Thibault IV «le Grand»  de Champagne, comte de Blois (c.1090 - 1151) MP

‹ Back to de Champagne surname

Is your surname de Champagne?

Research the de Champagne family

Thibault IV «le Grand»  de Champagne, comte de Blois's Geni Profile

Records for Thibault IV de Champagne

40,160 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Related Projects

Nicknames: "Theobald IV Count of Champagne & Blois", "o Grande", "Theobald IV Palatine de Champagne", "Теобалд II дьо Блуа"
Place of Burial: Lagny-sur-Marne, Île-de-France, France
Birthplace: Blois, Centre, France
Death: Died in Ligny-le-Ribault, Centre, France
Occupation: Count Theobald II of Champagne and Brie (1125 - 1151), Count Theobald IV of Blois and Chartres (1102 - 1151), AKA "Theobald the Great", Count of Champagne and Brie (1125 - 1151); Count of Blois and Chartres (1102 - 1151)
Managed by: Margaret, (C)
Last Updated:

About Thibault IV «le Grand»  de Champagne, comte de Blois

THIBAUT de Blois

From Medlands:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CENTRAL%20FRANCE.htm#EtienneIdied1102B

([1090/95]-10 Jan 1152, bur Lagny). His parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who names him second in order of the sons which he lists[197]. "Henricus comes cognomina Stephanus necnon et Adela uxor eius cum filiis nostris" granted immunities to Chartres Notre-Dame by charter dated [Oct 1100/1101], signed by "Stephani comitis, Adele comitisse, Guillelmi, Stephani, Odonis, Teobaldi"[198], which suggests that Thibaut may have been the fourth son although this is inconsistent with his having succeeded his father. He succeeded his father in 1102 as THIBAUT IV “le Grand/le Vieil” Comte de Blois, de Troyes

THIBAUT de Blois, son of ETIENNE Comte de Blois & his wife Adela of England ([1090/95]-10 Jan 1152, bur Lagny). "Henricus comes cognomina Stephanus necnon et Adela uxor eius cum filiis nostris" granted immunities to Chartres Notre-Dame by charter dated [Oct 1100/1101], signed by "Stephani comitis, Adele comitisse, Guillelmi, Stephani, Odonis, Teobaldi"[228], which suggests that Thibaut may have been the fourth son although this is inconsistent with his having succeeded his father. It does not appear from other sources that Thibaut was younger than his brother Etienne. His parentage is stated by Orderic Vitalis, who names him second in order of the sons which he lists[229]. Orderic also provides some indication of his birth year when he records that his mother Ctss Adela provided troops to Louis VI King of France at the time of the siege of Montmorency in [1108] "because Count Stephen her husband had gone on crusade and her eldest sons, William and Theobald, who were not yet of age, were unable to command troops of knights"[230]. The description is confused because Count Etienne had died several years earlier, but it nevertheless provides some indication of the comparative youth of the brothers Guillaume and Thibaut at the time. This is corroborated by the charter dated 2 Apr 1104 under which "Hugo comes Campanie Teotbaldi comitis filius" donated property to the abbey of Molesme which names "…comitissam Adelaidem uxorem fratris mei comitis Stephani nepotes…" and is subscribed by "Teotbaldus puer filius Stephani comitis nepos huius comitis Hugonis"[231]. He succeeded his father in 1102 as THIBAUT IV “le Grand/le Vieil” Comte de Blois, de Troyes. He was invested with the county of Chartres in 1107. Chibnall speculates that the delay in this investiture may have been due to lack of proof that his father was dead rather than Thibaut's own youth[232], but Thibaut´s age is the obvious reason. Orderic Vitalis states that Comte Thibaut supported Hugues du Puiset during his rebellion against Louis VI King of France in 1111, which led to more widespread warfare culminating in Thibaut defeating the king's forces near Meaux later in 1111[233]. Henry of Huntingdon records that Thibaut rebelled against King Louis in 1116, aided by his uncle Henry I King of England[234]. It is assumed that these two reports refer to the same rebellion, with contradictory dating. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records that "Hugo comes Campanie" became a Knight Templar in 1125 and was succeeded by "Theobaldus nepos eius"[235]. Orderic Vitalis states that Thibaut was proposed as successor to Henry I King of England by Normans at a meeting at Neubourg in Dec 1135, but when they heard that his younger brother had forestalled him, they agreed to serve King Stephen[236]. Orderic Vitalis also records that he was offered the crown of England in 1141 after his brother King Stephen was captured at Lincoln, but declined the offer[237]. He entered into conflict with Raoul Comte de Vermandois in 1142-43. Louis VII King of France declared war against him, laid siege to and captured Vitry but signed peace at Vitry in 1143. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines records the death "1152 VI Id Jan" of "comes Campanie Theobaldus" and his burial "apud Latinicacum"[238]. A list of foundations at Troyes records the memory "10 Jan" of "Thibault Comte de Champagne décédé ce jour"[239]. The necrology of Saint-Etienne, Troyes records the death "10 Jan" of "Theobaldus comes Campanie"[240]. The necrology of Saint-Loup, Troyes records the death "10 Jan 1152" of "Teobaudus comes" and his burial "in ecclesia de Lagny"[241]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "IV Id Jan" of "Teobaldus comes palatinus", stating that "cuius filius Teobaldus comes Blesensis et Francie senescallus…matris sui Matildis" donated property for his soul[242].

m (1123) MATHILDE von Sponheim, daughter of ENGELBERT Marchese of Istria [later Duke of Carinthia] [Sponheim] & his wife Uta von Passau [Ratpotonen] (-[13 Dec] [1160/1161]). She is named by Orderic Vitalis, who calls her father "Duke Engelbert", when recording her marriage[243]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitissa Mathildis Campaniensis et uxor Renaldi comitis Nivernensis et comitissa Montis Veteris iuxta Coloniam et mater illorum Romanorum qui Froiepain dicuntur" as sisters of "archiepiscopi Coloniensis Frederici"[244], although the latter is shown by other sources to be their paternal uncle. "Teobaudus Blesensis comes" made a donation to Montiérender by charter dated 1139 with the consent of "Matildis comitissa uxor mee et Henricus filius meus"[245]. "Comitissa Mathildis et filius eius Henricus et Theobaudus et Stephanus" donated property to the abbey of Fontevraud by charter dated to [1125/49][246]. A list of foundations at Troyes records the memory "13 Dec" of "Mathilde épouse du comte Thibaut"[247]. The necrology of Saint-Etienne, Troyes records the death "13 Dec" of "Mathildis comitissa"[248]. The necrology of Chartres cathedral records the death "Id Dec" of "comitissa Mathildis mater…archiepiscopi Senonensis Willelmi et…Henrici comitis, Teobaldi comitis atque comitis Stephani"[249].

Mistress (1): ---. The name of Comte Thibaut's mistress is not known.

Comte Thibaut IV & his wife had eleven children

-------------------- Theobald the Great (French: Thibaut de Blois ) (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him obstreperous and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England. [1]

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

--------------------

Thibaut IV de Blois

Un article de Wikipédia, l'encyclopédie libre.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thibaut_IV_de_Blois

Thibaut de Blois ou Thibaut IV le Grand (avant 1092 – 10 janvier 1151), fut comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Meaux, de Châteaudun, seigneur de Sancerre (1102-1151), comte de Troyes et de Champagne (1125-1151).

Il est le fils puîné d'Étienne-Henri († 1102), comte de Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Meaux, seigneur de Sancerre, et d'Adèle († 1137), fille de Guillaume le Conquérant. Son frère aîné Guillaume est déshérité probablement pour des problèmes mentaux. Il hérite en 1102 des domaines de son père, mort à la bataille de Rama, en Terre sainte. En 1125, son oncle Hugues Ier de Champagne se fait templier et lui lègue le comté de Troyes ainsi que le titre de comte de Champagne que ce dernier s'était attribué, bien que ne possédant pas la totalité de la province.

Sa mère Adèle contrôle totalement la gestion de la principauté de 1101 à 1107, quand il est adoubé chevalier. Ils gèrent alors le comté ensemble jusqu'en 1120, quand elle se retire à l'abbaye de Marcigny. En 1107, Thibaut se joint à une révolte contre Louis le Gros, le fils du roi Philippe Ier de France. En 1111, alors que Louis le Gros est devenu Louis VI de France, ses relations avec les Capétiens se détériorent encore et mènent à un conflit armé latent. En 1113, Thibaut forme une coalition avec son oncle, le roi d'Angleterre et duc de Normandie, Henri Ier, et ensemble il battent une armée composée de Capétiens et d'Angevins.

En 1108, son oncle lui confie quelques unes des terres et châteaux confisquées aux Bellême (notamment Alençon et Sées (dans le Calvados. Plus tard, il les échange avec son frère contre les terres dont celui-ci a héritées dans le comté de Blois).

Durant les années 1116-1119, Étienne de Blois lui vient en aide, notamment en commandant l'ost bléso-normand à Brie, de crainte que le roi de France Louis VI le Gros ne s'en empare pendant une absence de Thibaut.

Étienne vient aussi aussi à son secours, début novembre 1118, quand il est capturé au combat par la garnison du château de L'Aigle. Au même moment, les citoyens de la ville d'Alençon, ville frontière, exaspérés par la brutalité du traitement que leur réserve Étienne et sa garnison, se rebellent et en appellent à l'aide du comte Foulque V d'Anjou[5]. Celui-ci s'empare de la ville et assiège la forteresse. Thibaut et son frère Étienne, qui d'après le moine chroniqueur Orderic Vital sont « avides de gloire » devancent l'ost d'Henri Ier et partent libérer la ville avec leurs propres hommes. Ils sont battus dans un engagement qui a lieu en dehors de la ville, et Henri Ier est obligé de se retirer.

À la mort sans descendance mâle légitime de son oncle Henri Ier, en 1135, les barons du duché de Normandie lui propose de devenir leur suzerain. Fin décembre 1135, à Lisieux, alors qu'il discute du sujet avec Robert, comte de Gloucester et fils illégitime du roi, la nouvelle leur parvient que son frère cadet Étienne de Blois vient de se faire couronner roi d'Angleterre. En 1137, alors qu'il est en visite en Normandie, Étienne, devenu Étienne d'Angleterre, lui accorde une 2000 livres sterling par an en compensation de la revendication au trône d'Angleterre qu'il pouvait avoir.

Par son ascendant et son habileté, il étend le petit comté de Troyes à toute la Champagne, imposant sa suzeraineté à cinq vassaux de l'archevêque de Reims, à autant de l'évêque de Langres et à plusieurs ducs de Bourgogne (notamment Joigny). Aussi fait-il de Troyes la capitale de ses États et devient-il un des principaux vassaux de la couronne.

De Mathilde de Carinthie, épousée en 1123, il a dix enfants, dont :

  1. Henri Ier, comte de Champagne et de Brie ;
  2. Thibaut V, comte de Blois et de Chartres et connétable de France ;
  3. Étienne, comte de Sancerre ;
  4. Guillaume aux Blanches Mains, archevêque de Reims, cardinal et légat pontifical ;
  5. Adèle (1140-1206), épouse de Louis VII, roi de France, et mère de Philippe-Auguste ;
  6. Marie, épouse d'Eudes II, duc de Bourgogne ;
  7. Agnès, épouse de Renaud II, comte de Bar ;
  8. Marguerite, religieuse à Fontevraud.
  9. Mathilde († 1184), mariée avant 1160 à Rotrou IV († 1191), comte du Perche.

--------------------

Theobald the Great (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him obstreperous and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England.

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_II_of_Champagne

--------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_IV_of_Blois

Theobald II, Count of Champagne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Theobald IV of Blois)

Jump to: navigation, search

Theobald.

Original coat of arms of the county of Blois.

Original coat of arms of the county of Champagne.

Theobald the Great (French: Thibaut de Blois) (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him stubbornly resistant to control and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England. [1]

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142–1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry-le-François, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

   * Henry I of Champagne
   * Theobald V of Blois
   * Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France
   * Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170
   * Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.
   * William White Hands, 1135–1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176–1202, Cardinal 1179
   * Stephen I of Sancerre 1133–1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre
   * Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).
   * Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

[edit] References

  1. ^ LoPrete, Kimberly. Adela, Countess and Lord, Fourcourts Press, Dublin. 2007

[edit] See also

Peace with honor

Preceded by:

Hugues Count of Champagne

1125–1151 Succeeded by:

Henry I

Preceded by:

William the Simple Count of Blois

1107–1151 Succeeded by:

Theobald V

This page was last modified on 18 June 2010 at 00:13.

--------------------

Theobald the Great (French: Thibaut de Blois ) (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him obstreperous and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England. [1]

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry-le-François, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

[edit] References

1.^ LoPrete, Kimberly. Adela, Countess and Lord, Fourcourts Press, Dublin. 2007

[edit] See also

Peace with honor

Preceded by:

Hugues Count of Champagne

1125–1151 Succeeded by:

Henry I

Preceded by:

William the Simple Count of Blois

1107–1151 Succeeded by:

Theobald V

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_II,_Count_of_Champagne"

Categories: Counts of Champagne | Counts of Blois | Counts of Chartres | Medieval child rulers | 1090 births | 1151 deathsViews

ArticleDiscussionEdit this pageHistoryPersonal tools

Try BetaLog in / create accountNavigation

Main page

Contents

Featured content

Current events

Random article

Search

    Interaction

About Wikipedia

Community portal

Recent changes

Contact Wikipedia

Donate to Wikipedia

Help

Toolbox

What links here

Related changes

Upload file

Special pages

Printable version

Permanent link

Cite this page

Languages

Česky

Deutsch

Ελληνικά

Español

Français

Bahasa Indonesia

Italiano

Nederlands

‪Norsk (bokmål)‬

Polski

Português

Русский

This page was last modified on 11 April 2010 at 16:35.

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. See Terms of Use for details.

Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

Contact usPrivacy policyAbout WikipediaDisclaimers

--------------------

Theobald II, Count of Champagne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Original coat of arms of the county of Blois.

Original coat of arms of the county of Champagne.

Theobald the Great (French: Thibaut de Blois ) (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him obstreperous and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England. [1]

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

   * Henry I of Champagne
   * Theobald V of Blois
   * Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France
   * Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170
   * Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.
   * William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179
   * Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre
   * Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).
   * Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

[edit] Sources

  1. ^ LoPrete, Kimberly. Adela, Countess and Lord, Fourcourts Press, Dublin. 2007
   * Europaeische Stammtafeln

--------------------

Theobald the Great (in French: Thibaut de Blois ) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125. He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy.

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where about a thousand villagers perished in the burning of the church.

French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobald_II_of_Champagne for more information.

--------------------

Theobald the Great (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was chosen as heir over his elder brother, Guillaume, who was weak mentally.

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

--------------------

Theobald II, Count of Champagne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Theobald the Great (French: Thibaut de Blois ) (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was appointed above his older brother William. Several historians have painted William as mentally deficient, but this has never been substantiated. That said, we know that his mother found him obstreperous and unfit for wide ranging comptal duties. Thus he was given lands at Sulley in the North and was married off to a lady in his mothers court. His temper tantrums caused him problems early on. He did assault the Bishop of Chartres when he was about 15 and caused his mother to think twice about elevating him.Theobald had no such problems.

Theobald accompanied his mother throughout their realm on hundreds of occasions and, after her retirement to Marcigney in 1125, he administered the family properties with great skill. Adela died in her beloved convent in 1136, the year after her son Stephen was crowned king of England. [1]

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign. Abelard died at Cluny Abbey in Burgundy, a monastery supported by the Thebaudians for many centuries.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

--------------------

Theobald the Great (1090–1151) was Count of Blois and of Chartres as Theobald IV from 1102 and was Count of Champagne and of Brie as Theobald II from 1125.

He held Auxerre, Maligny, Ervy, Troyes, and Châteauvillain as fiefs from Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy. He was the son of Stephen II, Count of Blois and Adela of Normandy, and the elder brother of King Stephen of England. Although he was the second son, Theobald was chosen as heir over his elder brother, Guillaume, who was weak mentally.

King Louis VII of France became involved in a war with Theobald by permitting Count Raoul I of Vermandois and seneschal of France, to repudiate his wife Eléonore of Blois, Theobald's sister, and to marry Petronilla of Aquitaine, sister of the queen of France. The war, which lasted two years (1142-1144), was marked by the occupation of Champagne by the royal army and the capture of Vitry, where many persons perished in the burning of the church. French teacher Pierre Abélard, who became famous for his love affair with and subsequent marriage to his student Héloïse, sought asylum in Champagne during Theobald II's reign.

In 1123 he married Matilda of Carinthia, daughter of Engelbert, Duke of Carinthia.

Their children were:

Henry I of Champagne

Theobald V of Blois

Adèle of Champagne, married King Louis VII of France

Isabelle of Champagne, married 1. Roger of Apulia d. 1148 & 2. William Gouet IV d. 1170

Marie of Champagne, married Eudes II, Duke of Burgundy, became Abbess of Fontevrault later in life.

William White Hands, 1135-1202, Archbishop of Reims 1176-1202, Cardinal 1179

Stephen I of Sancerre 1133-1191, Count of Sancerre and Crusader, died at the Siege of Acre

Agnes of Champagne (d. 1207), Dame de Ligny married Renaut II of Bar (d. 1170).

Margaret of Champagne nun at Fontevrault

view all 47

Thibault IV «le Grand»  de Champagne, comte de Blois's Timeline

1090
1090
Blois, Centre, France
1123
1123
Age 33
Blois,Loir-Et-Cher,Centre,France
1127
December, 1127
Age 37
Vitry-le-François, Champagne-Ardenne, France
1128
1128
Age 38
Champagne, France
1130
1130
Age 40
Blois, Loir-et-Cher, Centre, France
1130
Age 40
Champagne, France
1133
1133
Age 43
France
1135
1135
Age 45
Sens, France
1137
1137
Age 47
Champagne, France
1138
1138
Age 48
Blois, Loir-Et-Cher, France