Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent

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Thomas Holland (de Holland), 1st Earl of Kent

Nicknames: "Earl of Kent"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Upholland, Lancashire, England
Death: Died in Plouigneau, Brittany, France
Place of Burial: Grey Friars Church, Stamford, Lincolnshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Sir Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand and Maude la Zouche, Baroness of Holland
Husband of Joan "The Fair Maid of Kent" Plantagenet and Alice Fitzalan
Father of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent; Edmund Holland; Joan Holland; John Holland, 1st Duke of Exeter; Lady Maud Holland and 2 others
Brother of Sir Robert de Holland, Lord Of Enreston; Alan de Holland; Sir Otho de Holland; Eleanor (Alianore) de Holland; Sir John de Holland, of Thorpe Waterville and 4 others

Occupation: Earl, Knight of the Garter, Earl of Kent
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About Thomas Holland (de Holland), 1st Earl of Kent

Sir THOMAS de Holand of Broughton, Buckinghamshire

From Medlands

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISH%20NOBILITY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#ThomasHolanddied1360B

son of Sir ROBERT de Holand of Upholland, Lancashire & his wife Matilda La Zouche (1314-in Normandy 26 or 28 Dec 1360, bur Stamford, Church of the Grey Friars). He served the king in various military expeditions in Flanders, Bayonne, and Brittany, and fought at the battle of Crécy 26 Aug 1346. During his absence in Prussia, his wife went through a form of marriage with William Montagu Earl of Salisbury. In May 1347, he petitioned Pope Clement VI who ordered Joan to return to Sir Thomas 17 Nov 1349. Appointed Joint Lieutenant and Captain of Normandy 28 Oct 1359, jointly with Philippe de Navarre Comte de Longueville. Summoned to a Council 1353/4 as Lord Holand. He was one of the founder Knights of the Order of the Garter. He succeeded as Earl of Kent, de iure uxoris.

m (1339 or before) as her first husband, JOAN of Kent, daughter of EDMUND Earl of Kent & his wife Margaret Baroness Wake (29 Sep 1328-Wallingford Castle, Berkshire 7, 8 or 21 Aug 1385, bur 29 Jan 1386 Greyfriars Church, Stamford, Lincolnshire, probably later transferred to London). She separated from her first husband shortly after their marriage. She married secondly (bigamously, before 10 Feb 1341, annulled by Papal Bull 17 Nov 1349) as his first wife, William de Montagu. She returned to her first husband in [1349] after her second marriage was annulled. She succeeded her brother in 1352 as Countess of Kent, Baroness Woodstock and Baroness Wake, suo iure. She was known as the Fair Maid of Kent. She married thirdly (Papal dispensation 10 Sep 1361, St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster or Canterbury Cathedral or Windsor Castle 10 Oct 1361) Edward "of Woodstock" Prince of Wales.

Earl Thomas & his wife had five children:

1. THOMAS de Holand ([1350]-25 Apr 1397, bur Bourne Abbey, Lincolnshire). He succeeded his father as Earl of Kent.

- see below.

2. EDMUND de Holand ([1351/52]-young).

3. JOAN de Holand (1350-Nantes Nov 1384, bur Nantes, Abbaye de Notre dame de Prières). m (London May 1366) as his second wife, JEAN V "le Vaillant" Duke of Brittany, son of JEAN IV Duke of Brittany & his wife Jeanne de Flandre ([Nov/Dec] 1339 or [30 Sep/8 Dec] 1340-Nantes 1/2 Nov 1399, bur Nantes Cathedral).

4. JOHN de Holand (after 1358-executed 9/10 Jan 1400, bur Pleshy, Collegiate Church). Appointed Lieutenant of Ireland in Aug 1382. In [May] 1384, he murdered a Carmelite friar who had charged John of Gaunt with high treason. In Jul 1385, he killed the Earl of Stafford's eldest son, in revenge for the death of his squire who had been killed in a quarrel by one of the Earl of Stafford's archers, but he was pardoned 2 Feb 1386. Appointed Constable of the army which John of Gaunt took to Spain to enforce his claim to the throne of Castile, it was on John de Holand's advice that John abandoned this unsuccessful enterprise. He was created Earl of Huntingdon 2 Jun 1388, and Duke of Exeter 29 Sep 1397. He was accused of complicity in the murder of Thomas Duke of Gloucester 29 Oct 1399. He joined in the plot to seize King Henry IV, but was captured at Prittlewell, Essex and taken to Pleshy Castle where he was executed. He was declared a traitor by Parliament in Jan 1401, and his possessions confiscated and titles forfeited[695]. m (Plymouth 24 Jun 1386) as her second husband, ELIZABETH of Lancaster, divorced wife of JOHN Hastings Earl of Pembroke, daughter of JOHN "of Gaunt" Duke of Lancaster & his first wife Blanche of Lancaster (Burford, Shropshire before 21 Feb 1363-24 Nov 1425, bur Burford Church, Shropshire). She deserted her first husband, was seduced by her second husband, whom she hurriedly married as she was pregnant. She married thirdly (before 12 Dec 1400) as his second wife, Sir John Cornwall. Duke John & his wife had five children:

a) CONSTANCE de Holand (1387-12 or 14 Nov 1437, bur London, St Katherine´s by the Tower). m firstly (1404) THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, son of THOMAS Mowbray Duke of Norfolk & his second wife Elizabeth FitzAlan of Arundel (1385-executed 1405). m secondly (1413) Sir JOHN Grey of Ruthin, son of REYNOLD Grey Lord Grey of Ruthin & his first wife Margaret de Roos of Helmsley, Yorkshire (-27 Aug 1439).

b) RICHARD de Holand (-3 Sep 1400).

c) EDWARD de Holand (-young).

d) ALICE de Holand ([1392]-before 1406). m (before 1400) as his first wife, RICHARD de Vere, son of AUBREY de Vere Earl of Oxford & his wife Alice FitzWalter ([1385]-15 Feb 1417, bur Earl's Colne). He succeeded his father in 1400 as Earl of Oxford.

e) JOHN de Holand (Dartington, Devon 29 Mar 1395-5 Aug 1447 bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower). He was taken prisoner at the battle of Baugé 22 Mar 1421 and remained in captivity for five years[696]. He was created Duke of Exeter 6 Jan 1444. m firstly (before 15 Jul 1427) as her second husband, ANNE Stafford, widow of EDMUND Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster, daughter of EDMUND Stafford Earl of Stafford & his wife Anne Ctss of Buckingham (-20 or 24 Sep 1432, bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower). m secondly (licence 20 Jan 1433) as her second husband, dona BRITES de Portugal, widow of THOMAS Earl of Arundel and Surrey, illegitimate daughter of dom JOÃO I King of Portugal & his mistress dona Inez Perez Esteves ([1386]-Bordeaux 23 Oct 1439, bur Arundel). m thirdly as her third husband, ANNE Montagu, widow firstly of Sir RICHARD Hankeford and secondly of Sir LEWIS Johan, daughter of JOHN Montagu 3rd Earl of Salisbury & his wife Matilda Fraunceys (-28 Nov 1457 bur London, Church of St Katharine by the Tower). Duke John & his first wife had two children:

i) HENRY de Holand (Tower of London 27 Jun 1430-drowned Sep 1475). He succeeded his father in 1447 as Duke of Exeter. He took part in Lord Egremont's rebellion in the north May 1454, was captured and sent to Pontefract Castle, and from there to Wallingford Castle. A Lancastrian supporter, he fled to Scotland after the defeat at Towton and was attainted by Parliament 4 Nov 1461 and all his honours forfeited. He escaped to Flanders, where he seems to have been reduced to extreme poverty[697]. He returned to England during the brief restoration of King Henry VI in 1471, but was severely wounded at the battle of Barnet 14 Apr 1471 and captured. He was released 20 May 1475 and joined the king's expedition to France, but was drowned on the return journey between Calais and Dover[698]. m (before 30 Jul 1447, divorced 12 Nov 1472) as her first husband, ANNE of York, daughter of RICHARD Duke of York & his wife Cicely de Neville (Fotheringay Castle 10 Aug 1439-12 or 14 Jan 1476, bur St George’s Chapel, Windsor). A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Cecily Duchess of York" as mother of "Anne Duchess of Exeter, also wedded to Sir Thomas Saint Leger", and her children "Anthony Saint Leger, Anne"[699]. Duke Henry & his wife had one child:

(a) ANNE de Holand (-[26 Aug 1467/6 Jun 1474]). A manuscript pedigree dated to [1500] names "Cecily Duchess of York" as mother of "Anne Duchess of Exeter, also wedded to Sir Thomas Saint Leger", and her children "Anthony Saint Leger, Anne"[700]. m (Greenwich Oct 1466) as his first wife, THOMAS Grey Lord Ferrers, son of Sir JOHN Grey Lord Ferres (of Groby) & his wife Elizabeth Wydeville (-20 Sep 1501, bur Astley, Warwickshire). He was created Earl of Huntingdon in 1471, and Marquess of Dorset in 1475.

Duke Henry had one illegitimate child by an unknown mistress:

(b) Sir ROBERT de Holand . m MARGARET, daughter of ---. Sir Robert & his wife had two children:

(1) JOAN de Holand . m firstly JOHN Kendall . m secondly Sir JOHN Trelawny .

(2) ELIZABETH de Holand . m as his second wife, JOHN Reskimir . No children.

ii) ANNE de Holand (-26 Dec 1486). m firstly (1441) Sir JOHN Neville, son of RALPH Neville Earl of Westmoreland & his first wife Elizabeth Percy (-7 Mar 1450). Lord Neville. m secondly (1452) her first husband's uncle, JOHN Neville Lord Neville, son of Sir JOHN Neville Lord Neville & his wife Elizabeth de Holand (-killed in battle Towton 1461). m thirdly as his second wife, JAMES Douglas 9th Earl of Douglas, son of JAMES Douglas 7th Earl of Douglas & his second wife Beatrice Sinclair (1425-Lindores Abbey [after 22 May] 1491, bur Lindores Abbey).

Duke John had two illegitimate children by an unknown mistress:

iii) WILLIAM de Holand .

iv) THOMAS de Holand .

5. MATILDA de Holand ([1359]-before 13 Apr 1392). m firstly (Papal dispensation 5 Sep 1363) as his second wife, HUGH de Courtenay, son of Sir HUGH de Courtenay & his wife Elizabeth --- (-20 Feb 1374). He was summoned to parliament 8 Jan 1371, whereby he is held to have become Lord Courtenay. m secondly (1380) as his first wife, VALERAN de Luxembourg Comte de Ligny et de Saint-Pol, son of GUY Comte de Ligny [Luxembourg] & his wife Mathilde de Châtillon Ctss de Saint-Pol (1355-château d'Yvoy 22 Apr 1415, bur Yvoy).

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Wikipedia entry

The Peerage entry

--------------------

Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, 1st Baron Holand, KG (c. 1314 – 26 December 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War. He was from a gentry family in Upholland, Lancashire. He was a son of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand and Maud la Zouche. One of his brothers was Otho Holand, who was also made a Knight of the Garter.

In his early military career, he fought in Flanders. He was engaged, in 1340, in the English expedition into Flanders and sent, two years later, with Sir John D'Artevelle to Bayonne, to defend the Gascon frontier against the French. In 1343, he was again on service in France. In 1346, he attended King Edward III into Normandy in the immediate retinue of the Earl of Warwick; and, at the taking of Caen, the Count of Eu and Guînes, Constable of France, and the Count De Tancarville surrendered themselves to him as prisoners.

At the Battle of Crécy, he was one of the principal commanders in the van under the Prince of Wales and he, afterwards, served at the Siege of Calais in 1346-7.

In 1348 he was invested as one of the founders and 13th Knight of the new Order of the Garter.

Around the same time as, or before, his first expedition, he secretly married the 12-year-old Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret Wake, granddaughter of Edward I and Margaret of France. However, during his absence on foreign service, Joan, under pressure from her family, contracted another marriage with William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (of whose household Holland had been seneschal). This second marriage was annulled in 1349, when Joan's previous marriage with Holland was proved to the satisfaction of the papal commissioners. Joan was ordered by the Pope to return to her husband and live with him as his lawful wife; this she did, thus producing 4 children by him.

Between 1353 and 1356 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron de Holland. In 1354 Holland was the king's lieutenant in Brittany during the minority of the Duke of Brittany, and in 1359 co-captain-general for all the English continental possessions.

His brother-in-law John, Earl of Kent, died in 1352, and Holland became Earl of Kent in right of his wife. He was succeeded as baron by his son Thomas, the earldom still being held by his wife (though the son later became Earl in his own right). Another son, John became Earl of Huntingdon and Duke of Exeter. -------------------- Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent (d. 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was from a gentry family in Holland, Lancashire. In his early military career, he fought in Flanders. He was engaged, in 1340, in the English expedition into Flanders and sent, two years later, with Sir John D'Artevelle to Bayonne, to defend the Gascon frontier against the French. In 1343, he was again on service in France; and, in the following year, had the honour of being chosen one of the founders of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. In 1346, he attended King Edward III into Normandy in the immediate retinue of the Earl of Warwick; and, at the taking of Caen, the Count of Eu and Guînes, Constable of France, and the Count De Tancarville surrendered themselves to him as prisoners. At the Battle of Crécy, he was one of the principal commanders in the van under the Prince of Wales and he, afterwards, served at the Siege of Calais in 1346/1347.

Around the same time or before his first expedition, he married the 12-year-old princess Joan Plantagenet, Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret Wake, granddaughter of Edward I and Marguerite of France, and sole heir of her father. However, during his absence on foreign service, Joan, under pressure from her family, contracted another marriage with William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (of whose household Holland had been seneschal). This second marriage was annulled in 1349, when Joan's previous marriage with Holland was proved to the satisfaction of the papal commissioners.

Between 1353 and 1356 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron de Holland. In 1354 Holland was the king's lieutenant in Brittany during the minority of the Duke of Brittany, and in 1359 co-captain-general for all the English continental possessions.

His brother-in-law John, Earl of Kent, died in 1360, and Holland became Earl of Kent in right of his wife.

He was succeeded as baron by his son Thomas, the earldom still being held by his wife (though the son later became Earl in his own right). Another son, John became Earl of Huntingdon and Duke of Exeter.

  • * *

Sir Thomas Holland, the second son of Robert, 1st Lord Holland, and Maud De La Zouche, was engaged, in 1340, in the English expedition into Flanders and sent, two years later, with Sir John D'Artevelle to Bayonne, to defend the Gascon frontier against the French. In 1343, he was again on service in France; and, in the following year, had the honour of being chosen one of the founders of the Most Noble Order of the Garter. In 1346, he attended King Edward III into Normandy in the immediate retinue of the Earl of Warwick; and, at the taking of Caen, the Count D'Eu and Guisues, Constable of France, and the Count De Tancarville surrendered themselves to him as prisoners. At the Battle of Crécy, he was one of the principal commanders in the van under the Prince of Wales and he, afterwards, served at the Siege of Calais in 1346-7. It was about this time, or shortly before the expedition, that he married the the twelve-year-old princess, Joan Plantagenet, the 'Fair Maid of Kent,' a grandaughter of King Edward I and sister and sole heir of John, Earl of Kent. However, it appears that, during his absence on foreign service, his consort contracted another matrimonial engagement with William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (of whose household our knight had been seneschal). This second marriage was annulled in 1349 when her previous marriage with Holland was proved to the satisfaction of the papal commissioners. He shared the naval triumph over the Spanish fleet near Ecluse in 1350. In 1353, the King, with the assent of Sir Thomas Holland and the Lady Joan, his wife, assigned, as dower, to Elizabeth, the widow of John, late Earl of Kent, numerous manors; and, in the same year, our knight had summons to parliament; and writs were in successive years directed to him until 1357. In March 1354, he was constituted the King's Lieutenant and Captain in Brittany and the parts of Poitou adjacent to the Duchy. He passed the ensuing winter and a great part of the following year on that high service; in which he was succeeded by Henry, Duke of Lancaster. In 1358, Thomas and his lady went into Normandy, where, in the next year, he obtained the custody of the Castle and Fort of St. Sauveur-le-Vicomte and of all the castles late of Geoffrey De Harcourt, including Barfleur. Shortly afterwards, he was appointed, jointly with Philip of Navarre, the King's Lieutenant and Captain in Normandy; and, in 1360, that office was vested in him solely. In the last-mentioned year, he assumed the title of Earl of Kent, in right of his wife; and on the 20th November was summoned to parliament by that title. But, in the following month, 28th December 1360, he died in Normandy.

Thomas had issue, by the Lady Joan (shortly afterwards Princess of Wales), two sons: 1. Thomas, 2nd Earl of Kent and 2. John, Earl of Huntingdon & Duke of Exeter. He had also two daughters: 3. Joan, the second consort of John IV, Duke of Brittany; and 4. Maud, married, first, to Hugh, Lord Courtenay, and, secondly, to Waleran, Count De St. Pol.

Edited from George Frederick Beltz's "Memorials of the Most Noble Order of the Garter" (1861). -------------------- From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Holland,_1st_Earl_of_Kent

Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, 1st Baron Holand, KG (c. 1314 – 26 December 1360) was an English nobleman and military commander during the Hundred Years' War.

He was from a gentry family in Upholland, Lancashire. He was a son of Robert de Holland, 1st Baron Holand and Maud la Zouche. One of his brothers was Otho Holand, who was also made a Knight of the Garter. Military career

In his early military career, he fought in Flanders. He was engaged, in 1340, in the English expedition into Flanders and sent, two years later, with Sir John D'Artevelle to Bayonne, to defend the Gascon frontier against the French. In 1343, he was again on service in France. In 1346, he attended King Edward III into Normandy in the immediate retinue of the Earl of Warwick; and, at the taking of Caen, the Count of Eu and Guînes, Constable of France, and the Count De Tancarville surrendered themselves to him as prisoners. At the Battle of Crécy, he was one of the principal commanders in the vanguard under the Prince of Wales and he, afterwards, served at the Siege of Calais in 1346-7. In 1348 he was invested as one of the founders and 13th Knight of the new Order of the Garter.

Around the same time as, or before, his first expedition, he secretly married the 12-year-old Joan of Kent, daughter of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent and Margaret Wake, granddaughter of Edward I and Margaret of France. However, during his absence on foreign service, Joan, under pressure from her family, contracted another marriage with William Montacute, 2nd Earl of Salisbury (of whose household Holland had been seneschal). This second marriage was annulled in 1349, when Joan's previous marriage with Holland was proved to the satisfaction of the papal commissioners. Joan was ordered by the Pope to return to her husband and live with him as his lawful wife; this she did, thus producing 4 children by him.

Between 1353 and 1356 he was summoned to Parliament as Baron de Holland.

In 1354 Holland was the king's lieutenant in Brittany during the minority of the Duke of Brittany, and in 1359 co-captain-general for all the English continental possessions.

His brother-in-law John, Earl of Kent, died in 1352, and Holland became Earl of Kent in right of his wife.

He was succeeded as baron by his son Thomas, the earldom still being held by his wife (though the son later became Earl in his own right). Another son, John became Earl of Huntingdon and Duke of Exeter.

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Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent's Timeline

1314
1314
Upholland, Lancashire, England
1319
1319
Age 5
1340
1340
Age 26
1350
1350
Age 36
Upholland, Lancashire, England
1351
1351
Age 37
Upholland, Lancashire, , England
1356
1356
Age 42
Upholand, Lancashire, , England
1358
1358
Age 44
Upholland, Lancashire, England
1359
1359
Age 45
Upholland, Lancashire, , England
1360
December 26, 1360
Age 47
Plouigneau, Brittany, France
1360
Age 46