Thomas Lynch, Jr., signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

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Thomas Lynch, Jr.

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hopsewee Plantation, Prince George's Parish, SC, USA
Death: Died in At sea - Caribbean
Cause of death: With wife on ship bound for St. Eustatius in the West Indies. Their ship disappeared in a storm and was never found.
Place of Burial: Burial: Body lost at sea-Atlantic Ocean
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Lynch, 1st Prov. Cong./Cont. Cong. and Elizabeth Lynch
Husband of Elizabeth Lynch
Brother of Sabina Cattell and Esther Lynch
Half brother of Elizabeth Hamilton

Occupation: Lawmaker; planter
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Lynch, Jr., signer of the "Declaration of Independence"

Thomas Lynch, Jr. (August 5, 1749–1779) was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of South Carolina. He and his father, Thomas Lynch, Sr., were the only father-son team that served concurrently in the Continental Congress. His father was unable to sign the Declaration of Independence because of illness.

Although ill himself, Lynch had made the onerous trip to Philadelphia. He stayed there throughout the summer, long enough to vote for and sign the Declaration of Independence at the age of 27. By the end of the year, the failing health of both men compelled them to start homeward. En route, at Annapolis, Maryland, a second stroke took the life of the senior Lynch.Thomas, Jr. was broken in spirit and physically unable to continue in politics. Late in 1779, he and his wife, heading to southern France in an attempt to regain his health, boarded a ship bound for the West Indies. The ship was never seen again. The couple died childless.

Thomas Lynch, Jr. was born at Prince George Parish, Winyah, in what is now Georgetown, South Carolina, the son of Thomas Lynch, Sr. He was schooled at the Indigo Society School in Georgetown before being sent to England, where he studied at Eton College and at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge. He studied law at the Middle Temple in London, returning to America in 1772.

His stepfather was South Carolina Governor William Moultrie; a nephew was South Carolina Governor James Hamilton, Jr. His grandfather was Jonas Lynch from the Galway lines of the Lynch family who were expelled from Ireland following their defeat in the Irish wars of William of Orange.

He became a company commander in the 1st South Carolina regiment in 1775 and was elected to the Continental Congress. He was taken ill at the end of 1779 and sailed, with his wife, for St. Eustatius in the West Indies. Their ship disappeared at sea in a storm and was never found.

Before he departed for his ill fated voyage he made a will, which stipulated that heirs of his female relatives must change their surname to Lynch in order to inherit the family estate. The family estate, Hopsewee, still stands in South Carolina. He was an only child.

Thomas Lynch Jr. 1749-1779

Representing South Carolina at the Continental Congress

Birthplace: Winyah, South Carolina Education: Graduated Cambridge University. (Lawyer) Work: Captain of a South Carolina Regimental Company, 1775; Delegate to the Continental Congress, 1776. Died: ca. 1779

Thomas Lynch, Jr., was born in South Carolina on August 5, 1749. He received an education in England and graduated with honors at Cambridge. He studied law in London and then returned home in 1772. He was politically engaged as soon as he returned home, and was commissioned a company commander in the South Carolina regiment in 1775. Soon afterward he was elected to a seat in the Continental Congress. He fell ill shortly after signing the Declaration and retired from the Congress. At the close of 1776, he and his wife sailed for the West Indies. Their ship disappeared.

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Birth: Aug. 5, 1749 Death: 1779

Signer of the Declaration of Independence from South Carolina. Born near Georgetown, South Carolina, Thomas Lynch, Junior, graduated from Cambridge University and studied law in London. He returned home and married Elizabeth Shubrick, and settled down to life as a lawmaker and wealthy planter. At the start of the American Revolution, he volunteered for the Army, and while in North Carolina, he became severely ill, possibly from malaria, which left him a semi-invalid for the rest of his life. While representing South Carolina in the Second Continental Congress, his father, Thomas Lynch Senior suffered a stroke on February 20, 1776, and in March the SC Legislature elected Thomas Jr. to go to Congress to care for his father and to take over his father’s duties as an additional delegate. Although in poor health himself, Thomas Jr. found his father too ill to continue, and remained just long enough in Philadelphia to vote for independence and to sign the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Lynch Sr. eventually improved, but not enough to sign the Declaration of Independence himself. In late 1776, father and son headed home together. While stopping in Annapolis, Maryland in December 1776, Thomas Senior suffered a second stroke and died. Thomas Jr. reached home, but his own health was failing. Hoping that an ocean voyage and a change in climate would help him recover, he and his wife, Elizabeth, embarked on an ocean voyage in late 1779. The ship was lost at sea with all aboard. The couple had no children. (bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson)


Family links:

Parents:
 Thomas Lynch (1727 - 1776)
 Elizabeth Allston Lynch (____ - 1755)

Spouse:
 Elizabeth Shubrick Lynch (1749 - 1779)*

Siblings:
 Esther Lynch (1747 - 1825)**
 Sabina Lynch Bowman (1747 - 1812)**
 Thomas Lynch (1749 - 1779)
  • Calculated relationship
    • Half-sibling

Burial: Body lost at sea


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Maintained by: Find A Grave Record added: Apr 26, 1998 Find A Grave Memorial# 2782 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=2782

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Thomas Lynch, Jr., signer of the "Declaration of Independence"'s Timeline

1749
August 5, 1749
SC, USA
1772
May 14, 1772
Age 22
SC, USA
1776
July 4, 1776
- 1776
Age 26
Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Descent Only 15 of the 56 signers have male descendants today. These Signers have no descendants: William Whipple, John Hancock, Samuel Huntington, James Smith, James Wilson, Caesar Rodney, George Wythe, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Lynch, Jr. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, and George Walton. These Signers have no same surname (male) descendants: Josiah Bartlett, Matthew Thornton, Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry, William Williams, William Floyd, Francis Lewis, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, George Clymer, George Taylor, George Ross, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, Thomas Stone, Thomas Jefferson, William Hooper and John Penn. These Signers have very doubtful same surname (male) descendants: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Oliver Wolcott, John Witherspoon, Abraham Clark, John Morton, Carter Braxton, Edward Rutledge. The remainder of the Signers is known to have same surname (male) descendants. (Talk about being blown away when you find out almost all of the signers are part of your family's history. You sit back shake your head and wonder am I dreaming. Then you double check in disbelief wondering how that could be. What does that mean for you and your.)

July 4, 1776
- 1776
Age 26
Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States

Descent Only 15 of the 56 signers have male descendants today. These Signers have no descendants: William Whipple, John Hancock, Samuel Huntington, James Smith, James Wilson, Caesar Rodney, George Wythe, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Lynch, Jr. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, and George Walton. These Signers have no same surname (male) descendants: Josiah Bartlett, Matthew Thornton, Samuel Adams, Elbridge Gerry, William Williams, William Floyd, Francis Lewis, Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamin Franklin, George Clymer, George Taylor, George Ross, Thomas McKean, Samuel Chase, Thomas Stone, Thomas Jefferson, William Hooper and John Penn. These Signers have very doubtful same surname (male) descendants: Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery, Oliver Wolcott, John Witherspoon, Abraham Clark, John Morton, Carter Braxton, Edward Rutledge. The remainder of the Signers is known to have same surname (male) descendants. (Talk about being blown away when you find out almost all of the signers are part of your family's history. You sit back shake your head and wonder am I dreaming. Then you double check in disbelief wondering how that could be. What does that mean for you and your.) =================================================================== Did Your Ancestor Sign the Declaration of Independence? By James Pylant And can you prove it? Kathy M. Cornwell's "Disspelling a Myth and Finding An Ancestor," in Seventeen Seventy-Six, Vol. 2, No. 2 (pp. 69-73), tells of a family tradition that her husband's ancestor, Jane Wilson Cornwell, was the daughter of James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. "Admittedly, there was plausibility for the claim, for descendants of all of Jane's children whom we could locate had heard the story, and firmly believed it. One relative knew it was true because his grandmother told him, and she was Jane's daughter." Her research did reveal her husband's ancestor was the daughter of James Wilson — only that he and the signer were not one and the same. Signer James Wilson, according to one source Cornwell found, had no living descendants. "Our search to prove or disprove it spanned several years," wrote Cornwell, "but at the end of the genealogical journey we found the real ancestor, another James Wilson, who turned out to be just as colorful and fascinating as the celebrated Wilson." Yet, some legends prove to be true. “I too had a family story that the Rev. Dr. John Witherspoon was an ancestor," says librarian Beatrice M. Beck. "It took three years to document this story. But it was one hundred percent correct.”* The Rev. Frederick W. Pyne’s Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, a nine-volume series, was published by Picton Press. The author’s work incorporates data from the application files of the Society of the Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, the Frank W. Leach manuscript, and many other published references. In 1987, the LDS Reference Unit at the Family History Library, in Salt Lake City, compiled the "Founding Fathers Project." The project encompasses genealogical data on signers of the Declaration of Independence, signers of the Articles of Confederation (1778), and members of the American Constitutional Convention (1787). The Reference Unit's objective was to identify names of wives, children, and parents. This reference is available on microfilm loan at the various Family History Centers. The film number is 1592751, item 3. However, for more complete data on descendants (up to 1900 in some cases), refer to the following microfilms: 001751: John Adams, Samuel Adams, Josiah Bartlett, William Ellery, Elbridge Gerry,John Hancock, Stephen Hopkins, Samuel Huntington, Robert Treat Paine, Roger Sherman, Matthew Thornton, William Whipple, William Williams, and Oliver Wolcott. 001752: Abraham Clark, William Floyd, John Hart, Francis Lewis, Phillip Livingston, and Lewis Morris. 001753: George Clymer, Benjamin Francis Hopkinson, Robert Morris, John Morton, and John Witherspoon. 001754: Charles Carroll, Samuel Chase, Thomas McKean, William Paca, George Read, Caesar Rodney, George Ross, Benjamin Rush, Thomas Stone, George Taylor, and James Wilson. 001755: Carter Braxton, Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Jefferson, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Nelson Jr., and George Wythe. 001756: Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, Joseph Hewes, Thomas Heyward Jr., William Hooper, Thomas Lynch Jr., Arthur Middleton, John Penn, Edward Rutledge, and George Walton * Beatrice M. Beck to James Pylant, 4 June 2001. http://www.genealogymagazine.com/didyouransig.html
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http://history.org/foundation/journal/Winter11/painting_magnify/

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/goddardsPrinting.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/publishing/dunlap.cfm

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http://research.history.org/pf/signers/

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William Woodruff's Facsimile

An upsurge in public interest in the Declaration of Independence occurred in the early nineteenth century. Among the various editions printed was one by Philadelphian William Woodruff, a journeyman engraver. Allegorical symbols of the new nation surround the text and signatures. The cursive signatures on the printing at the right indicate that it was one produced after Woodruff's initial 1819 printing.

http://research.history.org/pf/viewer.cfm?image=lg_woodruff.jpg&amp...

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July 4th, 2012 at the National Archives: Dramatic Reading of the Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drIdEZ_om9w
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Declaration of Independence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9ovu0a6pL8
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John and Abigail (Adams)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9ddILn141w
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Correspondence between John and Abigail Adams

http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/letter/
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Letter from Abigail Adams to John Adams, 31 March - 5 April 1776

http://www.masshist.org/digitaladams/archive/doc?id=L17760331aa
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1779
August 1779
Age 29
At sea - Caribbean
????
Burial: Body lost at sea-Atlantic Ocean