Thomas (3) LOVELAND, Sr. (c.1640 - 1715)

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Nicknames: "Thomas of Glastonbury"
Birthplace: Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Death: Died in Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
Occupation: Landowner - 1636, Freeman: May, 1670 purchased land, 1674 rec'd land grant
Managed by: Bill Krueger
Last Updated:

About Thomas (3) LOVELAND, Sr.

Progenitor of the Loveland Family in the USA

Excerpts from ‘Genealogy of the Loveland Family in the United States of America from 1635 to 1892.’ Containing the Descendants of Thomas Loveland of Wethersfield, Now Glastonbury, Connecticut.

“THOMAS1 LOVELAND, OF WETHERSFIELD, May 12, 1670 Freeman.

We first find him in Wethersfield, now Glastonbury, Connecticut. It is recorded of him that he owned land in the "First Purchase" by the town, previous to 1670. This purchase was made in 1636.

As the Indian grants to the individual settlers were included in the First Purchase, it gives color to the tradition i.f L. H. Loveland, that the Widow Loveland and her three sons bought lands of the Indians on the Connecticut River.

The name of his grandfather, who "died on the passage to this country," is a matter of conjecture. But in accordance with English custom, it was probably that of his oldest son.

The earliest home of the Lovelands in England is believed to be the city of Norwich, in the county of Norfolk. Lovelands lived in Norfolk County at a very early date, and at a very early date they migrated to different parts of the British Isles, and to America.

Thomas Loveland was made Freeman of Wethersfield in May, 1670, by the Court at Hartford. — (Colonial Records, p. 132.) Before a member of society could exercise the right of suffrage, or hold any public office, he must lie made a Freeman by the General Quarterly Court. To become a Freeman he was required to produce evidence that he was a respectable member of some Congregational Church. Previous to 1670, however, this regulation was modified by Royal Order, so that individuals could be made Freemen by obtaining certificates from clergymen acquainted with them, that they were correct in doctrine and conduct. But Thomas Loveland was an ardent supporter of the church and an influential member of the one in the society where he lived. 

All applicants to become Freemen were required to take the Freeman's Oath. (For oath see N. E. Gen. Reg. for 1849, p. 41.)

In 1673 he was assessed to pay "Indian Purchase of 5,000 acres" on the east side of the Connecticut River, one-half penny per pound assessment, amounting to three shillings and four pence. This would make the assessed value of his real estate at this time about 80 pounds, and in 1674 he was granted by the town the last of the four score acre lots (lot 44) included in the "First Survey" of lands in Connecticut.

The lands bought by the town included in these two purchases were distributed to the inhabitants of the town from time to time. In volume 4 of the Land Records we find that the first division of the above lands (5,000 acres) was made April 28, 1701, by a committee from Wethersfield, Thomas Loveland receiving No. ID, containing 120 acres. At other times thereafter he received various other grants of land in Glastonbury. One of special mention was 60 acres "for his good services in erecting the meeting house in 1693." We never made an exhaustive search to ascertain what disposition was made of his lands.

From the Glastonbury Records of Deeds we quote the following: "Thomas Loveland, Sen., to his son, John Loveland, in consideration of natural affection, five acres including house; dated 1707, acknowledged Nov. 8, 1708. Thomas Loveland, Sen., to his grandson, Thomas Loveland, Jun., and his sons Robert and John Loveland, 100 acres; John Loveland to have one-half, or 50 acres, Thomas 25 acres adjoining John, and Robert the remainder, 25 acres; dated 1716, acknowledged Sept. 10, 1716." He must have died within a few years after making this deed.

We have been unable to identify him previous to 1670, or to find a record of his marriage, or a record of the settlement of his estate. The Glastonbury Centennial gives the family records of five of his Children. Of the others, Thomas2 is proved to be his son from deed records, and Samuel because there was no other Love- land in Connecticut at the time of his birth old enough to be his father, and the date of his birth makes him contemporary with the children of Thomas. In the family record we place these names last, though we have reason to believe that Thomas and Robert were the oldest sons. The exact order is uncertain.

Children born in Glastonbury:

i. John2, m Keziah Williams, June 16, 1708.

ij. Robert, m Ruth Gillam, Aug. 19, 1697.

iii. Hannah, m William House, Dec. I, 1709.

iv. Mary, m Thomas Dickinson, fuñe i, 1693.

v. Elizabeth, m Benjamin Strickland, Dec. 2, 1708.

i. vi. Thomas2, m Eunice House; m 2(1.

i. vii. Samuel, b 1677, m Lydia Barnard, Oct. 4, 1705.”

FREEMEN OF WETHERSFIELD AND GLASTONBURY. A Court of Elections held at Hartford, May 12, 1670. Vol. iii. "Propounded for Freemen of Wethersfield: Isaac Stiles, John Stadder, Sicgesmun Richells and Thomas Loveland."

“Thomas, Wethersfield, 1670; proposed for Freeman that year; had a grant of land 1674; perhaps ten years later was of Hartford." We have discovered the source from whence Savage drew the above information, and we are convinced that he has given us the traditional family. Thomas, no doubt, qualified himself to use the right of suffrage as soon as the law would permit. This would fix the date of his birth in 1649. Robert and John we recognize the sons of Widow Loveland.”

“From Calkins' History of New London, Connecticut, we learn that Robert was mariner and trader from Boston, 1658. Calkins gives a lengthy report of this energetic and enterprising man. After his retirement from the sea he made New London his home, and died there. His name is frequently mentioned in the public records of Connecticut, and he had the reputation of being a rich man; but the assignment of his property, which was of the nature of a will, to satisfy the demands of his creditors, would indicate that he had been unsuccessful. " In May, 1660," says Calkins, "the ship Hope, from Malaga, in Spain, came into this harbor with a cargo. Robert Loveland was supercargo." Tradition says Robert Loveland married. This leads us to think that she may have died before he began his seafaring life. In fact her death may have been the principal cause of his taking to the sea. What would have been more natural than to have left Thomas1 with his mother? We find Thomas1 in the vicinity of this mother, and for aught we know he was an inmate of her home.”

“Among the early family names we find the name of the ship of which Robert was supercargo; soon after Robert's death Thomas came into notice as quite a landholder; and the names of his sons Robert, Thomas, John and Samuel. Robert, the oldest, was probably named in honor of his father, Thomas after himself, and John and Samuel after his uncles. From public records we learn that Robert died in 1668, and John in 1670, both old men.

It is quite certain that after their death Thomas1 was the only one in America bearing the name of Loveland. He was doubtless born here and is the American progenitor of the Loveland family in this country.

Additional information about this story

Description Thomas Loveland of Wethersfield, Now Glastonbury, Connecticut

Date 1668

Location Connecticut

--------------------

Thomas Loveland, immigrant, was born in England, and settled early in Wethersfield, Connecticut. He owned land in the First Purchase before 1670, and was made a freeman of Wethersfield in May, 1670.

There is a tradition that he was the son of John or Robert Loveland and that his grandfather died on the voyage to this country, his widow and three sons buying land of the Indians on the Connecticut river.

In 1673 Thomas was assessed to pay the Indian Purchase. He shared in the first division, April 28, 1701, having a hundred and twenty acres in the first division and sharing also in the later' divisions of Wethersfield. He deeded land to his sons, John, Thomas, Robert and grandson, Thomas, Jr., in 1717. He died in 1723.

Children:

John, married, June 16, 1708, Keziah Williams;

Robert, married, August 19, 1697, Ruth Gillam;

Hannah, married, December i, 1709, William House;

Mary, married, June i, 1693, Thomas Dickinson;

Elizabeth, married, December 2, 1708, Benjamin Strickland;

Thomas Jr., mentioned below;

Samuel, married, October 4, 1705, Lydia Barnard.

source New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the achievements of her people in the making of commonwealths and the founding of a nation, William Richard Cutter, Editor William Richard Cutter, Lewis historical publishing company, 1913 Original from Harvard University. Digitized Sep 17, 2008

view all 21

Thomas Loveland Sr's Timeline

1640
1640
Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
1668
April 27, 1668
Age 28
Glastonbury, CT, USA
1670
1670
Age 30
Wethersfield,Hartford,Connecticut
1676
1676
Age 36
Glastonbury, Hartford, CT
1677
1677
Age 37
Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
1677
Age 37
? Wethersfield,Hartford,Connecticut
1683
1683
Age 43
Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
1686
1686
Age 46
Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
1692
October 23, 1692
Age 52
Wethersfield, Hartford, Connecticut, United States
1715
1715
Age 75
Glastonbury, Hartford, Connecticut, United States