Sir Thomas Long, MP

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Thomas Long, MP

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wiltshire, England
Death: Died in England, United Kingdom
Place of Burial: St. James at Draycot, Wiltshire, England
Immediate Family:

Son of John Long, MP and Margaret Wayte
Husband of Margery Long
Father of Sir Henry Long, MP; Edward Longe; Sir Richard Long, MP; Thomas Longe; William Longe and 3 others

Occupation: KNIGHT OF THE BATH
Managed by: Carole (Erickson) Pomeroy, Vol. ...
Last Updated:

About Thomas Long, MP

  • 'Sir Thomas Long of Draycot (c. 1451–1509) was an English politician.
  • 'Born in Wiltshire, the son of John Long and his wife Margaret Wayte, he succeeded to the Draycot estates on the death of his father on 20 September 1478, and inherited South Wraxall from his uncle Henry Long in 1490. Long was among the 'great compaignye of noble men' who went with Edward, Duke of Buckingham, in 1496 to meet the King at Taunton, then in pursuit of Perkin Warbeck. In 1501 he received a knighthood at the marriage of Henry VII's eldest son, Arthur, Prince of Wales, and he was also at the reception of Catherine of Aragon at Shaftesbury in October of that year.
  • 'Long was elected Member of Parliament for Westbury in 1491. He was appointed High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1500 and again in 1506. He was present at the coronation of Henry VIII in 1509.
  • 'He married Margery, daughter of Sir George Darell, of Littlecote House,[1] and had one daughter and seven sons, including Sir Richard Long (c.1494-1546)? and Sir Henry Long (c.1489-.1556).
  • 'Long died in 1509 and his remains are entombed in a 'rich gothique altar monument' (as described by John Aubrey) in the church of St James at Draycot, Wiltshire. Hanging above his tomb until recently, and authenticated by the British Museum, were his armour Haume (helmet) and gauntlets, dating from c.1490. These are now safely kept in the Devizes Museum in Wiltshire.
  • Royal descendant
  • 'The present Charles, Prince of Wales is a descendant of Sir Thomas Long, as is Mark Phillips, the first husband of Anne, Princess Royal.[2]
  • See also: Category:Long family of Wiltshire
  • Further Reading
  • Inquisition Post Mortem: An Adventurous Jaunt Through a 500 Year History of the Courtiers, Clothiers and Parliamentarians of the Long Family of Wiltshire; Cheryl Nicol 2011
  • Hand of Fate. The History of the Longs, Wellesleys and the Draycot Estate in Wiltshire. Tim Couzens 2001 ISBN 1 903341 72 6
  • References
  • 1.^ Society in the Elizabethan Age — Hubert Hall 2003
  • 2.^ The Lineage and Ancestry of H.R.H. Prince Charles, Prince of Wales — Gerald Paget 1977
  • Sources
  • A Political Index to the Histories of Great Britain & Ireland — Robert Beatson 1806
  • The Gentleman's Magazine
  • Burke's History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland — John Burke 1838
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sir_Thomas_Long_of_Draycot
  • __________________
  • 'Historical account of the family of Long of Wiltshire (1889)
  • http://www.archive.org/details/historicalaccoun00chit
    • CHART
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n15/mode/1up
  • I. Robert Long.
    • II. Henry Long.
    • II. John Long.
      • III. Sir Thomas Long.
        • IV. Sir Henry Long.
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n21/mode/1up
  • But to return. Persons of the name of Long have been connected with the county of Wilts since the year 1254, and we conclude these persons were the originators of the family, but as some of the connecting links are missing, we will commence with the first known possessor of South Wraxall, viz. Robert Long, Esq. This gentleman was a justice of the peace in 1426, and M.P. for Wilts in 1433. Surely this is respectable enough, and the "good old times " seem to have commenced long after. Robert Long is stated to have married Alice, daughter of Reginald Popham, of North Bradley, Wilts, by whom he had issue three sons, Henry, John, and Reginald. In the 25th year of the reign of Henry VI., viz. in the year 1447, Henry was found to be his heir, and to be upwards of thirty years of age, while Thomas Wayte was found to be the heir of Margaret, his wife, and to be upwards of twenty-four years of age. This, therefore, seems conclusively to prove that Robert Long must have married a second time, and that this wife was Margaret, relict of Edward Wayte, of Draycot Cerne, and daughter of Philip Popham, of Berton Sacy, in Hampshire. This may account for the two coats of arms, one without, and the other with a crescent. It is supposed that this Robert Long was the original projector of the old Manor House. But there is no existing record to decide at what date the house was built, and the coats of arms are of no assistance, as they were put up long afterwards. We do not know more than we have mentioned about Robert Long, except that he was living in the year 1459, when he was mentioned in the
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n22/mode/1up
  • Will of Robert Lord Hungerford, and that he left three sons, Henry, John, and Reginald.
  • Before depositing this old squire in his grave, let us see if we can find out anything about the life of a squire ......
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n23/mode/1up
  • Robert Long died after 1459, as he is mentioned as living in that year by Robert Lord Hungerford in his Will. He was probably buried at Wraxall, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Henry Long, Esq. This gentleman was Sheriff for Wilts in 1457, 1476, and 1483. He married three times. His first wife was Johanne, daughter of J. Ernleigh. She died in 1468. He married secondly Margaret, daughter of John Newburgh, of Lulworth, in Dorsetshire. He married thirdly, another Joan, who survived him, but her maiden name is not known. He had no children by either of his wives. He made his Will (see appendix) on the 1st day of May, 1490, and died October 20th, 1490. He lived and died a zealous Catholic. In his Will he "commends his soul to God the Father Almighty, the blessed Virgin Mary, and all Saints, and requests that his body be buried in the church of Wroxhall. Amongst other bequests are xxs. for vestments. There is a very ancient tomb still existing in Wraxall parish church, which is supposed to be the burying-place of the widow of Henry Long, Esq. The crimping cap shows that it is a widow, and the arms show that she was descended from a Berkeley and a Seymour. From existing records it is
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n24/mode/1up
  • evident that a daughter of Thomas Berkeley and Elizabeth Seymer married a Long, as this is the only marriage on record, the dates of which will warrant the marriage. The tomb itself is supposed to have been erected by Sir Thomas Long, Knight, who inherited the estates of his uncle. This 'Sir Thomas was the eldest son and heir' of John Long (the second son of Robert Long). He married Margaret Wayte, the daughter of his stepmother by a previous husband. She was the eventual heiress of Draycot, and thus the manor of Draycot was acquired "in jure uxoris," and Aubrey says it was held by petit serjeantie, viz. by being marshall at the king's coronation, which was the reason the Cernes, who held it prior to the Waytes, gave the Marshall's lock for their cognizance. 'Sir Thomas Long was sheriff in 1501, and was executor to Richard Lord St. Amand in 1508. He married Margery, daughter of Sir George Darell, of Littlecote, Wilts. Sir Thomas Long was one of the "Greate compaigny of noble menne," who went with Edward, Duke of Buckingham, in 1496, to meet King Henry VII. at Taunton, who was then engaged in the pursuit of Perkin Warbeck. In Aubrey's time there was a painted glass window representing this fact, but no trace of it now remains. Aubrey says he saw it himself, and as he died in the year 1700, on his way to Draycot, the date of its destruction may be conjectured nearly. This was during the reign of Hope Long, Esq., at the Manor House, and curious things are said to have happened in his time, which we shall refer to more at length in our biographies of the Longs. Sir Thomas Long was at the marriage of Prince Arthur, and was knighted then. He "lyes buried by the north wall of the chancell, under a rich Gothique alter monument of free-stone without inscription, his heaume and crest do yet hang up." Sir Thomas made his Will in 1510, and died in that year. He was succeeded by his son,'
  • Sir Henry Longe, Knight. This gentleman was sheriff for Wilts in 1512, 1526, 1537, and 1542; for Somerset in
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/historicalaccoun00chit#page/n25/mode/1up
  • 1538, and for Dorset in 1539. He was M.P. for Wilts in 1552-53. He married first, Frideswide, daughter of Sir John Hungerford, of Down Ampney, great-grandson of the Lord Treasurer, by whom he had two sons and two daughters. The two sons died in infancy; his wife dying a few years after marriage. Sir Henry married secondly, Eleanor, daughter of Richard Wrottesley, of Wrottesley, in Staffordshire, relict of Edmund Leversedge, of Frome Selwood, Somersetshire, and by her, who died in 1543, he had six sons and three daughters. Sir Henry Longe was present at the siege of Boulogne, and also accompanied Henry VIII. to the Field of the Cloth of Gold. He was knighted for making a gallant charge at Therouenne, in Picardy, in the sight of Henry, when a new crest, consisting of a lion's head, with a man's hand in its mouth, was granted to him. His banner bears this motto, "Fortune soies heureux." It is supposed that Sir Henry did not improve or enlarge the Manor House, because there is no trace anywhere of these honours, and it is more than probable that if he had built anything at all, he would have caused his honours to be engraved thereon. The only trace of this gentleman's residence is some initials on a fireplace in one of the bedrooms, but which is thought to be the ancient parleure. On one side there is S. H. L. for Sir Henry Long, and on the other H. E,, linked together by a Gordian knot. This is for Henry and Eleanor, his second wife. Sir Henry Longe died in 1556, and was buried at Draycot. He was succeeded by Sir Robert Longe, Knight, of Wraxall and Draycot. He was born in 1517, was sheriff for Wilts in 1575. He was also esquire of the body of King Henry VIII., and served at the siege of Boulogne. He married Barbara, daughter of Sir Edward Carne, of Wenny, Glamorganshire, and had four sons and one daughter. One of his sons (Henry) was murdered by Charles and Henry Danvers. Another son was named Jewell, after the famous Bishop of Sarum. He was buried at Box, and .....
  • ________________________________
  • 'Sir Thomas Long of Draycot (Sheriff of Wiltshire)
  • 'Born: ABT 1451
  • 'Died: 1509
  • Father: John LONG of Draycot
  • Mother: Margaret WAYTE
  • 'Married: Margery DARRELL (dau. of Sir George Darrell and Margaret Stourton)
  • Children:
    • 1. Henry LONG (Sir) (See his Biography)
    • 2. Richard LONG (Sir) (See his Biography)
    • 3. Son LONG
  • 'Born in Wiltshire, the son of John Long of Draycot Cerne and his wife Margaret Wayte who, according to the printed Long family pedigree, was his half-sister. There were three sons from this marriage. John Long, the son of Robert Long and Margaret Godfrey, he was elected Member of Parliament for Cricklade in 1442 and in 1449 was an Elector for Wiltshire.
  • 'Thomas succeeded to the Draycot estates on the death of his father on 20 Sep 1478, and inherited South Wraxall from his uncle Henry Long of Wraxall (b. ABT 1417 - d. 3 May 1490).
  • Henry Long was an English politician and lawyer, Member of Parliament for Old Sarum in 1535, and in 1442 for Devizes, for Wiltshire in 1449, 1453-4, and again 1472-5. He served on various commissions between 1450 and 1488 and was High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1456, 1475, and 1482-3. In Shakespeare's play Richard III, the Sheriff, introduced in Act Five, Scene One, was Henry Long of Wraxall, who was Sheriff in the time of Richard III, in 1483. Long married three times; to Joan Ernle, Margaret Newburgh and Joan Malwyn. He inherited the manor of South Wraxall from his father, but having no issue, the manor devolved on his 'nephew Sir Thomas'.
  • 'Long was among the 'great compaignye of noble men' who went with Edward, Duke of Buckingham, in 1496 to meet Henry VII at Taunton, then in pursuit of Perkin Warbeck. In 1501 he received a knighthood at the marriage of Henry VII's eldest son, Arthur, Prince of Wales, and he was also at the reception of Catalina de Aragon at Shaftesbury in Oct of that year.
  • 'Long was elected Member of Parliament for Westbury in 1491. He was appointed High Sheriff of Wiltshire in 1500 and again in 1506. He was present at the coronation of Henry VIII in 1509.
  • 'He married Margery, daughter of Sir George Darell, of Littlecote House, and had one daughter and seven sons, including Sir Richard Long and Sir Henry Long.
  • 'Long died in 1509 and his remains are entombed in a 'rich gothique altar monument' (as described by John Aubrey) in the church of St James at Draycot, Wiltshire. Hanging above his tomb until recently, and authenticated by the British Museum, were his armour Haume (helmet) and gauntlets, dating from ABT 1490. These are now safely kept in the Devizes Museum in Wiltshire.
  • For more information see: Long family of Wiltshire
  • http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasLong.htm
  • _________________
  • 'Thomas Long1
  • 'M, b. circa 1455
  • Father John Long1 b. c 1420
  • Mother Margaret Wayte1 b. c 1423
  • ' Thomas Long was born circa 1455 at of Wraxall, Wiltshire, England.1 He married Margery Darell, daughter of Sir George Darrell, Sheriff of Wiltshire, Somersetshire, & Dorsetshire and Margaret Stourton, circa 1490.1 Thomas Long left a will in 1510.1
  • 'Family Margery Darell b. c 1462
  • Child
    • Sir Richard Long1 d. 29 Sep 1546
  • Citations
  • 1.[S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, SLC Archives.
  • http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1931.htm#i58019
  • _________
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Sir Thomas Long, MP's Timeline

1451
1451
Wiltshire, England
1473
1473
Age 22
1 dau. 7 sons
1477
1477
Age 26
of Draycott, Wilts, England
1481
1481
Age 30
Semington, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
1483
1483
Age 32
of Draycott, Wiltshire, England
1485
1485
Age 34
of Draycott, Wiltshire, England
1486
1486
Age 35
Wraxall, Wilts., Eng.
1487
1487
Age 36
of Draycott, Wiltshire, England
1489
1489
Age 38
of Draycott, Wiltshire, England
1494
1494
Age 43
Stoke Newington, London, England