Thomas Connelly, II

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Thomas Connelly, II

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Charleston, South Carolina, USA
Death: Died in Guilford, North Carolina, USA
Place of Burial: Guilford, North Carolina, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Edmund Connelley, I; Edmond Connelly; Mary Connelly and Mary Connelly
Husband of Mary Connelly and Mary Connelly
Father of Capt. Henry Connelly, American Patriot; David H Connelly, 1; John Connelly; Edmund Connelly; Thomas Connelly, Jr. and 6 others
Brother of John Conley; James Connelly; Harmon Connelley and Arthur Connelly

Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Thomas Connelly, II

     THOMAS CONNELLY, son of EDMUND CONNELLY and MARY EDGEFIELD, was born about 1725 in Charlestown, South Carolina, and died about 1783 in Guilford County, North Carolina. He married MARY VAN HARLINGEN (HARLINGER), daughter of HENRY VAN HARLINGEN (Henry came from Holland), about 1746 in Chester County, Pennsylvania. She was born about 1724 in Chester County, Pennsylvania.
     Note for Thomas Connelly: In his book "The Founding of Harman's Station," author and noted historian William Elsey Connelley says that according to family tradition there were some Connellys, probably Thomas and his brother Harmon, in an exploration party in Eastern Kentucky about 1763 in search for a suitable place to live. Also in this party were Daniel Boone, Matthias Harman, Walter Mankins, James Skaggs, Henry Skaggs, and a number of others. They camped along the Louisa River, at the mouth of Big Paint Creek, for six weeks in some old decaying cabins that the Ohio Indians had said they and the French had built many years before. The river and creek bottoms were covered with cane that was so high it would hide a man on horseback. Sometimes the river was so full of buffalo wallowing in the shoals that it was impossible to get a canoe either up or downstream. The Indians were so fierce in the area that it was impossible for anyone from the party to locate there at that time.
     Thomas Connelly on the trail
     Thomas was in the First South Carolina Regiment under the direction of Colonel Charles Pinckney during the Revolutionary War. He served in the winter of 1779-1780 in the defense of Charleston, which is where he had gone to consult Colonel Pinckney, who was his attorney in some business growing out of some land that was owned around that city by Thomas' ancestors. He was wounded during the Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780, when he was about 55 years old. During the battle Thomas was shot by a musket ball that went completely through him. He was treated by a Dr. Hicks, who was either the father-in-law or the nephew of Thomas' brother Harmon. To treat the wound, Dr. Hicks passed a silk handkerchief through it - completely through Thomas' body - several times. Thomas died in 1783 as a result of this wound.
     From the book "Three Hundred Years In America With The Connely Clan" by Reginald Dowaine Conley: "Thomas, who was born in Guilford County, North Carolina used to travel up North with his father, Edmund trading and then back to the Carolinas. He undoubtedly learned the trading business this way at an early age. And he was to meet his wife in Chester County, Pennsylvania where he resided for some time. He married Mary Van Harlingen about 1747. She was a Dutch woman whose ancestors lived in Holland. The Dutch influence was to have a strong impression upon their children. Their children and approximate year of birth are: John - 1749, Henry - 2 May 1751 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania (later to be known as Captain Henry Connelly), Thomas, Jr. - 1754, Elizabeth - 1757, Rachel - 1760, James - 1765, William - 1768.
     "Thomas Connelly while in Pennsylvania fought under British General Braddock and young Lieutenant George Washington in their campaign against the French during the French-Indian War in Pennsylvania. At the time of the Revolutionary War Thomas was living in Guilford County, North Carolina (1775-83). In 1780 the British army was trying to capture Charleston, South Carolina. Thomas was on his way to Charleston to see his lawyer concerning some land that he owned in Charleston. When he arrived in the city he learned that the British were near and marching on the city. Although he was getting old he was inducted into the American Army which was commanded by General Lincoln. He served under Colonel Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in the First South Carolina Regiment. The British captured the city 12 May 1780. During the confusion Thomas escaped and later fought at the battle of King's Mountain on 7 October 1780. The battle of King's Mountain was an overwhelming victory for the Americans. The entire British force was killed or captured. During the battle Thomas was shot through the body by a British musket ball. A Doctor Hicks, who was half Indian and had graduated from a French University treated the wound by passing a silk hankerchief through it. About three years later in 1783 Thomas died from the wounds. Some family historians feel that he died and was buried in Christensburg, Montgomery County, Virginia. He owned land and property in Charleston, South Carolina, Guilford County, North Carolina and Montgomery County, Virginia at the time of his death. The name was being recorded in North Carolina and Virginia at this time on legal documents as Connelly, Connely, Conley, Conneley, Connoley and Coneley.
     "William Elsey Connelley suggested and felt that the early Connelley brothers from Northern Ireland were of the Roman Catholic Religion. The author is not of this opinion. At the time the four Connelley brothers left Armagh there was a great deal of political and religious unrest. The First Presbyterian Church of Armagh was established in 1673. They came to a predominately protestant colony when arriving in the Charlston, South Carolina area. William of Orange married his cousin Mary in 1677. She was the daughter of James, Duke of York, later King James II of England. James was Roman Catholic. However William and Mary were both protestant. William and Mary became rulers of England in 1689 after forcing James to leave. He escaped to France. In 1690, William defeated James and a French and Irish army at the Battle of the Boyne, in Ireland. The Protestants of Ulster, Ireland, backed William, and are still called Orangemen today. William became a hero to the Protestants of Ulster. On Orange Day, July 12, Orangemen still celebrate his victory in the Battle of the Boyne. We find Thomas Connelly belonging to the Presbyterian Church until his marriage to Mary Van Harlingen in Pennsylvania. Then they became active in the Dutch Reform Church movement. They moved back to the Guilford County, North Carolina area. It is written that many of the Dutch Reform people joined the Lutheran and Presbyterian Churches when moving from the North down into the Carolinas. It shows in pension records that Captain Henry Connelly belonged to the Presbyterian Church up to the time he moved to Kentucky, where he became active in the Baptist faith. It appears that the early Connelley brothers were probably Presbyterian."
           The children of THOMAS CONNELLY and MARY VAN HARLINGEN are:
              1. DAVID CONNELLY, b. 1747, m. SUSANNAH (unknown last name).
              2. JOHN CONNELLY, b. 1749, Guilford County, North Carolina, d. about 1820, Orange County, North Carolina, m. ELIZABETH DONALDSON.
              3. THOMAS CONNELLY, JR., b. before 1750.
              4. EDMUND CONNELLY, b. about 1750.
              5. HENRY CONNELLY, b. May 2, 1752, Chester County, Pennsylvania, d. May 7, 1840, Oil Springs, Johnson County, Kentucky, m. (1) ANN MacGREGOR, m. (2) TEMPERANCE HITCHCOCK.
              6. POLLY CONNELLY.
           (This information comes from Joseph Conley and other sources) 

Source: http://www.geocities.com/jjccorn/Index/Page1.html#4 -------------------- In his book "The Founding of Harman's Station," author and noted historian William Elsey Connelley says that according to family tradition there were some Connellys, probably Thomas and his brother Harmon, in an exploration party in Eastern Kentucky about 1763 in search for a suitable place to live. Also in this party were Daniel Boone, Matthias Harman, Walter Mankins, James Skaggs, Henry Skaggs, and a number of others. They camped along the Louisa River, at the mouth of Big Paint Creek, for six weeks in some old decaying cabins that the Ohio Indians had said they and the French had built many years before. The river and creek bottoms were covered with cane that was so high it would hide a man on horseback. Sometimes the river was so full of buffalo wallowing in the shoals that it was impossible to get a canoe either up or downstream. The Indians were so fierce in the area that it was impossible for anyone from the party to locate there at that time. -------------------- Thomas was in the First South Carolina Regiment under the direction of Colonel Charles Pinckney during the Revolutionary War. He served in the winter of 1779-1780 in the defense of Charleston, which is where he had gone to consult Colonel Pinckney, who was his attorney in some business growing out of some land that was owned around that city by Thomas' ancestors. He was wounded during the Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780, when he was about 55 years old. During the battle Thomas was shot by a musket ball that went completely through him. He was treated by a Dr. Hicks, who was either the father-in-law or the nephew of Thomas' brother Harmon. To treat the wound, Dr. Hicks passed a silk handkerchief through it - completely through Thomas' body - several times. Thomas died in 1783 as a result of this wound.

From the book "Three Hundred Years In America With The Connely Clan" by Reginald Dowaine Conley: "Thomas, who was born in Guilford County, North Carolina used to travel up North with his father, Edmund trading and then back to the Carolinas. He undoubtedly learned the trading business this way at an early age. And he was to meet his wife in Chester County, Pennsylvania where he resided for some time. He married Mary Van Harlingen about 1747. She was a Dutch woman whose ancestors lived in Holland. The Dutch influence was to have a strong impression upon their children. Their children and approximate year of birth are: John - 1749, Henry - 2 May 1751 in Chester Co., Pennsylvania (later to be known as Captain Henry Connelly), Thomas, Jr. - 1754, Elizabeth - 1757, Rachel - 1760, James - 1765, William - 1768.

"Thomas Connelly while in Pennsylvania fought under British General Braddock and young Lieutenant George Washington in their campaign against the French during the French-Indian War in Pennsylvania. At the time of the Revolutionary War Thomas was living in Guilford County, North Carolina (1775-83). In 1780 the British army was trying to capture Charleston, South Carolina. Thomas was on his way to Charleston to see his lawyer concerning some land that he owned in Charleston. When he arrived in the city he learned that the British were near and marching on the city. Although he was getting old he was inducted into the American Army which was commanded by General Lincoln. He served under Colonel Charles Cotesworth Pinckney in the First South Carolina Regiment. The British captured the city 12 May 1780. During the confusion Thomas escaped and later fought at the battle of King's Mountain on 7 October 1780. The battle of King's Mountain was an overwhelming victory for the Americans. The entire British force was killed or captured. During the battle Thomas was shot through the body by a British musket ball. A Doctor Hicks, who was half Indian and had graduated from a French University treated the wound by passing a silk hankerchief through it. About three years later in 1783 Thomas died from the wounds. Some family historians feel that he died and was buried in Christensburg, Montgomery County, Virginia. He owned land and property in Charleston, South Carolina, Guilford County, North Carolina and Montgomery County, Virginia at the time of his death. The name was being recorded in North Carolina and Virginia at this time on legal documents as Connelly, Connely, Conley, Conneley, Connoley and Coneley.

"William Elsey Connelley suggested and felt that the early Connelley brothers from Northern Ireland were of the Roman Catholic Religion. The author is not of this opinion. At the time the four Connelley brothers left Armagh there was a great deal of political and religious unrest. The First Presbyterian Church of Armagh was established in 1673. They came to a predominately protestant colony when arriving in the Charlston, South Carolina area. William of Orange married his cousin Mary in 1677. She was the daughter of James, Duke of York, later King James II of England. James was Roman Catholic. However William and Mary were both protestant. William and Mary became rulers of England in 1689 after forcing James to leave. He escaped to France. In 1690, William defeated James and a French and Irish army at the Battle of the Boyne, in Ireland. The Protestants of Ulster, Ireland, backed William, and are still called Orangemen today. William became a hero to the Protestants of Ulster. On Orange Day, July 12, Orangemen still celebrate his victory in the Battle of the Boyne. We find Thomas Connelly belonging to the Presbyterian Church until his marriage to Mary Van Harlingen in Pennsylvania. Then they became active in the Dutch Reform Church movement. They moved back to the Guilford County, North Carolina area. It is written that many of the Dutch Reform people joined the Lutheran and Presbyterian Churches when moving from the North down into the Carolinas. It shows in pension records that Captain Henry Connelly belonged to the Presbyterian Church up to the time he moved to Kentucky, where he became active in the Baptist faith. It appears that the early Connelley brothers were probably Presbyterian."

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Thomas Connelly, II's Timeline

1725
1725
Charleston, South Carolina, USA
1746
1746
Age 21
Chester,,Pennsylvania,USA
1747
1747
Age 22
Chester, Pennsylvania, USA
1749
1749
Age 24
Guilford, North Carolina, United States
1750
1750
Age 25
Chester, Pennsylvania, USA
1752
May 2, 1752
Age 27
Chester, Pennsylvania, USA
1754
1754
Age 29
1757
1757
Age 32
Fairfax, Virginia, USA
1760
1760
Age 35
Guilford, North Carolina, USA
1765
1765
Age 40
North Carolina, USA