Thibault III de Blois, comte de Champagne

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Theobald de Blois, Comte de Champagne et Brie

Nicknames: "Thibaut III", "Count of Champagne & Brie"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Troyes, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
Death: Died in Troyes, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Henri I de Blois 'le Libéral', count of Champagne & Brie and Marie Capet de France, comtesse de Champagne
Husband of Blanche de Navarre, comtesse consort de Champagne
Father of Blanca Champagne and Teobaldo I el Cantautor, rey de Navarra
Brother of Henri 'le Jeune' de Champagne, comte de Champagne; Scholastique de Champagne and Marie de Champagne

Occupation: Conde de Champagne, Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death., Greve i champagne och Brie, Count of Champagne, Comte de Troyes et de Meaux, Conde de Troyes y de Meaux
Managed by: Pam Wilson
Last Updated:

About Theobald de Blois, Comte de Champagne et Brie

Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

   Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified
   He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet.
   Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial;
   While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

-------------------- Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

   Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified
   He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet.
   Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial;
   While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

-------------------- Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet. Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial; While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home. -------------------- Theobald III, Count of Champagne From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death. Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II. Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231. In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat. Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa. He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are: Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet. Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial; While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

-------------------- Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet. Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial; While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

Preceded by Henry II Count of Champagne 1197–1201 Succeeded by Theobald IV

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_III,_Count_of_Champagne" Categories: Counts of Champagne | People of the Fourth Crusade (Christians) | 1201 deaths Hidden categories: Articles lacking sources from April 2007 | All articles lacking sources | Articles containing French language text

-------------------- William de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey (1166–1240), otherwise known as William Plantagenet, was the son of Hamelin de Warenne (Plantagenet) and Isabel, daughter of William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. His father Hamelin granted him the manor of Appleby, North Lincolnshire.

De Warenne was present at the coronation of King John of England on May 27, 1199. When Normandy was lost to the French in 1204 he lost his Norman holdings, (in 1202 he was lieutenant of Gascony), but John recompensed him with Grantham and Stamford.

His first tenure of office as Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports began in 1204, and lasted until 1206. He was also a Warden of Welch marches between 1208-1213.

William was one of the few barons who remained loyal to King John (who was his cousin) during the king's difficulties with the barons, when they sought for the French prince to assume the English throne, and is listed as one of those who advised John to accede to the Magna Carta. His allegiance only faltered a few times when the king's cause looked hopeless.

In March, 1217 he again demonstrated his loyalty to England by supporting the young King Henry III, he was also responsible for the establishment of the cathedral at Salisbury.

Between the years 1200-1208, and during 1213-1226 he was to serve as the Sheriff of Wiltshire. In 1214 he was again appointed Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

[edit] Family He married Maud Marshal (1192 - 27 March 1248), eldest daughter and later co-heiress of William Marshal, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk, thus becoming by marriage the Earl of Salisbury, on October 13, 1225. They had a son and a daughter. The son John (1231-1304) succeeded his father as earl, while the daughter, Isabel de Warenne (c. 1228 - 1282), married Hugh d'Aubigny, 5th Earl of Arundel.

William may also have had an earlier, childless marriage to another Matilda, daughter of William d'Aubigny, 1st Earl of Arundel.

[edit] References

This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed. (March 2009) 

Preceded by Unknown Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports 1204–1206 1214 Succeeded by Hubert de Burgh

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_de_Warenne,_6th_Earl_of_Surrey"

-------------------- Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_III_of_Champagne Theobald III, Count of Champagne From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Theobald III of Champagne)

Jump to: navigation, search This article does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2007)

Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross", and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Épernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

   Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified
   He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet.
   Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial;
   While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

Preceded by Henry II Count of Champagne 1197–1201 Succeeded by Theobald IV This page was last modified on 18 June 2010 at 00:12. -------------------- Theobald III (French : Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201 ) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death. Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie , a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine . He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231. In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade . There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28 , 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly . There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat . Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1 , 1199 at Chartres , and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV . She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24 , 1201 , she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa . He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are: Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet. Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial; While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home. -------------------- Theobald III (French: Thibaut; 13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross," and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Epernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet. Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial; While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_III,_Count_of_Champagne -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_III,_Count_of_Champagne

Theobald III (French: Thibaut) (13 May 1179 – 24 May 1201) was Count of Champagne from 1197 to his death.

Theobald was the younger son of Henry I of Champagne and Marie, a daughter of Louis VII of France and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He succeeded as Count of Champagne in 1197 upon the death of his older brother Henry II.

Charters were written by him and Philip Augustus in September 1198 to dictate the rights of the Jews of the one vis-à-vis the other and to repay debts by Augustus to the count of Champagne for the employment of his Jews. These laws were reinforced subsequently in charters that were signed between 1198 and 1231.

In 1198, Pope Innocent III called the Fourth Crusade. There was little enthusiasm for the crusade at first, but on November 28, 1199 various nobles of France gathered at Theobald's court for a tournament (in his Ecry-sur-Aisne's castle), including the preacher Fulk of Neuilly. There, they "took the cross", and elected Theobald their leader, but he died the next year and was replaced by Boniface of Montferrat.

Theobald married Blanche of Navarre on July 1, 1199 at Chartres, and was succeeded by his posthumous son by Blanche of Navarre, Theobald IV. She was Theobald's dower thus receiving his seven castles (Épernay, Vertus, Sézanne, Chantemerle, Pont-sur-Seine, Nogent-sur-Seine and Méry-sur-Seine, and all the subsidiaries coming from these castles and castellaries at the Count's death. On May 24, 1201, she was to rule as regent for the following 21 years, during which the succession was contested by Theobald's nieces, Alice and Philippa.

He was buried beside his father at the Church of Saint Stephen, built at Troyes by the latter. On his tomb the inscriptions are:

Intent upon making amends for the injuries of the Cross and the land of the Crucified

He paved a way with expenses, an army, a fleet.

Seeking the terrestrial city, he finds the one celestial;

While he is obtaining his goal far away, he finds it at home.

view all 15

Thibault III de Blois, comte de Champagne's Timeline

1179
May 13, 1179
Troyes, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1195
1195
Age 15
1199
July 1, 1199
Age 20
Chartres, Eure Et Loire, Orleanais, France
1201
May 3, 1201
Age 21
Pamplona, Navarre, Navarre, Spain
May 24, 1201
Age 22
Troyes, Aube, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1992
March 24, 1992
Age 22
September 11, 1992
Age 22
1993
February 23, 1993
Age 22
July 14, 1993
Age 22
1994
May 12, 1994
Age 22