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Thomas Ford

Birthplace: Dorchester, Dorsetshire, England
Death: Died in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of John Ford, III and Joan list her as Ellynor Ford
Husband of Joan Ford; Elizabeth Ford and Ann Ford
Father of Mary Cook; Joanna Clapp; Hannah Ackley; Hepzibah Marsh; Abigail Strong and 3 others
Brother of Christopher Ford; Joan Ford; Edith Ford; Cecily Ford and John Ford, IV

Occupation: farmer, a 1st settler of Windsor 1636. Deputy. Northampton
Managed by: Kurt Gregory Robson
Last Updated:
view all 24

Immediate Family

About Thomas Ford

Birth: 1587 Bridport Dorset, England Death: Nov. 28, 1676 Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA

He and his wife Elizabeth arrived in New England on the "Mary and John" in 1630.

His first wife was Joane Waye Ford. She was buried in Powerstock, Co.Dorset, England in 1615.

His second wife was Elizabeth Chard Cook Ford. She was the widow of Aaron Cook. She died in Windsor,CT April 18,1643.

His third wife, married Nov 7,1644, was Anna ____ Scott Ford, widow of Thomas Scott of Hartford. She died in Northampton May 5,1675.

He was possibly the son of John Ford and Joan Beck Ford, but the ancestry has not been proven. Thomas was probably born about 1587 in Bridport.

Children(by first marriage): Mary Ford Cook(wife of Aaron Cook Jr).

Children(by second marriage): Joanna Ford Clapp, Abigail Ford Strong, Thomas Ford Jr, Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh, and Hannah Ford.

Children(by third marriage): Ann Ford Newberry Leonard.


Family links:

Spouses:
 Elizabeth Charde Cooke Ford (1587 - 1643)*
 Ann Scott Ford (____ - 1675)*

Children:
 Joanna Ford Clap (1617 - 1695)*
 Abigail Ford Strong (1619 - 1688)*
 Thomas Ford (1623 - 1623)*
 Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh (1625 - 1683)*
 Hannah Ford (1628 - 1629)*
 Ann Ford Newberry (1657 - ____)*
  • Calculated relationship

Note: Monument photograph courtesy of The Moo.

 

Burial: Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA


Created by: Kevin Avery Record added: Jan 06, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 32679682

_____________________________

Arrived in America aboard the Mary and John 1630.

"It has been said that THOMAS FORD may have left more descendants than any other immigrant who ever came to New England. "

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Links

biographical sketch

Thomas Ford (at 48) and his family are the first known Fords to come to America. Sailing from Plymouth England 20 March 1630 on the 400 ton ship "Mary and John". The passage costs were about 5 pounds per adult, half that for children over 12 and younger children free, 10 pounds per horse, 3 pounds per ton of freight. Servants and skilled workmen's had there way paid for by their sponsors or the proprietors of the colony. Thomas apparently had enough money to afford two head of stock (type unspecified) as he is asked to build enough railed fencing in 1633 to protect the community herd--his share corresponded to two head of stock. Thomas Ford and his wife Elizabeth (Charde) Ford and family were among the few "west country" settlers from the counties of Dorset, Somerset, and Devon that came to Massachusetts in the "Great Migration" that year [1]. They arrived in Boston harbor on May 30, 1630, nine days before the main Winthrop fleet started arriving. After much looking they settled on a peninsula of Boston harbor to set themselves and their animals ashore. The town they established was called Dorchester (now a suburb of Boston MA) after the former home in England of many of the passengers.. Their ship, in addition to its approximate 140 passengers, had brought many head of cattle and horses with them (of high value on a continent that as of yet had almost none) and in an unfenced wilderness they were looking for an area where they could watch and protect their herds (American wolves were a perpetual pest in these early settlements) their herds with as little effort as possible.

The initial winter of 1630-31 was rough for all with only improvised homes for shelter, no crops to fall back on for food, no precut supplies of wood for heat, and with only the inadequate supplies and tools they could bring with them. A thousand and one things that still needed to be done to establish a going community; but there hadn't been enough time or skills developed to do more than the minimum needed for survival.. Fortunately they were better prepared than the first settlers of Plymouth and Jamestown Virginia who lost about half their number in their first winter in America. They bought what supplies they could from the Plymouth colony, which after ten years had some surpluses, and they even had the good fortune of a ship from Jamestown Virginia showing up that was hauling corn to England--they bought nearly all of it. Finally, new supply ships carrying food and other commodities they had ordered arrived from England and Ireland in February of 1631, just as they were near the end of their original supplies. Still about 200 of the initial 1000 colonists died that winter and another 200 would go back--some to get their families, some to stay in England. Thomas Ford, Elizabeth and their family hung on and built a new life in America.

Thomas Ford was made a "freeman" (a man of good moral character, church member, property owner, and respected member of the community) in 1631. As a freeman he was entitled to vote in all town meetings and initially vote in all colony affairs. As more emigrants arrived and the population continued to grow with their portion of freemen this arrangement became unwieldy and the town were instructed to vote for representatives to go to the meetings of the General Court that ran Massachusetts.

By 1635, it had became possible to do more extensive scouting in America and it was found that there was much fertile ground on the Connecticut River valley and the native Indians were desirous of settlers in their area.[2] For better opportunities (and perhaps more room for independent action) over half the original settlers of Dorchester Mass. picked up their cattle and their few possessions starting in 1635 and moved to the site of what would become Windsor Connecticut on the Connecticut River. Thomas Ford and his family were among the movers and were prominent in the settlement of Dorchester Mass. and Windsor Conn.

Thomas Ford represented Windsor in the General Court of Connecticut from 1637 to 1640 as Connecticut began its life as an independent colony.

Elizabeth died in Windsor Connecticut in 1643 and in 1644 Thomas moved down the river about seven miles to Hartford, Connecticut and married 3.)Mrs. Ann Scott, widow of Thomas Scott, Nov. 7 1644 in Windsor Connecticut. He ran an "Ordinary", then the name for an inn (combined pub and motel) for strangers passing through town and a place for locals to have a brew and socialize. It was located in the Scott house located on the southwest corner of State and Front Streets.

From the diary of John Winthrop, Jr. we read-- "reached the Inn of Thomas Ford at Hartford", 17 Nov. 1645. 

The Inn was sold to Thomas Cadwell in 1652 and in 1656 Thomas bought the home and lot of William Hosford. In 1658/59 Thomas bought th Arthur Williams house and lot and in 1667 Thomas helped settle the estate of Nicholas Denslow.

In 1669 --Thomas helped settle the estate of Elizabeth Denslow's.

In 1670 Apr. --Thomas Inventoried the estate of Rev. John Warham.

Thomas moved to Northampton, Massachusetts before about 1672 where several of his children lived and there he spent the rest of his life. Thomas died 28 Nov. 1676, in Northampton, Massachusetts, at about 87, and is buried there.

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[1] Of the 17 ships that came to Massachusetts in 1630 the "Mary and John" was the only one to collect its 140 passengers in the Dorsetshire and Plymouth England area. The rest of the approximate 1000 colonists which came to Massachusetts bay colony that year were from the East Anglia parts of England--where most Puritans originated.

[2] The Indians in the New England area had been much reduced in numbers in a wave of disease, contracted from fishermen from Europe, struck them in 1618 and again every few years. The native population had never been exposed to these new viruses and bacteria and had very little resistance to their ravages. In addition to these waves of disease there were intense tribal rivalries, particularly along the Connecticut river, going on as tribes moved to fill in newly vacant areas and set up trading operations with the new arrivals and their steel weapons and tools. Going from the stone age to the iron age virtually overnight was a significant change in tribal lifestyles.

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Born about 1580 in Sulcomb Regie in Devonshire England. Had 4 daughters including Joanna who married Captain Roger Clapp. These two families came to America in the ship Mary and John leaving England in March and landing in Boston on May 30, 1630. They became early settlers of the Dorchester Settlement.

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ID: I1634

Name: Thomas Ford

RFN: 1634

Sex: M 1

Birth: 1 ABT 1588 in ,,, England

Note: (age 42 on ship passenger list)

Immigration: 1 30 MAY 1630

Note: (He was a passenger on the "Mary and John")

Death: 28 NOV 1676 in Northampton, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts

Note:

Thomas Ford came to this country in 1630 on the Mary and John (Capt.

Squeb) with John Strong, and founded, with the rest of the company,

the new Dorchester of the new world. He was also one of the early

settlers of Windsor, Ct. He was deputy to the General court in

1637,'38,'39 and '40 and grand juror in 1643. His wife died in Windsor

on 18 Apr 1643 and he married for a 2nd wife, Mrs. Ann Scott, widow of

Thomas Scott. He removed to Northampton, and probably at the same

time with John Strong in 1659. He exchanged on 10 Dec 1660 his

home-lot and lands in Windsor with Edward Elmer, in Northampton, and

died there in 1676. He had four daughters, if not more, and no sons

that are known of.

Marriage 1 Elizabeth Chard b: ABT 1589 in ,,, England

Married: ABT 1612 in ,,, England

Note: (date based on eldest known daughter's age)

Children

Abigail Ford b: 8 OCT 1619 in Bridport, Dorset,, England
Joanna Ford b: ABT 1618 in ,,, England
Hepzibah Ford b: ABT 1626 in ,,, England
Mary Ford b: ABT 1613 in ,,, England

From passenger list

http://www.maryandjohn1630.com/passengerlist_a.html:

FORD, THOMAS a. 42 Dorchester, Dorset

 Elizabeth Chard, second wife a. 41 Dorchester, Dorset 
 Mary Ford, daughter   17 Dorchester, Dorset 
 Joan Ford, daughter   12 Dorchester, Dorset 
 Abigail Ford, daughter   10 Dorchester, Dorset 
 Hepzibah Ford   4 Dorchester, Dorset 

--------------------

ID: I04142

Name: Thomas Ford

Sex: M

Death: 28 NOV 1676 in Northampton, Hampshire, Mass.

Note:

[From SFAA] In 1623 Thomas Ford and his family were living in Dorchester, Dorset, England and were members of Holy Trinity Church, whose rector was Rev. John White. John White has been called the "Founder of Massachusetts"

Rev. John White wrote to Gov. John Endicott, 'to appoint places of habitation for sixty families out of Dorsetshire which were to arrive the following spring." A meeting was held on 15 Oct. 1629, "at the Deputyes House". Twenty five members of the council which financed the planters were there and "MR. FORDE, wth divers others of the genalitie."

This meeting was arranged so that the finance company would benefit for seven years by the shipping of furs. The government of the colony was to be placed into the hands of Gov. John Winthrop. In New England.

Thomas Ford and his family came on the MARY AND JOHN, 1630. The passage costs were 5 pounds per adult, 10 pounds per horse, 3 pounds per ton of freight.

Thomas requested admission as a freeman 19 Oct. 1630 and took the oath 18 May 1631 in Dorchester, Massachusetts. To become a freeman at that time you had to be a member of the Church.

3 Apr. 1633 - "It is agreed that a doble rayle with morteses in the posts, of 10 foote distance one from the other, shall be set up on the marish.....by the owners of the Cowes vnder named, p'portionally. 20 foote to everye cowe." Thomas Forde owed two cows.

The last record of Thomas Ford in Dorchester, Massachusetts was 5 Jul. 1636.

1637 - Thomas was one of four men who purchased a large tract from Sachem Tehano, which now includes Windsor Locks, the northern third of Windsor and the southern part of Suffield.

1637 - Granted fifty acres - Simsbury, Connecticut.

Feb. 1639/40 - George Hull, "moved the court in behalf of Thomas Ford of Windsor, that in regard the workmen are much taken up and emplyed in making a bridge and meetinghouse with them, and his work hindered of impaling in the ground which was granted him by the court for a hog-park, that there may be granted him a year longer time for the fencing it in; which was upon the reasons aforesaid, condescended to."

1644 - Thomas removed to Hartford, Connecticut. He ran an "Ordinary", as an accomodation for strangers passing through. It was located in the Scott house located on the southwest corner of State and Front Streets.

Diary of John Winthrop, Jr. - "reached the Inn of Thomas Ford at Hartford", 17 Nov. 1645. The Inn was sold to Thomas Cadwell in 1652.

1656 - Thomsa bought the homelot of William Hosford.

1658/59 - Thomas bought th Arthur Williams house and lot.

1667 Thomas helped settle the estate of Nicholas Denslow.

1669 - Thomas helped settle the estate of Elizabeth Denslow.

1670 Apr. - Thomas Inventoried the estate of Rev. John Warham.

Thomas removed to Northampton, Massachusetts bef. 1672 where he spent the rest of his life.

Marriage 1 Joan Way

Married: 13 DEC 1610 in Powerstock, Dorset, England

Children

Mary Ford

Marriage 2 Elizabeth Chard

Married: 19 JUN 1616 in Bridport, Dorset, England

Children

Hepzibah Ford
Joan Ford
Thomas Ford b: in Dorchester, Dorset, England
Hannah Ford b: in Dorchester Dorset, England
Abigail Ford b: 8 OCT 1619 in Bridport, Dorset, England

Marriage 3 Ann Scott

Married: 7 NOV 1644 in Hartford, Conn.

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"Thomas FORD - b. about 1589, Dorset, England; d. Nov. 28, 1676, Northampton, MA [memorial - inscription]. It is possible he was the son of John FORD III and Joan BECK (m. Feb. 3, 1583, Piddlehinton, Dorset, England), and nephew of Thomas FORD, merchant of Dorchester who died Jan. 20, 1610/11. The latter's will, proved May 8, 1611 names, among others, his brother John, and "Thomas, son of my brother, John FORDE." Thomas FORD arrived at Dorchester, MA in the 'Mary & John' 1630 with wife, four daughters and step-son Aaron COOKE, settled at Windsor, CT, where he was granted a lot in 1637, and moved to Northampton, MA 1659. Freeman 1631; deputy to General Court 1637-1640; juror 1643 and 1644. In 1645 Thomas moved to Hartford, CT and established a tavern in the house of Thomas SCOTT. In 1652 he sold the tavern, and in 1655 was Constable at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. No documentary evidence has been found to support the long standing claim that the Thomas FORD who married Dec. 13, 1610, at Powerstock, Dorset, England, Joan WAYE was the emigrant, nor that the Joane WAYE who was buried there May 10, 1615 was the wife of Thomas FORD, rather than, say, his child. Thomas FORD married first Jun. 19, 1616, Bridport, Dorset, England; and second Nov. 7, 1644 Annie (SANFORD) SCOTT (d. May 5, 1676, Northampton, MA), widow of Thomas SCOTT (d. Nov. 6, 1643)."

Source:

http://kinnexions.com/ancestries/strong.htm#TFord

http://www.holcombegenealogy.com/data/p190.htm#i9484 -------------------- Birth: 1587 Bridport Dorset, England Death: Nov. 28, 1676 Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA

He and his wife Elizabeth arrived in New England on the "Mary and John" in 1630.

His first wife was Joane Waye Ford. She was buried in Powerstock, Co.Dorset, England in 1615.

His second wife was Elizabeth Chard Cook Ford. She was the widow of Aaron Cook. She died in Windsor,CT April 18,1643.

His third wife, married Nov 7,1644, was Anna ____ Scott Ford, widow of Thomas Scott of Hartford. She died in Northampton May 5,1675.

He was possibly the son of John Ford and Joan Beck Ford, but the ancestry has not been proven. Thomas was probably born about 1587 in Bridport.

Children(by first marriage): Mary Ford Cook(wife of Aaron Cook Jr).

Children(by second marriage): Joanna Ford Clapp, Abigail Ford Strong, Thomas Ford Jr, Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh, and Hannah Ford.

Children(by third marriage): Ann Ford Newberry Leonard.


Family links:

Spouses:
 Elizabeth Charde Cooke Ford (1587 - 1643)*
 Ann Scott Ford (____ - 1675)*

Children:
 Joanna Ford Clap (1617 - 1695)*
 Abigail Ford Strong (1619 - 1688)*
 Thomas Ford (1623 - 1623)*
 Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh (1625 - 1683)*
 Hannah Ford (1628 - 1629)*
 Ann Ford Newberry (1657 - ____)*
  • Calculated relationship

Note: Monument photograph courtesy of The Moo.

 

Burial: Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA


Created by: Kevin Avery Record added: Jan 06, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 32679682

______________________________

The Mary & John left Plymouth, England March 20, 1630 with her unknown Master, arriving in Nantasket Point, now Dorchester, Mass., at the entrance of Boston Harbor on May 30, 1630, two weeks before the Winthrop Fleet arrived.

These families and passengers were recruited by the Reverend John White of Dorchester, Dorset. Nearly all of the Mary and John 1630 passengers came from the West Country counties of Somerset, Dorset , Devon, and West Country towns of Dorchester, Bridport, Crewkerne and Exeter.

The passengers of the Mary and John 1630 founded one of the first towns in New England, Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1630 and also founded the town of Windsor, Connecticut five years later in 1635

Other information says the master was Thomas Chubb, and they landed in Dorchester. "140 passengers, but the list has never been found."

Ford, Thomas 42 Dorchester, Dorset Ford, Elizabeth Chard, second wife 41 Ford, Mary, daughter 17 Ford, Joan, daughter 12 Ford, Abigail, daughter 10 Ford, Hepzibah 4

Source: http://www.packrat-pro.com/ships/maryjohn1.htm -------------------- (f/g) Thomas Ford Birth: 1587 Bridport Dorset, England Death: Nov. 28, 1676 Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA

He and his wife Elizabeth arrived in New England on the "Mary and John" in 1630.

His first wife was Joane Waye Ford. She was buried in Powerstock, Co.Dorset, England in 1615.

His second wife was Elizabeth Chard Cook Ford. She was the widow of Aaron Cook. She died in Windsor,CT April 18,1643.

His third wife, married Nov 7,1644, was Anna ____ Scott Ford, widow of Thomas Scott of Hartford. She died in Northampton May 5,1675.

He was possibly the son of John Ford and Joan Beck Ford, but the ancestry has not been proven. Thomas was probably born about 1587 in Bridport.

Children(by first marriage): Mary Ford Cook(wife of Aaron Cook Jr).

Children(by second marriage): Joanna Ford Clapp, Abigail Ford Strong, Thomas Ford Jr, Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh, and Hannah Ford.

Children(by third marriage): Ann Ford Newberry Leonard.


Family links:

Spouses:
 Elizabeth Charde Cooke Ford (1587 - 1643)*
 Ann Scott Ford (____ - 1675)
Children:
 Joanna Ford Clap (1617 - 1695)*
 Abigail Ford Strong (1619 - 1688)*
 Thomas Ford (1623 - 1623)*
 Hepzibah Ford Lyman Marsh (1625 - 1683)*
 Hannah Ford (1628 - 1629)*
 Ann Ford Newberry (1657 - ____)

Note: Monument photograph courtesy of The Moo.


Burial: Bridge Street Cemetery Northampton Hampshire County Massachusetts, USA Created by: Kevin Avery Record added: Jan 06, 2009 -tcd Find A Grave Memorial# 32679682 -------------------- Arrived on the Mary & John ( 1620 )

view all 78

Thomas Ford's Timeline

1587
1587
Bridport, Dorsetshire, England, United Kingdom
1588
1588
Dorchester, Dorsetshire, England
1590
January 6, 1590
Age 2
West Milton, Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
Powerstock, Westmilton, Dorsetshire, Eng.
January 6, 1590
Age 2
Powerstock, Westmilton, Dorset, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
West Milton, Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
West Milton, Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
Powerstock, Westmilton, Dorset, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
West Milton, Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England
January 6, 1590
Age 2
West Milton, Powerstock, Dorsetshire, England