Thomas A. Ballard (c.1630 - 1689) MP

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Birthplace: Inkborough, Worcester, England
Death: Died in Bruton Parish, Middle Plantation, James City County, Virginia
Occupation: Farmer, Speaker of the House of Burgesses
Managed by: Geraldine Ballard Ryan
Last Updated:

About Thomas A. Ballard

In 1635 , Thomas , along with his family came to America aboard the ship " James ". Thomas would eventually reside in York CO. Virginia where he served as the counties clerk from 1652 to 1663. He married , Anne Thomas in 1650 & together they would have eight children until Anne's death in 1678. After Anne's death , Thomas remarried to his 2nd wife , Alice Hilliard & together had two more children. In 1667 , Thomas served as a Burgess & had also served for the governor's council. He had also served in the Virginia Militia & also as a Vestryman of the Bruton Parish Church. He served as Speaker Of The House Of Burgesses from 1680 to 1684. He was a close colleague of Sir William Berkeley & was also a key figure in the Bacon Rebellion. Thomas died on March 24th , 1689. He is buried in the Bruton Parish Church. His name is inscribed on a small bronze tablet in the interior of the church & on the name plate of a pew. _________________________________

Thomas Ballard immigrated to Virginia, where he married Ann, daughter of William and Anne Thomas, in York County, 1650 (William Thomas of York County, Virginia referred to Thomas Ballard as his son-in-law in his will (William and Mary Quarterly Magazine)).

He served as the clerk of York County from 1652 to about 1663. He moved to James City County by 1668 and settled at Middle Plantation, which was later renamed Williamsburg. He was elected to the House of Burgess in 1666 and his name appears on records there. From 1666 to 1668 or 1669, he served as a member of the Governor's Council. In 1669 he was a lieutenant colonel in the James City County Militia and promoted to colonel in 1680. Thomas Ballard patented 1000 acres on the southeast side of Mattaponey River in Gloucester County on July 16, 1655, for the transportation of 20 persons (C.P. 309). He patented 600 acres upon the head of the Poropotank River on October 15, 1657. He deserted the Mattaponey land and it was repatented to Thomas Hickman in 1658 (C.P. 380).

He patented 1300 acres on the north side of the Mattaponey River on October 6, 1658, and used the same 20 headrights he had before on his first grant. Bacon's Rebellion began in 1676. To very simply explain at least one cause of the rebellion, Indians were raiding the frontier and Governor Berkeley refused to do anything about it. Nathaniel Bacon and his party finally forced him to authorize the raising of a militia to fight the Indians. At this time, Thomas Ballard was a colonel and a council member. He was very instrumental in persuading his friend Governor Berkeley to sign the authorization to raise the militia. He persuaded several men to aide Bacon with supplies and to march with him. He ordered Captain Thomas Young to open certain storehouses and issue the goods to Bacon's army.

Shortly after the militia marched to the frontier, Berkeley issued new proclamations that declared the militia was illegal and the militiamen were rebels and traitors. Bacon and his officers decided to evict Berkeley from the colony and establish a new government under the king.

The rebels raided the Middle Plantation (later known as Williamsburg) and captured Ann Ballard, Thomas Ballard's wife; Elizabeth Angelica Bray, wife of Colonel James Bray; Elizabeth Bacon, wife of the rebel leader's cousin Nathaniel Bacon, Sr.; Elizabeth Page, wife of Colonel John Page (all wives of council members); and other women.

Bacon besieged Jamestown, the capital, and built breastworks against it, but the town's defenders kept them under fire. As a result, Bacon had the women hostages put on white aprons and placed them on the breastworks. It's not often we learn anything about our female ancestors because they usually stayed home to care for the children, but here we see our ancestress Ann Thomas Ballard, wearing a white apron, standing in the pouring rain on breastworks, and hoping the other side would stop shooting at them. Even though it was raining, the town's defenders recognized the women and ceased firing.

The women were later referred to as "dear white guards of the Devil," meaning Bacon. Skipping ahead several months, Bacon soon died of fever and his rebellion began to collapse. Additionally, King Charles II issued a proclamation that ordered Berkeley to do whatever it took to appease the rebels and heal the wounds that caused the rebellion. All rebels were to be pardoned except Bacon, who was already dead anyway. Governor Berkeley published this proclamation throughout Virginia and invited the rebels to surrender while promising them some concessions. Many put down their arms, but some of the rebel leaders, knowing Berkeley would never honor the pardons, refused to surrender and were taken by force. Col. Thomas Ballard was now in a pickle, if not before. I have seldom read of a more vindictive man than Governor Berkeley and Ballard had assisted the rebels, albeit before they were technically rebels. However, he went to the governor and asked for his forgiveness, probably offered him gifts of restitution as he later suggested others do. The Governor called him his "Mary Magdelene" and forgave him all. He even appointed Col. Ballard to serve as a member of a military court martial which tried many of the rebel officers. As a member, he helped try Captain Thomas Young for supplying the rebels with materiel, but you may recall Young did so at Col. Ballard's command. The court martial had Captain Young hanged. Thomas Glover was arrested by Captain William Hartwell, then Berkeley's chief bodyguard, for aiding the rebels. In his defense he said he had been "pressed by [Captain William] Hartwell to serve under Bacon and was encouraged to go by Mr. [Thomas] Ballard who told him Bacon's Commission was freely granted, etc." (1676, page 140). Glover would have been convicted, but Ballard went to him and told him the Governor very much liked a particular black horse Glover owned and if Glover would make a present of it to the Governor, the Governor would pardon him. Glover gave the Governor the horse and obtained a pardon. The king sent a commission to see how well the rebels responded to his proclamation and how well Governor Berkeley obeyed them. They learned that rather than "heal the wounds" as the king commanded, the governor sought to make a monument to retribution and aggravated the hurts to the detriment of the king's colony. As a result, Berkeley was ordered back to England. The commission also had several council members removed from office, beginning with Col. Ballard.

Thomas Ballard was Speaker of the House of Burgesses from 1680 to 1684, and from 1674 to October 31, 1684, he was a vestryman of Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg. The church has a bronze tablet with his name inscribed on it and one of the pews bears a plate with his name. He was buried there on March 24, 1689. Ann Thomas Ballard, his wife, died September 26, 1678, in Williamsburg.

Several of my sources refer to his armorial seal and arms which were emblazoned on his tombstone. Boddie described them as "sable, a griffin segreant, ermine, armed or." [may be some tying errors in here--bears checking-DACrea] I found such a blazon for the Ballard family in most heraldry books.

Their children were John, Thomas, Lydia who married Thomas Harwood, Elizabeth who married ---- Ladd, Martha who married John Collier, Francis who married Mary Servant, William who married Philadelphia Lee or Ludwell, and Alice."

He married, first, Ann Thomas, daughter of William Thomas, circa 1650, in York Co., VA. William THOMAS was his step father and Ann was this William's daughter by his first wife. Thomas Ballard, the founder of the Virginia family, was the clerk of York Co., VA from 1652 to about 1663

On 16 July 1655, he patented 1000 acres in Glouster Co., now calledNew Kent Co. on the SE side of Mattaponey, for the transportation of 20 persons. Apparently, Thomas Ballard "deserted" the 1000 acres on the Mattapony, for it was re-patented on Oct 6, 1658 by Thomas Hickman. Hickman's grant was for "1000 acres granted to Thomas Ballard 16 July 1655, and by him deserted". (C.P. 380) . GRANTEE Ballard, Thomas. grantee. DATE 16 July 1655. NOTE Location: Gloucester County. NOTE Description: 1000 acres in Gloucester County now called New Kent; On the So. Et. side of Mettapony River. See margin This patent relinquished &c. NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 3, 1652-1655, p. 350 (Reel 2).

(C.P. 309) His next patent, 15 Oct 1657, was for 600 acres upon the head of Poropotank River. This latter land was assigned to Major David Cant, April 2, 1662. (C.P. 334, 496). GRANTEE Ballard, Thomas. grantee. DATE 15 October 1657. NOTE Location: County location not given. NOTE Description: 600 acres upon the south side and upon the land of Pianketank River: Bounded on the E:S:East side with the branch of Peanketank River. . NOTE Memo: In the margin of the record are the foll.g words "by Moone assigned to Mr. Ballard and by Mr. Ballard assigned to Major David Cant, and gtd. to the sd. Cant by patent, dated Apl. 2nd 1662." NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 4, 1655-1664, p. 186 (Reel 4).

On Oct 6, 1658, Thomas patented 1300 acres "upon the north side of Mattapony River" and used the same 20 headrights as in his first grant. GRANTEE Ballard, Thomas. grantee. DATE 6 October 1658. Location: New Kent County. NOTE Description: 1300 acres on the North side of Mattapony River, and on the branches of Whorecock seamp. NOTE Source: Land Office Patents No. 4, 1655-1664, p. 330 (Reel 4).

Thomas Ballard- Old Rappahannock Co VA Land Patent- 6 Nov 1666. 800 ac on the South Side int he freshes of Rappahannock river. Beg on the nw side of a creek dividing this land and the land of John Weire. Patents No. 6, p.a16. Card #20.

July 12, 1666 and October 23, 1667, he was a Burgess for James City Co. In 1666-1668/9 he was a member of the Governor's Council. He removed to James City Co., where, by 1668, he was living at Middle Plantation (later Williamsburg). In 1669, he was Lt. Col. of the Militia in James City Co. and in 1680 was Col. of the Militia.

In 1670 Beverley had been elected clerk of the house of burgesses and soon became the leader of the majority of that body, and it was they who, at the outbreak of Bacon's rebellion, were, with the Ludwells and Thomas BALLARD in the council, the strongest supporters of Gov. Berkeley in his efforts to suppress the uprising.

Thomas signed a petition for inquisition on escheated land in 1672 Bruton Parish, York, VA.

http://www.linkline.com/personal/xymox/roh/ballard.htm In Colonial Virginia, Thomas BALLARD was often referred to as the Honorable Thomas BALLARD, or as Colonel BALLARD. He was born in March of 1630/31 in England. Some researchers believe that he was brought to the New World as a child by his parents.

Whether or not he came as a child, it is fair to say that he was the founder of the Virginia BALLARD family.Thomas BALLARD married Anne THOMAS in 1650. Anne bore his eight children before her death in 1678.

Thomas lived in York County, Virginia, and imported at least twenty persons into Gloucester County, Virginia, under the head right system. He also patented land in Gloucester, County as well as lands on the Propotank and Mattapony rivers. Both the head right system and the land patenting practice were devised to populate the new colonies and proved to be lucrative propositions for many of the early colonists.

Thomas BALLARD was a member of the Governor's Council, whose members were chosen from the wealthiest, most educated and influential citizens of the colony. In this office, of Counselor, he was both a Naval officer and a collector of customs. Members of this council constituted the Upper House of the General Assembly. In many respects, they were the New World counterpart of the English House of Lords. His many offices included Clerk of York County, Member of Council, Member of the House of Burgesses, and Speaker of the House of Burgesses. He was also a Colonel in the James City County militia.

In the following and final decade of his life, Thomas BALLARD remarried, was promoted to the rank of Colonel of the James City County militia, was elected speaker of the House of Burgesses, and was vestryman of Bruton Parish Church. Upon his death in 1689, he was buried at Bruton Church, and his name was inscribed on a bronze tablet as well as a pew nameplate there. Submitted by George F.Emerson

http://www.ku.edu/heritage/cousin/thosyork.htm [DERBY V-2] [W&M Vol. II, Pg. 276][Nell M. Nugent, CAVALIERS AND PIONEERS, 1934, 975.5N (3 vol), in custody of Ft. Worth Public Library pg. 309, 334, 379, 496] [BSSVF]. Born, circa 1630, in England. Buried, 24 Mar 1688/9, in Williamsburg, VA. Thomas Ballard, the founder of the Virginia family, was the clerk of York Co., VA from 1652 to about 1663. He removed to James City Co., where, by 1668, he was living at Middle Plantation (later Williamsburg). July 12, 1666 and October 23, 1667, he was a Burgess for James City Co. In 1666-1668/9 he was a member of the Governor's Council. In 1669, he was Lt. Col. of the Militia in James City Co. and in 1680 was Col. of the Militia. On 16 July 1655, he patented 1000 acres in Glouster Co., now called New Kent Co. on the SE side of Mattaponey, for the transportation of 20 persons. (C.P. 309) His next patent, 15 Oct 1657, was for 600 acres upon the head of Poropotank River. This latter land was assigned to Major David Cant, April 2, 1662. (C.P. 334, 496) Apparently, Thomas Ballard "deserted" the 1000 acres on the Mattapony, for it was re-patented on Oct 6, 1658 by Thomas Hickman. Hickman's grant was for "1000 acres granted to Thomas Ballard 16 July 1655, and by him deserted". (C.P. 380) On Oct 6, 1658, Thomas patented 1300 acres "upon the north side of Mattapony River" and used the same 20 headrights as in his first grant. In 1676, his wife, Ann, together with Mrs Elizabeth Bacon, wife of Nathaniel Bacon Sr. (a cousin of the rebel); Mrs Angelica Bray, wife of Col. James Bray; and Mrs. Elizabeth Page, wife of Col. John Page, all wives of members of the Council, were captured by Nathaniel Bacon, Jr.,by a raid on the Middle Plantation. When Bacon besieged Jamestown these ladies were put before his breastworks at Jamestown to warn Governor Berkeley from attack. In January 1677, Thomas was a member of the Courts Martial following the collapse of Bacon's rebellion. From 1680 to 1686, he was a Burgess for James City Co., serving as Speaker of the House of Burgesses from 1680 to 1684. From 1674 to October 31, 1684, he was a vestryman of Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg, where he was buried Mar 24, 1689. His name is inscribed on a bronze tablet in the interior of the church and on the name plate of a pew.

He married, first, Ann Thomas, daughter of William Thomas, circa 1650, in York Co., VA. Died, 26 Sep 1678, in Williamsburg, VA. He married, second, Alice ______, after 1678 (after Sep 26, 1678). Died, after1691 (was liviing Jul 24, 1691).

From "Genealogies of Virginia Families" from Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine. Colonel Thomas Ballard was an attorney and a member of the House of Burgesses from James City Co., VA, 1666. Re-elected for the sessions 1682-83-84-85-86. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1680-82-83-84. He was Owner of historic "Middle Plantation", on which some of the land is now located on the College of William and Mary, and a part of the city of Williamsburg. Thomas Ludwell sold this land March 1674-75 to Honorable Thomas Ballard of the Council by the deed below." (no copy). In 1693 Ballard sold the same tract of land to the Trustees of the College, and the Deed was at the College, until about 1892, when it disappeared.

Colonel Ballard and his wife are mentioned as victims of Nat Bacon's Rebellion. The Colonel was a member of the King's Council, 1675-1688. This was a position of high honor under Governor Berkeley who in turn received his appointment from the King.

"Colonel Thomas Ballard was born in 1630, baptized at Inkborough, England, County of Worcester, 1636. He was the son of Henry Ballard, baptized at St. Margaret's West Minster, February 28, 1585, England and he died in Virgina.

Colonel Thomas Ballard died at his home in Middle Plantation, now Williamsburg and was buried at Bruton Parish, March 24, 1689. He married Miss Anne Thomas, daughter of William and Ann Thomas of York County, Virginia. She died September 26, 1678.

From Southside Virginia Families by John Bennett Boddie, 1955, Pacific Coast Publishers, Redwood City, California, pp. 17-24 "It has been stated that the first of the name in America was William Ballard, born in England 1609 and his son Thomas, born in England in 1630, same to America on the ship "James", arriving at Yorktown in May 1635. The Richmond Times Dispatch, in an article written in 1888 on "Ballard" says that William remained for some time in Virginia, but after the death of his wife he removed to Andover, Massachusetts and died there in 1689. He married at Andover, Grace _____ and had (so T.D. says) Joseph, who married Elizabeth Phelps, and perhaps otherchildren.

"Thomas Ballard, son of William Ballard and Elizabeth, remained in Virginia, and in 1654 was Clerk of York County. (End of quoted statement).

"Now, the list of "Emigrants to America" by Hotten, page 107, shows the following emigrants "imbarqued on the 'James', 13 July 1635, to be transported to New England": William Ballard, Husband 32 years Elizabeth Ballard, 26 years Hester Ballard, 2 years Jo. Ballard, 1 year "No "Thomas Ballard, aged 5" is shown in this list and the ship evidently sailed directly to New England. "There was a Ballard family in Wadhurst, Sussex, England, whose arms were "Sable, a griffin sergeant ermine, armed or". They had resided there for many generations previous to the coming of Thomas Ballard to Virginia. (See Misc. Gen. & Heraldica) There were many "Thomas', Johns and Williams" in this family and it is very probable that Col. Thomas Ballard of Virginia was a descendant of one of the branches of this family. However, the "William Ballard", third son of Thomas Ballard who died at Wadhurst, Feb. 9, 1624, does not appear to be the William who came to America in the ship "James". Thomas Ballard's eldest son Thomas, was aged 15 in 1619, according to the above pedigree. He also had a daughter Elizabeth, unmarried, and another one, Martha, married to Abraham Haynes. Inasmuch as Thomas Ballard, the eldest son, was born in 1604, William, the third son, was born much later andtherefore could not be the above William Ballard, born 1603 who came on the ship "James".

"In a search for verification of the connection of this family with Virginia, it was found that Thomas Ballard, born in 1604, who married Anne, daughter of Sir Nathaniel Napper, (Berry's Sussex p. 116) made his will in London Sept. 10, 1641, same probated Sept. 18, 1641. He bequeathed all his lands and tenements given him in the will of his father, Thomas, to his brother William Ballard; wife Anne, daughter Anne; godchild Samuel Maplesden; brothers Mr. John White, and Abraham Haynes. Executor, brother William Ballard. (It seems that his sister Elizabeth married John White). The will of Thomas' brother, Richard of London, was probated Aug. 1, 1638. He died unmarried and bequeathed his property to his bother, Abraham Haynes, Rector of St. Olaves, Hart Street, London. The children of Abraham Haynes were: Martha, born Mar 15, 1634; Thomas, born Oct. 18, 1638; William, born April 22, 1640; Abraham Haynes, died Mar 29, 1649; Martha, his wife died Sept 23, 1647 (Register). (The wills are from the "Ballard Genealogy" by C. F. Farlow, 1911, p. 1) William Ballard was the survivor of this family and inherited all of their property. It is very doubtful, therefore, that he would leave England for America.

"Thomas Ballard, the founder of the Virginia family, as "Mr. Thomas Ballard", patented "1000 acres in Glouster Co., now called "New KentCo." on S.E. side of Mattapony, along the head of Mr. William Wyatt's land, 16 July 1655, for the transportation of 20 persons". (C.P. 309) His next patent was for 600 acres upon the head of Poropotank River, W.N.W. upon land of Capt. Stephen Gill, dec'd. 15 Oct 1657. Thomas assigned this land to Major David Cant, April 2, 1662. (C.P. 334, 496)

"On Oct 6 1658, Thomas Hickman re-patented Thomas Ballard's first grant of 1000 acres in New Kent for Hickman's grant shows same"granted to Mr. Thomas Ballard 16 July 1655 and by him deserted." (C.P. 379)

"It seems that Thomas Ballard "deserted" the 1000 acres and added 300 more "upon the north side of Mattapony River" for on Oct 6 1658, he patented 1300 acres there and used the same 20 headrights he had used in his first grant. (C.P. 380)

"On April 16, 1664, Anthony Branch patented 150 acres on N.W. branch of Nansemond River, which had been sold to him by Mr. Thomas Ballard.

"Thomas Ballard was appointed Clerk of York County in 1652, and served for many years thereafter. He was a Burgess from James City in 1666; was appointed Lt. Col. of Militia in 1669, and a member of the Council in 1675, later was re-elected to the House of Burgesses and became Speaker of the House in 1680-84. Colonel Ballard's wife Ann, together with Mrs. Elizabeth Bacon, wife of Nathaniel Bacon, Sr., (A cousin of Nathanial Bacon, Jr. the Rebel); Mrs. Angelica Bray, wife of Colonel James Bray, and Mrs. Elizabeth Page, wife of Colonel John Page, all wives of members of the Council were captured by Nathanial Bacon, Jr., during his rebellion, by a raid on the Middle Plantation.

"When Bacon besieged Jamestown these ladies, wearing white aprons, were compelled to stand before his breastworks, so they could be recognized by their husbands, and thereby cause Gov. Berkeley to cease his cannonade. (2 W I-276)

"Colonel Ballard married Ann, step-daughter of William Thomas, whose will was probated in York County, about 1664. In his will Thomas mentioned wife Anne; . . . calls Sarah Herman and Jane Hilliard "daughters-in-law" and Thomas Ballard "son-in-law". Son-in-law in those days meant "step-son" (See Hilliard).

"Thomas Ballard and his son, Thomas, were vestrymen of Historic Bruton Parish Church at Williamsburg where he was buried March 24, 1689. His name is inscribed on a bronze tablet in the interior of the Church, also on the name plate of a pew. "His children were: (1.) John, dsp. (2) Thomas, (1654-1711); (3) Lydia; (4) Elizabeth; (5) Martha; (6) William; (7) Francis, all said to have been born at Middle Plantation, now Williamsburg.

THOMAS BALLARD VIRGINIA (1630/31-1689) In Colonial Virginia, Thomas BALLARD was often referred to as the Honorable Thomas BALLARD, or as Colonel BALLARD. He was born in March of 1630/31 in England. Some researchers believe that he was brought to the New World as a child by his parents.

Whether or not he came as a child, it is fair to say that he was the founder of the Virginia BALLARD family. Thomas BALLARD married Anne THOMAS in 1650. Anne bore his eight children before her death in 1678.

Thomas lived in York County, Virginia, and imported at least twenty persons into Gloucester County, Virginia, under the head right system. He also patented land in Gloucester, County as well as lands on the Propotank and Mattapony rivers. Both the head right system and the land patenting practice were devised to populate the new colonies and proved to be lucrative propositions for many of the early colonists.

Thomas BALLARD was a party to a number of recorded land trading transactions. Among these was the purchase and sale of the land on which William and Mary College was founded."The College of William and Mary was originally built on a tract of 330 acres most of which has been sold off, only about 30 acres remain. The tract was the property of the Honorable Thomas LUDWELL, Secretary of State 1660-1678, who lived at 'Richneck'on the west side of Archers Hope Creek. Thomas LUDWELL sold this land March 1674-75 to Hon. Thomas BALLARD of the Council...In 1693 BALLARD sold the same tract to the Trustees of the College."

It was probably Thomas BALLARD Jr. who made the sale in 1693, since Thomas the elder died in 1689. It is of interest to note that the grandson of Colonel Thomas BALLARD, William BALLARD, married a LUDWELL.

Thomas BALLARD was a member of the Governor's Council, whose members were chosen from the wealthiest, most educated and influential citizens of the colony. In this office, of Counselor, he was both a Naval officer and a collector of customs. Members of this council constituted the Upper House of the General Assembly. In many respects, they were the New World counterpart of the English House of Lords. His many offices included Clerk of York County, Member of Council, Member of the House of Burgesses, and Speaker of the House of Burgesses. He was also a Colonel in the James City County militia.

At the height of his political career, the Bacon Rebellion had a devastating effect on his life. In a raid on Middle Plantation, the rebels kidnapped the wives of many of the Governor's highest officials. These included the wife of Thomas BALLARD, as well as the wife of Nathaniel BACON's cousin, who was also on the Governor's Counsel.

The kidnapped women were used as human shields against and retaliation of the Governor. Once the rebellion collapsed, BALLARD sat on the court martial of BACON the rebel. Still, the trauma of these events took its toll. Within a year of the court martial, BALLARD's wife died.

In the following and final decade of his life, Thomas BALLARD remarried, was promoted to the rank of Colonel of the James City County militia, was elected speaker of the House of Burgesses, and was vestryman of Bruton Parish Church. Upon his death in 1689, he was buried at Bruton Church, and his name was inscribed on a bronze tablet as well as a pew nameplate there. Submitted by George F. Emerson

The Children of Thomas BALLARD and Anne THOMAS were. 1. Thomas b.1654 York, Co. VA. d.c.26 Sept 1706 2.John b.1659 York Co. VA. 3. Lydia b.1660 York Co. VA. 4. Martha Margaret b.1661 James City Co. VA. 5. William b1663. 6. Elizabeth b.1665 Spottslvania, VA 7. Frances b.1665 James City Co. VA. 8. Matthew b.1667 James City, Co. VA Married 2, Alice?...no known children

From Marriages of some Virginia Residents 1607-1800 by Dorothy Ford Wulfeck Volume I Surnames A-H, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore 1986 p. 64 Thomas, Col., son of Col. Thomas, m. Katherine Hubard, dau. of John and Katherine. Bell, p. 173; 4V360; 35V49; 4W(1)135.

From Cavaliers and Pioneers Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1800 abstracted and indexed by Nell Marion Nugent, Virginia Land Office, Richmond, VA. 1934, Press of the Dietz Printing Co., Vol One. p. 309

"MR. THOMAS BALLARD, 1,000 acs. Glouseter Co., now called New Kent Co., on S.E. side of Mettopony Riv & along the head of Mr. William Wyatt's land. 16 July 1655. Trans. of 20 pers: James Cook, Robert Fisher, Thomas Crump, Wm. Johnson, Wm. Cunningham, Elizabeth Masterson, Grace Farloe, Thomas Pritchard, Grace Fisher, Ann Simpson, James Glover, Thomas Pratt, Toby. Forester, Richard Proby, Cuthbert Jackson, James Cooper, William Smith, Fra. Crosyer, James Smith, Sarah Talbott. Page 350." Patent Book No. 3. p. 354 - Patent Book No. 4

"THOMAS BALLARD, 600 acs. upon the head of Pyanketanke Riv. & W. N. W. upon land of Capt. Stephen Gill, dec'd. 15 Oct. 1657, p. 126, (186). Granted unto Abraham Moone 1 Nov. 1654, & by him assigned unto sd. Ballard. Renewed 2 Apr. 1662 in name of Major David Cant, assignee of sd. Ballard." p. 379 - Patent Book No. 4

"THOMAS HICKMAN, 1000 acs. New Kent Co., 6 Oct. 1658, p. 224, (322). On S.E. side of Mattappany Riv., beg. at the head of Mr. Wm. Wyatts lower devdt. Granted to Mr. Thomas BALLARD 16 July 1655, by him deserted & now due for trans. of 20 pers. Rights for 640 acs. granted to Mr. Wm. Lewis, 25 May 1654 & assigned to sd. Hickman which patent & the land therein conteyned is relinquished." p. 380

"MR. THOMAS BALLARD, 1300 acs. New Kent Co., 6 Oct. 1658, p. 232, (330). Upon N. side of Mattapany Riv. & branches of Whorecock Swamp. Trans. of 26 pers: Wm. Reynolls, Hannah Reynolds, Abygoll Reynolls, Jno. Reynolls, James Glover, Cutbert Jackson, James Smith, Hannah Reynolls, Deborah Reynolls, James Cooke, Robt. Fisher. Tho. Pratt, James Cooper, Sarah Talbott, Tho. Crumpe, Wm. Jnoson (Johnson), Wm. Cunningham, Eliz. Masterson, Toby. Forrester, Wm. Smith, Grace Farloe, Tho. Pritchard, Grace Fisher, Anna Simpson, Richard Proby, Francis Croper." p. 498 - Patent Book No. 5

MAJOR DAVID CANT, 912 acs., 1 Oct. 1663, p. 316 (300). 600 acs. on S. side of Peanketanke Riv., bounded on E.S.E. with br. of same, W.N.W. upon land of Capt. Stephen Gill, dec'd., &c. 312 acs. on S. side of sd. Riv., adj. devdt. he is now seated on, beg. at the mouth of the Stoare (or Score) branch &c. to Stephen Gills land &c. to Mr. Ludlowes corner Sickamore tree &c. 600 acs. granted to THOMAS BALLARD 14 Oct. 1657 & assigned to sd. Cant & 312 acs. for trans. of 6 pers: Fra. Hart, Wm. Callis, Mary Partin, Tho. Jones, Wm. Crump, Edw. Lewre." p. 518

ANTHONY BRANCH, 150 acs. in the N.W. br. of Nancimond Riv., butting on land of Symon Symons &c. 16 Aug. 1664, p. 382, (426). Granted to Robt. Sabin 11 June 1653, by him sold to Mr. THOS. BALLARD, who sold to sd. Branch.

Thomas Ballard, the founder of the Virginia family, was the clerk of York Co., VA from 1652 to about 1663. He removed to James City Co., where, by 1668, he was living at Middle Plantation (later Williamsburg). July 12, 1666 and October 23, 1667, he was a Burgess for James City Co. In 1666-1668/9 he was a member of the Governor's Council. In 1669, he was Lt. Col. of the Militia in James City Co. and in 1680 was Col. of the Militia. On 16 July 1655, he patented 1000 acres in Glouster Co., now called New Kent Co. on the SE side of Mattaponey, for the transportation of 20 persons. (C.P. 309) His next patent, 15 Oct 1657, was for 600 acres upon the head of Poropotank River. This latter land was assigned to Major David Cant, April 2, 1662. (C.P. 334, 496) Apparently, Thomas Ballard "deserted" the 1000 acres on the Mattapony, for it was re-patented on Oct 6, 1658 by Thomas Hickman. Hickman's grant was for "1000 acres granted to Thomas Ballard 16 July 1655, and by him deserted". (C.P. 380) On Oct 6, 1658, Thomas patented 1300 acres "upon the north side of Mattapony River" and used the same 20 headrights as in his first grant. In 1676, his wife, Ann, together with Mrs Elizabeth Bacon, wife of Nathaniel Bacon Sr. (a cousin of the rebel); Mrs Angelica Bray, wife of Col. James Bray; and Mrs. Elizabeth Page, wife of Col. John Page, all wives of members of the Council, were captured by Nathaniel Bacon, Jr.,by a raid on the Middle Plantation. When Bacon besieged Jamestown these ladies were put before his breastworks at Jamestown to warn Governor Berkeley from attack. In January 1677, Thomas was a member of the Courts Martial following the collapse of Bacon's rebellion. From 1680 to 1686, he was a Burgess for James City Co., serving as Speaker of the House of Burgesses from 1680 to 1684. From 1674 to October 31, 1684, he was a vestryman of Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg, where he was buried Mar 24, 1689. His name is inscribed on a bronze tablet in the interior of the church and on the name plate of a pew.

The Valentine Papers, Vol 1-4, 1864-1908 Ballard Family Virginia Land Records and Order Books

  • Thomas Ballard , Patent, 600 acres upon the south side and upon the head of Piankatauk River, adjoining Capt. Stephen Gill , decd. Was formerly granted to Abraham Moore Nov. 1, 1654 , and by him assigned to the said Thomas Ballard . Oct. 15, 1657 . (4, p. 186.)
  • Thomas Ballard , Deed from Abraham Moone , being the said Moone 's interest in a pattent of land. Aug. 24, 1655 . Ibid. 1 p. 275.
  • Mr. Thomas Ballard , Patent 1000 acres in Gloucester Co. , now called New Kent on the south side of Mattapony River , adjoining William Wyatt . July 16, 1655 . (3, p. 350.)
  • Thomas Ballard , Patent, 600 acres upon the south side and upon the head of Piankatauk River , adjoining Capt. Stephen Gill , decd. Was formerly granted to Abraham Moore Nov. 1, 1654 , and by him assigned to the said Thomas Ballard . Oct. 15, 1657 . (4, p. 186.)
  • Mr. Thomas Ballard , Patent, 1300 acres in New Kent Co. , on the north side of Mattapony River , on the branches of Whorecock Swamp . Oct. 6, 1658 . (4, p. 330.)
  • Col. Thomas Ballard , bondsman for Mr. William Aylett , being appointed Guardian for Jerome Haus . April 2, 1677 . Book 6, p. 419.
  • Coll. Thomas Ballard vs Robert Ruffin admr. of Jno. Goings estate. Judgment for Pltf. July 6, 1680 . 1670-91 , p. 306-7.
  • Mr. William Ballard , asignee of Benjamin Goodrich , attorney of Mrs. Alice Ballard Exor. of Coll. Thomas Ballard decd., Plt. vs. James Harrison Deft., the suit is dismissed with cost the Deft. having made oath that the debt was paid to Mr. Jerom Haus (Ham?) by order of ye said Thomas Ballard . Nov. 24, 1691 , Book 9, p. 73.
  • Thomas Ballard (Bullard) head right, of Humphrey Higginson, Gent. Feb. 6, 1637 . (1, vol. 2, p. 520.* )

Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography, Volume I III--Colonial Councillors of State

was born in 1630 and came to Virginia in or before 1652, at which date he was clerk of York county. In 1666, he represented James City in the house of burgesses and on July 12 of the same year was appointed one of the commissioners to treat with Maryland regarding tobacco culture. He was sworn a member of the council in 1670 and was present at sessions in 1670, 1672 and 1675. He was included among Berkeley's "wicked and pernicious councillors" in the proclamation of Nat. Bacon in 1676, which seems rather hard upon Ballard, as he was denounced by the opposite party as "a fellow of turbulent and mutinous speech and Bacon's chief trumpet, parasite &c," and ultimately lost his seat in the council on account of his sympathy with and furtherance of the rebellion. In Aug., 1676, Col. Ballard issued warrants for pressing men and provisions for Bacon's service and on Aug. 11, he signed the petition calling for the election of burgesses for an assembly to meet Sept. 4, of that year. On June 11, 1677, Gov. Jeffreys wrote Secretary Williamson that he had suspended Ballard from the council and a collectorship, and on Feb. 10, 1678-79, the board of trade and plantations directed that Col. Ballard be put out of the council. Ballard continued to be a prominent figure in the colony, however, and in 1680, was speaker of the house of burgesses. His case as a creditor of "Bacon the Rebel" was represented to the King by the council in 1686. Ballard's wife, Anna ----, was one of the ladies of the council placed by Bacon upon the breastworks before Jamestown, to delay Berkeley's attack until he could complete his defences. He has many descendants.

In Virginia in 1676 Nathaniel Bacon led a rebellion. This is the manifesto of that effort. It expresses many of the reform objectives that would later be further developed and bring about the American Revolution. ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Bacon's Declaration in the Name of the People July 30, 1676 The Declaracon of the People.

1. For haveing upon specious pretences of publiqe works raised greate unjust taxes upon the Comonality for the advancement of private favorites and other sinister ends, but noe visible effects in any measure adequate, For not haveing dureing this long time of his Gouvernement in any measure advanced this hopefull Colony either by fortificacons Townes or Trade.

2. For haveing abused and rendred contemptable the Magistrates of Justice, by advanceing to places of Judicature, scandalous and Ignorant favorites.

3. For haveing wronged his Majesties prerogative and interest, by assumeing Monopoly of the Beaver trade, and for haveing in that unjust gaine betrayed and sold his Majesties Country and the lives of his loyall subjects, to the barbarous heathen.

4. For haveing, protected, favoured, and Imboldned the Indians against his Majesties loyall subjects, never contriveing, requireing, or appointing any due or proper meanes of sattisfaction for theire many Invasions, robbories, and murthers comitted upon us.

5. For haveing when the Army of English, was just upon the track of those Indians, who now in all places burne, spoyle, murther and when we might with ease have distroyed them: who then were in open hostillity, for then haveing expressly countermanded, and sent back our Army, by passing his word for the peaceable demeanour of the said Indians, who imediately prosecuted theire evill intentions, comitting horred murthers and robberies in all places, being protected by the said ingagement and word past of him the said Sir William Berkeley, haveing ruined and laid desolate a greate part of his Majesties Country, and have now drawne themselves into such obscure and remote places, and are by theire success soe imboldned and confirmed, by theire confederacy soe strengthned that the cryes of blood are in all places, and the terror, and constimation of the peOple soe greate, are now become, not onely a difficult, but a very formidable enimy, who might att first with ease have beene distroyed.

6. And lately when upon the loud outcryes of blood the Assembly had with all care raised and framed an Army for the preventing of further mischeife and safeguard of this his Majesties Colony.

7. For haveing with onely the privacy of some few favorites, without acquainting the people, onely by the alteracon of a figure, forged a Comission, by we know not what hand, not onely without, but even against the consent of the people, for the raiseing and effecting civill warr and distruction, which being happily and without blood shed prevented, for haveing the second time attempted the same, thereby calling downe our forces from the defence of the fronteeres and most weekely expoased places.

8. For the prevencon of civill mischeife and ruin amongst ourselves, whilst the barbarous enimy in all places did invade, murther and spoyle us, his majesties most faithfull subjects.

Of this and the aforesaid Articles we accuse Sir William Berkeley as guilty of each and every one of the same, and as one who hath traiterously attempted, violated and Injured his Majesties interest here, by a loss of a greate part of this his Colony and many of his faithfull loyall subjects, by him betrayed and in a barbarous and shamefull manner expoased to the Incursions and murther of the heathen, And we doe further declare these the ensueing persons in this list, to have beene his wicked and pernicious councellours Confederates, aiders, and assisters against the Comonality in these our Civill comotions.

Sir Henry Chichley William Claiburne Junior

Lieut. Coll. Christopher Thomas Hawkins

Wormeley William Sherwood

Phillip Ludwell John Page Clerke

Robert Beverley John Cluffe Clerke

Richard Lee John West

Thomas Ballard Hubert Farrell

William Cole Thomas Reade

Richard Whitacre Matthew Kempe

Nicholas Spencer

Joseph Bridger

And we doe further demand that the said Sir William Berkeley with all the persons in this list be forthwith delivered up or surrender themselves within fower days after the notice hereof, Or otherwise we declare as followeth.

That in whatsoever place, howse, or ship, any of the said persons shall reside, be hidd, or protected, we declaire the owners, Masters or Inhabitants of the said places, to be confederates and trayters to the people and the estates of them is alsoe of all the aforesaid persons to be confiscated, and this we the Comons of Virginia doe declare, desiering a firme union amongst our selves that we may joyntly and with one accord defend our selves against the common Enimy, and lett not the faults of the guilty be the reproach of the inocent, or the faults or crimes of the oppressours devide and separate us who have suffered by theire oppressions.

These are therefore in his majesties name to command you forthwith to seize the persons above mentioned as Trayters to the King and Country and them to bring to Midle plantacon, and there to secure them untill further order, and in case of opposition, if you want any further assistance you are forthwith to demand itt in the name of the people in all the Counties of Virginia.

Nathaniel Bacon Generall by Consent of the people.

The first Ballard ancestor in America was Col. Thomas BALLARD (b. 1630, Warwick, England d. 1689 Williamsburg, Virginia) who was in York Co., Virginia ca. 1650 when he m. Anna THOMAS. He served as Clerk of County Court and Speaker of the House of Burgess. He purchased a large tract of land which is now William and Mary College. " The Ballards The Early Generations: 1603-1877 ", edited by Cynthia N. Vincent. 1993. privately published for family use.

The Statutes at Large Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619. By William Waller Hening Volume III. New York, 1823 pg. 428, ... That his Excellency Francis Nicholson, esq. his majesty's lieutenant and governor general of Virginia, Edmund Jenings, esq. of his majesty's honourable council, Philip Ludwell, esq. and Thomas Ballard, gentlemen, members of the right worshipful house of burgesses of this present general assembly, Lewis Burwell, Philip Ludwell, Junior, John Page, Henry Tyler, James Whaley, and Benjamin Harrison, Junior, gentlemen, or any five, or more of them, shall be and are hereby nominated, authorized, and impowered, ... to give such directions in the building of the said city and ports, ... _______________________________

Member of the Society of Colonial Wars

Speaker of the House of Burgesse

Oldest Episcopal Church in continous use in America Burton Parish Church

Immigrated 166 Name: Thomas Ballard Year: 1676 Place: Maryland Source Publication Code: 8510 Primary Immigrant: Ballard, Thomas Annotation: Index from manuscript by Arthur Trader, Chief Clerk in the Maryland Land Commission, 1917. And see nos. 4507-4511, Land Notes. Source Bibliography: SKORDAS, GUST, editor. The Early Settlers of Maryland: an Index to Names of Immigrants, Compiled from Records of Land Patents, 1633-1680, in the Hall of Records, Annapolis, Maryland. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1968. 525p. Repr. 1986. Page: 21

Thomas Sr. Ballard (son of Thomas Ballard and Ann Napper Napier)65 was born 1630 in Inkbouough, Worcester, England65, and died March 24, 1687/88 in Williamsburg, York Co, VA. He married (1) Alice ?. He married (2) Anne Thomas on 1650 in Williamsburg, York Co, VA, daughter of William Thomas and Anne Thomas.

The first Ballards in America landed at Willis Wharf on the Eastern Shore of VA in 1617, according to records found in a small church and in the courthouse of Accomack Co, VA. They were among the first English settlers to move beyond Jamestown VA, the first English settlement which landed in 1608. According to the remaining local Ballards the name is Franco-Norman and orginated in the Bals Mountains.

There was a Lady Baylord who was a Lady-in-Waiting in England. She was a paramour of one of the higher echelon withing the court. When she had her child, she changed the name to Ballard. Have not been able to prove or disprove.

Ballard, the founder of the Virginia family, pattented 1000 acres in Glouster Co., now called "New Kent Co." on the S. E. side of Mattapony, along the head of Mr. William Wyatt's land, on 16 July 1655, for the transportation of 20 persons. His next patent was for 600 acres upon the head of Poropotank River W.N.W. upon the land of Capt. Gill, deceased, on 15 October 1657. Thomas assigned this land to Major David Cant on 2 Pril 1622.

On 6 October 1658, Thomas Hickman re-patented Thomas Ballard's first grant of 1000 acres in New Kent. Hickman's grant describes the land as "granted to Mr. Thomas Ballard 16 July 1655 and by him deserted." It seeems that Thomas Ballard "deserted" the previously mentioned 1000 acres and added 300 more on the north side of the Mattapony River. On 6 October 1658 he patented 1300 acres there and used the same 20 headrights.

On 16 April 1664, Anthon Branch pattended 150 acres on the N>W. branch of the Nansemond River which had been sold to him by Mr. Thomas Ballard. Came to America on the ship "James" arriving at Yorktown in May 1635

Thomas Ballard was appointed Clerk of York County in 1652 and served for many years thereafter. He was Burgess from James City in 1666, was appinted Lt. Col. of Militia in 1669, and member of the Council in 1675, whose members were chosen from the wealthiest, most educated and influential citizens of the colony. In this office, of Counselor, he was both a Naval officer and a collector of customs. Members of this council constituted the Upper House of the General Assembly. In many respects, they were the New World conterpart of the English Hose of Lords. He was Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1680 - 1684.

Colonel Thomas Ballard wife Anne, thgether with Mrs. Elizabeth Bacon, wife of Nathaniel Bacon, Sr. (a cousin of Nathaniel Bacon, Jr- the rebel); Mrs. Angelica Bray, wife of Colonel James Bray; and Mrs. Elizabeth Page, wife of Colonel John Page; all wives of members of the Council; were captured by Nathaniel Bacon, Jr. during his rebellion by a raid on Middle Plantation. When Bacon besieged Jamestown, theese ladies, wearing white aprons, were compelled to stand before his breastworks, so that they could be recognized by their husbands and therby cause Governor Berkeley to cease his cannonade.

Colonel Ballard married Anne, step daughter of William Thomas whose will was probated in York County in 1664. In his will, William Thomas mentioned his wife, Anne, calls Sarah Herman and Jane Hilliard "daughters-in-law, and Thomas Ballard "son-in-law". Son-in-law at that time meant step-son.

Thomas Ballard and his son, Thomas, were vestryment of Bruton Parish Church at Middle Plantation (now Williamsburg) werre he was buried on 24 March 1689. His name is inscribed on a bronze tablet in the interior of the church; also on the plate of a pew. No one knows how many graves the Bruton Parish graveyard contains, or the age of the oldest. Many of the early murials are not marked. In some instances, the lack of grave markers led to people being buried atop one another.

There are Wills in Worchester County England for Thomas Ballard dated 1608, 1620, a burial in 1550, 1559, 1607

Colonel Thomas Ballard (March 1631 - March 24, 1687) was a member of the upper class of the Virginia Colony and founder of the Ballard family in America.

[1]Thomas resided in York County, Virginia for a good portion of his young life. He patented land in Gloucester County, Virginia along with some in the Propotank and Mattaponi rivers. He was also involved in many land transactions including one property that he sold that would become the land in which the College of William and Mary was founded. Thomas would later become a member of the Governor's Council. In this position he was firstly a Naval officer and secondly a customs collector. He would also become a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, the Burgesses' Speaker, and Colonel of the local militia. His luck did not last though at the peak of his political career Nathaniel Bacon during the Bacon's Rebellion raided Middle Plantation and took many of the wifes of leading politicians including Anne Thomas, Ballard's wife. Though Anne was later returned it lead to her sudden death one year later.

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THOMAS BALLARD VIRGINIA (1630/31-1689)

In Colonial Virginia, Thomas BALLARD was often referred to as the Honorable Thomas BALLARD, or as Colonel BALLARD. He was born in March of 1630/31 in England. Some researchers believe that he was brought to the New World as a child by his parents.

Whether or not he came as a child, it is fair to say that he was the founder of the Virginia BALLARD family.Thomas BALLARD married Anne THOMAS in 1650. Anne bore his eight children before her death in 1678.

Thomas lived in York County, Virginia, and imported at least twenty persons into Gloucester County, Virginia, under the head right system. He also patented land in Gloucester, County as well as lands on the Propotank and Mattapony rivers. Both the head right system and the land patenting practice were devised to populate the new colonies and proved to be lucrative propositions for many of the early colonists.

Thomas BALLARD was a party to a number of recorded land trading transactions. Among these was the purchase and sale of the land on which William and Mary College was founded."The College of William and Mary was originally built on a tract of 330 acres most of which has been sold off, only about 30 acres remain. The tract was the property of the Honorable Thomas LUDWELL, Secretary of State 1660-1678, who lived at 'Richneck'on the west side of Archers Hope Creek. Thomas LUDWELL sold this land March 1674-75 to Hon. Thomas BALLARD of the Council...In 1693 BALLARD sold the same tract to the Trustees of the College."

It was probably Thomas BALLARD Jr. who made the sale in 1693, since Thomas the elder died in 1689. It is of interest to note that the grandson of Colonel Thomas BALLARD, William BALLARD, married a LUDWELL.

Thomas BALLARD was a member of the Governor's Council, whose members were chosen from the wealthiest, most educated and influential citizens of the colony. In this office, of Counselor, he was both a Naval officer and a collector of customs. Members of this council constituted the Upper House of the General Assembly. In many respects, they were the New World counterpart of the English House of Lords. His many offices included Clerk of York County, Member of Council, Member of the House of Burgesses, and Speaker of the House of Burgesses. He was also a Colonel in the James City County militia.

At the height of his political career, the Bacon Rebellion had a devastating effect on his life. In a raid on Middle Plantation, the rebels kidnapped the wives of many of the Governor's highest officials. These included the wife of Thomas BALLARD, as well as the wife of Nathaniel BACON's cousin, who was also on the Governor's Counsel.

The kidnapped women were used as human shields against and retaliation of the Governor. Once the rebellion collapsed, BALLARD sat on the court martial of BACON the rebel. Still, the trauma of these events took its toll. Within a year of the court martial, BALLARD's wife died.

In the following and final decade of his life, Thomas BALLARD remarried, was promoted to the rank of Colonel of the James City County militia, was elected speaker of the House of Burgesses, and was vestryman of Bruton Parish Church. Upon his death in 1689, he was buried at Bruton Church, and his name was inscribed on a bronze tablet as well as a pew nameplate there. Submitted by George F.Emerson

The Children of Thomas BALLARD and Anne THOMAS were. 1. Thomas b.1654 York, Co. VA. d.c.26 Sept 1706 2.John b.1659 York Co.VA. 3. Lydia b.1660 York Co. VA. 4. Martha Margaret b.1661 James City Co. VA. 5. William b1663. 6. Elizabeth b.1665 Spotslvania, VA 7. Frances b.1665 James City Co. VA. 8. Matthew b.1667 James City, Co. VA Married 2, Alice?...no known children

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Col. Thomas Ballard, Speaker, House of Burgesses's Timeline

1630
March 1630
Inkborough, Worcester, England
1637
1637
Age 6
1640
July 10, 1640
Age 10
Inkborogh, Worcester, England
July 10, 1640
Age 10
Inkborogh, Worcester, England
1650
1650
Age 19
James City County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)
1651
1651
Age 20
1652
1652
Age 21
Middle Plantation, York County, Virginia Colony
1652
Age 21
1654
1654
Age 23
Williamsburg, James City County, Virginia Colony, (Present USA)
1657
1657
Age 26
Williamsburg, York, Virginia, USA