Theodo II, duke of Bavaria

public profile

Theodo II, duke of Bavaria's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Theodo, Herzog von Bayern

Also Known As: "Theodo", "Theodo V", "Theodo II", "Theodon", "Théodon"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: (Present Bavaria), Herzogtum Bayern (Present Germany)
Death: Died in Regensburg (Ratisbon), (Present Bavaria), Herzogtum Bayern (Present Germany)
Place of Burial: Mettlach, Saar, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Theodo I, duke of Bavaria and Gleisnod di Friuli
Husband of Daughter of Tassilo I der Bayern; Regintrud of the Franks and Folchaide von Salzburg
Father of Hersuinda von Bayern; Willigarde von Bayern; Theudebert II, duke of Bavaria; Tassilo II, duke of Bavaria; Grimaldo II von Bayern and 1 other
Brother of Pilitrud von Bayern and Uta von Bayern
Half brother of Lantpert, duke of Bavaria; Saint Almaberge de Neustria; Hugues, Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia and Theodard d'Oeren, bishop of Liège

Occupation: Herzog von Bayern, Duke of Bavaria, Duque da Bavária (670-680), Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death., Prince, de Bavière, 630, duke of Bavaria, duc de Baviere, Roi de Bavière (11e, 680-717), Duke, Duc de Bavière
Managed by: Steven Roger Nelson
Last Updated:

About Theodo II, duke of Bavaria

His ancestry is unknown, although he is often called a son of Theodo I. (Stewart Baldwin, soc.genealogy.medieval, May 18, 2012).

Analysis by Ben Angel

Ben M. Angel notes: The main event that seems to define the question of Theodo's first marriage and children seems to be the martyrdom of St. Emmeram of Regensburg, which was done at his command by his eldest son in 652, when Theodo himself was around the age of 27.

Although births can in rare incidents happen very early (Lina Medina of Peru is recorded as the world's youngest mother at 5 years 229 days according to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_youngest_birth_mothers), typical childbearing age begins around ages 12-13. This would mean that Theodo and Gleisnot of Friuli would have fathered Uta no later than 640, when he was roughly 15 years of age, and Lantpert when he was even younger (Wikipedia shows in 636, when Theodo was 11).

This is important because of the uncertainty in who is Theodo's wife. Supposedly Regintrud was the daughter of Dagobert I of Austrasia (603-639) and Nathid (his third of many wives 610-642) - they married in 629 (at age 19), and had their eldest son in 637 (at age 27, Clovis II). If their younger daughter Regintrud was Theodo's wife, then she wouldn't be born in 660 (at age 50), but closer to Clovis' birth date.

-----------------------

From the Wikipedia page on Theodo von Bayern:

Theodo (about 625 – 11 December c. 716) also known as Theodo V and Theodo II, was the Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death.

It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins. He strengthened Bavaria internally and externally and, according to Arbeo of Freising, he was a prince of great power whose fame extended beyond his borders.

His father was Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria and his mother was probably Fara of Bavaria (b: 600), daughter of one of the Kings of the Lombards and (her mother) Daughter of Gisulf of Friuli (b: 577).

Theodo established his capital at Ratisbon (modern Regensburg). He married Folchaid, of the aristocracy of Alemannia, to build diplomatic ties there. He intervened in Lombard affairs by harbouring the refugees Ansprand and Liutprand, whom he assisted militarily on his return to claim the Iron Crown. Liutprand later married his daughter Guntrude. Theodo also defended his duchy ably from the Avars (with some failure in the east).

Theodo is the patron to the four great missionaries of Bavaria: Saint Rupert, Saint Erhard, Saint Emmeram, and probably Saint Corbinian. He was the first to draw up plans for the Bavarian church, aiming both at a deeper cultivation of the countryside as well as greater independence from the Frankish Kingdom by a closer association with the Pope. He was the first Bavarian duke to travel to Rome, where he conferred with Pope Gregory II. The diocesan seats were placed in the few urban centres, which served as the Duke's seats: Regensburg, Salzburg, Freising and Passau.

Two of his children are involved with the death of Saint Emmeram. Theodo's daughter Uta (or Ota) had become pregnant by her lover (c.652). Fearing her father's wrath, she confided to Emmeram and the saint promised bear the blame, as he was about to travel to Rome.

Soon after his departure, Uta's predicament became known and in keeping with the agreement she named Emmeram as the father. Her brother Lantpert went after Emmeram and greeted him as "bishop and brother-in-law" ("Aie, episcope et gener noster!") Then he had Emmeram cut and torn into pieces. Theodo had the remains of the saint moved to Regensburg. Nothing more is known of Lantpert and Uta.

Ordinals

Some historians have distinguished between a Duke Theodo I, ruling around 680, and a Duke Theodo II, reigning in the early eight century. Theodo I is attributed with the events involving Saint Emmeram, Uta and Lantpert, while Theodo II is associated with Saints Corbinian and Rupert, the ecclesiastical organisation and the division of the Duchy. However, no contemporary source indicates a distinction between different Dukes of that name.

To complicate matters even further, Bavarian tradition has referred to Theodo I and Theodo II as Theodo IV and Theodo V respectively to differentiate them from legendary Agilolfing ancestors Theodo I to III, all who would have reigned before 550.

Marriage and issue

He married Regintrude of Austrasia, daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude. They had the following:

1. Daughter of Theodo, married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg. They had the following:

1. Theodbert 2. Theobald 3. Tassilo 4. Grimoald

Theodo was eventually succeeded by his four other sons, among which he divided his duchy sometime before 715.

As early as 702, Theodbert had been ruling from Salzburg and from 711 or 712, Theobald was co-reigning. It is impossible to see if this division was territorial (as with the Merovingians) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua). If so, Theodbert's capital was probably Salzburg and the Vita Corbiniani informs that Grimoald had his seat there. References to Theobald and the Thuringii implies perhaps a capital at Regensburg and this leaves Tassilo at Passau. All of this is educated conjecture.

------------------------------

From the Wikipedia page on Emmeran of Regensburg: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmeram_of_Regensburg

As the story goes, Uta (or Ota), the daughter of the duke, confided to Emmeram that she was expecting a child out of wedlock. According to Arbeo, the father was one Sigipaldus from her father's own court. Moved with compassion, Emmeram advised her to name himself, whom every one respected, hoping to mitigate some of her shame.(according to the Catholic Encyclopedia).

Shortly thereafter, the legend goes, Emmeram abruptly went on a pilgrimage to Rome. At this point Uta named Emmeram as the father.

When Duke Theodo and his son Lantpert learned of Uta's pregnancy, Lantpert went after the bishop. Lantpert caught up to Emmeram in Helfendorf (now part of the Munich suburb of Aying) on the old Roman road between Salzburg and Augsburg on the Via Julia Augusta. Lantpert and his followers tied Emmeram to a ladder and proceeded to torture and cut Emmeram to pieces. The day of his martyrdom is also his name day, 22 September (c. 652).

His companions Vitalis and Wolflete found him still alive, lying in his own blood and tried to bring him quickly back to Aschheim, where at that time stood a walled church of the Apostle Peter.

Veneration

The prevalent legend of Emmeram's torture describes how he was bound to a ladder, and was hacked to pieces, starting with his finger tips. Later his eyes were put out and his nose was cut off. Still living, he asked for water. His companion Vitalis answered, "Why do you seek relief, when nothing of you remains but your stubby trunk, undecorated with limbs? I would think you should wish for your death rather than live with such shame." Emmeram answered that one should not attempt to hurry death, rather drag it out, in order to persuade the face of God's mercy through divine intervention. At this Emmeram was beheaded. As proof of Emmeram's innocence, a ladder was lowered to bear him to Heaven. As they carried his body to Aschheim, a wondrous light shone from his body.

A text printed in Munich in 1743, Officium oder Tageszeiten des wunderthätigen bayerischen Apostels und Blutzeugen Christi St. Emmerami, zu täglichen und andächtigen Gebrauch in allen Anliegen und Widerwärtigkeiten etc., states that the cart was accompanied by: “ Men and women of 200 persons with great sympathy and prayer. A half hour before reaching Aschheim, the saint called for a halt, as within the hour his reward of heaven was before him. Then it happened that they lifted him down from the cart and laid him upon a beautiful sward, where he gave up his ghost at once... The place where this happened remained fresh and green for all time until finally through the alms of travelers (because all four roads come together there) and other good-hearted Christians had a church built, where even today many wonders still occur! ”

Arbeo of Freising depicted the place of his death as a “lovely, ever spring-green place, upon which a spring appeared and the local people later built a little church. ”

When the misunderstanding of Emmeram's relationship to Uta was revealed, Emmeram was entombed in Aschheim, whereupon legend states that it rained for forty days. Emmeram was exhumed and put upon a raft in the Isar. When the raft reached the Danube, it miraculously floated upstream to Regensburg, where Emmeram was interred in the church of St. George. His remains were moved by Bishop Gawibaldus to a church dedicated to the martyr. This church burned down in 1642. Emmeram's bones were found under the altar in 1645 and moved to St. Emmeram's Abbey. The church, now a basilica minor, houses his leg bones in a silver reliquary in the eastern portion under the altar. Bishop Ignaz de Senestrez canonically recognized the relics in 1833. They are displayed every year on 22 September.

At the spot Saint Emmeram died in the year 652, a small chapel was erected in the year 1842. The chapel stands there today. The church of St. Lorenz in Oberföhring has a side altar dedicated to St. Emmeram. In the church of Saints Peter and Paul in Aschheim, a plaque memorializes the first grave of Emmeram with an inscription.

------------------------

From the Wikipedia page on Lantpert of Bavaria, Theodo's first son: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantpert

Lantpert (or Landbert or Landfried) (born before 636, died after 680) was the son of Theodo, duke of Bavaria, and Gleisnot of Friuli.

According to the Vita Hamhrammi by Arbeo, bishop of Freising, Lantpert is the murderer of the Saint Emmeram [1].

Emmeram had been a guest of the ducal court for three years, where he was known for his chaste and pure lifestyle. Uta, daughter of Duke Theodo and sister to Lantpert, had become pregnant by her lover. Fearing her father's wrath, she confided to Emmeram and the saint promised bear the blame, as he was about to travel to Rome.

Soon after his departure, Uta's predicament became known and in keeping with the agreement she named Emmeram the father. Lantpert went after Emmeram and greeted him as "bishop and brother-in-law" (Aie, episcope et gener noster!) Then he had Emmeram cut and torn into pieces.

Nothing more is known of Lantpert and his sister Uta. Lantpert's deed might be the cause for the Lex Baiuvarorum's unique penalty for killing a bishop: a leaden copy of the corpse was weighed with gold.

References

"Landbert Herzog von Bayern (680- )" (in German) From the Mittelalter Genealogie site (in German) of Karl-Heinz Schreiber Retrieved 2006-12-25. http://www.mittelalter-genealogie.de/agilolfinger/landbert_herzog_von_bayern_680.html

--------------------

Biography from unspecified source:

Theodbert (also Theodebert, Theudebert, Theotpert, and Theodo) (c. 685 – c. 719) was the duke of Bavaria in some capacity or other from 702 to his death. He was the eldest son of Duke Theodo of Bavaria and Folchaid. He was first associated with his father as duke in 702, ruling from Salzburg. In 711, his younger brother Theobald was co-ruling as well and his father was making plans for a fourfold division of the duchy on his death. Sometime before 715, the division was given, but whether territorial or coregent is not known. If the former, the dioceses set up by Theodo probably corresponded to the duchies of his sons. In that scenario, Theodbert probably had his seat at Salzburg, as since 702.

His father did have him swear to always defend Rupert of Salzburg when he transferred the government to Theodbert. Theodbert also provided military help to Ansprand and Liutprand in their reconquest of Italy in 712.

After Theodo's death, the four brothers warred with each other, but all were dead by 719 save Grimoald, who thereafter ruled alone until his own death. Theodbert had married Regintrude and a son and a daughter: Hugbert, the only grandson of Theodo II, who inherited the duchy united after Grimoald's death, and Guntrude, who married Liutprand.

--------------------

Theodo, also known as Theodo V and Theodo II, was the Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death.

It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins. He strengthened Bavaria internally and externally and, according to Arbeo of Freising, he was a prince of great power whose fame extended beyond his borders.

His father was Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria and his mother was probably Fara of Bavaria (b: 600), daughter of one of the Kings of the Lombards and (her mother) Daughter of Gisulf of Friuli (b: 577).

Theodo established his capital at Ratisbon (modern Regensburg). He married Folchaid, of the aristocracy of Alemannia, to build diplomatic ties there. He intervened in Lombard affairs by harbouring the refugees Ansprand and Liutprand, whom he assisted militarily on his return to claim the Iron Crown. Liutprand later married his daughter Guntrude. Theodo also defended his duchy ably from the Avars (with some failure in the east).

Theodo is the patron to the four great missionaries of Bavaria: Saint Rupert, Saint Erhard, Saint Emmeram, and probably Saint Corbinian. He was the first to draw up plans for the Bavarian church, aiming both at a deeper cultivation of the countryside as well as greater independence from the Frankish Kingdom by a closer association with the Pope. He was the first Bavarian duke to travel to Rome, where he conferred with Pope Gregory II. The diocesan seats were placed in the few urban centres, which served as the Duke's seats: Regensburg, Salzburg, Freising and Passau.

Two of his children are involved with the death of Saint Emmeram. Theodo's daughter Uta had become pregnant by her lover. Fearing her father's wrath, she confided to Emmeram and the saint promised bear the blame, as he was about to travel to Rome. Soon after his departure, Uta's predicament became known and in keeping with the agreement she named Emmeram as the father. Her brother Lantpert went after Emmeram and greeted him as "bishop and brother-in-law" (Aie, episcope et gener noster!) Then he had Emmeram cut and torn into pieces. Theodo had the remains of the saint moved to Regensburg. Nothing more is known of Lantpert and Uta.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodo_of_Bavaria for more information.

--------------------

Theodo of Bavaria From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Theodo (about 625 – 11 December c. 716) also known as Theodo V and Theodo II, was the Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death.

It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins. He strengthened Bavaria internally and externally and, according to Arbeo of Freising, he was a prince of great power whose fame extended beyond his borders.

--------------------

Theodo (about 625 – 11 December c. 716) also known as Theodo V and Theodo II, was the Duke of Bavaria from 670 or, more probably, 680 to his death.

It is with Theodo that the well-sourced history of Bavaria begins. He strengthened Bavaria internally and externally and, according to Arbeo of Freising, he was a prince of great power whose fame extended beyond his borders.

His father was Theodo IV, Duke of Bavaria and his mother was probably Fara of Bavaria (b: 600), daughter of one of the Kings of the Lombards and (her mother) Daughter of Gisulf of Friuli (b: 577).

Theodo established his capital at Ratisbon (modern Regensburg). He married Folchaid, of the aristocracy of Alemannia, to build diplomatic ties there. He intervened in Lombard affairs by harbouring the refugees Ansprand and Liutprand, whom he assisted militarily on his return to claim the Iron Crown. Liutprand later married his daughter Guntrude. Theodo also defended his duchy ably from the Avars (with some failure in the east).

Theodo is the patron to the four great missionaries of Bavaria: Saint Rupert, Saint Erhard, Saint Emmeram, and probably Saint Corbinian. He was the first to draw up plans for the Bavarian church, aiming both at a deeper cultivation of the countryside as well as greater independence from the Frankish Kingdom by a closer association with the Pope. He was the first Bavarian duke to travel to Rome, where he conferred with Pope Gregory II. The diocesan seats were placed in the few urban centres, which served as the Duke's seats: Regensburg, Salzburg, Freising and Passau.

Two of his children are involved with the death of Saint Emmeram. Theodo's daughter Uta had become pregnant by her lover. Fearing her father's wrath, she confided to Emmeram and the saint promised bear the blame, as he was about to travel to Rome. Soon after his departure, Uta's predicament became known and in keeping with the agreement she named Emmeram as the father. Her brother Lantpert went after Emmeram and greeted him as "bishop and brother-in-law" (Aie, episcope et gener noster!) Then he had Emmeram cut and torn into pieces. Theodo had the remains of the saint moved to Regensburg. Nothing more is known of Lantpert and Uta.

He married Regintrude of Austrasia, daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude. They had the following:

   * Daughter of Theodo, married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg. They had the following:

   * Theodbert
   * Theobald
   * Tassilo
   * Grimoald

Theodo was eventually succeeded by his four other sons, among which he divided his duchy sometime before 715.

As early as 702, Theodbert had been ruling from Salzburg and from 711 or 712, Theobald was co-reigning. It is impossible to see if this division was territorial (as with the Merovingians) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua). If so, Theodbert's capital was probably Salzburg and the Vita Corbiniani informs that Grimoald had his seat there. References to Theobald and the Thuringii implies perhaps a capital at Regensburg and this leaves Tassilo at Passau. All of this is educated conjecture.

--------------------

In English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodo_II_of_Bavaria

--------------------

He married Regintrude of Austrasia, daughter of Dagobert I and Regintrude. They had the following:

   * Daughter of Theodo, married Godefroy, Duke of Alamannia

He also married Folchiade of Salzeburg. They had the following:

   * Theodbert
   * Theobald
   * Tassilo
   * Grimoald

Theodo was eventually succeeded by his four other sons, among which he divided his duchy sometime before 715.

As early as 702, Theodbert had been ruling from Salzburg and from 711 or 712, Theobald was co-reigning. It is impossible to see if this division was territorial (as with the Merovingians) or purely a co-regency (as with the later princes of Benevento and Capua). If so, Theodbert's capital was probably Salzburg and the Vita Corbiniani informs that Grimoald had his seat there. References to Theobald and the Thuringii implies perhaps a capital at Regensburg and this leaves Tassilo at Passau. All of this is educated conjecture.

view all 14

Theodo II, duke of Bavaria's Timeline

625
625
(Present Bavaria), Herzogtum Bayern (Present Germany)
670
670
Age 45
Bavaria, Germany
685
685
Age 60
Herzogtum Bayern, Frankish Kingdom
686
686
Age 61
Bavaria, Germany
690
690
Age 65
710
710
Age 85
Mayence,,,France
716
December 11, 716
Age 91
Regensburg (Ratisbon), (Present Bavaria), Herzogtum Bayern (Present Germany)
????
????
????