Thomas Pargitor (1796 - d.)

‹ Back to Pargitor surname

Is your surname Pargitor?

Research the Pargitor family

Thomas Pargitor's Geni Profile

Records for Thomas Pargitor

659,269 Records

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Birthplace: Lower Tysoe, Warwickshire, UK
Death: (Date and location unknown)
Occupation: 1861 Lab 1851 Manager of Warmington Manor House over 8 acres 2 men & 2 boys
Managed by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)
Last Updated:

About Thomas Pargitor

1841 census shows a Richard Pargitor also born in Tysoe circa 1801 who could be a younger brother of Thomas

  • Wife Ann 35
  • Mary 12
  • Hannah 9
  • Mark 6
  • Harriett 4
  • Thomas 1

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In 1851 Possible the above mentioned Richard possibly a different Richard was recorded as born 1798 in Warmington with wife Ann 45 of Banbury

  • Charlotte 12 Warmington
  • Hannah 10 "

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In 1851 Thomas Pargitor was the Manager of Warmington Manor for the Earl of Jersey over 8 acres, 2 men and 2 boys.

( http://www.geni.com/people/George-Child-Villiers-5th-Earl-of-Jersey/6000000007264257842 )

Image produced from the Windows on Warwickshire service with permission of Landmark Information Group Ltd. and Ordnance Survey, where Windows on Warwickshire is hyperlinked to http://www.windowsonwarwickshire.org.uk, Landmark Information Group Ltd. is hyperlinked to http://www.landmark-information.co.uk and Ordnance Survey is hyperlinked to http://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

WARMINGTON Acreage: 1,809. Population: 1911, 252; 1921, 245; 1931, 233. The parish, which adjoins Oxfordshire on the east and south, is hilly, most of the land lying between 400 ft. in the north and 600 ft. in the south. The soil is rich corn-land, but much of it is pasture. There are several small streams, of which one forms the parish boundary for some distance on the east and north; and there are many trees in the hedgerows, as well as one or two shaws in the south. The road from Banbury to Warwick runs through the parish from south to north and then north-west, sending off a branch to the hamlet of Arlescote, which lies in the west of the parish on the slopes of Edge Hill where it is crowned by Nadbury Camp in Ratley (q.v.). The church stands directly on the east side of the main road from Banbury to Warwick at the top of a steep gradient and the village lies mostly to the northeast of it at a lower level. It is one of the few in this district that has a spacious village green (almost rectangular), with the houses on three sides of it and with a slope upwards to the south. Most of the buildings are of local stone with thatched or stone-tiled roofs. One of the houses at the south-east angle, facing west, has 17th-century windows with mullions and labels and an arched and square-headed doorway also with a label. Grove Farm, in a side turning just off the south-east of the green, is mainly an 18th-century ashlar stone house with a central front door and plain square-headed windows, but is of earlier origin, having mullioned windows surviving in the basement walls, moulded ceiling-beams, and a staircase with turned balusters and newels of the 17th century. The Manor House, of two stories and attics, faces the green at its higher south end and is built of coursed rough ashlar. It dates from the second half of the 16th century and is of half-H-shaped plan: the gabled wings project to the south and have gables also on the north front, which is all in one plane. They have moulded copings and tall pinnacles at the apexes. The west side of the west wing has a tall flush dormer (over the staircase) with a similar gable. A similar dormer on the east side of the house (to the east staircase) became dilapidated and was taken down a few years ago. All the windows have moulded mullions and labels; some have been restored. The north and south doorways have moulded jambs with base-stops and four-centred arches in square heads with labels and with plain shields carved in the spandrels. They open into a crosspassage west of the middle hall, which is entered from it by another arched doorway. The hall has a moulded north fire-place with four-centred arch, set in a chimney-stack that projects on the north front and has a plain shaft. There are similar fire-places in the southeast wing and in the upper story. The kitchen in the south-west wing has a plain wide fire-place. The hall has fine moulded ceiling-beams and exposed joists. Both east and west staircases wind round a central framed square newel in which are cupboards, &c., and the eastern retains a few pierced flat-shaped balusters against the wall of the lowest flight. The window masonry throughout has a large number of masons' marks, a W, an R, and another. The roofs have tall queen-posts, between which are the attic-chambers. They are mostly covered with stone tiles. Manors In 1086 the Count of Meulan held 13 hides in WARMINGTON (which probably included Shotteswell) which Azor had formerly held. (fn. 1) A knight, unnamed, held 2½ hides of the count. (fn. 2) Another 5 hides in ARLESCOTE, (fn. 3) which Boui had held before the Conquest, were held in 1086 of the count by the Norman Abbey of Préaux, to whom they had been given by the count's father Roger de Beaumont, and confirmed by William the Conqueror c. 1080. (fn. 4) When the count's brother Henry de Newburgh, Earl of Warwick, succeeded to his estates he evidently gave to the abbey the whole vill of Warmington, 'excepting the berewicks', as this gift was confirmed by his grandson Earl Waleran. (fn. 5) Roger, Earl of Warwick (1123–53), confirmed to the monks the grant by Ralf de St. Sanson of 1 hide and 1 virgate in Warmington, with tithes there and in Arlescote and Shotteswell, all of which had been given to his father Richard by Ralf son of Helebold. (fn. 6) The latter may have been the unnamed knight who held of the count in 1086, and Ralf's father Richard may be identified with the Richard who, as a brother of the convent of St. Mary of Warwick, was allowed to grant tithes in Warmington and its hamlets to Préaux c. 1130. (fn. 7) The Abbey of Préaux established a cell at Warmington, (fn. 8) the prior of which was holding Arlescote as half a knight's fee of Edmund, brother of Edward I, as of the earldom of Leicester in 1299. (fn. 9) During the 14th century, however, the 'priory' seems to have lapsed, and the manor of Warmington, which was worth about £30 in 1380, was under the control of the Prior of Toft Monks (Norfolk), the abbey's representative in England. (fn. 10) With other possessions of alien houses it was constantly being seized into the king's hands during the war with France, and in 1390 Lewis Clifford and his son Lewis obtained a grant of the English estates of Préaux for their lives. (fn. 11) . (fn. 12) Sir Lewis in 1403 transferred his interest to Sir Thomas Erpingham, who in turn made it over to the Carthusian Priory of Witham in Somerset. (fn. 13) After the death of Sir Thomas the priory received further confirmations of the manors from Henry VI (fn. 14) and Edward IV. (fn. 15) The manor of Warmington, which in 1291 had produced £13 17s. 8d. yearly, (fn. 16) in 1535 was worth £25 10s. 2d. clear. (fn. 17) After the Dissolution the priory's tenements in Arlescote were granted in 1542 to Richard Andrews and Leonard Chamberlain, (fn. 18) who promptly alienated them to John Lecke of Astrop (Northants) and Edward his son. (fn. 19) In 1548 Edward Lecke had licence to grant them to John Croker, (fn. 20) of Hook Norton (Oxon.), who in 1551 settled the manor of Warmington (which he had presumably acquired from William and Francis Sheldon, grantees in 1544) (fn. 21) and lands in Arlescote on himself for life, with remainder to his son Gerard. (fn. 22) By Gerard the manors of Warmington and Arlescote were sold in 1572 to Richard and Thomas Cupper. (fn. 23) Richard died in or before 1605, when his son Henry Cupper had livery of the manors. (fn. 24) In 1622 Henry Cooper (as the name had now become) conveyed the manor of Warmington to his second son Thomas Cooper, (fn. 25) who, with Mary Cooper, widow, was dealing with it in 1628. (fn. 26) Henry Cooper had died seised of the manor in 1626, (fn. 27) and there seems to have been a division of the manor, as his eldest son Richard in 1633 had livery of one-third of the manor of Warmington. (fn. 28) Presumably Thomas's share passed to Mannasseh Cooper, who died in 1640 seised of Arlescote manor and other lands in Warmington, leaving a son Richard. (fn. 29) Meanwhile, in 1637, one Simon Davis had livery of the manor of Warmington, late of his father Richard. (fn. 30) Simon Davis was dealing with the manor in 1659, (fn. 31) as were Thomas Knight and Alice his wife (probably Simon's daughter) in 1671. (fn. 32) In 1702 the same Thomas and Alice with Richard Davis Knight, (fn. 33) and in 1736 the latter with Mary his wife and John Knight, (fn. 34) dealt with the manor. It is next found in 1743 in the hands of William Bumpstead, (fn. 35) who with his wife Mary dealt with it in 1752. (fn. 36) In 1758 William Bumpstead (no doubt his son), (fn. 37) John Boyd and Mary his wife (probably widow of the elder William), and Francis Kemp and Martha conveyed the manor to Francis Child. (fn. 38) Robert Child, the wealthy banker, held it in 1764 (fn. 39) and was succeeded by his daughter Sarah, who in 1787 with her husband John, Earl of Westmorland, was dealing with the manor. (fn. 40) Their daughter Sarah Sophia married George, Earl of Jersey, who was lord of the manor from about 1806 until his death in 1859. (fn. 41) Mrs. Bennett was lady in 1889, (fn. 42) and Mr. H. F. Bennett is named as lord of the manor in 1900, (fn. 43) and in 1924, (fn. 44) but the manorial rights appear to have lapsed.

Plan of Warmington Manor House (see Media) From: 'Parishes: Warmington', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 5: Kington hundred (1949), pp. 182-187. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=57070 Date accessed: 29 December 2012.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Wikipedia about The Earl of Jersey Earl Of Jersey... the fifth Earl. He was a Tory politician and served as Lord Chamberlain of the Household and as Master of the Horse. Lord Jersey married Sarah Sophia (d. 1867), daughter of John Fane, 10th Earl of Westmorland, and his wife Sarah Anne (d. 1793), daughter of Robert Child. Through this marriage the private bank Child & Co came into the Villiers family. In 1819 Lord Jersey assumed by Royal license the additional surname of Child. On his death the titles passed to his son, the sixth Earl. He sat as Conservative Member of Parliament for Rochester, Minehead, Honiton and Weymouth and Melcombe Regis and Cirencester. He succeeded in the earldom on 3 October 1859 and died on 24 October 1859, having held the title for only twenty-one days. Lord Jersey married Julia, daughter of Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, in 1841.

view all

Thomas Pargitor's Timeline

1796
1796
Lower Tysoe, Warwickshire, UK
1821
1821
Age 25
1826
1826
Age 30
Middle Tysoe, Warwickshire, UK
1828
1828
Age 32
Lower Tysoe, Warwickshire, UK
1838
1838
Age 42
Lower Tysoe, Warwickshire, England, United Kingdom
1839
1839
Age 43
Middle Tysoe, Warwickshire, UK
1840
1840
Age 44
????
????
- present
Warmington Manor House, Oxfordshire, England
????