Thomas Pettit, I (1609 - c.1668) MP

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Birthplace: Saffron Walden, Essex, England, United Kingdom
Death: Died in Newtown, Long Island, NY, USA
Managed by: mi² Anderson, (c) ♥
Last Updated:

About Thomas Pettit, I

Puritan Thomas Pettit in 1637 sided with Mrs. Anne Hutchinson in her controversy with Massachusetts Bay Colony. During the trial he was arrested on suspicion of slander, insubordination and inciting to riot. He was convicted and sentenced to jail but was later released with others upon agreement that they would all leave Massachusetts Bay Colony within 10 days. Thomas went with Rev. John Wheelwright to the Falls of Piscataqua in New Hampshire where a tract was obtained from the natives and they founded the town of Exeter. When the Duke of York granted all of the land surrounding the settlement of Exeter to Massachusetts Bay Colony, it became economically necessary that Exeter be reinstated with the Bay Colony. At that time, Thomas Pettit sold his property and in 1655 moved to Long Island with others where they were given permission to settle. The new settlement was called Newtown.

Family

Thomas Pettit 1st, born about 1609, was living as late as March 1668 and died in Newtown before October 1668.

Parents: not confirmed. (See "brief biography" section for possible ancestry)

Married:

  1. November 1629 in county Essex, England to Christian Mellowes, daughter of Abraham Mellowes and Martha Bulkeley.

Children: at least eight children; the exact order of their birth is not known.

  1. Thomas Pettit 2d, born in Salem Harbor 1630.
  2. Sarah Pettit, born at Boston 1634 (?).
  3. Joseph Pettit, born at Boston 1636.
  4. Elizabeth Pettit, born at Exeter 1637 (?).
  5. John Pettit, born at Exeter 1638.
  6. Mary Pettit, born at Exeter 1640 (?)
  7. Nathaniel Pettit, born at Exeter 1645.
  8. Hannah Pettit, born at Exeter 1647.

Brief Biography

Thomas Pettit, an ardent Puritan whose parentage is not known [yet] , born at Widford, England, about 1609. It is not known [yet] whether he is descended from Valentine de Pettit of co. Kent, or from Sir Otes Pettit, or from some other old English line, or whether he was descended from one of the several families named Pettit who, among many Huguenot refugees, were forced to flee france under the terrible persecution of the Protestants, as on St. Bartholemew's Day in 1572, when the slaughter continued for a month and 30,000 persons were murdered.

My ancestor Thomas Pettit is said to have married Christian Mellowes (daughter of Abraham Mellowes and Martha Bulkeley) in co. Essex, England, in November 1629, five months before they sailed on the ship "Talbot," which left England in March 1629/30 and after three months at sea landed at Charlestown (Cambridge) 2 July 1630, 20 days after the flagship "Arabella" landed at Salem.

!DATA: John S. Wurts, MAGNA CHARTA, Brookfield Pub. Co., Philadelphia, PA, 1954, Part VII, p. xii, 2288-2304:


CHRISTIAN MELLOWES married in England 1629 Thomas Pettit, born in England about 1609, died at Newtown, L. I., before October 1668, who on 8 January 1737/8 in Boston was granted a house-plot "over toward the new mill" where the Capitol now stands. Between this lot and that of Oliver Mellows (a manufacturer of cloth) John Hancock later built the finest mansion in New England. It was unfortunately torn down about 1856; a bronze plate marks its location.

Consistently a non-conformist, Thomas Pettit, with many others in 1637, sided with Mrs. Anne Hutchinson, and her brother-in-law, Rev. John Wheelwright, in their controversy with the Massachusetts Bay Colony. During the trial, 7th of 1st mo. (April?) [March] 1638, Thomas Pettit, was arrested on suspicion of slander, insubordination and inciting a riot. He was convicted and sentenced to receive thirty lashes and to be held in gaol. As the church and state were then one, they were all arrested, but were later released upon their agreeing to leave the colony within ten days. Mrs. Hutchinson went to the Rhode Island Plantation of Roger Williams, while Thomas Pettit went to the Falls of the Piscataqua in New Hampshire with Rev. John Wheelwright and thirty-three others and, on a tract called Winnicomette obtained from the Indians, they founded the town of Exeter, and in 1638 established the Congregational Church. In the founding he received six acres and thirty poles as his share of Exeter upland. On 4 July 1639 they joined in signing the Exeter Combination, a Declaration of Independence. Although half of the 35 signers made their mark, the signature of Thomas Pettit is seen in excellent handwriting. He became in 1647 chief military man and Inspector of Staves. He served as Selectman of Exeter from 1652 to 1655.

The Duke of York, brother of Charles II, granted to the Massachusetts Bay Colony all the land east of the earlier Connecticut grant. This enabled the Bay Colony to surround the settlement at Exeter, making it economically necessary for it, in order to survive, to be reinstated with the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Thomas Pettit, unwilling to be again under its jurisdiction, sold his property and, with his wife and eight children and other settlers, came in 1655 to Long Island and petitioned Governor Stuyvesant, who granted them the right to settle. They named the place Newtown (now, since 1895, Elmhurst, Queens County (Mespat) and formerly called Mittleburg) which the Dutch had settled in 1644.

Soon after his arrival on Long Island the Town Marshal, one Elias Bailey, was voted out of office by the townspeople for exercising the duties of his office in an objectionable manner, and Thomas Pettit was elected 8 May 1657 to fill the office. This rather complicated matters, for his son, Nathaniel 1st, had fallen in love with the deposed Marshal's daughter, Mary Bailey.

On 4 December 1666 Thomas Pettit's name was on the list of freeholders, and in 1708 he was one of the first eight members of the Presbyterian Church in Newtown, L. I. Christian his wife (Asahel Pettit says her name was Catherine) became a member about five years later. The names Bailey and Furman occur frequently on the Church roll.

   1. THOMAS PETTIT 2d was born 25 June 1630 on the "Talbot" in Salem Harbor, before the ship proceeded to Charlestown.   He owned land in Exeter in 1644 or 1652 "and one had to be at least 14 years of age to own land in New England at that time."   His name is on the Charter from Governor Dongan in 1686 with his brother Nathaniel.   He was an elder of the Presbyterian Church in 1708.   He married Hannah, widow of John Moore of Newtown, L. I.   His son
   Thomas Pettit 3d was born at Newtown in 1666.   He purchased in the year 1715 a farm of 400 acres at New Rochelle, N. Y., took possession in the early spring and died there in the summer of 1715.   He married first Mary Bond of Hempstead (or May Hallock of Hallock's Cove) and by her had two children Thomas 4th (who had settled in Jamaica, L. I. and was conservator of his father's estate) and Christian, born 2 February 1710, who married Daniel Baruch.
   Thomas 3d married second Catherine La Broche (La Brenche) of New Rochelle and had Benjamin (a Loyalist, born 24 March 1701), Joshua (an ardent Patriot, born 24 February 1702, who married Sarah, daughter of Increase Carpenter), Samuel (a Loyalist, born 29 October 1704), Bartholomew, born 2 February 1706/7, and Nathan, born 3 February 1709/10. all mentioned in their father's Will, dated 24 July 1715, and probated 13 September 1715.
   Joshua and Sarah, above, had Increase Pettit, born at Hempstead 1726, from whom is descended the late Francis Pettit of Hollis, L. I.
   2. SARAH PETTIT, daughter of Thomas and Christian, born at Boston about 1634, married an English soldier named Skidmore after 1663, the date the English occupied New Netherland.   They have descendants in Somerset County, N. J.
   3. JOSEPH PETTIT, born at Exeter, N. H., 1636, received in 1657 or 1658 a grant of a lot, as did his brother John, at Hempstead, L. I., was the Town Clerk of Hempstead 1680 to 1700, and Justice of the Peace.   The last entry in the Hempstead town book says he sold in 1725 (he would then be aged 89) a lot "at the beach called Rock-a-way."   He married Margaret German (Germaine).   Their children were: Margaret, Sarah, Martha, Joseph, Mary and John.
   4. ELIZABETH PETTIT, born at Exeter about 1637 (?), died in 1730 (?).  She married first Thomas Reed and second, after 1665, John Burroughs of Newtown, L. I., born 1617, died 1678, and had John Burroughs, Jr.   In her Will dated 1678 she leaves her clothing to her sister Hannah.
   5. JOHN PETTIT, son of Thomas and Christian, born at Exeter in 1638, whose testimony at the Newtown Court on 16 April 1669 was corroborated by his brother Nathaniel.  He received in 1657 or 1658 a grant of land at Hempstead, L. I., as did his brother Joseph.   His name is on the Dongan Charter of 1686, with his brother Thomas.   John Pettit was an assessor from 1687 until his death in 1690.   John married first a Miss Moore and second a Miss Osborn. He was the father of:
   William Pettit 1st, born about 1690, whose Will at Jamaica, L. I., dated 1714, was probated 1726, and who married in 1716 (?) at Newtown Church, Catherine Van Velsey.
   6. MARY PETTIT, daughter of Thomas and Christian, was born at Exeter about 1640 (?). She married at Newtown, L. I., after 1660, John Furman (Forman).   After her father's death in October 1668 they were paid a small sum for caring for him in his last illness.   John Furman received Thomas Pettit's sword.
   We think her too young (age 13?) to have been the same Mary Pettit who, with a Thomas Pettit, witnessed a Deed to John Gilman at Exeter, N. H., in 1653/54.   It is not clear who these persons were.   In a Will at Newtown, L. I., in 1659, a lady devised an apple tree to her friend Mary Pettit.
   7. Nathaniel Pettit 1st, of whom below
   8. Hannah PETTIT, "youngest child" of Thomas and Christian, was born at Exeter, 1 February 1647, daughter of "Goodman" Pettit and "Christian" Pettit (Town Record).   Hannah is mentioned in 1678 in the Will of her sister Elizabeth.

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/13863584/person/236935015/media/2

Colonial and Revolutionary Families of Pennsylvania, Volumes I-III

, Ancestry.com & Pennsylvania -- Genealogy

WURTS

Excert from Pg 1678 & 1679

Dr. George Wurts married Abigail, daughter of Amos and Esther Pettit, granddaughter of John Pettit, great-granddaughter of Nathaniel Pettit, and great-great-granddaughter of Thomas Pettit.

Thomas Pettit, born about 1610, was in Boston, Massachusetts, as early as 1634. He located at Exeter, where he was awarded six acres and thirty poles of land as his share of the land divided among the thirty-four founders of the town. He served as selectman of Exeter from 1652 to 1655, and in the latter year formed one of a party of New Englanders who migrated to Newtown, Long Island, where he was named as marshal, May 8, 1657. His name appears on the list of freeholders at Newtown in 1666, and on the Charter from Governor Dongan in 1686. By his wife, Christian (Mellows) Pettit, he had at least three sons, Thomas, Nathaniel and John.

Thomas Pettit, son of Thomas and Christian (Mellows) Pettit, was born at Exeter, Massachusetts, in 1645, and accompanied his parents to Newtown, Long Island, in 1655. On April 23, 1668, he was granted ten acres of land in Hempstead meadow. He was a member of the Society of Friends, and on September 13, 1673, is of record as refusing to take the oath of allegiance though promising fealty. His name appears on the Dongan Charter of 1686, but soon after that date he removed to Hopewell township, then Hunterdon county, and obtained the grant of a tract of land on the Delaware near the mouth of the Assunpink, within the present limits of the city of Trenton, where he died in 1718, leaving a widow Mary, and children: Moses, Judith, Nathaniel, Elias, Jane, Jonathan and John.

John Pettit, son of Nathaniel and Mary Pettit came to New Jersey from Long Island prior to 1737, his youngest son Charles having been born in Amwell, New Jersey, in that year. He removed to Philadelphia prior to 1759, where he engaged in marine insurance in partnership with Andrew Reed, and conducted a large business in underwriting under the firm name of Reed & Pettit with office in Front street, a few doors below Walnut.

The six sons of John Pettit were all prominent men. Jonathan was a Colonial justice at Hardwick, where he died in 1768. Charles, born in New Jersey, in 1737, died in Philadelphia, September 6, 1896, was a colonel in the Revolutionary war, Colonial secretary of the Province of New Jersey, member of Continental Congress, one of the founders of the University of Philadelphia, president of the Insurance Company of North America, etc. Isaac remained loyal to the English crown, and was placed in the custody of his loyal brother Amos, and later removed to Canada. John lived and died in Sussex county, New Jersey, where his descendants still reside. Nathaniel was a justice of Sussex county, New Jersey, and that county's first representative int he Governor's Council, in 1772.

Amos Pettit, second son of John Pettit, and father of Abigail (Pettit) Wurts, was a freeholder in Brighton, (Hohnsonburg) 1764-89 and an incorporator of Christ Church in 1774. He was born in 1724, died in 1790. He was an ardent patriot during the trying years of the Revolution, as shown by the fact that his two tory brothers, Isaac and Nathaniel, were put in his charge by the Committee of Safety, to see that they did not communicate witht he enemy until they were permitted to remove to Canada. By his wife Ester he had three daughers, Polly, Mitilda Chambers, Abigail, wife of Dr. George Wurts.

Colonial and Revolutionary families of Pennsylvania : genealogical and personal memoirs Source: Original data: Colonial and Revolutionary families of Pennsylvania : genealogical and personal memoirs. New York: Lewis Pub. Co., 1911

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/13863584/person/236935015/media/4

1. THOMAS PETTIT 2d was born 25 June 1630 on the "Talbot" in Salem Harbor, before the ship proceeded to Charlestown. He owned land in Exeter in 1644 or 1652 "and one had to be at least 14 years of age to own land in New England at that time." His name is on the Charter from Governor Dongan in 1686 with his brother Nathaniel. He was an elder of the Presbyterian Church in 1708. He married Hannah, widow of John Moore of Newtown, L. I. His son

Thomas Pettit 3d was born at Newtown in 1666. He purchased in the year 1715 a farm of 400 acres at New Rochelle, N. Y., took possession in the early spring and died there in the summer of 1715. He married first Mary Bond of Hempstead (or May Hallock of Hallock's Cove) and by her had two children Thomas 4th (who had settled in Jamaica, L. I. and was conservator of his father's estate) and Christian, born 2 February 1710, who married Daniel Baruch.

Thomas 3d married second Catherine La Broche (La Brenche) of New Rochelle and had Benjamin (a Loyalist, born 24 March 1701), Joshua (an ardent Patriot, born 24 February 1702, who married Sarah, daughter of Increase Carpenter), Samuel (a Loyalist, born 29 October 1704), Bartholomew, born 2 February 1706/7, and Nathan, born 3 February 1709/10. all mentioned in their father's Will, dated 24 July 1715, and probated 13 September 1715.

Joshua and Sarah, above, had Increase Pettit, born at Hempstead 1726, from whom is descended the late Francis Pettit of Hollis, L. I.

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/13863584/person/236935015/media/3 -------------------- It is not known [yet] whether he is descended from Valentine de Pettit of co. Kent, or from Sir Otes Pettit, or from some other old English line, or whether he was descended from one of the several families named Pettit who, among many Huguenot refugees, were forced to flee France under the terrible persecution of the Protestants, as on St. Bartholemew's Day in 1572, when the slaughter continued for a month and 30,000 persons were murdered[Pettit Arms - A Collection of Pettit Lineages, online <http://pages.prodigy.net/reed_wurts/heraldry/pettit.htm>].

Sergeant Thomas Pettit was born in 1609 in Saffron, Walden, Essex, England.

He was the son of Henri Pettit. He was baptized on 17 April 1614 in Widford?, Essex?, England. He "served his brother-in-law Oliver Mellowes more than three and a half years" to pay for money advanced for he and his wife to gain passage on the "Talbot" between September 1627 and March 1630 in England.

He married Christian Mellowes, daughter of Abraham Mellowes and Martha Bulkeley, in November 1629 in Essex, England.

He and Christian Mellowes emigrated from England, leaving March 1629/30; sailing on the "Talbot."

He immigrated to Charlestown (Cambridge), Massachusetts Bay Colony, arriving 2 July 1630, arriving 20 days after the flagship "Arabella" landed at Salem. He served Oliver Mellows in Boston 3½ years after 1634 in Boston[New England Families, Genealogical Dictionary of New England, 1600s-1700s (FTM CD #169), CD-ROM (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Dictionary of New England Genealogical Publishing Company, 1991 & 1994), "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England." Volumes I-IV].

He was consistently a non-conformist in religious life, siding with Anne Hutchinson and her brother-in-law, Rev. John Wheelwright, in their controversy with the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1637.

He was ordered whipped for suspicion of slander, idleness and stubbornness in 1636/37 [New England Families, Genealogical Dictionary of New England, 1600s-1700s (FTM CD #169), CD-ROM (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Dictionary of New England Genealogical Publishing Company, 1991 & 1994), "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England." Volumes I-IV].

He was granted a house plot in Boston, on which the State House now stands, on 8 January 1637/38 in Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was arrested on suspicion of slander, insubordination and inciting to riot, during the trial of Anne Hutchinson on 7 March 1638.

He was convicted and sentenced to receive thirty lashes and to be held in jail in Massachusetts Bay Colony.

He was released when he agreed to leave Massachusetts Bay Colony, moving to the Falls of the Piscataqua in New Hampshire with Rev. John Wheelwright and with others founded the town of Exeter and established the Congregational Church in (then New Hampshire).

He received six acres and thirty poles as his share of Exeter upland in 1638.

He was named as among the many who signed The Exeter Combination, an agreement of all original settlers of Exeter, Mass., to obey the laws of England, and although half of the 35 signers made their mark, the signature of Thomas Pettit is seen in excellent handwriting, on 4 July 1639 in Exeter (then New Hampshire).

Incorporated in 1638, Exeter was one of the four original towns established in New Hampshire. It was first known as Squamscott, and was given the name Exeter by the settlement's managers, the "Exeter Combination," a group of English colonizers. The river location of the town made it a shipbuilding center and West Indies trading port [http://www.nhes.state.nh.us/elmi/htmlprofiles/exeter.html].

He was chief military man and Inspector of Staves in 1647 in Exeter, (then New Hampshire).

He was noted for having a wife named Christian in 1647 [New England Families, Genealogical Dictionary of New England, 1600s-1700s (FTM CD #169), CD-ROM (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Dictionary of New England Genealogical Publishing Company, 1991 & 1994), "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England." Volumes I-IV].

Selectman, Exeter, (then New Hampshire), between 1652 and 1655.

He was in Exeter when it became economically necessary for the Town to become part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and unwilling to again come under the jurisdiction of the Colony, he sold his lands and relocated to Dutch controlled Long Island, establishing there Newtown (now Elmhurst) in 1655.

He was elected Town Marshal on 8 May 1657 in Newton, Long Island, New York.

He was named on the list of freeholders on 4 December 1666 in Newton, Long Island, New York.

He died before October 1668 in Newton, Long Island, New York.

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Thomas Pettit, I's Timeline

1609
June 1609
Saffron Walden, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1629
November 1629
Age 20
Essex, , England
1630
June 25, 1630
Age 21
Harbor, NY, USA
1636
1636
Age 26
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
1638
1638
Age 28
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
1639
1639
Age 29
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
1641
1641
Age 31
Newtown, NY, USA
1645
1645
Age 35
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
1647
February 1, 1647
Age 37
Exeter, Rockingham, New Hampshire, USA
1648
1648
Age 38
Newtown, Queens, NY, USA