonso and elected by God", explicitly being called queen in an 1117 document, leading some to refer to her as the first monarch of Portugal. [1]

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and led her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

[edit] Notes

1.^ Marsilio Cassotti, D. Teresa utilizou armas de homens - Jornal de Notícias (pag.39), 13 July 2008

[edit] See also

Royal male consorts in Portugal

[edit] References

MATTOSO, José, D. Afonso Henriques, Círculo de Leitores e Centro de Estudos dos Povos e Culturas de Expressão Portuguesa, 1st ed., Lisboa, 2006, ISBN 972-42-3867-9978-972-42-3867-8.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theresa,_Countess_of_Portugal"

Categories: 1080 births | 1130 deaths | Women in Medieval warfare | Women of medieval Portugal | Portuguese royalty | Burials at Braga Cathedral, Portugal | Counts of Portugal (Asturias-León)

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Theresa of Portugal (in Galician-Portuguese, Tareja) (1080 – 11 November 1130), known in Portuguese as Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal, was the illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile by Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, had been granted to Raymond of Burgundy, but was transferred to Theresa's husband Henry in 1096.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was left to deal with the military and political situation. She took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River. In recognizing her victory in defending Coimbra, she was called "Queen" by pope Paschal II and in light of this recognition, she appears in her documents as "Daughter of Alphonso and elected by God", explicitly being called queen in an 1117 document, leading some to refer to her as the first monarch of Portugal. [1]

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and led her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

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Queen Theresa of Portugal, Countess of Portugal, (Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León) (1080 – November 11, 1130), illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, was Theresa's dowry, establishing Henry as Regent in the County of Portugal, her personal fief, till her coming of age.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was a very young widow, maybe aged eighteen years, and left to deal with the military and political situation. The Queen took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River.

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Queen Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Queen Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Queen Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and lead her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son.

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Illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz

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Após a morte de D. Henrique, em 1112, fica D. Teresa a governar o condado, pois achava que este lhe pertencia por direito, mais do que a outrém, já que lhe tinha sido dado por seu pai na altura do casamento. Associou ao governo o conde galego Bermudo Peres de Trava e o seu irmão Fernão Peres de Trava. Terá até talvez casado em segundas núpcias com Bermudo, do qual terá tido uma filha.

A crescente influência dos condes galegos no governo do condado Portucalense levou à revolta verificada em 1128, portagonizada pela grande maioria dos infanções do Entre Douro e Minho. Estes escolheram para seu caudilho, D. Afonso Henriques, filho de D. Henrique e de D. Teresa.

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REYES DE CASTILLA

1) Significado: Castilla: tierra de castillos.

2) Casa solar: Castilla, España.

3) Armas: Las del Reino de Castilla en su diversas épocas. Las que aparecen a la derecha son las Armas de los antiguos Condes de Castilla, en particular del Conde Fernán González: En campo de oro una banda de gules. Las Armas de la Casa Real de Castilla, que aparecen más abajo, fueron: En campo de gules un castillo de oro aclarado de azur. Las de Castilla-León (escudo de Fernando III, "el Santo"): Escudo partido en cuatro: 1° y 3°: un castillo de oro en campo de gules. 2° y 4°: un león rampante de gules en campo de plata.

4) Antepasados: Según cuenta la leyenda, Don Rodrigo (siglo IX), último rey de los visigodos, tuvo por hijo a Diego Porcelos (s. IX). Luego le sucedieron Nuño Núñez (s.IX), que fue padre de Fernando Muñóz (s. IX). Le siguen entre los condes de Cantabria: Gonzalo Téllez (s. X), Assur Fernández (s. X), Nuño Fernández (s. X), Gutier Núñez (s. X), Álvaro Herraméliz (s. X) y Gonzalo Fernández (c.890-932), que fue padre de Fernán González, primer conde de Castilla. Los antepasados directos de los condes de Castilla comienzan con Nuño Núñez Rasura que, siguiendo la línea de la Casas de Manuel y Múgica (ver Fernando III, el Santo).

I. Nuño Núñez Rasura nació hacia el año 810. Murió el año 860. Casó con Argilo. Tuvieron por hijo a

II. Fernando Muñóz "el Negro" de Castrogeríz nació hacia el añao 855. Murió el 927. Casó con Gutina de Castilla. Tuvieron por hijos a Gonzálo Fernández de Castilla (c.890, que sigue) y Munio Fernández de Amaya (+932, padre de Muniadomna, que casó antes del año 912 con Fernando Asúrez y tuvieron por hijo a Ansur Fernández, esposo de Guntroda y padre de Teresa Ansúrez de Monzón, que fue mujer de Sancho I "el Craso" de León: ver Reyes de León).

III. Gonzalo Fernández de Castilla nació hacia el año 890. Murió el año 932. Tuvo por hijo a

IV. Fernán González, conde de Castilla, primer conde de Castilla, que nació hacia el año de 915 y gobernó el Condado de 932 a 970. Casó con Sancha Sánchez de Pamplona (hija de Sancho Garcés I de Navarra —905-925— y Toda Aznárez de Aragón) y tuvo entre otros hijos a: García Fernández I de Castilla (c.928; que sigue), Urraca Fernández de Castilla (c.935; que casó sucesivamente con Ordoño III, Ordoño IV de León y Sancho Garcés Abarca de Navarra [ver Reyes de Navarra]; de este último matrimonio nació García Sánchez II de Navarra, que casó con Jimena Fernández y fueron padres de Sancho III de Navarra), Munia Fernández de Castilla (c.942; que casó con Gómez Díaz y fueron padres de Sancha Gómez de Saldaña y Carrión, mujer que fue de Ramiro III de León [ver Reyes de León]) y Gonzalo Fernández de Lara (que murió antes del año 970 y casó con Nuna, y fueron antepasados de Nuño González de Lara, padre de Jimena Núñez de Lara que, según una hipótesis, fue amante de Alfonso VI de Castilla y madre de Teresa y Elvira de Castilla: ver más abajo y nota 1). Fernán González murió en junio del año 970.

V. García I Fernández, conde de Castilla nació el año de 928 y gobernó Castilla de 970 a 995. Casó con Ava de Ribagorza (del condado aragonés de Ribagorza; hija de Raimundo II de Ribagorza y de Garsenda de Fezensac (ver Duques de Gascuña). Por su madre descendía de Carlomagno [ver Carolingios], ya que la 5ª abuela de Garsenda de Fezensac era Berta de Francia [779], hija de Carlomagno e Hildegarda de Vintzgau). García Fernández murió el 30-V-995. Tuvieron por hijos a Sancho García de Castilla (c.965, que sigue) y Elvira García de Castilla (c.970, que casó con Bermudo II "el Godo", rey de León, y tuvieron por hijo a Alfonso V de León: ver Reyes de León).

VI. Sancho García, conde de Castilla nació hacia el año de 965. Gobernó Castilla de 995 a 1017. Casó con Urraca Salvadórez (nacida c.984 y fallecida el 20-V-1025) en 994. Tuvieron por hijos a García (que gobernó Castilla de 1017 a 1029), Munia Mayor de Castilla (c.995, que sigue) y Sancha Sánchez de Castilla (nacida c.1006 y fallecida el 26-VI-1026, que casó con Ramón Berenguer I, conde de Barcelona, en 1021: ver Condes de Barcelona).

VII. Doña Munia Mayor (o Elvira) nació hacia el año 995. Casó en 1010 con Sancho III de Navarra (ver Reyes de Navarra). Tuvieron por hijos a Fernando I (c.1016, primer rey de Castilla, que sigue), Garcia Sánchez III de Navarra "el de Nájera" (nacido después de 1020 y fallecido el 12-XII-1054; casó con Estefanía de Foix, que descendía de Carlomán —era su 8° abuelo—, hijo de Pipino "el Breve": ver Carolingios) y Gonzalo (conde de Sobrarbe y de Ribagorza). Fuera de matrimonio tuvo a Ramiro I, primer rey de Aragón.

VIII. Fernando I, rey de Castilla nació entre 1016 y 1018, en Burgos, Castilla. Gobernó Castilla de 1035 a 1065 y León de 1037 a 1065. Casó con Sancha de León (hija de Alfonso V de León y Elvira Menéndez de Melanda: ver Reyes de León), entre noviembre y diciembre de 1032. Tuvieron por hijos a Sancho II (rey de Castilla —1065 a 1072— y de Galicia -1071-1072), Alfonso VI (rey de Castilla, que sigue), García (rey de Galicia de 1065 a 1071), Urraca (señora de Zamora) y Elvira (señora de Toro). Fernando I murió el 27 de diciembre de 1065.

IX. Alfonso VI, rey de Castilla nació antes del mes de junio de 1040. Fue rey de León (1065-1109), rey de Castilla (1072-1109) y rey de Galicia (1071-1109). Se le conocen cinco esposas legítimas. La segunda fue Constanza de Borgoña (que tuvo lugar el 8-V-1081) en la que tuvo por hija a Urraca (c.1082). Constanza de Borgoña (ver Casa de Borgoña), nacida en 1046, era hija de Roberto "el Viejo", duque de Borgoña, y Helie de Semur; y nieta de Roberto II "el Piadoso", rey de Francia. También era sobrina de Hugo, abad de Cluny. El nombre de "Constanza" lo llevaba por su abuela, Constanza de Arles (984) que, a su vez, era nieta de Constanza de Provenza (931) y tataranieta de Luis III "el Ciego" (883), emperador, nieto de Lotario I (795, el hijo de Ludovico Pío y nieto de Carlomagno: ver Carolingios). Alfonso VI tuvo otras dos hijas ilegítimas, según una hipótesis discutida, con Jimena Muñoz (ver nota 1). La primera fue TERESA ALFONSO DE CASTILLA (1070), que casó con ENRIQUE DE BORGOÑA (hermano de su madrastra: Constanza de Borgoña) y fueron padres de Alonso I Enríquez, primer rey de Portugal (nacido el 25-VII-1110, que casó con Matilde de Saboya (ver Casa de Saboya) y fueron padres de doña Urraca de Portugal, esposa de Fernando II de León: ver Reyes de León). La otra hija ilegítima de Alfonso fue doña Elvira Núñez (c.1075), que casó con el conde tolosano Raimundo de Saint Gilles, el primero de los cruzados (ver Casa de Toulouse). Alfonso VI murió en Toledo el 29-VI-1109.

X. Doña Urraca, reina de Castilla nació hacia el año de 1082, en Burgos, Castilla. Fue reina de Castilla de 1109 a 1026. Caso con Raimundo de Borgoña, conde de Amerous (ver dinastía de Borgoña-Ivrea), en Toledo, el año de 1087. Raimundo de Borgoña fue conde de Galicia y Coimbra en 1087. Raimundo murió en Grajal, el 20-IX-1107. Tuvieron por hijo a Alfonso VII (1-III-1004/05). En segundas nupcias casó con Alonso I de Aragón. Doña Urraca muere el 8-III-1125/26, en Saldana, Palencia.

XI. Alfonso VII, rey de Castilla nació el 1-III-1105, en Toledo, Castilla. Fue rey de Castilla de 1126 a 1157. Casó con Berenguela de Barcelona (1116-1149), en Saldana, el año de 1128. Berenguela era hija de Ramón Berenguer III de Barcelona (ver Condes de Barcelona) y Dulce Aldonza de Milhaud, condesa de Provenza (descendiente de los Reyes Capetos de Francia y también de los Carolingios). En 1152, casó en segundas nupcias con Richeza (hija del príncipe Ladislao II de Cracovia y Silesia). Muere el 21-VIII-1157, en la Fresneda, Teruel, Aragón. Está sepultado en la Catedral de Toledo. De su primer matrimonio tuvo por hijos a Sancho III (que sigue), Raimundo (murió antes de 1151), Fernando II (rey de León de 1157 a 1188 —ver Reyes de León—, y casado con doña Urraca de Portugal, que era hija de Alfonso I de Portugal y nieta de Enrique de Borgoña y Teresa de Castilla -hija de Alfonso VI-), García, Alonso, Sancha (casó con Sancho VI de Navarra en 1153), Constanza (casó con Luis VII de Francia). De su segundo matrimonio tuvo a Fernando y Sancha. Además tuvo dos hijas naturales: Urraca y Estefanía.

XII. Sancho III, rey de Castilla nació el año de 1134, en Toledo. Fue rey de Castilla de 1157 a 1158. Casó — el 30-I-1150/51, en Calahorra, Logroño— con Blanca de Navarra (hija de García VI Ramírez de Navarra, "el Restaurador" y Margarita de L'Aigle Rotrou —descendiente de los Reyes Capetos de Francia y los Carolingios—; García Ramírez era hijo de Ramiro Sánchez de Navarra —ver Reyes de Navarra— y Cristina Rodríguez de Vivar, hija del Cid Campeador). Murió el 31-VIII-1158, en Toledo. Tuvieron por hijo a

XIII. Alfonso VIII, rey de Castilla nació el 11-XI-1155, en Soria. Fue rey de Castilla de 1158 a 1214. Casó, el 22-IX-1177, en Burgos, Castilla, con Leonor de Plantagenet (1162-1214), princesa de Inglaterra (ver Casa de Anjou-Plantagenet y Reyes de Inglaterra de la Casa de Wessex). Tuvieron diez hijos: Sancho, Fernando, Enrique I —rey de Castilla de 1214 a 1217—, Berenguela (que sigue), Sancha, Urraca (casada con Alfonso II de Portugal), Blanca (casada con Luis VIII de Francia), Mafalda, Leonor (casada con Jaime I de Aragón) y Constanza (abadesa de las Huelgas). Alfonso VIII murió en Gutierre de Muñóz, Ávila, Castilla, el 6-X-1214. Está enterrado, con su esposa (que murió el 25-X-1214), en el Monasterio de las Huelgas, Burgos.

XIV. Berenguela de Castilla, reina de Castilla nació el mes de junio de 1180, en Burgos. Casó en primeras nupcias con Conrrado de Hoenstaufenen, duque de Suabia, en 1188 (este matrimonio fue anulado). Luego casó, en diciembre de 1197, en Valladolid, con Alfonso IX de León (ver Reyes de León), que en primeras nupcias había casado con doña Teresa de Portugal (y, entre estos dos matrimonios había tenido por amante a doña Inés Íñiguez de Mendoza, en la cual tuvo por hija a doña Urraca Alfonso). Alfonso IX y doña Berenguela eran nieto y biznieta de Alfonso VII. Aunque este matrimonio era ilegítimo, el hijo de esta pareja, Fernando III, fue considerado como descendencia legítima. Berenguela murió el 8-XI-1246, en Burgos.

XV. Fernando III "el Santo", rey de Castilla y León nació el 19-VIII-1201, en el monasterio de Santa María de Bellofonte, llamado luego de Valparaiso, en el término municipal de Peleas de Arriba, provincia de Zamora. Fue rey de Castilla de 1217 a 1252, y rey de León de 1229 a 1252. Casó en primeras nupcias con Beatriz de Suabia (hija de Felipe de Suabia y nieta del emperador Federico Barbarroja, de la Casa de Suabia-Hohensatufen). De este matrimonio tuvo diez hijos: Alfonso X (rey de Castilla de 1252 a 1284, que caso con Violante de Aragón, y tuvo por hijo y sucesor a Sancho IV), Fadrique, Fernando, Enrique, Felipe, Sancho, Manuel (ver Casas de Manuel y Múgica), Leonor, Berenguela y María. Casó en segundas nupcias con Juana de Ponthieu Montreueil. De este segundo matrimonio tuvo por hijos a Fernando, Leonor y Luis. Murió en Sevilla, el 30-V-1252, y está sepultado en la Catedral de Sevilla.

XVI. Alfonso X, rey de Castilla y León, "el Sabio" (rey de Castilla de 1252 a 1284), hijo de Fernando III "el Santo" y Beatriz de Suabia, nació en Toledo el 23-XI-1221. Murió el 4-IV-1284 en Sevilla. Caso con Violante de Aragón (1236-1301; hija de Jaime I "el Conquistador" y Violante de Hungría), y tuvo por hijo y sucesor a Sancho IV), Fadrique, Fernando, Enrique, Felipe, Sancho, Manuel, Leonor, Berenguela y María. Tuvieron por hijo a

XVII. Sancho I, rey de Castilla y León, "el Bravo" nació el 12-V-1258 en Valladolid. Murió en Toledo el 25-IV-1295. Casó en junio de 1281, en Valladolid, con María Alfonso de Molina "la Grande" (1264-1321). Tuvieron por hijo a

XVIII. Fernando IV, rey de Castilla y León nació en Sevilla el 6-XII-1285. Murió en Jaén el 7-IX-1312. Casó el 23-I-1301 en Valladolid con Constanza de Portugal (1289-1313; hija de Diniz de Portugal e Isabel de Aragón). Tuvieron por hijo a

XIX. Alfonso XI, rey de Castilla y León nació en Salamanca el 13-VIII-1311. Murió en Gibraltar (Batalla del Salado) el 27-III-1350. Casó en Alfayete (1328) con María de Portugal (1313-1356; hija de Alfonso I de Portugal y Beatriz de Castilla). Tuvieron por hijo a Pedro I de Castilla "el Justiciero" (ver nota 2). Además, Alfonso XI se unió fuera de matrimonio con Leonor de Guzmán (ver nota 3) y tuvo por hijos, entre otros, a Enrique II (c.1333), rey de Castilla y a Fadrique Alonso de Castilla (1334), antepasado de la familia Enríquez Fonseca, de los Gómez de Parada, y de la Casa de Sarmiento, a su vez enlazada con la Casa de Ayala y con el linaje guipuzcoano de los Galartza (y a través de ellos de varios linajes del Valle de Lenitz: Eraña, Otalora, Ocaranza, Santamaría, Zubía, etc.).

NOTAS:

   * Condes de Barcelona: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 367. Desde Bellón, conde de Carcasona, hasta Berenguer Ramón I (1018-1035).
   * Reyes de Pamplona: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 359. Desde García Jiménez (c.870) hasta García Sánchez III (1035-1054).
   * Condes de Castilla: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 366. Desde Fernán González a Munia.
   * Primeros príncipes pamploneses: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 245. Desde Íñigo Arista (m. 851) hasta Sancho Garcés I (905-925).
   * Ver cuadro genealógico de los descendientes de Sacho el Mayor, rey de Navarra de 1004 a 1035, en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo V, p. 375. Se pueden ver los enlaces matrimoniales de los reyes de Portugal, León, Castilla, Navara. Aragón y Cataluña, desde el siglo X hasta el siglo XIV.
   [1] Hipótesis sobre la ascendencia materna de las hijas de Alfonso VI: Teresa y Elvira de Castilla. El origen de las hijas de Alfonso VI es una cuestión debatida. Según algunos autores, su madre sería Jimena Núñez de Lara, hija de Nuño González de Lara (descendiente del conde de Castilla Fernán González) y de Emersenda González de Amaya, que era 5ª nieta de Abd Allah I de Córdoba —nacido el 7-III-844— que, a su vez, era descendiente de los Omeya de Córdoba y de Mahoma el Profeta, que era su 8° abuelo. Otros genealogistas afirman que Elvira fue hija de Alfonso VI e Isabel (Zaïda) de Denia, una mujer conversa pero de origen árabe. Y por último, otra hipótesis —quizá la más sólida y defendida por la mayoría— sostiene que Teresa y Elvira de Castilla eran hijas de Alfonso VI y doña Jimena Muñóz, hija de Nuño Rodríguez de Guzmán y doña Jimena Ordóñez (o de Nuño González, Conde de Asturias, y doña Mayor Rodríguez). Doña Jimena Muñóz habría tenido a sus dos hijas entre 1081 y 1082. Al final de su vida, se retiro al convento benedictino de Esinareda del Bierzo, donde murió en 1128.
   [2] Descendencia de Pedro I de Castilla "el Justiciero", hijo de Alfonso XI, Rey de Castilla, y María de Portugal) (ascendientes de Aldonza de Castilla)
   I. Pedro I de Castilla (Burgos, 30-VIII-1334; murió en Montiel el 22-III-1369) casó, en Cuellar (abril de 1354), con Juana Castro Ponce de León (fallecida en Galicia el 21-VIII-1374), y tuvieron por hijo a
   II. Juan de Castilla (Enero de 1355) caso con Elvira de Eril y Falces (hija de Beltrán de Eril y Magdalena de Falces) y tuvieron por hijo a
   III. Pedro de Castilla, Obispo de Osma y Palencia (c.1380; murió el 28-IV-1461) que, de Isabel de Drochelín (dama inglesa de la reina Catalina), tuvo por hijos naturales a 1) Alfonso de Castilla (que casó con Juana de Zúñiga y Portugal y fueron padres de Pedro de Castilla y Zúñiga: ver ascendencia de Francisca Osorio de Castilla, hija del conquistador de la Nueva España, don Luis de Castilla) y 2) Aldonza de Castilla (que sigue).
   IV. Aldonza de Castilla (c.1440) casó con Rodrigo de Ulloa, Señor de la Mota.
   [3] Descendencia de la Casa de Guzmán (ascendientes de María Teresa de Guzmán)
   I. Pedro de Guzmán (c.1225) de Isabel Alonso (fallecida el 9-IX-1309) tuvo por hijo a
   II. Alonso Pérez de Guzmán "el Bueno", 1er. Señor de San Lucar (24-I-1256) casó con María Alonso Coronel y tuvieron por hijos a 1) Juan Alfonso (que sigue), 2) Isabel, 3) Leonor de Guzmán (falleció el 24-IV-1341 y casó con Luis de la Cerda en 1306; fue amante de Alfonso XI y madre de Enrique de Trastamara y de sus hermanos, entre otros, don Fadrique).
   III. Juan Alfonso de Guzmán, 2° Señor de San Lucar (1285-1351) casó con Urraca de Osorio y tuvieron por hijos a 1) Alonso y 2) Juan Alonso (que sigue).
   IV. Juan Alfonso de Guzmán, 1er. Conde de Niebla (1342-1396) casó con Beatriz de Castilla (hija de Alfonso XI y María de Portugal) y tuvieron por hijo a
   III. Enrique de Guzmán, 2° Conde de Niebla (1379-1436) casó con Teresa de Figueroa (1383) en 1399, y tuvieron por hija a
   V. María Teresa de Guzmán (c.1405-1479), que casó con Enrique Enríquez, 1er. Conde de Alba de Liste.

--------------------

Queen Theresa of Portugal, Countess of Portugal, (Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa, Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León) (1080 – November 11, 1130), illegitimate daughter of King Alfonso VI of León and Castile and Ximena Moniz.

In 1094, her father married her to a French nobleman, Henry of Burgundy, nephew to the queen, a brother of the Duke of Burgundy, a descendant of the kings of France in the male line. Henry was providing military assistance to father-in-law against the Muslims on the Portuguese march. The County of Portugal, the southern part of the realm of the assassinated brother of the Leonese king, Garcia II of Galicia and Portugal, was Theresa's dowry, establishing Henry as Regent in the County of Portugal, her personal fief, till her coming of age.

At first, Henry was a vassal of his father-in-law, but when Alfonso VI died in 1109, leaving everything to his daughter Urraca of Castile, Henry invaded León, hoping to add it to his lands. When he died in 1112, Teresa was a very young widow, maybe aged eighteen years, and left to deal with the military and political situation. The Queen took on the responsibility of government, and occupied herself at first mainly with her southern lands, that had only recently been reconquered from the Moors as far as the Mondego River.

In 1116, in an effort to expand her power, Queen Teresa fought her half-sister and Queen, Urraca. They fought again in 1120, as she continued pursue a larger share in the Leonese inheritance, and allied herself as a widow to the most powerful Galician nobleman for that effect. This was Count of Trava, who had rejected his first wife to openly marry her, and served her on her southern border of the Mondego. In 1121, she was besieged and captured at Lanhoso, on her northern border with Galicia, fighting her sister Queen Urraca. A negotiated peace was coordinated with aid from the Archbishops of Santiago de Compostela and Braga. The terms included that Queen Theresa would go free and hold the county of Portugal as a fief of León, as she received it at first.

By 1128, the Archbishop of Braga and the main Portuguese feudal nobles had had enough of her persistent Galician alliance, which the first feared could favour the ecclesiastical pretensions of his new rival the Galician Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, Diego Gelmírez, who had just started to assert his pretensions to an alleged discovery of relics of Saint James in his town, as his way to gain power and riches over the other cathedrals in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Portuguese lords rebelled, and the Queen was deposed after a short civil war. Her son and heir, Afonso, defeated Teresa's troops near Guimarães and lead her, along with the Count of Trava and their children, into exile in the kingdom of Galicia, near the Portuguese border, where the Trava founded the monastery of Toxas Altas. Teresa died soon afterwards in 1130, being succeeded by her son. -------------------- Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal, em galaico-português: Tarasia ou Tareja de Portucale (1080 - 11 de Novembro de 1130, na Póvoa do Lanhoso ou Mosteiro de Montederramo). Nascida infanta do reino de Leão, foi a primeira condessa do condado Portucalense. Esposa de Henrique de Borgonha, conde de Portucale e mãe de D. Afonso Henriques de Borgonha, primeiro rei de Portugal. -------------------- Teresa of CASTILE [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1070 in Toledo, Toledo, Spain. She died 1 Nov 1130 in Villa de Guimar, Braga, Portugal. Teresa married Henry I of PORTUGAL Count of Portugal on 1093 in Villa de Guimar, Braga, Portugal.

They had the following children:

M i Alfonso I of PORTUGAL King of Portugal was born 25.7.1110 and died 6.12.1185.

in: Selected Families and Individuals <http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~hwbradley/aqwg867.htm#14040> _____________________________________________________________________________

Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal, em galaico-português: Tarasia ou Tareja de Portucale, mais conhecida em Portugal apenas por Dona Teresa (1080 - 11 de Novembro de 1130, na Póvoa do Lanhoso ou Mosteiro de Montederramo).

Descendência:

  1. Urraca Henriques (c. 1095), casou com D. Bermudo Peres de Trava
  2. Sancha Henriques (c.1097-1163), casou com D. Sancho Nunes de Celanova e com D. Fernão Mendes, senhor de Bragança
  3. Teresa Henriques (nasceu c. 1098).
  4. Henrique (c.1106-1110).
  5. Afonso Henriques, rei de Portugal (n. 1109 em Guimarães - f. 6 de Dezembro de 1185 em Coimbra), casou com Mafalda, condessa de Sabóia

in: Wikipédia, a enciclopédia livre <http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teresa_de_Le%C3%A3o>

Veja também:

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theresa,_Countess_of_Portugal -------------------- Teresa de León (1083/1085 - Monasterio de Montederramo (Galicia) o Póvoa de Lanhoso,11 de noviembre de 1130). Infanta de León y condesa de Portugal. Era hija ilegítima de Alfonso VI de León, y de su amante Jimena Muñoz. Fue madre de Alfonso I de Portugal, primer rey de Portugal.

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