Thomas Noble, II

Is your surname Noble?

Research the Noble family

Thomas Noble, II's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Thomas Noble, II

Also Known As: "Thomas Noble"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Probably England, (Present UK)
Death: Died in Westfield, Hampshire County (Present Hampden County), Province of Massachusetts, (Present USA)
Immediate Family:

Son of Thomas Noble; Thomas Noble; Rachel Noble and Rachel Noble
Husband of Hannah Noble
Father of Matthew Noble; Elizabeth Church; John Warriner Noble, Sr.; Hannah Edwards; Thomas Noble, Jr and 7 others

Occupation: Lumber mill owner
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Noble, II

Thomas was the emigrant ancestor of the largest family in the United States, bearing the name of Noble. He was born as early as 1632, probably in some part of England. His exact origin and early history are involved in obscurity, the place of his birth, the names of his parents, and the year in which he came to his country, being alike unknown. He was, without doubt, here in 1653, and was the man mentioned by Drake, (History of Boston, p. 331) as admitted, on the 5th of January of that year, an inhabitant of Boston. The same year, he removed to Springfield, Mass., and opened an account at the store of John Pynchon. though not one of the founders, he may be considered as one of the early settlers of that ancient town, the first settlement having been made in 1636, only seventeen years before. A few years after removing to Springfield, he visited England, as appears from an account-book of Mr. Pynchon. In 1664, in connection with several of his townsmen, he had liberty granted him to erect a saw-mill, on the west side of the Connecticut. Mr. Noble, though a man of activity and industry, seems to have early fallen into a habit of living "beyond his means," and as a natural result, soon found himself in debt. To secure the sums due to Henry Smith and John Pynchon, he was obliged, in 1667, to make over to Pynchon his house in Springfield, and all his lands, except a grant towards Windsor. In the hope of improving his condition, and providing for the wants of a large and growing family, he was therefore ready to join those who were beginning a settlement at Westfield. The precise time of his removal to that place is not known. The lands there granted to him, July, 1666, on condition that he settled upon them before the last of May, 1667, having been forfeited by non-settlement, the grant was renewed, Jan. 9, 1668, and the time of the settlement extended to Nov. 10, 1668. At all events, he was there as early as Jan. 21, 1669, for at a meeting at Warronoco, (Westfield), at that date. In his historical sketch of Westfield, Rev. Dr. Emerson Davis states, that Mr. Noble's residence in Westfield was about two and a half miles east of the present center of the town, on the farm where his son, Dea. Thomas Noble, afterwards resided, and which remained in the family until after the death, in 1791, of his great-grandson, Lieut. Stephen Noble, when it passed into the possession of Ambrose Day. There, he doubtless lived in peace and quite, until the commencement of "King Philip's" war, in 1675. Agriculture, necessarily the main pursuit of every one in the early history of a country, was his principal employment, although while at Springfield, during the winter, he worked a portion of the time as a tailor. At Westfield, he was so much prospered in his labors, as not only to bring up a large family of children well, but also to leave them at his death a respectable estate.

  1. Occupation: 1665 Operated a sawmill in Springfield,MA.
  2. Occupation: Tailor
  3. _ELEC: 1696 Land surveyor for the county.
  4. Emigration: ABT 1653
  5. Event: Moved 1664 from Boston, MA to Springfield, MA.
  6. Event: Moved 21 JAN 1668/69 To Westfield, MA

--------------------

 Second Generation  

2. Thomas NOBLE (Thomas1) was born about 1632 in England? and died on 20 Jan 1704 in Westfield Mass.

Although Thomas is thought to have been from England, many Nobles came from Scotland and Ireland by way of England. As of this entry nothing has been found as to his birthplace.

Thomas Noble was mentioned by Drake (History of Bostom, p 331) as admitted 1-5-1653 as an inhabitant of Boston.

Same year moved to Springfield, Mass, opening an account at the store of John Pychon.. This was only 17 years after the first settlers established the towm in 1636.

In September of 1657 he was indebted to Pynchon for loaning him money to go back to England and return plus expense money.

In 1664 he and 3 other men set up a sawmill.

In 1665 Thomas and James Warriner were chosen by the selectmen to "Making rates and taking a list of ye estates of ye plantations. And for prizing ye living stock of ye town."

In July 1666, He was granted land in the new settlement of Westfield..

He lived there in peace until the beginning of King Phillips War in 1675

Made Constable of Westfield and sworn in 7th of April 1674.

Took the oath of allegiance to His Majesty 1-23-1678

.

Joined Westfield Church, 2-20-1681.

At Hampshire court. 9-26-1682, took the freeman's oath.

About the same time he was charged for violating the law about traveling on Fast Day, and was fined 5 shillings.

By 1684 he was recognized as one of the most influential town fathers.

on 3-2-1696 he was chosen county surveyor.

His main occupation was in agriculture although during the winter he worked as a tailor.

Thomas married Hannah WARRINER, daughter of William WARRINER and Joanna SCANT. (Hannah WARRINER was born on 17 Aug 1643.)

They had the following children:

  3 M    i. Mark NOBLE (All details for this living person have been suppressed.)
  4 M    ii. Mathew NOBLE (All details for this living person have been suppressed.)
  5 M    iii. John NOBLE was born on 6 Mar 1662. 
  6 F    iv. Hannah NOBLE was born on 24 Feb 1664. 

+ 7 M v. Thomas Noble (DEACON) was born on 14 Jan 1666 in Springfield Mass and died on 29 Jul 1750 in Westfield Mass

  8 F    vi. Elizabeth NOBLE was born on 9 Feb 1673. 
  9 M    vii. Luke NOBLE was born on 15 Jul 1675. 
  10 M    viii. James NOBLE was born on 1 Oct 1677. 
  11 F    ix. Mary NOBLE was born on 29 Jun 1680. 
  12 F    x. Rebecca NOBLE was born on 4 Jan 1683. 

-------------------- Thomas Noble, "probably born in England" per family notes, moved to Westfield, Massachusetts, in 1658. His farm was 2.5 miles from Westfield.

Per the records of Katherine Griswold (see below), Thomas Noble was "a public office holder and man of influence."

He joined Westfield Church 2/20/1681.

Thomas and Hannah had 10 children, "from whom are descended the largest family of Nobles in the U.S.," according to the notes of Katherine Griswold, an 8th-generation descendant of Hannah and Thomas. -------------------- Married Hannah Warriner on 11-1-1660 -------------------- FIRST GENERATION AND OHILDREN.

1.

THOMAS NOBLE was the emigrant ancestor of the largest family in the United States^ bearing the name of Noble. He was born as early as 1632, probably in some part of England, and died in Weatfield, Mass^ Jan. 20, 1704, m. at least 72 yrs. His exact origin and early history lost in obscurity, {he place of his birth, the names of his parents, and the year in which he came to this country, being alike unknown. He was» without doubt^ here in 1653, and was the man mentioned by Drake, (History of Boston, p. 331,) as admit- ted, on the 6th of January of that year, an inhabitant of Boston. The same year, he removed to Springfield, Mass., and opened an account at the store of John Pynehon. Though not one of the founders, he is considered as one of the early settlers of that ancient town, the first settlement having been made in 1636, only seventeen years before. A few years after removing to Spring- field, he visited England, as appears from an account-book of Mr. Pynehon. On the Ist of September, 1657, he was indebted to Pynehon to the amount of £32 3«. 6<f., in which account is this item: << To what I pd.for your passage to and fro. Eng^d., and for yo^ charges (beside what I give you) as in my pocket booke, £16 00. 00."

In 1664, in connection with several of his townsmen, he had Uberfy granted him to erect a saw-mill, on the west side of the Con- necticut^ as appears from the following vote:

"Thomas Nobles is listed as Thomas Noble also in the narrative, but appear to my investigation as the same people.

December y 8th, 1664. There is Granted liberty unto Samual Murah- fidd^ Thomas Noble, Thomas Miller and Xuzur Holyoke upon their desires, for y* setting up of a saw Mill on a *field below Ensign Cooper's farms over Agawam River; also there is granted them about Forty acres of land where they shall chuse It, neere the place where the Mill shall stand, not prejudging any of y* Inhabitants property, or the high way: Also there is granted them thirty acres of Meadow within 2 or 8 mile of y* (place where They shall fynd H most convenient for their use, iii*gii»i<tig at one end of their Meadow and soe proceeding tUl *to 80 acree be made up. These grants are on condition that the 7 cause a saw mill to be sett up in the place above mentioned A sett to work in Sawing by the first day of April w«k shal be in y« year 1606. And in case that the said Undertakers, when they have sett up such work, shall see cause to desert the work, within three yeeres from the^said tyme, they^ shall yield up the place and lands hereby granted, into the hands of y* Town, or such in the town as shall carry on y* work, provided these undertakers be paid w* charges they shall be at about the Work. Also, they are not restrayned of the liberty of the commons, for all sorts of tymber for their use for Sawing or otherwise."

At a meeting of the selectmen of Springfield, Jan. 1, 1665 0. e. 1666), it is recorded, " This day according to Towne order we considered about (making Rates A) taking a list of y« estate of jT Plantation. And for Prizing y* Living Stock of y* Towne we choose Tho. Noble And James Warriner."

Mr. Noble, though a maB of activity and industry, seems to have clearly fallen into a habit (which it is to be hoped that his descend- ants will carefully avoid) of living " beyond his means," and as a natural result, soon found himself in debt To secure the sums due to Henry Smith and John Pynchon, he was obliged, in 1667, to make over to Pynchon his house in Springfield, and all his lands, except a grant towards Windsor. In the hope of improving his condition, and providing tor the wants of a large and growing family, he was therefore ready to join those who were beginning a settlement at Westfield. The precise time of his removal to that place is not known. The lands there granted to him, July, 1666, on condition that he settled upon them before the last of May, 1667, having been forfeited by non-settlement^ the grant was renewed, Jan. 9, 1668, and the time of settlement extended to Nov. 10, 1668. At all events, he was there as early as Jan. 21, 1669, for at a meeting at "Warronoco, (Westfield,) at that date, it

" Voted, That Ja. ComiBh, Geo. Phelps, Thomas Dewey and Thomas Noble shall go to Springfield the first Tuesday in February next, at a Towne meeting, to propound to the Towne for the settlement of our place and aflayres, in particular to determine where the line shall run betwixt Springfield and us, and to appoynt persons to lay out the bounds granted us by the honored Gen" Court, and to allow us to be a Township by o'selves and signify the same to the honored Qeaf^ Court"

In his historical sketch of Westfield, Rev. Dr. Emerson Davis- states, that Mr. Noble's residence in Westfield was about two and a half miles east of the present centre of the town, on the farm where his eon, Deacon Thomas Noble, atterwarde resided, and which renudned in the family ontQ after the death, in 1791, of his great-grandson, Lieut Stephen Noble, when it passed into the possession of Ambrose Day. There, he doubtless lived in peace and quiet^ until the commencement of *' King Philip's " war, in 1675. In this war, says Rev. Br. Davis, " Mr. Noble was much exposed. One night during fsmily prayers. Gray Lock* (an old Indian), stepped up and pulled the string and let the door swing open, and as soon as all was quiet, be would pull the string again. Mr. Noble was persuaded by his friends to move into town. Gray Lock said he had several opportunities of killing most of his children at a shot, but did not want scalps as much as captives."

Having been chosen constable of Westfield, the records of the Hampshire county court show, that on the 7th April, 1674, he '< was sworne to discharge y* s* office,'* which in those days was one of honor and trust He took the oath of allegiance to his Majesty, Jan. 23, 1678; joined "Westfield church, Feb. 20, 1681; was made a freeman, Oct 12, 1681, and at the Hampshire county court, Sept 26, 1682, took the freeman*s oath.

The Hampshire county records show that about this tame he suffered the penalty of the law for traveling on Fast day:

"At a County courte held at North Hampton, March 87th, 1688. Thomas Noble of Westfield being p'sented by the Grand jury for Traveling on a day of Humiliation, publiquely appointed by the Gen" Courte, which he owned, pleading his necessity for Coming home, and yet this Oo^^ Con- sidering said offense, being a growing evil amoungest us, many Persons too much disregarding such extraordinary Dutys, & Seasons, have adjudged sd. Noble to pay as a fine to the County treasurer five shilings. "

In 1684, his name is with the most influential of his townsmen, upon the jury of inquest on the body of Elieser "Wellerf of West-

•If this wss the chieftain of the Waranokes, Rev. Dr. Davis is obviously

in error in calling him "an 0U Indian/' King Philip's war 

terminated in July, 1676. Temple and Sheldon, in their History of North- Held, state, that Gray Lock, the chief of the Waranokes, so called from the color of his hair, was the most prominent chief in Father Ralle's war, which raged fifty years later, 1723-M. They say: "He was now well advanced in age, but retained all the daring, and tact, and energy of his youth. In 1788, he was living on the shore of Missilquoi bay, at the northerly end of Lake Champlain." The only way of reconciling the statement of Rev. Dr. Davis with that of Temple and Sheldon, is by sup- posing, that in 1676, he was prematurely gray, and was at that time really young, although from the color of his hair, appearing to be an old man.

t Sliezer Weller was doubtless s. of Richard and Ann (Wilson) Weller, and b. in Windsor, Conn., Kov. 90, 1650.

22 DESENDANTS OF TH0MAS NOBLE. field, M appears by the following record of the Hampshire county court:

(spelling partially as transcribed, LAN) ^'Att the Gountie Court held at Springfield, Sept 80, 1684. "Nathaniel Wellere p'eented to this <V«« the Inventory of the Estate of Sliezer Wellere of Westfeild late deceased, & made oath to the truth of the Inventory, & that if more estate shall appeare, he will discover it to the Ckmntie Ckxrie, & he tbe sd. deceased dying intestute, in his own selfe another, power of administration is granted to ad. Nathaniel Wellers upon said estate: And the Inquest made upon sd. Nathaniel Wellers death, was p^sented to this Co^S & is as followes: " Westfeild: 17 Aug. 1684.

" We whose Names are und' written being desired by the Constable as a Jury according to Law, to give or Judgmt on the awful, amazing, and untimely death of Nathaniel Wellers, after due notice taken, we all unani- mously agree, that through the strength of temptation he became his own Execution', by hanging himself, al signes & circumstances fully concur- ring therein, & nothing appearing to the Contrary, to the best of or Judgm**, we suppose he might be dead twenty four houres before it was known.

John llaudsley, John Root, Samuel Root,

Samuel LoomiB, Sen., John Sacket, Jacob Phelps,

Isaac Phelps, John Ponder, John Williams,

Thomas Noble, Josiah Dewey, Thomas Dewey.

"The sevrall persons above subscribed, Sam^ Root excepted, who was from home, made oath to what is above written this 10th of Sept, 1684. Before me,

JOHN PTNCHON. AmM:'

The town of Westfield, on the 6th of Sept, 1685, granted to him, in connection with Isaac Phelps, Nathaniel Weller, and David Ashley, liberty to erect a saw-mill <<on the brook, on the northeast side of the river; " and at the same date, together with George Sexton, he was chosen "to join with the Selectmen to prize buildings." At a town meeting held Sept 22, 1691, he was appointed with Ideut Phelps and John Sacket, << to atend the Court upon the town account with respect to the difference between our town and SulBeld, and do what they can in the towne* behalf settling our bounds between us and SuiBeld.*'

At a town meeting, March. 4, 169(, . . . there was Granted unto Tho. Noble, Sen**, upon the. plaine knowne by the name of tower miles plaine, the contents of halfe a mile Square, that is to say the Liberty of the Pines one this piece of Land for Boysume, w* is to continue for three years ensuing the date heare/'

The records of Westfield show, that on the 2d of March, 1696, he was chosen county surveyor.

DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS NOBLE. 23

Agriculture, necessarily the main pursuit of every one in the early history of a country, was his principal employment^ although while at Springfield, during the winter, he worked a portion of the time as a tailor.

At Westfield, he was so much prospered in his labors, as not only to bring up a large family of children well, but also to leave them at his death a respectable estate.

A copy of the will of Thomas Noble, executed almost seven years before, and proved about seven months after his death, recorded in the office of the Hampshire Probate court [Vol. Ill, pp. 119-20], together with the inventory, is given below :

"Tbe last will and testament of Tbomas (Noble) Noble of Westflcld, in y« County of Hampshire, in y Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, being weak in body, but of perfect understanding.

" Impr, 1 commend my soul into the hands of Christ my blessed Lord and Savior, and my body to a christian burial, in full faith of a blessed resurrection, through the rich grace of God in Christ my Savior.

" Item, I give unto my son Thomas, that parcel of land lying in the farm purchased from Mr. Jn^. Pynchon, from the gate beyond the house entering

into the field bounded by the plowing land, the way to Springfield, 

John Noble's land and the drain all along to the swamp.

"Item, to my son Matthew, a tract of land in the same farm, lying by a ditch easterly, and bounded at both ends by the river.

"Item, I give unto my sons Mark and Luke, my little meadow, lying against the orchard of Noah Cooke, and that home lot that I have bought, and they have raised frames upon.

"Item, I give the lot that the town gave me on the top of the hill ag* my house on tbe same farm, to all my six sons for a pasture.

" Item, to my son James, a parcel of land and house upon it, on that farm that is fenced in, being six or seven acres more or less. .

" Item, I bequeath the rest of this my farm lying bounded upon James north'ly, Thomas on the east, Matthew on the south'ly, y* river on the. westly sides, to all my sons, i. e, to my sons John, Thomas, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and James, equally to be divided amongst them by my brother James Warriner, and John Hitchcock of Springfield, and by Capt. Isaac Phelps of Westfield.

"Item, I give to my son James, all my land in the plain, on this side the hundred acres, and the lot by the way to Pochastuck.

"Item, I give to my son John, the rest of my lot in y fort meadow.

" Item, I give unto my beloved wife, Hannah Noble, an acre of land reserved out of my son John's home lot; also half my dwelling house, that is to say, that end next the street, and halfe the land and orchard and ham we dwell on, and the other halfe of the house lot and barn to my son James, as also the thirds of all that I here will to my sons, and after her decease, I give my son James the whole of the house, houselot, and barn. and the acre reserved out of my son John's homelot. _ "Item, 1 give unto my four daughters, Hannah, Elizabeth, Mary, and

24 DBSOBIIDAIITB OF THOMAB NOBLE.

Rebecca, £90 apiece, to be paid them by my sons (viz.), Thomas, Mat- thew, Kai^, Luke, and James, to Mar}' and to Rebecca about half a year after their marriage, and a cow apiece at their marriage. And in case any of my children should die, not leaving any issue behind them, then my will is that the legacies that I here give them, be equally divided among the surviving, and also, I order these my sons to And my wife fuel wood, and two load of hay every year, so long as she shall remain widow.

" Item, I give unto my wife also a cow and an heifer, also all my house- hold goods, which household goods I would have her at her pleasure dis- pose of to my two youngest daughters.

"Item, my team (one yoke of oxen excepted), I give unto my three youngest sons, Mark, Luke, and James. And for the well and faithful execution of this my last will, I ordain and make my beloved wife Han- nah Noble and my son Thomas Noble Joynt executors, to defray all my lawfull debts, and for that end leave one yoke of working cattle, a yoke of fat oxen, and the money in the Bay due to me, and all other dues, the which, when my debts are defray^, the remainder I would have to go to pay my daughter's portions. But in case the same should be too little to clear my due debts, that then they are to raise what is sufficient out of the legacies I have here given to my children, to do the same. In witness whereof I set to my hand and seal this eleventh day of May, An« Dom., 1697.

THOMAS NOBLE and a [Bbal]." " Signed A sealed in the pvesence off Sdwabd Tatlob,

y XOTOBT SXKBS,

jAioa Wabbirbb.

In Springfield, Sept: 5th, 1704. ' Mr. Edward Taylor and Victory Sikee, two of the witnesses to this instrument, appeared before the Judge of Probates in Hampshire, viz., Samuel Partridge, Esq., and made oath that they saw Thomas Noble, deceased^, sign and seal the s< instrument, as his last will and testament, and that he was of a sound mind and memory, when he did it, according to theire Judgment, and that th^ with James Warriner signed as witnesses to the same, in the testaturs' presence. Which b4 will (the executors therein named having accepted s* trust), was by the s' Judge approved and allowed of.

Attest, JOHN PTNGHON, Regt.

An inventory of the estate of Thomas Noble, Sen' of Westfield, de- ceased, taken February y 18th, 170|.

Imp^. £ s. d.

To a house and barn and homestead in the town plott, . 085 00 00

To a lot in the plain by estimation eleven acres, . 086 00 00

To four acres of land in the fort meadow, . . 006 00 00

To six acres of upland or pastureing, . Old 00 00

DESCENDANT8 OF THOMAS NOBLE. 25

£ t. If.

To an acre of homelot land in the town plait, . 018 00 00

To ninety acres of land in the farm, . . 270 00 00

To fifty acres of upland or thereabouts called the pasture,

lying against the farm 005 00 00

To the old buildings upon the farm, . . 002 00 00

To two and one halfe acres of land with a frame upon it

ca]« Mark's homestead, . 010 00 00

To two acres of homelot land near the Widow« Dewey's, . 005 00 00 To a yoak of three years old steers at £5, . . 005 00 00

To two cows, and one calfe at £5; and a heifer and 2 steers

at£815t. 008 15 00

To a horse at £2 10«. and dx swine at £2, . . 004 10 00 To a cart at £1 12f., and plow and plow chain at £1 5«., to- gether with half other implements belonging to the team

£1 14f.; and y« halfe of a Umber chain at 18d., . . 004 14 00

Two axes, hatchets, hoes, and forks at 18tf., and hay knife

• and pease hooks 4d., 001 02 00

To wareing apparel £8; and armes, and ammunition £1 15«. ;

and bed, bolster, and 2 pillows at £2 Ids., and a rugg

and blanketts £1101., 007 11 00

To 4 toe ruggs £1 4f., an^ a blankett 4f. ; 2 down beds and

2 bolsters at £12i., 002 10 00

To two pillows 7«., and curiaines and valiants 15«., and 4 *

bedsteads and cords £18f., . 002 06 00

To 1 dosa of napkins, and 2 table doathes, and 8 towels,

£18t.; and 5 pillow beers 8«., . 001 16 00

To nine aheeU £1 16«., and 8 large pewter platters £1 4f.,

and 6 plates a 16s., - . 008 16 00

To old pewter 18f. and a tankerd, and 2 porringers and aalt

cellars*., 001 01 00

To brass kittles and skilleU and wanning pann, . 001 16 00

To an iron pot and kitUes £1 2f., and tin and earthen ware

6t. i)01 06 00

To pott hooks, trammels and Are irons and chafen dish 18f.', 000 18 00 To barrels, tubbs, chaires, and wheels, and aome other small

things, £1 16«., 001 16 00

Topailes, bowls, dishes, trenchers, spoons, and cannl8f., . 000 18 00 Towheat, peas, lye, Indian com; and oates £7 Of. 6d., . 007 00 06 To wool, flax, and sacks, £1 6s. ; and chests, boxes, hookes,

and hatchets £1 16«., 008 00 00

To a ahorel, frying pann, and bridle, and saddle 18f. ; and

provision in y« house £1 10s., . 002 08 00

To sdeths, sickles, and sdeth tackling 6t., . . 000 06 00

To beetle rings, and wedges, and other small things, 6«., and

2 bbl of turpentine at £1 lOd,, and linnen, and woolen

yam, 8a., 002 08 00

Totall, £448 06*. 06d.

p^ Isaac Phelps, Nath^ WeUar, Joa. Bexton.

26 DESCendants OF THOMAB NOBLE.

" Hampsh* 68. Bpbikgfield Sbftbm* 5tb 1704.

" Hannah Noble wid* and Thomas Noble, executors of the last will and testament of Thomas Noble (late of Westileld deceasd«) made oath before Sam Partridge, Esq., Judge of the Probate of wills &c fors* County, that the within is a true inventory of the estate of s* decease, lnso far as they know of, and if more appear, they will readily make discovery thereof from time to time, to s* Judge, or his successors.

Attest, JOHN PYNCHON, ile^."

"April 8th 1704. A division of a oerUin tract of land among the six sons of the deceased Thomas Noble of Westfleld, who dyed the 21st of January 170|, the land lyes about the middle of the farm, that the dec« Thomas Noble bought of Mr. Pynchon, the quantity is about sixty-seven acres. It lyes by the river southeast, and norwest by a ditch which parts James Noble's pasture land from this dividing line, the northeast end buts upon the old cartway that goes through or that went through the S4 farm to Springfield, the southeast end buts on the old ditch or the land of Matthew Noble. It is divided in two divisions. The first divis- ion begins two foot to the norwest side of the first rowe of apple trees.

The first lot in that division was laid out for Thomas, which was 13 rod broad.

The 2 for James, four rods and 7 foots, 4 broad.

The 8 for Matthew, twelve rod, 12 broad.

The 4 for Luke, nineteen rod, 19 broad.

The 5 for John, fourteen rod, 14 broad.

The 6 for Mark, that is all from John's lot to the river south, east and noreast to a small brook of water that runs between John's land, and the dividing land. The second division runs from the upper rowe of apple trees to the ditch norwest

The first lot was laid for Thomas, and it is three rod broad.

2. John was four, 8 rod and almost half e.

8. Mark six, 6 rod. 4. James eighteen, 18 rod.

5. Matthew thirteen, 18 rod or fourteen.

We who are the sons of the deceased Thomas Noble, do all of .us agree to take up satisfied with the above division, (with good likeing,) of Isaac Phelps, James Warriner, John Hitchcock, who are the distributors.

JOHN NOBLE, THOMAS NOBLE, as witness our hands, MATTHEW NOBLE,

ISACH PHELPS, MARK NOBLE,

James Warriner, LUKE NOBLE,

JoHH HiTCBcocK. JAMES NOBLE."

He m. Nov. 1, 1660, Hannah Warriner, b. in Springfield, Mass., Aug. 17, 1643, only dau. of William and Joanna (Scant) Warriner. She joined the Weatfield church, Nov. 11, I6S0. She

DECENDANTS OV THOMAS NOBLE.

27

m. (2) Jan. 24, 1705, Deft. Hedad Pomeroy of Nortbampton, Mass., bapt in Windsor, Conn., Aug. 19, 1638, s. of Eltweed Pomeroy. The Weatfield church records show, that "Sister Noble, widow of brother Thomas Noble, being married again to Mr. Medad Pomeroy of Northampton, and settled with him there, was dismissed to Northampton, about the end of April, 1705.*' Medad Pomeroy was a blacksmith, and town clerk for many years, deacon, and representative 1677, '83, '84, '86, '90, '92, a man of large wealth for the times, and much influence. [He m. (!) Nov. 21, 1661, Experience Woodward, dau. of Henry Woodward of Dorchester and Northampton. She d. June 8, 1686; (2) Sept 8, 1686, Mrs. Abigail Chauncy, dau. of Jolm and Abigail (Ford) Strong of Northampton, Mass., and wid. of Rev. Nathaniel Chauncy of Hatfield. She d. April 15, 1704.] Medad Pomeroy d. in Northampton, Dec. 30, 1716, m, 78. ^e survived Dea. Pomeroy, who, in his will dated Jan. 4, 1709, and proved Jan. 5; 1717, makes the not very liberal pro- vision, that at his decease, she shall have liberty to choose what oow shoe will out of y« cows w«^ I shall then have, to be her own, and alsoe to have returned to her all such things as she brought" The date of her death is not recorded, and it is only known that it occurred prior to May 12, 1721.

CHIU>RSN.

8. John;. . b. March 6, 1662; m. (1) A. Sacket; (2) M. Goodman.

a :Hannah, b. Feb. 24, 1664; m. (1) J- Goodman; (2) N. Edwards;

John NoBLES son. of Thomas, was b. in Springfield, Mass., March 6, 1662, and d. in New Milford, Conn., Aug. 17, 1714, m. 62. He removed in childhood with his father to Westfield. In her will, ezeeated at Deerfield, Maae., Feb. 25, 1692, and proved on the 29th of the succeeding March, Mary, widow of Richard Goodman, formerly of Hadley, names her son-in-law, John Noble, her executor, and declares: <<My will is, that my son Noble shall possess, im- prove, b enjoy my house. Barn & all my Lands in Hadley, till y* term of his foure years be fully accomplished and Completed." It is probable that he was at that time a resident of Hadley, and an occupant of the above-named house. Certain it is, that he was of Hadley, November, 1694, and at that date purchased of John Pynchon, skins to the value of nearly £6. Possibly he was then a furrier, though it may be that he bought these skins to sell again, for in 1702 he is styled " trader.'* On the 12th of February, 1695, he was still at Hadley, and then, for £10, bought of Stephen Lee of Westfield, five and three-quarter acres of land in Westfield. ^ He returned to Westfield as early as March 2, 1696, at which date he was chosen constable, and on the 20th April, 1702, is called '<trader,"and on the 1st September, 1703, "innholder,"and con- tinued, doubtless, to make that the place of his residence until 1707. In the last-named year, as is supposed, he was the pioneer settler of New Milford, Conn.

CoL Robert Treaty and other inhabitants of Milford, Conn., hav- ing purchased, for £60 in money, and £30 in goods, '<a certain tract of land, formerly called Weantenuck, now New Milford," of the Indians, the same was confirmed to them by the General Court, Oct 22, 1703. On the 22d June, 1706, John Noble, then of West- field, purchased land at New Milford, Conn., of John Woodruffe of Milford, an original proprietor.

Rev. Stanley Oriswold, pastor of the Congregational church at New Milford, in a century sermon preached January, 1801, full extracts from which are entered on the town records) has the following in relation to John Noble: tract of land, formerly called Weantenuck, now New Milford," of the Indians, the same was confirmed to them by the General Court, Oct 22, 1703. On the 22d June, 1706, John Noble, then of West- field, purchased land at New Milford, Conn., of John Woodruffe of Milford, an original proprietor.

Rev. Stanley Oriswold, pastor of the Congregational church at New Milford, in a century sermon preached January, 1801, full extracts from which are entered on the town recoidS) has the following in relation to John Noble:

BRANCH OF JOHN. 29

" The lint white trader, who came to this town, was John Noble from Westfleld, Mass., who came here in the year 1707. He brought with him at first one of his daughters, then about eight years old. He first built a hut under what is called Fort Hill, but afterwards moved, and pitched here in the centre of the town. His house here was for some time the last house on this side of Albany, and General Nicholson once lodged in it, ' during the reign of Queen Anne. It deserves to be mentioned to the credit of the natives, that Mr. Noble once left his little daughter, then eight years old, with them for the space of three m four weeks, while he was necessarily absent from the town, and on his return found she had been well treated and taken exceedingly good care of. Another daughter of his, the late Mrs. Margaret Hine, who died here in the 80th year of her age, was then three years old, and the fact was fresh in her memory, as she had heard it while young, though she herself was not then brought hither."

No one who has seen New Milford in the summer, will call in question the good taste of Mr. Noble, in selecting that town as his future home, for in the whole valley of the Housatonic, no place, surpassing it in the beauty of its natural scenery, can be found.

" At a meeting of y* Proprietors of New Milford, held at Milford, Dec y*27th 1710. Voted, That there be a Committee chosen for ordering y« settlement of New Milford, and dividing y lands according to y* several limitations, here after agreed upon by y Proprietors. Committee chosen are MaJ' Wells, Capt Joseph Treat, Lieut. Joseph Peck, Sergt Sam^ Clark, Jonathan*Law, John* Nobles, Jn* Bostick, Berg* Zachariah Baldwin.

Voted, that any five shall be a sufficient number or Quorum for doing any matter proper for y* Committee to do.

Voted, That y Committee consider how many families may be accom- modated, in and ab* y place where y Town platt is already pitched, with a sufficiency of land, taking care that they do not exceed their Proportion of y whole tract of land and fall short of it according to their best Judge- ment, and when those accommodations are filled or taken up with Inhabi- tants, to pitch upon some other convenient place and there lay out another number of accommodations as y adjacent land will admitt of, taking y same care as before specifyd and so to proceed as there shall be occasion, untill y whole is laid out leaving suitable Commons, Highways, &c."

On the 10th January, 1710, several years previous to the organ- isation of the church in New Milford, Mr. Nobles joined the First Congregational church in Woodbury, Conn. Shortly after this date, the inhabitants of New Milford, though few in numbers, feel- ing their need of religious privileges, petitioned the (General Court of Connecticut for liberty to lay a tax upon all their lands, for the support of the gospel A copy of the original petition, preserved in the Secretary's office, is here inserted : 5

30 DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS NOBLE.

'*2btke han^ gen* (hurt or AmnMff n&w Ming in New Hat$n :

The Inhabitants of New Milford, being twelve families and about 70 souls, haTing since y* time of our first settlement, which is about three years, been without y* advantages of y* ministrey of y* gospell and of themselves as able to giue necessary Encouragement there unto, humbly i^ply themselves to your honours for relief therein, and for that End your humble petitioners put into a Capacity to Levy y* same, or that your hon- ors would contriye some other way for y* health of our souls, as In your wisdoms shall be thought meet, and your humble petitioners shall ever pray for your honors' prosperity. Dated in New Milford, Octob^ 17*^, 1711.

John Noble, sen', Samuel Grindel,

John Bostwick, sen', John Bostwick, jun',

Benjamin Bostwick, Zachariah Ferris,

John Noble, jun', Roger Brunson,

Isaiah Bartlet, John Weller,

Samuel Brunson. Thomas Weller."

" Upon the petition of the Inhabitants of New Milford, this Assembly do order that a tax of seven shillings each pr. annum, for the space of four years, shall be laid upon the proprietors of Lands within s* town (viz.,) so much on whole share, and proportionate upon lesser shares, or rights there, and the s* inhabitants have hereby liberty to choose a collector to gather the s* Rates or taxes, always provided the Money gathered as above S*, shall be emproved for promoting the Ministry in s* Town.'*

" New Milford, May 29th, 1712. Pursuant to y* Act or agreement of y* Proprietors of New Milford December 27th, 1710, authorizing a Committee for ordering y* settlement of New Milford as ores' and dividing y lands. The Committee whose names are hereunto subscribed, did meet and take a view of y* lands, and situation of y* same.

Whereupon they have considered and ordered as followeth: .... That in y* first forty acre Division, the Liberty of Choice shall be first to those who have already settled or built here in such order as they agree or otherwayes, as they came here first to settle here, but with this Limitation that they shall not make y* pitch further Southward than an East and West line across y* fishing f aUs nor farther Northward than an East and West line half a mile above y* mouth of Aspatuck river, excepting only Mr. John Nobles, who has already improved land att Hockey river, who has Liberty to take his pitch in that place. ....

Ordered that twenty acres on a square be left on Aspatif hill to sett a Meetingouse on, Ac. ....

Signed by SAM^* EELLS,

JOSEPH PECK,

JOSEPH TREAT,

SAMi^ CLARE.

JOHN NOBLE.

JOHN BOSTICK,

JON** LAW.

The town records of New Milford show, that "May y« 11th, 1718, at a

OmdUee qf

y* Proprietor

qf New Maford.**

BEAKGH or JOHN. 31

Iflgall meting John Noble senyr was chosen as an attorney to serve y* peti- tion to 7* general court holden at Hartford, may 14th, 1718.*'

" At a town meeting November y* 80, 1718, agreed y* John Noble and', John Weller, or Sam^ Bionaon ahould go to Milford, to discover y* comity about y* settlement of a minister."

"March y* 4th 171f at a leagall town meeting y* was agreed by a vot y* 8am> bronson, John Weller A John Noble sen' ahonld lay out y* ministers land y* is to say one home lot with y ten aoer division for a pastor lot & a forty acre lot, it is y* that y proprietors did agree to give Mr. Daniel Boaidman if he becomes a settled minister at New Milford.'*

passed in the Lower House.

Test, R BTJ8HNSLL, Clerk,

New Milford became a town, Oct 9, 1712, by act of the legisla- tore. Its growth, howevar, waa slow. Permission was granted to gather a church in May, 1715, the church was organized Nov. 21, 1716, and a meeting-bouee commenced in the spring of 1719. In May, 1719, the number of families in the town was twenty- three. In October, 1727, the inhabitants asked the General Court for their county rate, to aid their school, and help finish the meeting- house, and their request was granted for two years. They again asked, May, 1730, for their country rate, to be used in 'finishing their meeting-house, and the Legislature granted their petition.

But in midsummer of 1714, before the plans which he had so fondly cherished had been carried out, even before the establish- ment of a church John Nobles, the enterprising founder of this new town, was, in the full strength of manhood, suddenly removed by death.

The proceedings in the settlement of his estate, from the New Haven probate records, are as follows:

  • 'At a Court of Probates held at Newhaven Nov* 8d, 1714.

"Administration of the estate of John Noble, late of New Milford, dec*, is granted unto Stephen Noble, son of y« dec*, on his bond and surety. [V6L 4, p. 899.]

"Att a Court of Probates held at Newhaven, Monday, Jan>T 8«. 171}.

"Stephen Noble, ad' of the Estate of John Noble, late of New Mil- ford dee*, exhibited an inventory of the said dec** estate, which was approved forieoord.

"New Milford, December 9d, 1714. An Inventory of the estate of John Noble, Sr^, lately deceased is as followeth :»

£ $. d. "First, the house and homestead y* is all the Land from y

^ highway at y« East end to the highway at y« west end, 80 00

40 acres over Bocky River, . . 06 00

all y« out land not taken up yett, . 04 00

32 DECENDANTS OF THOMA8 NOBLB.

£ i. d.

"Secondly, y Stock, 1 Cam £210$., one diUo £2 S«.,2 yoang

mein 2 y old £4 lOf., 09 05

a heUFer 2 y* old iMt spring £2: one bona £4, one ditto

£1 St. 07 05

el^t amall swine, . 02 15

"9^. by Iron Tackling by boop and boxes 15«., . 00 15

byaLinspinand washer It: by bona chain 5«., . . 00 06

by a plow chain St. by Double hooks and single books

2t.8tf, 00 10 8

a stabing hoe 5t. and two broad hoes (U., . ^ . 00 11

a cart [ . ] and pin 8t. and one ring 2«., . 00 05 a staple and ring 2t. 6d. faUng ax 4f., . 00 06 6

old btmSd. one bottle ring and wedge 2«. 6(2., . 00 08 2

2 p^ fork tinee and sn old spade, . 00 08

old sytbs and tackling, 00 06

1 old Coulter 8t. 6d. : plough and part of two harrows, . 00 06 6

1 shoyell Scf. flesh fork U, 00 01 8

1 old plow share and bolt 4f., . 00 04

i share in a wolf pitt, 00 04

part of a Grin stone, 00 08 6

6 bushells Rye, 00 18 4

15ibudiels wheat, 08 06

60 bushk Indian at U 8d. p. busbi, . .» . 04 08 4^

8bushelsoates8t. 6d. hay lOt. flat £12«. Off., . 01 16 6

"4*^, by wearing cloths, a loose coat, . 00 04

a flaneUyestTt. a broadcloth vest 6t., . 00 12

ahat2«. 6d. twopairstockens2t.2d, . 00 04 8

a p' of shoes 8i. a flaneU coat 16t., . . 00 19

a neckcloth Is. bed stead and cord 7«. 6d., . . 00 08 6

a bolon shirt 12«. two linen shirts 7s., . 00 19

afeatherbed£2 8s. Oil. and bolster 2t., . 02 10

two piUows 6s. 8d. 8 old coYerUds lU, . 00 17

a trundle bed stead 6s., 00 05

a bed stead and cord 10«. a trundle bedstead and cord 6s., . 00 16

a feather bed £1 15t. Od. two feather bolsters, . 02 08

another bolster 8t. 4 coyerlids 2s., . 00 05

2 old beds and a Quilt lOt., 00 10

a set of Curtains 20s. another set of curtains, . 01 05

nine sheets £1 5s. Od. 5 napkins, a table cloth. . 01 09 8

2 table cloths Is., a chest ft Drawers, . 00 16

a linen wbeeU Is. 6d. a woollen wbeall, . 00 04

2tubs2s. 6d.8cnshens2s. 9d. 00 06 8

ahalfbushiU half peck. 00 01 8

a cow hide 8s. 5* f linen yem, . 00 17 7

7* tow yem 8s. 9d. 12> blankett yem lis., . . 00 19 9

6* woolen yem course 4s. 6d. flne linen yem 6* 10s., . 00 14 6

a p^amall sheets 00 08

twotrameIls5s. apairtongs2s. OJ., . . 00 07 6

Digitized by

Google

BBAKOH or JOHN.

33

m PaA U. Iron pot and hooka 6b,,

an IroD ketle (U. a brass ketle ISi., .

a table U. a mashing tub and cheesepress, .

8 brass pans 2$. one skillet It. a skimer U. 6d.,

6 pewter platen 9i. nine plates (U., .

2 bassons 8t. 6<2. Are poringers 2t. 6d.,

8 spoons It. a half pint and jill caps,

a dram cop and salt cellar It. a flagen St., .

an earthen pott 8d. two small cask 8t.6<2., .

a tab and beef 14$. an old cupboard and tubs,

a frying pan St. 6d. a wanning pan St.,

a mortar and pestle 8t. a TreTitt 16d.,

a shreding knife It. a salt box and desk It.,

a looking glass 8t. two pails St. 6d., .

atable St. 6<2., one old side 6d. wooden dishes St.,

loldladleSt. a pr. bridle bits id., .

an old coulter It. 8d. a knife 8d., . r

a trowell It. a smoothing iron and heaters, .

a hatchell St. books one bible 7t. Sd.,

books Sf. a pr. spectides It. and case,

soap Sd tallow It. (id. a brush Sd., .

8 glass botles St. id. four chairs if. 6d.,

part of three wohres £5 lOf. Od. ten pound woll,

S^ooarsewooUU. apilionSt. 6d., .

a grid iron Sd. lins^ woolsey St. Sd. ,

1* and f tow yem, ....

a bee tree and half St. a yerd and part of a yx^ cotten

it. id.,

old iron St., .....

Totally "Tttken l^ Samuel Brownson, Roger Brownson."


Digitized by Google)

Montville, Ct.

On October 5, 1724, it was voted " to build a school-house near the meeting-house, the same to be 19 feet long, 14 feet wide, and 7 feet posts." The house was completed before the close of the year and a teacher hired. Mr. Allen Mullan was the first teacher approved by the committee. The parish settled upon him a salary of 24 pounds a year and ten acres of land forever. December 31, 172S, liberty was granted to John Vibber, Peter Wickwire, Jason Allen, Joseph Atwell, Samuel Fox, Jr., and John Nobles, " to build a stable on the southeast corner of the meeting-house lot, for the accommodation of le: use- when attending church."

Since the Church families' record has been in type, facts have come into the possession of the writer, through the courtesy of Mrs. Mary F. W. Church, wife of Frederick Fargo Church, Esq., a lawyer of Rochester, N. Y., that scatter much of the mist that has hitherto surrounded the more remote ancestry of this branch of the Church families. It now appears to be clearly established that Richard Church of Westfield, Mass.. born in 1664, and married 3 March, 1692, Elizabeth Nobles, b. 9 Feb., 1673, daughter of Thomas Nobles of Boston, was the father of Jonathan Church, who married Abigail Fairbanks of North Parish, 24 Feb., -1724. 1730, in the 67th year of his age. His wife afterwards married Deacon Samuel Loomis, and died 10 Aug., 1741, aged 78 years 6 months 1 day.

The children of Richard Church, as found recorded at Westfield, Mass., were 1st, Hannah, b. 5 Oct., 1692; 2d, John, b. 12 Jan., 1693-4; 3d, Rachel, b. 1 March, 1694-5; 4th, James, b. 26 Oct., 1696; 5th, Joseph, b. 7 Dec, 1698; 6th, Jonathan, b. 7 Dec, 1700; 7th, Samuel, b. 28 'Nov;, 1702; 8th, Elizabeth, b. 26 March, 1705; Jonathan, 6th child of Richard Church and Elizabeth Nobles, b. 7 Dec, 1700; m. 24 Feb., 1724, Abigail Fairbanks. He had a son, Jonathan, b. about 1726, and was twice married. The name of his first wife is unknown, and may have been Amy , that being the name of her daughter, b. 1 April, 1754, and in. V. ADONTJAH (140), b. 18 Nov., 1754, eldest son of Thomas Rogers and Sarah Fitch; married Anna Nobles, daughter of James Nobles and Anna Vibber, widow of William Vibber. He settled at Montville.

view all 21

Thomas Noble, II's Timeline

1632
1632
Probably England, (Present UK)
1660
November 1, 1660
Age 28
(Present USA)
1661
March 6, 1661
Age 29
Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, Massachusetts
1664
February 24, 1664
Age 32
Springfield, Hampshire County (Present Hampden County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1665
July 14, 1665
Age 33
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
1668
September 9, 1668
Age 36
Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, USA
1670
August 1670
Age 38
Westfield, Hampshire County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
1673
February 9, 1673
Age 41
Westfield,Hampden,MA
1675
July 15, 1675
Age 43
Westfield, Hampden County, Massachusetts, USA
1677
October 1, 1677
Age 45
Westfield, Hampden, Massachusetts, New England