Thomas Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger

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Thomas Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger

Also Known As: ""Mayflower Passenger"", "Pilgrim on Mayflower"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Watford, Northamptonshire, England
Death: Died in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony
Cause of death: The great sickness.
Place of Burial: Burial Hill, Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of William Rogers, of Watford and Eleanor Lyne
Husband of Alice "Elsgen" Rogers
Father of John Rogers; Thomas Rogers; Richard Rogers; Lt. Joseph Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger; John Rogers, Sr. and 2 others
Brother of (Possibly) Margaret Rogers; Elizabeth Rogers; William Rogers, III and John Rogers

Occupation: Sold "camlet" - cloth used in making petticoats and cloaks, "Mayfloer Compact", Sold camlet
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger

Thomas Rogers, Mayflower Passenger, was born circa 1571 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He died in Plymouth Colony in the winter of 1620/21 "in the first sickness." He did not die aboard the Mayflower.

Parents: son of William Rogers (ca 1540 -1585) of Watford, and Eleanor Rogers Lyne (d. 1607).

Married:

  1. on 24 October 1597 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England to Alice Cosford, daughter of George Cosford and Margart (Willis?). Her name has been also seen as Elsgen & Grace.

Children of Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] and Alice Cosford:

  1. Thomas Rogers b. 24 Mar 1598/99 [3]
  2. poss. Richard Rogers b. 12 Mar 1599 [3]
  3. Joseph Rogers+ b. 23 Jan 1602/3, d. between 2 and 15 Jan 1677/78 [3]
  4. John Rogers+ b. 6 Apr 1606, d. bt 26 Aug 1691 - 20 Sep 1692 [3]
  5. Elizabeth Rogers b. 26 Dec 1609 [4]
  6. Margaret Rogers b. 30 May 1613 [4]

Brief Biography

from: Thomas Rogers Society: Thomas Rogers Bio Page

Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] was born circa 1571 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of William Rogers and Eleanor. Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] married Alice Cosford, daughter of George Cosford and Margart (Willis?), on 24 October 1597 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] Our earliest known encounter with Pilgrim Thomas Rogers was on 25 June 1618 when he became a citizen of Leiden, Holland, vouched for by William Jepson, formerly of Worksop, Notts., and by Roger Wilson, formerly of Sandwich, Kent Co. Engalnd.

On 1 April 1620 Thomas sold his Leiden house on the Barbarasteeg for 300 guilders, in preparation for the journey to New England.

Governor Bradford says in his history of the Plymouth settlement that on board the Mayflower were "Thomas Rogers and Joseph his son; his other children came afterwards......Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness but his son Joseph is still living (1650) and is married and hath six children. The rest of Thomas Rogers' [children] came over and are married and have many children." Therefore we know that Thomas and his son Joseph arrived at Cape Cod aboard the ship Mayflower and on 11 November 1620 according to their calendar, or 21 November on ours, Thomas was one of forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Thomas did not live through the rigorous winter which carried off half the group but young Joseph, like so many of the children, did survive.

Recent discoveries show that Thomas had a family living in Leiden, Holland, when the 1622 Poll Tax was taken. In the Over "t Hoff Quarter, in a house with other Pilgrim families in St. Peter's Churchyard west-side, were Jan Thomas, orphan from England without means; Elsgen Rogiers, widow of Thonis Rogiers, an Englishwoman; and Lysbeth and Grietgen her children, poor people. Translated this could read John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children. At that period the word orphan meant that either or both parents were dead.

In the 1623 Plymouth Colony land division, Joseph Rogers was allotted two acres-one for himself and one on behalf of his late father. He may have been living in the household of Governor Bradford with who he was grouped on 22 May 1627, in the division of cattle. Joseph and twelve other inhabitants of Plymouth received "an heyfer of the last year which was of the Great white-back cow that was brought over in the Ann and two shee goats."

Governor Bradford's statement that the rest of Thomas Rogers' children came over and married and had children, seems clearly to indicate that more than one of his children came to New England after 1620. We know that his son John came to Plymouth about 1630. Although many other male Rogers immigrants have been claimed as sons of Thomas the Pilgrim, none of the claims has been proved and some have been disproved. Therefore it seems likely that at least one of the Rogers daughters who were living in Holland in 1622 came over. John and Joseph Rogers each named a daughter Elizabeth, perhaps thereby indicating that their sister Elizabeth lived in New England. Unfortunately extensive research has failed to uncover any further evidence.

John Rogers came to Plymouth about 1630, when the last of the Leiden contingent arrived and was in Plymouth Colony on 25 March 1633 when he was taxed 9 shillings. The proof of his identity lies in a grant made 6 April 1640 to "Joseph Rogers and John Rogers his brother...fifty acres apeece of upland....at the North River." Both then had growing families to carry forward the Rogers heritage, although only Joseph's descendants would carry forward the Rogers name beyond the fourth generation."

He died in Plymouth Colony in the winter of 1620/21 "in the first sickness."

Links

Citations

  1. [S1] Ann T. [Revised by], (Originally compiled by Alice W. A. Westgate) Reeves, Rogers-Silver.
  2. [S14] Clifford L. Stott, "English Ancestry of Thomas Rogers".
  3. [S1] Ann T. [Revised by], (Originally compiled by Alice W. A. Westgate) Reeves, Rogers-Silver, 1:1.
  4. [S1] Ann T. [Revised by], (Originally compiled by Alice W. A. Westgate) Reeves, Rogers-Silver, 1:2.

Additional information

From the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Rogers_(Mayflower_Pilgrim) English Wikipedia page on Thomas Rogers]:

Thomas Rogers, a Mayflower Pilgrim and one of 41 signatories of the Mayflower Compact was among those who did not survive that first harsh Plymouth, Massachusetts winter of 1620-1621.

Thomas Rogers was accompanied by his son, Joseph, but not his wife or other children, who had stayed behind in Leiden. There is record of his wife and other children in the 1622 poll tax of Leiden.

Thomas died during the first winter in Plymouth, when Joseph was 18. Joseph married Hannah, who bore him four sons and four daughters.[1]

Thomas' daughters Elizabeth and Margaret apparently came to New England later, but no further information is available.

Thomas' son John came to Plymouth about 1630. On April 16, 1639, John married Anna Churchman, who bore him one son and three daughters.[2]

Governor William Bradford (Mayflower passenger) wrote of Thomas Rogers in 1650: "Thomas Rogers, and Joseph, his sone (came). His other children came afterwards… Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness, but his sone Joseph is still living, and is married, and hath 6 children. The rest of Thomas Rogers (children) came over, and are maried, and have many children.”[3]

The Thomas Rogers Society - [4]

References

Sources

  • Genealogies of Mayflower Families , 1500s- 1800s- CD #171, FTM.
  • "The English Ancestry of the Pilgrim Thomas Rogers and His wife Alice (Cosford) Rogers" , The Genealogist, 10:138-149. by: Cilfford Stott.

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From the http://www.richmondancestry.org/mayflower.shtml Richmond Family Ancestry page on Mayflower Descendants:

Many present day members of the Richmond Family are direct descendants of the Mayflower pilgrims. In the fall of 1620, a small group courageous pilgrims left Leyden, Holland and immigrated to America to found the Plymouth Colony on the shores of Cape Cod Bay. Although no Richmonds were aboard the Mayflower, the children and grandchildren of the early Massachusetts settler, John Richmond, lived and grew up in the same Plymouth Colony communities as the Mayflower descendants.

The Richmond Mayflower connection comes through the descendants of Thomas Rogers of the Mayflower. Thomas was a Leyden contingent and also a signer of the Mayflower Compact. The ancestry of Thomas Rogers had for many years remained a question. The lineage for Thomas Rogers recognized by the Thomas Rogers Society is the research completed by Clifford Stott and published in the Genealogist in 1989. Stott states that Thomas Rogers (1572-1598) was the son of William and Eleanor Rogers and the grandson of William and Joan Rogers. Thomas married Alice Cosford (October 24, 1597; Watford, Northampton, England). The baptismal records for his children are all found in the parish records of Watford, Northampton, England. It also states that Thomas Rogers is not a descendent of John Rogers the Martyr, which misinformation has been often published. The traditional lineage, no longer accepted, was portrayed by John Cox Underwood in his book Lineage of the Rogers Family published in 1911.

Thomas Rogers became a citizen of Leyden, Holland on June 25, 1618 with the sponsors William Jepson and Roger Wilson, and was called a Camelot-merchant. Two years later on April 1, 1620, he sold his house in Leyden before coming to America on the Mayflower. Thomas was a business man and not a Puritan or Pilgrim. He took advantage of the connection he had made with them while living in Holland, and joined them on their trip. Thomas brought his third son, Joseph with him on the Mayflower. Only his fourth son, John Rogers is known to also have come to America. Thomas Rogers died during the first winter at the Plymouth Colony in 1621.

John Richmond (1637-1663), who was the son of John Richmond, was the first Richmond to marry a pilgrim wife. He married Abigail Rogers (1641-1663), the daughter of John Rogers and Ann Churchman and the granddaughter of Thomas Rogers. This line has produced many Mayflower descendants.

Colonel Silvester Richmond (1672-1754), son of Edward Richmond and Abigail Davis and grandson of John Richmond also married a pilgrim wife. Silvester married Elizabeth Rogers in 1693. She was a niece of the Abigail Rogers who married Silvester's uncle John. Elizabeth's father was John Rogers, son of John Rogers and Ann Churchman and grandson of Thomas Rogers. Descendants of Silvester and Elizabeth have a second Mayflower line through her mother Elizabeth Pabodie whose parents were Hon. William Pabodie and Elizabeth Alden, the daughter of pilgrim John Alden and his wife Priscilla Mullins. Col. Silvester Richmond and his wife had 11 children to carry on this double Mayflower lineage.

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From the Mayflower History page on Thomas Rogers: http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/ThomasRogers.php

Thomas Rogers was born in Watford, Northampton, England, the son of William and Eleanor Rogers. He married Alice Cosford in 1597. All his children were baptized and/or buried in Watford. He brought his wife and family to Leiden, Holland, where he became a citizen of Leiden on 25 June 1618, where he is called a camlet merchant.

On 1 April 1620, he sold his house on Barbarasteeg for 300 guilders, apparently in preparation for his voyage on the Mayflower. He came on the Mayflower with eldest son Joseph, leaving behind in Leiden his son John, daughters Elizabeth and Margaret, and wife Alice.

Thomas Rogers died the first winter at Plymouth, leaving behind his 18-year old son Joseph. His wife and children that were left behind in Leiden are found in the 1622 poll tax of Leiden, and were termed "poor people" and "without means". Children Elizabeth and Margaret apparently came to New England later, but where they lived or who they married with remain unknown. Son John came to Plymouth about 1630, and there married Anna Churchman, on 16 April 1639.

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http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Thomas_Rogers_%281%29

http://www.tracycrocker.com/p27.htm

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b. prob. England. Camlet merchant. Saint. 18th signer of the Mayflower Compact. He died the first winter of 1621.

m. Elsgen (information unknown), b. prob. England; d. Leiden, Holland, aft. 1622; Four children

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From the Spring 2007 Newsletter of the Thomas Rogers Society: http://www.thomasrogerssociety.com/NL-S2007.pdf

Thomas Rogers is listed as a camlet merchant. What is camlet? Camlet is a blended fabric of camel hair and silk. Camel hair is hollow and has excellent insulating qualities. Silk is light weight and when blended with the camel hair provides a serviceable fabric that is lighter in weight, but still warm. Other blends of camlet may be camel hair and linen or goat hair and silk or linen. This fabric was woven in various widths and used for outer garments.

Did Thomas Rogers begin this trade when he arrived in Leiden or was he a camlet merchant in England? A question for one of our researchers.

---------------------------------

Article on the Mayflower Compact apparently taken from: http://www.economicexpert.com/a/Mayflower:Compact.htm

http://www.mayflower-de.org/MF_PilgrimHistory.html

The Mayflower Compact was the first governing document of Plymouth Colony. It was drafted by the Pilgrims while they were still aboard the Mayflower and prior to their disembarking. It was signed on November 11, 1620 in what is now Provincetown Harbor near Cape Cod. The purpose of the Mayflower Compact was to prevent people that didn't split from the Church of England from separating with the Separatists (Pilgrims). The Pilgrims were people who separated from the Church of England to follow their beliefs. The people that threatened to separate were non-pilgrims but they had the skills so the Pilgrims could survive.

Original spelling and uneditted text from the History of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford (1590-1657), second governor of Plymouth:

In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereigne Lord, King James, by the grace of God, of Great Britaine, France, and Ireland king, defender of the faith, etc., having undertaken, for the glory of God and the advancement of the Christian faith, and honour of our king and country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne parts of Virginia , doe, by these presents, solemnly and mutually in the presence of God, and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politick, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enacte, constitute, and frame such just and equall laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the generall good of the Colonie unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.

In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cap-Codd the 11. of November, in the year of the raigne of our sovereigne lord, King James of England, France, and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fiftie-fourth. Anno. Dom. 1620.

The Compact was signed by the following 41 passengers:

  • 1. John Carver born c. 1576, in either Nottinghamshire or Derbyshire, England and died on April 15, 1621 in what became Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States, was the first governor of Plymouth Colony. Carver was one of the Pilgrims who came over in the May
  • 2. Digery Priest
  • 3. William Brewster: Several notable persons were named William Brewster: William Brewster (Pilgrim) (1567-1644), Pilgrim and Mayflower passenger; William Brewster (ornithologist) (1851-1919), ornithologist.
  • 4. Edmund Margesson
  • 5. John Alden ( 1599 September 12, 1687) was one of the Pilgrims who emigrated to America in 1620 on the Mayflower and founded the Plymouth Colony. He was one of the first settlers of Duxburrough or Duxborough, known today as Duxbury Massachusetts.
  • 6. George Soule
  • 7. James Chilton
  • 8. Francis Cooke one of the 102 passengers on the Mayflower was born c. 1583 in England. He died on April 7, 1663, in Plymouth, Massachusetts. This early settler is one of the 26 male Pilgrims known to have descendants. He is described in Dutch records...
  • 9. Moses Fletcher
  • 10. John Ridgate
  • 11. Christopher Martin
  • 12. William Mullins
  • 13. Thomas English
  • 14. John Howland
  • 15. Stephen Hopkins
  • 16. Edward Winslow
  • 17. Gilbert Winslow
  • 18. Miles Standish
  • 19. Richard Bitteridge
  • 20. Francis Eaton
  • 21. John Tilly
  • 22. John Billington
  • 23. Thomas Tinker
  • 24. Samuel Fuller
  • 25. Richard Clark
  • 26. John Allerton
  • 27. Richard Warren
  • 28. Edward Liester
  • 29. William Bradford
  • 30. Thomas Williams
  • 31. Isaac Allerton
  • 32. Peter Brown
  • 33. John Turner
  • 34. Edward Tilly
  • 35. John Craxton
  • 36. Thomas Rogers
  • 37. John Goodman
  • 38. Edward Fuller
  • 39. Richard Gardiner
  • 40. William White
  • 41. Edward Doten

Massachusetts history United States historical documents U.S. colonial history 1620

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Thomas Rogers, was a signer of "The Mayflower Compact" that arrived in Plymouth in 1620

Pilgrim Homes In Leiden By Jeremy Dupertuis Bangs

Excerpt

The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol 154 pgs. 413-445

When the English Separatists who were to become famous as America’s Pilgrims settled in Leiden in 1609, one of the first problems they had to solve was housing. Although for most of them their solutions during the first months of the Leiden exile are unrecorded, that in itself implies that they were renters. Eventually several bought houses. Property transactions in Leiden were carefully recorded, and the records are preserved.

The pilgrims who bought or sold houses before 1620 were: William Robinson, William Jepson, John Robinson, Henry Wood, Jane White, Roger Wilson, Robert Cushman, William Bradford, William Minter, Richard Masterson, John, Ellis, John Kebel, Henry Coleth (or Collet), William Bristsman (or Bridgeman), Roger Symons, Phineas Edwards, Henry Richard, Bartholomew Smith, John Carpenter, and Thomas Rogers, besides Jan Allaert whose connection with the Pilgrim congregation is less certain, but who might be John Allerton.

Various Pilgrims rented houses in more or less identifiable locations.

The Leiden betrothal records, as well as other types of documents, identify some people’s place of residence. Several Pilgrims lived “in Douveren” or near it: Elizabeth Pettinger, William Pontus, Jane Peck, John Spooner, and John Jennings.

Dover was the name of a brewery situated between the Haarlemmerstraat, a major street running through the northern third of the city and the Oude Rijn (the north branch of the Rijn, or Rhine River), midway along the block bounded by the Hooijgracht bridge to the east and the Hooglandsekerksteeg to the west. John Jenny (not the same as John Jennings) who was a brewer’s man (brouwerksknecht) living in the Veldestraat may have worked in this brewery with its other Pilgrim the Veldestraat may have worked in this brewery with its other Pilgrim associations. What the structural arrangements of breweries were is unclear, but from these and other references not concerning Pilgrims we can conclude that breweries often included rental space. Taverns were also found on the brewery premises. The river frontage of the Douveren brewery was 15 roeden 6 voeten 6duim (about 192’), which indicates that there was plenty of space in the lot where rental housing could be constructed.

The exact location of the other rental property is unknown, like the house where Samuel Fuller lived near the Marepoort (a town gate), or the house on file: ///C|/Documents and Settings/Tracy Crocker/Desktop/TO DO/Need to File/PILGRIM.HTM (1 of 3)2/18/2007 2:09:20 PM

Pilgrim Homes In Leiden: the Levendal (a long canal) where Francis Cooke and Hester Mayhew lived in 1608.

Although the Pilgrims’ houses have disappeared or cannot be precisely located, with the exception of the house of Anthony Clemens, in a room of which Alice, the widow of Thomas Rogers, was living with three children in 1622, study of sale records and comparison with similar rental properties can indicate something about these homes of the Pilgrims in Leiden.

On 22 February 1617, Thomas Rogers bought a house on the west side of the Barbarasteeg, in a row between houses owned by Jacob Sullof, fustian weaver. The neighbor to the rear was Aelbert Cornelisz. Van Berckendael Rogers’ bondsman was Gerrit Gerritsz. Van Berrevelt, a miller. Payment took the form of a mortgage for 475 guilders, of which 325 was due in cash immediately and 150 to be paid on May Day, 1617.

On 1 April 1620 Rogers sold the house to Mardecheus Colven (not Cohen, contrary to the Dexters), for 300 guilders cash. Colven was from Colchester or Hastings. The sale was preparatory to Thomas Rogers’ departure to go to New England on the Mayflower. He died in the first winter, leaving his widow and three children in Leiden.

In the poll tax of 1622 we see that Elsgen Rogiers (Rogers), widow of Thom[a]s Rogiers, was living in the rear house or in the kitchen (in tachterhuys of Inde keucken) of the house on the corner of the Kloksteeg and the west side of the Pieterskerk churchyard. The children were Lijsbett and Grietgen (lizzie and Gertie), identified as her children (haer kinderen), and Jan Thomasz. (who from his patronymic was John son of Thomas [Rogers]).

They were living in the huse of Pilgrim Anthony Clemens, a bombazineweaver, whose family consisted of his wife Jannetgen Jansdr (rendered by the Dexters as Jane Jones, although Jane Johnson would be equally possible, and her father’s name may simply have been John, while the surname was omitted) and their children Compassi and Hopij (Compassion and Hope).

The household included several poor orphans:

  • Jan Robertsz., from the eastern Dutch region 't Goijlant (misread as Scotland by the Dexters);
  • Marya Flut (Flood) and Lysbet Turner, with Sjou (Joe) Jansz and Jan Thomasz (already mentioned), all four described as orphans from England; and
  • Marcus Druven, serge worker, with his wife Judit Jansdr. and their Son Jan, living upstairs in the same house.

This house still stands, the only one with Pilgrim connections that is largely intact. Its step gable facing the Pieterskerk, seen in the map from 1600, has been reduced to a cornice with a hipped roof.

file:///C|/Documents and Settings/Tracy Crocker/Desktop/TO DO/Need to File/PILGRIM.HTM (2 of 3)2/18/2007 2:09:20 PM

Pilgrim Homes In Leiden

ADDED By Walter G. Ashworth, 9th great grandson

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From the Richmond Family Ancestry page on Pilgrim History (as it relates to Thomas Rogers):

http://www.richmondancestry.org/pilgrim.shtml

Pilgrim History

A portion of a book written by R. Walton, a Richmond Family researcher

"The 'Pilgrims' were a group of English Calvinist religious dissenters, known as Separatists, who fled persecution under Queen Elizabeth I and her successor King James I, taking up residence in Leyden, Holland in 1609. Many of the group immigrated to America on the MAYFLOWER (1620), the FORTUNE (1621), the ANNE and the LITTLE JAMES (1623) and the second MAYFLOWER (1629). They provided the leadership in the establishment of the colony "New Plymouth" as well as about half the colony's population. The term 'Pilgrims' was first used in 1596 in the 'Confession of Faith' they adopted and, in later references, to their own idea of life on earth as a pilgrimage towards heavenly bliss."

Queen Elizabeth I wanted to firmly establish the Church of England as THE CHURCH and she attempted to have all religious groups conform to the Anglican Church. The Puritans, another group in the Anglican Church, wanted to purify" the church of all Roman Catholic ceremonies and practices and bring about further reforms. Both groups wanted to be a church unto themselves but the Puritans were being persecuted for their attempts to run their churches the way they wished rather than the way the bishops of the Anglican Church wanted the churches run.

Queen Elizabeth I died in 1603. The majority of Englishmen were now Protestant and the Bible was the most read book. Shakespeare, music, poetry all flourished during her reign. Songs were created and sung by the common man as he worked.

Elizabeth, however, had no children so the reign of the Tudor's came to an end with her death. Her successor was James I born in 1566. He was already King James VI of Scotland. His mother was Mary, Queen of Scots. She had tried, unsuccessfully, to oust Elizabeth.

With the reign of James I, the House of Stuart came to power. He persecuted both Catholics and the extreme Protestant Puritans and Separatists. He believed he had the divine right to rule as he pleased to the extent that he ruled without parliament for seven years (1614-1621). He finally gave in, however, and agreed to let Parliament share in government but he died shortly after.

It was during the end of Elizabeth's years as Queen and the beginning of James' reign that the Separatists left England, fleeing to Holland where there was more acceptance of different religious beliefs and, from 1620 on to America. Despite his treatment of the non-conformists, it was during James' reign, and with his support, that the version of the Bible we know as the King James Version was translated.

His son, Charles I became King (1625-1649) and proved to be far more uncompromising than his father. It was during his reign that Reverend William Walton and his fellow Puritans educated at Cambridge began to fear for their lives. The Archbishop of Canterbury, William Laud, inflamed anti-Puritan feeling and caused a big wave of emigration of Puritans to America.

The Separatists had already immigrated to America by this time because, even though they were safe in Holland, they were not well off financially. They had mostly worked in existing trades, or if they qualified by virtue of having graduated from Cambridge or Oxford in England, taught at the University.

They also published religious pamphlets, which annoyed King James when these materials were smuggled into England. This caused a problem with the Dutch because the English Ambassador complained.

As time went on, the hard work, aging Separatists, increased poverty and the feeling the Separatists had that the Dutch did not sufficiently respect the Sabbath caused them to consider going to America. They wanted to spread the word of God to remote parts of the world and felt they should go to America where they might convert the Indians and thus bring their religion into this New World.

According to Eugene Stratton, author of "Plymouth Colony, its History and People" those who left Leyden were not known as Pilgrims at this time. William Bradford writing his history many years later first applied the word to them.

In preparation, the Separatists in Leyden who wished to go to America, bought one ship, the SPEEDWELL, and chartered another, the MAYFLOWER. They left Leyden and embarked on the SPEEDWELL on July 31, 1620. They met the MAYFLOWER from London and sailed together from Southampton to Plymouth in Devon. After taking on all necessary provisions, they departed on the trip to America.

The SPEEDWELL, unfortunately was not seaworthy and both boats therefore turned back to Plymouth. Some Separatists (Pilgrims) returned to Leyden but others were determined to get to America and departed on the MAYFLOWER on September 6, 1620.

Two of our ancestors, Thomas Rogers and Henry Sampson (grandfather of Anna Sproat Richmond, wife of Ebenezer Richmond) were on board the Mayflower. Among the 102 passengers who arrived in America, were Separatists, Strangers and Adventurers. The non-Separatists were people who came from various backgrounds but most had been farmers.

There was one doctor in the group who got very little sleep because of so much illness. Fortunately he did have some medicines with him.

The Adventurers were looking forward to a new and exciting life in an unknown world. It was necessary to include passengers who were not Separatists because of the tremendous cost of the journey, which the Separatists could not have funded by themselves.

There were social problems on board the ship because of the diversity of backgrounds. Especially did the crew find it difficult to deal with and understand the Separatists (Pilgrims). However, all passengers showed much courage on the trip and learned to respect each other's differences.

Fortunately, the women had brought whatever was needed for cooking and the men their guns and tools for building and farming in the New World. There was not room for much else. Their diet was mostly dry biscuits called 'hard tack' and for meat they had salted beef. They could also catch fish. The passengers from Holland brought dried peas, beans, cheese and even some butter.

They did not have anything to cook on that resembled a stove as you know it. They had to build charcoal fires in metal boxes if they wanted hot food. Due to the terrible weather, however, it was far too dangerous to have a fire so they ate cold food.

Beer was the main drink for all, including the children, because the water they had brought became contaminated and unsafe to drink. What food and beer that was left towards the end of the journey became inedible causing much hunger. The Mayflower was a cargo ship and was not equipped for 102 passengers and 30 crew members to sleep comfortably. As you can imagine, it was very crowded and most of the people slept in an area with virtually no light or air.

The Mayflower's intended destination was the northern Virginia territory at the mouth of the Hudson River that we know today as Manhattan. The first month out of England the trip went well. There were good sailing winds and calm seas but, by October, the wind became stronger and storms more frequent.

No one really knows for sure why Capt. Christopher Jones went to Cape Cod instead of Virginia and many theories have been suggested. Eugene Stratton writes that one reason was that they wanted to be outside the jurisdiction of the Anglican Church, which was the established church in Virginia. However, Mr. Stratton states, "Bradford and Winslow went to their graves maintaining that they arrived at New England either by accident or by the treachery of Capt. Christopher Jones."

The Mayflower reached the tip of Cape Cod (now Provincetown, Massachusetts) on Saturday 11 November 1620 after 66 days at sea. They remained at Provincetown for 36 days before leaving for Plymouth across Cape Cod Bay. While in Provincetown, the Mayflower Compact was signed by 41 men. It was an agreement concerning their self government in the new land.

Of the 102 passengers who arrived in Provincetown, 29 were females (18 married women who accompanied their husbands; 7 unmarried daughters with their parents, 3 young unmarried women, and one little girl who came with Edward Winslow's family).

There were 73 males but only 41 signed the Compact because 32 were under age (17 were minor sons of passengers, 5 were boys who did not come with their own parents, 2 were seamen hired to stay one year before returning to England and 8 were servants, who were not free agents). Thus, every male passenger of legal age (41 men) signed the Compact. Besides the 102 passengers there was also a crew of about 30 sailors.

Several of the men went out to survey the bay and land abutting the bay. To do this, they used a small boat called a "shallop". One might wonder why the Pilgrims did not settle on Cape Cod once they found fresh water ponds and land already cleared for planting by the Indians. There was much discussion as to where to settle. Winter had set in, many people were sick and there was little food so a decision had to be made quickly. There was fighting with the Indians on the Cape but the guns scared the Indians away.

Finally, the small shallop returned to the Mayflower. On December 11, 1620 the Mayflower sailed into Plymouth. This was the place Captain John Smith had discovered and named six years before. Everyone was so happy to be able to go on shore even though they continued to live on The Mayflower while the men started exploring on land to find a place for the Pilgrims to live.

The main thing was that they had found a new home! There was a good harbor, rivers, fields cleared for planting and they saw no enemy Indians. The "Rock" we now call Plymouth Rock was the only good landing place and to this day everyone believes that was where the Pilgrims landed. Gradually houses were built for the families and a "Common House" for storage of tools and as shelter for those who did not have houses. The weather was so bad it took 26 days to build this "Common House".

On Sunday's the Pilgrims worshipped God, sang Psalms and listened to long sermons by William Brewster.

There was no Christmas celebration on December 25, 1620. This Christmas Day was devoted to hard labor! "The Pilgrims used all their holiday energies felling trees 'in order to avoid any frivolity on the day called Christmas'."

"The Pilgrims interpreted the Bible literally, and nothing in the Scriptures mentioned having a good time at Christmas. While the rest of the Christian world celebrated the Lord's birthday, the Pilgrims chopped wood. Governor William Bradford had to reprimand several of the colonists who took Christmas Day off 'to pitch ye barr, and play at stoole ball and such like sports."

Mr. Pelton writes in his article on this subject; "Although we think of Pilgrims as ideal Americans, actually they were a cantankerous group of fervent believers who had little or no tolerance for those who had different opinions or ideas."

By the spring of 1621, half of the Pilgrims including Thomas Rogers, had died and were buried. The doctor had run out of medicines and it was not until the women were able to plant and harvest their herbs that a cure for headaches or cuts was again available.

Finally in March an Indian came to make friends. He spoke English and his name was Samoset. Gradually more Indians came to visit.

One - Squanto - stayed and helped the Pilgrims learn to catch fish and hunt for game. He also showed them, which wild plants were safe to eat and which were not. He even told them when it was time to plant corn.

Eventually, Chief Massasoit came to meet with Governor Carver (He was the first Governor of the colony until his death in April,1621). They made a peace treatyand agreed to live peacefully. This treaty lasted 54 years.

It was not till the end of March 1621 that all the Pilgrims had a place to live. Today, this original village the Pilgrims built has been re-created in Plymouth, Massachusetts and is called Plimoth Plantation. There one can see how the Pilgrims slept, cooked, ate, and the kind of work they all did (including the children). There were no schools but all the children learned to read at home or from someone in the colony who could teach them. The Bible was the main book read by all. Everyone has heard about the rules all had to live by (i.e. go to church on Sunday, work hard, not steal or get drunk, etc.). Punishment was severe.

Finally, on the 5th of April 1621, Capt. Jones sailed the Mayflower back to England...

-----------------------

Ben M. Angel notes: There was an assertion that Thomas Rogers had died on January 11, 1621. This apparently is not a universally held belief - certainly the Thomas Rogers Society does not assign a date of death, even though they have arguably done the most research on his life story.

Nonetheless, January 11 was an important date in Plymouth Colony. From the Wikipedia page on William Bradford: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Bradford_(Plymouth_governor)

Great sickness

The Mayflower arrived in Plymouth Bay on December 20, 1620. The settlers began building the colony's first house on December 23. Their efforts were slowed, however, when a widespread sickness struck the settlers.[33]

On January 11, 1621, as Bradford was helping to build houses, he was suddenly struck with great pain in his hipbone and he collapsed. Succumbing to the illness that had stricken many others, Bradford was taken to the "common house"–the only finished house then built–and it was feared he would not last the night.[34]

During the epidemic, there were only a small number of men who remained healthy and bore the responsibility of caring for the sick. One of these was Captain Myles Standish, a soldier who had been hired by the settlers to coordinate the defense of the colony. Standish cared for Bradford during his illness and this was the beginning of a bond of friendship between the two men.[35] Bradford would soon be elected governor and, in that capacity, he would work closely with Standish. Bradford had no military experience and therefore would come to rely on and trust the Captain's advice on military matters.[36]

Bradford recovered. However, during the months of February and March 1621 sometimes two or three people died a day. By the end of the winter, half of the 100 settlers had died.[37] In an attempt to hide their weakness from Native Americans who might be watching them, the settlers buried their dead in unmarked graves on Cole's Hill and made efforts to conceal the burials.[38]

-----------------------------

There was also an assertion about a date and place of burial in 1639. This apparently was also inaccurate. From the Thomas Rogers Society newsletter of Spring 2007: http://www.thomasrogerssociety.com/NL-S2007.pdf

In early 1620, there were approximately 300 Separatists in Leiden and their leaders were very careful about who they would select to travel to America. They picked approximately 45 persons from their congregation to make the voyage and gave first priority to those who were younger, particularly young males, or those who possessed special skills that were needed in the new colony. Thomas Rogers, at the approximate age of 49 (possibly older since he was born “before 1572”), was one of the oldest members of the Leiden congregation to be selected and, in accordance with their preference not to select older persons, normally would not have been chosen.

Only William Brewster and James Chilton, both about 54 years of age in 1620, were known to be older. We can only wonder if Thomas Rogers was selected because of his personal qualities, his investment in the venture or because he was to bring with him his 18 year old son, Joseph, who might have been looked upon as an asset in establishing a new community. We might also wonder if the fact that Thomas Rogers and William Bradford were both in the textile business might have caused them to have a common bond in some areas.

Except for William Bradford’s account of John Howland being rescued after falling overboard, little is known about the activities of any of the Mayflower passengers during the voyage. After they arrived at Cape Cod, there were several instances when men from the Mayflower went ashore to explore. However, none of those accounts mention the older men; Brewster, Chilton or Thomas Rogers going ashore on those occasions. James Chilton died before the Mayflower reached Plymouth harbor and there is no record of the date of Thomas Roger’s death except that he died during the “general sickness’ that was at its peak in February and March, 1621 when many of the 51 deaths of Mayflower passengers occurred.

It might be presumed Thomas Rogers was buried in Plymouth, possibly on Coles Hill, at a time when the Pilgrims customarily buried their dead at night to prevent unfriendly Indians from knowing about their many losses. The only known burial location of any of the Mayflower passengers is that of Richard More who is buried in Salem, Massachusetts.

--------------------

Source: "Sherman Ancestry," NEHGS "Register," Vol 51, pg. 310

Thomas Rogers was a native of England, and a member of the Leyden congregation. He was accompanied on the Mayflower' s voyage by his son, Joseph, who became a resident of Duxbury , and afterwards lived in Eastham, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. He was, in 1647, appointed lieutenant of the military company at Nawsett. The father, Thomas Rogers, died in the first sickness in 1621, and Joseph received his allotment of lands in the division at Plymouth in 1623. Thoma s Rogers' other sons, John, William and Noah, afterwards e migrated from England to the Plymouth Colony and settled at Duxbury, Massachusetts.

_______

The often published descent of Thomas Rogers from John Rogers the Martyr is complete fiction. Thomas Roger's true English origins were discovered in 1989 by Clifford Stott and published with supporting documentation in The Genealogist 10:138-149. Thomas Rogers was the son of William and Eleanor Rogers, and grandson of William and Joan Rogers. Thomas' marriage to Alice Cosford and his children's baptisms are all found in the parish registers of Watford, Northampton, England.

Thomas Rogers became a citizen of Leyden on 25 June 1618 with sponsors William Jepson and Roger Wilson, and is called a Camlet-merchant. And just two years later, on 1 April 1620, he sold his house in Leyden before coming to America on the Mayflower.

Thomas Rogers brought his son Joseph on the Mayflower. He died the first winter, but his son Joseph survived. William Bradford in his Of Plymouth Plantation writes of Thomas Rogers: "the rest of Thomas Rogers' [children] came over and are married and have many children."

In the 1622 poll tax for Leyden are listed his wife Elsgen (Alice), and daughters Lysbeth (Elizabeth) and Grietgen (Margaret), and son John. John Rogers is known to have come to America and married, but unfortunately the whereabouts of Elizabeth and Margaret remain unknown, though Bradford seems to suggest they came to America and married.

SOURCES:

Clifford Stott, "The English Ancestry of the Pilgrim Thomas Rogers and His Wife Alice (Cosford) Rogers", The Genealogist, 10:138-149.

Robert S. Wakefield, "Mayflower Passengers Turner and Rogers: Probable Identification of Additional Children," The American Genealogist 52:110-113.

Caleb Johnson © 1998

--------------------

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=rogers&GSfn=thomas&GSbyrel=in&GSdyrel=in&GSst=21&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=28964616&

Birth: 1571, England Death: 1621 Plymouth Plymouth County Massachusetts, USA

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSsr=1&GScid=2272036&GRid=28964616&

--------------------

Thomas Rogers was born before 1572 in Watford, Northampton, England. His parents were William and Eleanor, grandparents William and Joan. He married Alice Cosford, daughter of George Cosford, in Watford on October 24, 1597. They had five children. Thomas Rogers was in the Leyden contingent - i.e. a Puritan separatist fleeing religious persecution. Leyden (Leiden) is located in the Netherlands. He brought their son Joseph on the Mayflower when it sailed from Plymouth, England on September 6, 1620. He died during the first winter in the Plymouth colony, sometime between January and March 1621. His brother John joined the colony at some point as well. William Bradford wrote that that John Rogers' children came over, married and had many children.

The only children of Thomas Rogers to have known descendants are Joseph and John. Other Rogers in New England are not related (specifically William Rogers of CT/Long Island was not a son).

Thomas Rogers was a subscriber of the Mayflower Compact, signed on November 11, 1620.

--------------------

ID: I421016

  • Name: Thomas Rogers , Pilgrim
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: BEF 1572 in Of Watford, Northampton, England
  • Death: AFT JAN 1619/20 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co. Massachusetts

Note:

  • Ref; Genealogies of Mayflower Families , 1500s- 1800s- CD #171, FTM.
  • Ref: "The English Ancestry of the Pilgrim Thomas Rogers and His wife Alice (Cosford) Rogers" , The Genealogist, 10:138-149. by: Cilfford Stott.

Thomas Rogers become a citizen of Leyden on 25 Jun 1618 with sponsors William Jepson and Roger Wilson and is called a Camlet-merchant. And just two years later, on 1 April 1620, he sold his house in Leyden before coming to america on the "Mayflower".

Thomas brought his son Joseph on the Mayflower. He died the first winter, but his son Joseph survived,

  • Ref; William Bradford in his "Of Plymouth Plantation" writes of Thomas Rogers: "the rest of Thomas Rogers (children) came over and are married and have many children. The whereabouts of Elizabeth & Margaret unknown, though Bradford seems to suggest they came to America and married.?
  • The AFN: 93HJ-9S; The Descent of Thomas Rogers From John Rogers the Martyr is complete Fiction.

Father: William Rogers

Mother: Eleanor

Marriage 1 Alice Cosford b: BET 1560 AND 1580 in England

  • Married: 24 OCT 1597 in Watford, Northampton, England

Children

  • *1. Thomas Rogers b: ABT 24 MAR 1597/98 in Watford, Northampton, England
    • 2. Richard Rogers b: ABT 12 MAR 1598/99 in Watford, Northampton, England
    • 3. Joseph Rogers b: ABT 23 JAN 1601/02 in Watford, Northampton, England
    • 4. John Rogers b: ABT 6 APR 1606 in Watford, Northampton, England
    • 5. Elizabeth Rogers b: ABT 26 DEC 1608 in Watford, Northampton, England
    • 6. Margaret Rogers b: ABT 30 MAY 1613 in Watford, Northampton, England

--------------------

  1. ID: I1259
  2. Name: ROGERS Thomas
  3. Surname: ROGERS
  4. Given Name: Thomas
  5. Sex: M
  6. Birth: 1554 in Bryanstone, Dorsetshire, England
  7. Death: 1610
  8. _UID: 734033E5BDC6D911928E00055DF97DBDED6D
  9. Change Date: 17 May 2005 at 13:04:06

Father: ROGERS William b: Bet. 1516 - 1521 in England Mother: TAYNTON Eleanor b: 1523 in Dowdeswell, Gloucestershire, England Marriage 1 PACE Margaret Children

  1. Has Children ROGERS Elizabeth b: in England

-----------------------------------------------------

Genealogical gleanings in England, Volume 2 By Henry Fitz-Gilbert Waters, New England Historic Genealogical Society Pg.180 http://books.google.com/books?id=caGKnZ6GsR0C&pg=PA181&lpg=PA181&dq=Thomas+Rogers+1610&source=bl&ots=ZKdkF46cf5&sig=zVNN840XofajK51n7LBHmZLtMKY&hl=en&ei=sS-hTLKxJIjSsAOZj7Vo&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CCIQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Thomas%20Rogers%201610&f=false Pg.180

The Parish Registers of Stratford upon Avon commence Anno 1558. By the kind permission of the Vicar, the Rev. George Arbuthnot, M.A., I was enabled to devote the whole of one day, from the close of the morning service to the beginning of the afternoon service, to an examination of them. I took notes of the following marriages:

  • 1562 January 31, Thomas Rogers and Margaret Pace.
  • 1563 November 27, Henry Rogers and Elizabeth Burback.
  • 1566 July 6, Edward Huntington and Matilda Rogers.
  • 1570 October 15, John Rogers and Anne Salsbury.
  • 1579 July 20, William Rogers and Elizabeth Walker.
  • 1581 October 30, Richard Rogers and Susanna Castell.
  • 1581 November 5, Richard Rogers and Ales Calle.
  • 1592 (?3) December 30, Antherin Russell and Joyce Rogers.
  • 1596 November 21, William Rogers and Jone Tante.
  • 1600 October 28, John Nelson to Elizabeth Rogers.
  • 1602 April 13, Lewes Rogers to Joane Rodes.
  • 1602 October 12, Francis Rogers to Elizabeth Sperpoint.
  • 1603 (4) January 1, William Smith to Ales Rogers.
  • 1605 "Apriell 8, Robertus Harwod to Katherina Rogers."
  • 1608 (9) February 6, Henry Stanton to Phillip Rogers.
  • 1609 July 18, Thomas Chestley to Margaret Rogers.

Pg.181

I looked through the record of the marriages down to 1637 inclusive, and found a few other Rogers marriages, which it hardly seems worth the while to print. Thomas, Henry, John, William and Richard Rogers had numerous children baptized and buried. Of these I pick out the children of Thomas.

 

Baptized.

  • Margaret, September 26, 1562.
  • Elizabeth, October 28, 1563.
  • Charles, March 28, 1565.
  • Johanna, January 24, 1566 (7).
  • Alice, September 2, 1568.
  • Joanna, October 14, 1571.
  • Joyce, February 9, 1572 (3).
  • Ales, September 11, 1574.
  • Richard, November 10. 1575.
  • William, June 8, 1578.
  • Edward, February 18, 1579.
  • Thomas, July 22, 1582.
  • Katherin, November 25, 1584.
  • Thomas, June 11, 1587.
  • Rose, March 29, 1590.
  • Frances, March 10, 1593.

Buried.

  • Margaret, December 1, 1562.
  • Johanna, February 21, 1566 (7).
  • Alice, October 3, 1568.
  • Anne, Jul 24, 1581.
  • Thomas, August 13, 1584.
  • "Infant," Janurary 15, 1591.
  • Charles Rogers. "Homo" March 30, 1609 (10).
  • Thomas Rogers, August 31, 1639.

The burial of Margaret, the wife of Mr. Rogers, I did not find. He evidently married again; for I found the burial of "Alice Wyf to Mr Thomas Rogers," August 17, 1608. His own burial is thus given: 1610 (11) February 20, Thomas Rogers, one of the Aldermen.

--------------------

Name: Thomas Rogers

  • Sex: M
  • Birth: JUL 1586 in Dedham, Essex County, England
  • Death: JAN 1620/21 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts

Note:

  • Mayflower Families Through Five Generations II, Chilton, More, Rogers
  • General Soceity of Mayflower Descendants, 1978
  • TGM 3:1598 includes additional information on this family

Thomas1 Rogers, the Mayflower Passenger, who died in the first sickness, made his journey to the new world with his son Joseph, who survived. His wife did not come to America. Gov. Bradford says "The rest of Thomas Rogers came over, & are maried, & have many children." According to Bowman, and substantiated by later research, only one of the children who came later has been identified, viz.: John2 Rogers, who married Ann Churchman.

Of Thomas little is known. Born by about 1572, son of William and Eleanor (____) Rogers, Watford, Northamptonshire [TGM 3: 1598 citing The Genealogist] In 1619 he sued a baker and a miller of Leiden to free a lien on his house, and perhaps in preparation for his journey, won the suit and was awarded court costs. (NEHGR 143:207). He had bought this house in 1616/7 and sold it April, 1620 (Ibid.)

Records in Leiden of the 1622 poll tax show his family living there in the back part of a house owned by separatist Anthony Clements, and including John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children.

Upon Thomas' death, Joseph may have lived with Governor Bradford. Joseph came in 1530. Many have claimed for Thomas other male descendants, none of which had been proved by the publication date of Mayflower Family Volume Two, Thomas Rogers, and it is there noted one has been disproved, i.e., William Rogers of Connecticut and Long Island. -------------------- Mayflower Passenger! -------------------- Came over on the Mayflower -------------------- Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Thomas Rogers

Name: Thomas Rogers

Year: 1620

Place: Massachusetts

Family Members: Son Joseph

Source Publication Code: 108

Primary Immigrant: Rogers, Thomas

Annotation: Age, occupation, and social condition given. For other Mayflower references, see the index.

Source Bibliography: AMES, AZEL. The May-Flower and Her Log, July 15, 1620-May 6, 1621, Chiefly from Original Sources. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifflin, 1907, pp. 166-195. Page: 184

---------------------------------------------------------

Millennium File about Thomas*** "Mayflower Compact" Rogers

Name: Thomas*** "Mayflower Compact" Rogers

Spouse: , Unknown

Birth Date: 1590

Birth Country: England

Death Date: 11 Jan 1621

Death City: Duxbury

Death County: Plymouth

Death State: Massachusetts

Death Country: USA

Children: John Rogers

-----------------------------------------------------------

THOMAS ROGERS of the MAYFLOWER

           Thomas1 Rogers, the Mayflower Passenger, who died in the first sickness, made his journey to the new world with his son Joseph, who survived. His wife did not come to America. Gov. Bradford says "The rest of Thomas Rogers came over, & are married, & have many children." According to Bowman, and substantiated by later research, only one of the children who came later has been identified, viz.: John2 Rogers, who married Ann Churchman.
           Of Thomas little is known. Born by about 1572, son of William and Eleanor (____) Rogers, Watford, Northamptonshire [TGM 3: 1598 citing The Genealogist] In 1619 he sued a baker and a miller of Leiden to free a lien on his house, and perhaps in preparation for his journey, won the suit and was awarded court costs. (NEHGR 143:207). He had bought this house in 1616/7 and sold it April, 1620 (Ibid.)
           Thomas Rogers (William)was born in Watford, Northamptonshire CA 1572.Thomas died 1621 in Plymouth, Barnstable, at 49 years of age.
           He married Alice Cosford before 24 October 1597 in Watford, Northamptonshire. Alice, as Joseph Rogers's mother, presented him at his baptism. Alice became the mother of Joseph Rogers before 1602 in England or Holland. Alice became the mother of John Rogers before 1606 in England or Holland. Alice, as John Rogers's mother, presented him at his baptism 06 April 1606. Alice became the mother of Elizabeth or (Lysbeth) Rogers before 1609. Alice, as Elizabeth or (Lysbeth) Rogers's mother, presented her at her baptism 26 December 1609. Alice became the mother of Margaret (Grietgen) Rogers before 1613. Alice, as Margaret (Grietgen) Rogers's mother, presented her at her baptism 30 May 1613.
           As Joseph Rogers's father, Thomas, presented him at his baptism. Thomas became the father of Joseph Rogers before 1602 in England or Holland. Thomas became the father of John Rogers before 1606 in England or Holland. As John Rogers's father, Thomas, presented him at his baptism 06 April 1606. Thomas became the father of Elizabeth or (Lysbeth) Rogers before 1609. As Elizabeth or (Lysbeth) Rogers's father, Thomas, presented her at her baptism 26 December 1609. Thomas was employed at as a Merchant in Leyden, Holland after 1610. Thomas became the father of Margaret (Grietgen) Rogers before 1613. He was listed on a passenger list 5 August 1620 sailing on the "Mayflower".
           Thomas Rogers Mayflower Familes through Five Generations Vol 2, pg 153
           Thomas Roges alleged descent from John Rogers the Martyr was disproved in the 19th century by Joseph Chester and Henry F. Walters. Banks notes that taxpayers named Thomas Rogers, Christopher Martin and John Hooke appear in the London parish of St. Bartholomew the Great early in 1620, but there is no proof that these were the Mayflower passengers.
           Our earliest known encounter with Pilgrim Thomas Rogers was on 25 June 1618 when he became a citizen of Leiden, Holland, vouched for by William Jepson, formerly of Worksop, Notts., and by Roger Wilson, formerly of Sandwich, Kent Co. Engalnd. Banks therefore speculates that Rogers might have been from one of those towns. On 1 April 1620 Thomas sold his Leiden house on the Barbarasteeg for 300 guilders, in preparation for the journey to New England.
           Governor Bradford says in his history of the Plymouth settlement that on board the Mayflower were "Thomas Rogers and Joseph his son; his other children came afterwards......Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness but his son Joseph is still living (1650) and is married and hath six children. The rest of Thomas Rogers' [children] came over and are married and have many children." Therefore we know that Thomas and his son Joseph arrived at Cape Cod aboard the ship Mayflower and on 11 November 1620 according to their calendar, or 21 November on ours, Thomas was one of forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Thomas did not live through the rigorous winter which carried off half the group but young Joseph, like so many of the children, did survive.
           Recent discoveries show that Thomas had a family living in Leiden, Holland, when the 1622 Poll Tax was taken. In the Over "t Hoff Quarter, in a house with other Pilgrim families in St. Peter's Churchyard west-side, were Jan Thomas, orphan from England without means; Elsgen Rogiers, widow of Thonis Rogiers, an Englishwoman; and Lysbeth and Grietgen her children, poor people. Translated this could read John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children. At that period the word orphan meant that either or both parents were dead.
           In the 1623 Plymouth Colony land division, Joseph Rogers was allotted two acres-one for himself and one on behalf of his late father. He may have been living in the household of Governor Bradford with who he was grouped on 22 May 1627, in the division of cattle. Joseph and twelve other inhabitants of Plymouth received "an heyfer of the last year which was of the Great white-back cow that was brought over in the Ann and two shee goats."
           Governor Bradford's statement that the rest of Thomas Rogers' children came over and married and had children, seems clearly to indicate that more than one of his children came to New England after 1620. We know that his son John came to Plymouth about 1630. Although many other male Rogers immigrants have been claimed as sons of Thomas the Pilgrim, none of the claims has been proved and some have been disproved. Therefore it seems likely that at least one of the Rogers daughters who were living in Holland in 1622 came over. John and Joseph Rogers each named a daughter Elizabeth, perhaps thereby indicating that their sister Elizabeth lived in New England. Unfortunately extensive research has failed to uncover any further evidence.
           John Rogers came to Plymouth about 1630, when the last of the Leiden contingent arrived and was in Plymouth Colony on 25 March 1633 when he was taxed 9 shillings. The proof of his identity lies in a grant made 6 April 1640 to "Joseph Rogers and John Rogers his brother...fifty acres apeece of upland....at the North River." Both then had growing families to carry forward the Rogers heritage, although only Joseph's descendants would carry forward the Rogers name beyond the fourth generation."
           Records in Leiden of the 1622 poll tax show his family living there in the back part of a house owned by separatist Anthony Clements, and including John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children.
           Upon Thomas' death, Joseph may have lived with Governor Bradford. Joseph came in 1530. Many have claimed for Thomas other male descendants, none of which had been proved by the publication date of Mayflower Family Volume Two, Thomas Rogers, and it is there noted one has been disproved, i.e., William Rogers of Connecticut and Long Island.

Children of Thomas1 Rogers

           John2 Rogers (Thomas1), married Ann(a) Churchman.
           Joseph2 Rogers married Hannah _____
           Lysbeth, living 1622, and may have come over, but no further record
           Grietgen (or Margaret) living 1622, may have come over, but no further record.

Children of John2 and Ann(a) Churchman Rogers

           John3 Rogers, married, 1st, Elizabeth Pabodie3 (Elizabeth2 Alden, John1); married, 2d, Hannah (Hobart) Brown; married, 3d, Marah (---) Browning, a widow.
           (H)Anna3 Rogers, married, 1st, John Tisdale; married, 2d, Thomas Terry; married 3d, Samuel Williams (Taunton Family)
           Abigail3 Rogers, married John Richmond as his second wife.
           Elizabeth3 Rogers, married Nathaniel Williams.(Taunton Family)

Source: http://www.thomasrogerssociety.com/trsbio.html -------------------- About Thomas Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger

Biography from the Thomas Rogers Society:

http://www.thomasrogerssociety.com/trsbio.html

Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] was born circa 1571 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of William Rogers and Eleanor. Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] married Alice Cosford, daughter of George Cosford and Margart (Willis?), on 24 October 1597 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] Our earliest known encounter with Pilgrim Thomas Rogers was on 25 June 1618 when he became a citizen of Leiden, Holland, vouched for by William Jepson, formerly of Worksop, Notts., and by Roger Wilson, formerly of Sandwich, Kent Co. Engalnd.

On 1 April 1620 Thomas sold his Leiden house on the Barbarasteeg for 300 guilders, in preparation for the journey to New England.

Governor Bradford says in his history of the Plymouth settlement that on board the Mayflower were "Thomas Rogers and Joseph his son; his other children came afterwards......Thomas Rogers died in the first sickness but his son Joseph is still living (1650) and is married and hath six children. The rest of Thomas Rogers' [children] came over and are married and have many children." Therefore we know that Thomas and his son Joseph arrived at Cape Cod aboard the ship Mayflower and on 11 November 1620 according to their calendar, or 21 November on ours, Thomas was one of forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Thomas did not live through the rigorous winter which carried off half the group but young Joseph, like so many of the children, did survive.

Recent discoveries show that Thomas had a family living in Leiden, Holland, when the 1622 Poll Tax was taken. In the Over "t Hoff Quarter, in a house with other Pilgrim families in St. Peter's Churchyard west-side, were Jan Thomas, orphan from England without means; Elsgen Rogiers, widow of Thonis Rogiers, an Englishwoman; and Lysbeth and Grietgen her children, poor people. Translated this could read John, son of Thomas; Elizabeth Rogers, widow of Thomas; and Elizabeth and Margaret, her children. At that period the word orphan meant that either or both parents were dead.

In the 1623 Plymouth Colony land division, Joseph Rogers was allotted two acres-one for himself and one on behalf of his late father. He may have been living in the household of Governor Bradford with who he was grouped on 22 May 1627, in the division of cattle. Joseph and twelve other inhabitants of Plymouth received "an heyfer of the last year which was of the Great white-back cow that was brought over in the Ann and two shee goats."

Governor Bradford's statement that the rest of Thomas Rogers' children came over and married and had children, seems clearly to indicate that more than one of his children came to New England after 1620. We know that his son John came to Plymouth about 1630. Although many other male Rogers immigrants have been claimed as sons of Thomas the Pilgrim, none of the claims has been proved and some have been disproved. Therefore it seems likely that at least one of the Rogers daughters who were living in Holland in 1622 came over. John and Joseph Rogers each named a daughter Elizabeth, perhaps thereby indicating that their sister Elizabeth lived in New England. Unfortunately extensive research has failed to uncover any further evidence.

John Rogers came to Plymouth about 1630, when the last of the Leiden contingent arrived and was in Plymouth Colony on 25 March 1633 when he was taxed 9 shillings. The proof of his identity lies in a grant made 6 April 1640 to "Joseph Rogers and John Rogers his brother...fifty acres apeece of upland....at the North River." Both then had growing families to carry forward the Rogers heritage, although only Joseph's descendants would carry forward the Rogers name beyond the fourth generation."

He died in Plymouth Colony in the winter of 1620/21 "in the first sickness."

Children of Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] and Alice Cosford:

   * 1. Thomas Rogers b. 24 Mar 1598/99 [3]
   * 2. poss. Richard Rogers b. 12 Mar 1599 [3]
   * 3. Joseph Rogers+ b. 23 Jan 1602/3, d. between 2 and 15 Jan 1677/78 [3]
   * 4. John Rogers+ b. 6 Apr 1606, d. bt 26 Aug 1691 - 20 Sep 1692 [3]
   * 5. Elizabeth Rogers b. 26 Dec 1609 [4]
   * 6. Margaret Rogers b. 30 May 1613 [4]

-------------------- Came to the MA Bay Colony at Plymouth in 1620 on the Mayflower. -------------------- Thomas Rogers was a Mayflower Pilgrim. He was among those who died that first harsh winter of 1620-1621 -------------------- Thomas Rogers was one of the original Mayflower Passengers, as was his son, Joseph Rogers (who was only 17 years old when he traveled on the Mayflower to Plymouth Colony with his father). The Rogers family had left England due to religious persecution (they were Separatists of the Church of England) and fled to Leyland, Holland. Thomas and Joseph were among the passengers that boarded the Mayflower in Holland, leaving Thomas' wife and the other children in Holland. Thomas died from the general sickness in the winter of 1620/1621. Alice and the remaining children arrived in Plymouth Colony circa 1623 aboard the Anne. -------------------- Thomas Matthew Rogers was a passenger on the Mayflower. -------------------- Thomas Rogers (c.1572-winter of 1620/21). He was a Leiden Separatist who traveled in 1620 with his eldest son Joseph as passengers on the historic voyage of the Pilgrim ship Mayflower. Thomas Rogers was a signatory to the Mayflower Compact but perished in the winter of 1620/21. His son Joseph survived to live a long life.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Rogers_(Mayflower_passenger) -------------------- Mayflower Passenger....

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Thomas Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1571
1571
Watford, Northamptonshire, England

According to the Thomas Rogers Society: Thomas Rogers was born circa 1571 at Watford to William Rogers and Eleanor.

1587
June 11, 1587
Age 16
Stratford, On The Avon, Warwick, England
July 11, 1587
Age 16
Stratford On Avo, Warwick, England
1597
October 24, 1597
Age 26
Watford, Northamptonshire, England
1598
May 1598
Age 27
Watford, Northamptonshire, England, UK

Thomas Rogers II, first-born child of Thomas and Alice Rogers, was baptized on 24 March 1598/99 (or simply 24 March 1599 - this was the last day of the old English Calendar year 1598, and 24 March was O.S. or Julian Calendar, 3 April N.S. or Gregorian Calendar) at the Parish Church in Watford, Northamptonshire.

(Until the tree gets straightened out, this is probably the best way to keep track of the actual children of Thomas Rogers.)

1599
March 24, 1599
Age 28
Watford, Northamptonshire, England, (Present UK)
May 1599
Age 28
Watford, Northamptonshire, England, UK

Richard Rogers, possible second-born child of Thomas and Alice Rogers, was baptized on 12 March 1599 (presumably 1599/1600 or simply 12 March 1600 - this was still in the old English Calendar year 1599, or 22 March N.S. or Gregorian Calendar) at the Parish Church in Watford, Northamptonshire.

(Until the tree gets straightened out, this is probably the best way to keep track of the actual children of Thomas Rogers.)

1600
March 12, 1600
Age 29
Probably Watford, Northamptonshire, England, (Present UK)
1602
January 23, 1602
Age 31
Stratford On Avon, Warwickshire, England
March 1602
Age 31
Watford, Northamptonshire, England, UK

Joseph Rogers, TRS listed third-born child of Thomas and Alice Rogers, was baptized on 23 January 1602/03 (or simply 23 January 1603 - this was still in the old English Calendar year 1602 - and in N.S. or Gregorian Calendar, the date was February 2) at the Parish Church in Watford, Northamptonshire.

(Until the tree gets straightened out, this is probably the best way to keep track of the actual children of Thomas Rogers.)