Thomas Harbo Rynning

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Thomas Harbo Rynning

Also Known As: "Capt. Thomas H. Rynning"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Norway, Came to US age 2, Beloit, Wisconsin, USA
Death: Died in San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
Place of Burial: Ft. Rosecrans National Cemetery Plot OS A11, San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Halvor Olsen Rynning and Ina Marie Rynning
Husband of Margaret Eve Rynning
Father of Linda Marie Rynning; Margaret Alexandria Rynning and Rosemond Rynning
Brother of Frederik "Fred" Rynning; Martha Rynning and Olivius Ole Rynning

Occupation: Cowboy, Arizona Ranger and Warden of Arizona State penitentiary. Also 2ND LIEUT TRP B 1 U S VOLUNTEER CAVALRY, Spanish American War
Managed by: Della Dale Smith-Pistelli
Last Updated:

About Thomas Harbo Rynning

According to a New York Passenger List, Harbo Rynning, age one year, six months old, arrived in New York on July 24, 1869, along with his mother, Ina Rynning, 34, Julino (listed as a female), 9, Mar E., and Ole, 4 (listed as males). They traveled in steerage and came from Scandinavia to the United States. The ship, Columbia, departed from Glasgow, Scotland. I don't know if Thomas Harbo Rynning's father arrived in America on another ship at a different time, but he obviously came to this country separately from his wife and children. Tom's parents passed away in Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin, in 1878 when he was just 12 years old.

In the 1880 U.S. Federal Census for Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin, Harbo Rynning was 14 years old and living with his siblings, Fred, 21, Martha, 19, and Olivius, 17, on Bluff Street. His brother, Fred, was working as a tailor, his sister was keeping house, his brother Olivius was a laborer and Harbo was working as a painter. All four of the Rynnings were born in Norway per this census record, as were their parents.

There is a Minnesota, Territorial and State Census for Red Wing, Goodhugh County, showing a T.H. Rynning, 20 years old, living with 14 other people from Norway including Halvor Vik, 40, Tonborg Vik (female), 43, Ingeborg Vik, (female), 15, Christine K. Vik, 10, and Ole Emil Vik, 8. Also at the same location were others named Brohaugh, Meland, Elstad, Veium, Gaardsnes, Ostby, Romo, Hjertaas, and Gjerstad. They ranged in age from 23 to 29 years old. I wonder if these people were relatives of Tom's from Norway.

Per a U.S. Army Register of Enlistments, on February 19, 1885, Harbo Rynning was registered in Del Rio, Texas, by Captain Raudlett for five years. He stated he was born in Christiana, Norway, and was 21 years old. He was working as a carpenter and had blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was 5'8" tall. He was in the 8th U.S. Volunteer Calvary, Company D, and was discharged February, 18, 1890, at Ft. Meade, South Dakota, as a Sergeant with excellent character.

Thomas H. Rynning was listed as a Sergeant and 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S. Spanish American War Volunteers of 1898, in the 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry, Company B. Source Information was Ancestry.com, U.S. Spanish American War Volunteers, 1898, Provo, Utah, and the original data was from: General Index to Complied Service Records of Volunteer soldiers who Served During the War with Spain. Microfilm publication M871, 126 rolls, ARC ID 654543, Records of the Adjutant General's Office, 1780's - 1917, Record Group 94. The National Archives at Washington, D.C.

From a book entitled Portrait and Biographical Record of Arizona, commemorating the achievements of citizens who have contributed to the progress of the state, Lieut. T.H. Rynning was described as follows:

"A record of the life of Thomas H. Rynning shows incidents as interesting and at times as thrilling as those which are frequently introduced by writers of fiction, who have taken as their themes the various military exploits of the far west during the days when the red men still continued to contend with the whites for the supremacy of the plains. Born in Christiana, Norway, February 17, 1866, a son of Halvor and Indiana (or Ina) Rynning, he was brought to America at the age of two years by his parents, and for ten years, or until the death of both parents, he made his home in Beloit, Wisconsin. During the succeeding three years he served an apprenticeship to a stair-builder in Chicago. At the age of fifteen he went to Texas and for four years was employed as a cow-puncher.

February 18, 1885, he enlisted as a private in Troop D, Eighth United States Calvary, and July 12th following was ordered with his command to the Indian Territory, where he served through the Cheyenne outbreak. Returning to Texas, he was detailed as packer with Troop C, and served two years and three months in Arizona under Generals Miles and Crook, at various times during the period acting as dispatch carrier and mail rider.

Upon his return to Texas he rejoined Troop D and two days later was made corporal. For some time he performed duty as a line rider along the Mexican frontier. In 1888 his regiment made its famous ride to Fort Meade in the Black Hills of Dakota, the longest cavalry march on record.

During this trip, on the 3rd of July, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant, and a few days later was made assistant regimental quartermaster sergeant, acting in this capacity about a year. While on this expedition he made a ride from Fort Meade to Camp Crook, one hundred and nineteen miles, in one night, which is probably the longest single ride within the same time ever made by a United States soldier.

Lieutenant Rynning was honorably discharged from the service February 19, 1890. Until the spring of 1892 he remained in Beloit. Going to Chicago, upon the opening of the Columbian Exposition he was appointed a guard, then was made gate-keeper, and finally was promoted to the post of installation officer in the agricultural building.

In November, 1893, he removed to California, and a year later settled in Tucson, Arizona, where for eighteen months was employed by the Southern Pacific Railroad Company. From that time until the spring of 1898 he engaged in contracting, in which he was very successful. Upon the breaking out of the Spanish-American war he went to Prescott, and April 29, 1898, enlisted as a private in Troop B of the Rough Riders, under Captain McClintock. The day following he was promoted to be first sergeant and acted as adjutant.

May 20, while the regiment was at San Antonio, Texas, he was made second lieutenant, and that office he held until the end of the war, commanding the troop when it was mustered out. While in active service in Cuba he contracted the yellow fever, but his rugged constitution pulled him through the attack in excellent form. At the close of the war, he remained a month in a hospital in Brooklyn, and finally arrived in Arizona on Thanksgiving Day. Since that time he has been engaged in contracting at Tucson and Safford, in which he has met with success. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias. He has never married."

A U.S. Civil War Pension Index showed that Thomas H. Rynning (alias Harbo Rynning) served in Company D, 8th U.S. Cavalry and Company B 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalary. He filed for his pension on January 14, 1899, in Arizona. His attorney was listed as M. V. Furney. He filed under the class of Invalid, and his application number was 1,216,595 and certificate number was 1,287,402.

Tom married Margaret Eve Rollins on August 27, 1901, in Safford, Graham County, Arizona, according to the Western States Marriage Record Index. Margaret was the daughter of John Henry Rollins, Sr., (1841 to 1887) and Nancy Malinda West (1844 to 1917). She was named for her maternal grandmother, Margaret Cooper West, (1804 to 1883). John Henry Rollins, Sr., was the son of James Henry Rollins (1816-1899) and his first wife, Evaline Walker Rollins (1823-1912). Nancy was the daughter of Samuel Walker West (1804-1873) and his first wife, Margaret Cooper West. I have not yet been able to find any familial connection between Evaline Walker Rollins and Samuel Walker West, although it is possible they were somehow related, since her maiden name was Walker and Samuel's middle name was Walker. In those days it was not unusual for a child to have a middle name which was a maiden name of one of their female ancestors.

Both James Henry Rollins and his first wife, Evaline, and Samuel Walker West and his first wife, Margaret, were early converts to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. James, born in Lima, New York, and lost his father in a shipping accident on Lake Erie when he was only about 4 years old, joined the church in the 1830's in Ohio, and Samuel and his wife, Margaret, joined in 1834 while living on a 1,000 acre plantation in Tennessee.

Both families migrated to Nauvoo, Illinois, with the Latter-Day Saints, and later to Iowa, and then Utah. Samuel died in Utah in 1873 before Margaret and her daughter Nancy's family moved to Safford, Arizona, in 1879. James Henry Rollins and his wife, Evaline, left Utah in the late 1890's and settled in Lyman, Wyoming, to live with some of their younger children. They both passed away and were buried there in the late 1890's and early 1900's. Both James Henry Rollins and Samuel Walker West were Mormon polygamists; James had 2 wives and 22 children, and Samuel had 3 wives and had children with two of his three wives.

From 1902 to 1907, Thomas Harbo Rynning was Captain of the Arizona Rangers. Only three men ever wore the badge of Captain of the Arizona Rangers, Burton C. Mossman from 1901 to 1902, and he ended large scale cattle rustling in North America; Thomas H. Rynning, 1902 to 1907, who made more arrests and convictions than any man in Arizona; and Harry Wheeler, 1907 to 1909, the "shootinest" Ranger of them all.

From an article in the Arizona Republican dated April 10, 1905, Thomas H. Rynning earned $175.00 as his ranger pay in March of 1905. Tom's successor, Harry C. Wheeler, earned $110.00 that year. My great grandmother's second husband, Joseph Thomas McKinney, was also serving in the Rangers that year, and his income was $100.00 in the Month of March, 1905.

My great grandmother, Dortha Roxana Madsen Rollins McKinney, was married to John Henry Rollins, Jr., brother-in-law of Tom Rynning, since Tom married John Henry's sister, Margaret Eve Rollins. John Henry died in 1889 at the young age of 24 from an accident, leaving my great grandmother a 20-year old widow with 2 children to raise on her own. She did not marry again until 1897, at which time she married Joseph Thomas McKinney, an Arizona Sheriff. They had four more children, and separated sometime before 1920 when Dortha moved to Bakersfield, California, and lived with her children by both John Henry Rollins and Joseph T. McKinney.

In March of 1909, Thomas became the Superintendent of the Territorial Prison at Florence, Pinal County, Arizona. In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Thomas H. Rynning, 44, was still working as the Superintendent of the Territorial Prison in Pinal County, Arizona, and was living there with his wife, Margaret Eve Rollins Rynning, 27, and their first two daughters, Linda Marie, 7, and Margaret, 5 years old. In this census record, it stated Tom was born in Wisconsin and his parents in Norway. Margaret was born in Arizona, and her father and mother in Illinois. Both of their daughters were born in Arizona. They were renting their home at the prison.

According to a story found on Ancestry.com, in 1912 Sunset Boulevard resident and lawman, Thomas Rynning, moved to San Diego to help clean up the Stingaree, the notorious downtown red light district, before the opening of the 1915 Expo. For more information about the clean up of the Stingaree, see the following website:

http://www.sandiegohistory.org/journal/74spring/stingaree.htm

A 1914 California Voter Registration record for San Diego County, shows Thomas H. Rynning, a Contractor, living at 1681 Sunset Boulevard, registered as a Progressive, with his wife, Mrs. Margaret E. Rynning, Housewife. A 1916 registration record shows Tom and Maggie living at 1871 Sunset Boulevard, and they were both still Progressives, and Tom was working as an Under Sheriff.

A 1918 registration record showed Tom was working as a drillmaster, living at 1817 Sunset Boulevard and registered as a Republican. In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census, Tom, 53, and Maggie 38, and their children, Linda Marie, 17, Margaret A., 14, and Rosemond, 7, were living at 1871 Sunset Boulevard in San Diego. He was working as a house building contractor and owned his own home but had a mortgage. Since Rosemond was born in California, we know the family arrived there as early as 1912.

A 1928 voter registration record showed Tom and Maggie were living at 4030 Jefferson in San Diego, with their daughter, Marie, and they were all registered as Republicans. Tom was listed as a builder, Margaret as a housewife, and Marie was working in "pictures". At that time Marie may have been modeling and/or acting in movies.

In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census for San Diego, Tom, 57, Margaret, 42, Rosemond, 17, were still living at 4030 Jefferson Avenue with Marie, 22, and her husband, Gordon T. Taylor, 32. Tom owned his own home which was valued at $5,000.00 and they had a radio in their home. Tom and Maggie had been married for 24 years and Marie and Gordon had been married for 2 years. Both of Gordon's parents were born in England. Gordon was the only one working per the census record and his occupation was real estate salesman.

A California Biographical Index Card dated January, 1932, for Thomas H. Rynning stated that he was born February 17, 1866, in Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin, his father's name was Halvor Rynning and his mother's name was Indiana Marie Rynning. His spouse was Margaret Eve Rollins, and they were married August 27, 1901, in Safford, Arizona. He stated that he was educated in the Beloit public schools and the Army. At the time he completed the card, he stated that he had lived in California for twenty years, having moved there in 1912. His present address at the time was shown as 4030 Jefferson Avenue.

A 1934 California Voter Registration record for San Diego County showed that Tom and Maggie were living at 1886 W. Pt. Loma Blvd., in Ocean Beach. Tom was working as a builder, Maggie as a housewife, and he was registered as a Democrat and she as a Republican. Their daughter Marie Taylor was living with them, but Gordon Taylor was not listed in the voter registration records. Marie was also listed as a housewife and a Republican.

A 1936 voter registration record shows Tom, Maggie, and daughter Rosamond living at 1922 Muir, Ocean Beach, and Tom was working as a Deputy Marshal. All three of them were registered as Democrats. Their daughter, Linda Marie Taylor, was also living with them, and was listed as a Fashion Model registered as a Democrat. Gordon Taylor was not listed in the voter registration record wit his wife, so perhaps he had passed away.

A 1937 U.S. City Directory listing for San Diego, showed Tom and Maggie and daughters Linda and Rosamond, living at 4427 Brighton Avenue, Ocean Beach, and Tom was working as a U.S. Marshal at 325 West F., Room 212. Their daughter Rosamond was listed as an artist.

From 1938 to 1940 they were living at the same place, Tom was working as a Deputy Marshal, Margaret as a housewife, Marie as a model and Rosamond as a housewife. They were all still registered as Democrats. In the 1940 U.S. Federal Census for San Diego, they were listed as follows: Thomas H., 74, Margaret E., 58, Linda M., 33, and Rosamond, 28. They were renting their home at 4427 Brighton for $36.00 per month. Tom had a 6th grade education, Margaret had 2 years of high school, Linda 2 years of college, and Rosamond 4 years of high school. Tom was working as a Deputy Marshall in Federal Investigation, and for the 52 weeks he worked at 44 hours per week at that profession in 1939 his income was $1,800.

Their neighbors on the same census page were working in the following professions: dentist, aircraft manufacturing paint sprayer, secretary in a doctor's office, postal clerk for the federal post office, platoon sergeant for the U.S. Marines, telephone operator, classified laborer for the U.S. Naval Supply Department, brewery shipping clerk, cosmetician in a beauty parlor, automobile repair shop mechanic, retail grocery checker, and a manager/owner of a restaurant. They were from Finland, Germany, and the states of Massachusetts, Illinois, Idaho, New Mexico, Kansas, Oregon, Missouri, Virginia, Oregon, Wisconsin, Arizona, California, Oklahoma, Utah, Minnesota, Nebraska, Montana, Tennessee, Washington, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. California was truly a melting pot of cultures at the time.

The following year, Thomas Harbo Rynning passed away on June 17, 1941, at the age of 75. He was still living at 4427 Brighton Avenue, Ocean Beach, San Diego. He died at his home just after noon of a heart attack. He was buried in the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego, Section OSA, Site 11.

The following information about Thomas Harbo Rynning was found on Find A Grave.com:

Thomas was a 2nd Lt. in the First U.S. Volunteer Cavalry in the Spanish-American War. He was the husband of Margaret Eve Rynning. He was born in Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin and became an orphan at age 12. He worked in a Wisconsin sawmill for a year before going to live with his sister in Chicago. He spent three years in Chicago working as a stair builder. In 1882, at the age of sixteen, he went to Texas and became a bull whacker outside of Del Rio. He then hired on as a cowboy on a ranch in Texas' Davis Mountains and made two trail drives to Dodge City.

All of his life his ambition had to become an Indian fighter and in February of 1885, outside of Del Rio, Texas, he enlisted in Troop D of the US Eighth Cavalry to fight in the Indian Wars. Private Rynning was sent to Arizona where he rode dispatch for General Crook and then as packer for General Miles. After the Apache wars ended, Rynning fought in Indian skirmishes from Texas to Deadwood, South Dakota, before mustering out as a sergeant when his five year hitch was up. He then made a visit to his boyhood home of Beloit and found his friends all gone and nothing was like he remembered. He gravitated down to Chicago and worked the World Fair for a while.

Turning down an offer from Buffalo Bill to join his Wild West Show, he went into engineering and specialized in building bridges for the Southern Pacific Railroad. This took him back to Arizona where he was when the Spanish American War began and he enlisted with the First Volunteer Cavalry, soon to become known as the Rough Riders. He was quickly appointed as a sergeant and then promoted to lieutenant when the unit moved to San Antonio. He fought in Cuba side-by-side with Leonard Wood and Theodore Roosevelt and they became fast friends. When Captain Bucky O'Neill was killed at San Juan, Lieutenant Rynning led the charge up San Juan Hill.

After the war he returned to Arizona and his contracting business. In 1901, the Arizona legislature had established the Arizona Rangers to combat all the lawlessness in the territory. Burt Mossman was selected as the first captain and after the first year he resigned. Governor Brodie appointed Rynning as the new captain and he received his commission on August 29, 1902. Under his leadership, he and his dedicated band of Rangers, never numbering more than 25 at any one time, virtually eliminated major crimes in the territory.

They also were called upon to quell union disputes on more than one occasion. He even led a band of Americans into Mexico to dispel a large union uprising a few miles below the border. He served as captain for five years and was then appointed by President Taft as the last warden of the Yuma Territorial Prison. While there he convinced the governor that living conditions were just too poor and that he could build a new prison at Florence, Arizona using only his contracting skills and prison labor. He was given permission to commence work.

The prisoners were paid in time, for each day the worked they received two days in time. At the completion of the facility an appraiser from Washington gave an appraisal of $1,500,000. The actual cost had been $182,000. He stayed on as warden at Florence until 1912 when a Democratic president was elected and replaced him. He moved to San Diego where he remained until he died. (Bio by Tom Todd)

Sources: "Gun Notches, A Saga of Frontier Lawman", by Captain Thomas H. Rynning as told to Al Cohn and Joe Chisholm, and "The Arizona Rangers" by Bill O'Neal.

FROM ANOTHER SOURCE: Born in Norway in 1866, Rynning arrived in the United States when he was just two years old. Joining the military, Rynning served under General Phillip Sheridan during the campaigns against the Southern Cheyenne and the Chiricahua Apaches in 1885 and 1886.

He was present at the capture of Geronimo, and helped in the chase of Sitting Bull and his band as they escaped to British Columbia following the Battle of the Little Bighorn. 1898 found him serving in the U.S. Army, rising to the rank of First Sergeant, and rode with General Miles. He served as a Second Lieutenant in Troop B of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders and was with Roosevelt during the many military engagements that led up to the surrender of the opposition forces at San Juan Hill in Santiago, Cuba, during the Spanish American War. He was also a track and field competitor.

Rynning had been building railroad bridges for the Southern Pacific Railroad when he was recruited to lead the Arizona Rangers following Burt Mossman's resignation in 1902. Several former Rough Riders had joined the Rangers after the war. Rynning was appointed Captain September 1, 1902. In 1906 he lead a force of volunteers assisting the Mexican Rurales to put down the rioting and bloodshed that were taking place in the copper mines of Cananea. During his tenure, he expanded the Arizona Rangers and began a thorough training program before he resigned on March 20, 1907.

Rynning was appointed superintendent of the Arizona State Prison by President Howard Taft and later had the prison moved from Yuma to Florence, Arizona. He also wrote a book entitled Gun Notches, the story of the Arizona Rangers. According to his book, he became an orphan at age 12 and worked in a Wisconsin sawmill for a year before going to live with his sister in Chicago. He spent three years in Chicago working as a stair builder. In 1882, at the age of sixteen, he went to Texas and became a bull whacker outside of Del Rio.

He then hired on as a cowboy on a ranch in Texas' Davis Mountains and made two trail drives to Dodge City. All of his life his ambition had been to become an Indian fighter, and in February of 1885, outside of Del Rio, Texas, he enlisted in Troop D of the US Eighth Cavalry to fight in the Indian Wars.

Private Rynning was sent to Arizona where he rode dispatch for General Crook and then as packer for General Miles. After the Apache wars ended, Rynning fought in Indian skirmishes from Texas to Deadwood, South Dakota, before mustering out as a sergeant when his five year hitch was up. He then made a visit to his boyhood home of Beloit and found his friends all gone and nothing was like he remembered.

He gravitated down to Chicago and worked the Worlds Fair for a while. Turning down an offer from Buffalo Bill to join his Wild West Show, he went into engineering and specialized in building bridges for the Southern Pacific Railroad. This took him back to Arizona where he was when the Spanish American War began and he enlisted with the First Volunteer Cavalry, soon to become known as the Rough Riders.

He was quickly appointed as a sergeant and then promoted to lieutenant when the unit moved to San Antonio. He fought in Cuba side-by-side with Leonard Wood and Theodore Roosevelt and they became fast friends. When Captain Bucky O'Neill was killed at San Juan, Lieutenant Rynning led the charge up San Juan Hill.

After the war he returned to Arizona and his contracting business. In 1901, the Arizona legislature had established the Arizona Rangers to combat all the lawlessness in the territory. Burt Mossman was selected as the first captain and after the first year he resigned. Governor Brodie appointed Rynning as the new captain and he received his commission on August 29, 1902. Under his leadership, he and his dedicated band of Rangers, never numbering more than 25 at any one time, virtually eliminated major crimes in the territory.

They also were called upon to quell union disputes on more than one occasion. He even led a band of Americans into Mexico to dispel a large union uprising a few miles below the border. He served as captain for five years and was then appointed by President Taft as the last warden of the Yuma Territorial Prison. While there he convinced the governor that living conditions were just too poor and that he could build a new prison at Florence, Arizona, using only his contracting skills and prison labor. He was given permission to commence work.

The prisoners were paid in time, for each day the worked they received two days in time. At the completion of the facility an appraiser from Washington gave an appraisal of $1,500,000. The actual cost had been $182,000. He stayed on as warden at Florence until 1911 when a Democratic president was elected and replaced him. He moved to San Diego where he remained until he died.

Bio by Tom Todd. Sources: "Gun Notches, A Saga of Frontier Lawman", by Captain Thomas H. Rynning, as told to Al Cohn and Joe Chisholm, and "The Arizona Rangers" by Bill O'Neal.

There is a photo of the badge Thomas H. Rynning wore as an Arizona Ranger under the media tab above along with two pictures of him with his horse. The photo with Thomas Harbo Rynning and his horse has a caption which reads..."Portrait of an Arizona Ranger beside a horse in Arizona. Captain Thomas H. Rynning wears a cowboy hat, a neckerchief, suspenders, a jacket, slacks tucked into tall cowboy boots with spurs, leather gauntlets, and a leather cartridge belt. A horse stands with a lasso tied on his saddle and with a rifle in a scabbard. Date 1903?"

More from another Ancestry.com post: Much was written about Tom Rynning. Tom Rollins Lyall (my great-grandfather) was named after him. Tom Rynning and Jesse West Rollins were best of friends and shared many adventures, then Rynning married Jesse's sister Margaret Rollins.

Captain Thomas H. Rynning authored an autobiography (as told to Al Cohn and Joe Chisholm), GUN NOTCHES, The Life Story of a Cowboy-Soldier, which was published in 1931 by Frederick A. Stokes Co. of New York. It is a folksy tale of cowboys, Indians, bad guys and Arizona Rangers. He names his friend and brother-in-law Jesse Rollins as a great 'tracker'.

Tom Rynning, and Jesse too, were a part of the History of Arizona. In addition to his own book many others have been written about Rynning. Plus, there is much on file with the Archives in the State of Arizona. Therefore I will not go into great detail about him here, but will hit a few of the highlights.

1866 - Born in Wisconsin, his parents died when he was twelve. With uncle one winter in Wisconsin lumber camp, with sister in Chicago - apprenticeship as stair builder, built stairs along Mississippi River towns.

Mastered levee folk dances and danced for living at times. Wisconsin - learned how to mount running horse without using his hands. Texas near Pecos - drove Longhorns. Dodge City - in a shooting scrape.

1884 - Apaches on warpath - joins Cavalry.

1890(9 ) - Out sprints Harry Bethume (world champ) in informal contest. Longest one horse ride in Military history.

1892 - Buffalo Bill Troupe - Chicago World's Fair, guard at the Chicago Colombian Exposition, windmill salesman, successful building contractor.

1898 - Spanish American War - With Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders, San Juan Hill, Cuba (First U.S. Volunteers)

1902 - Captain of Arizona Rangers (2nd Captain). Striking miners threaten to flood mine

Mexican Outlaws in New Mexico Led 300 Americans into Mexico to save Americans under Indian attack.

1907 - Warden Territorial Prison at Yuma, planned and oversees building the new penitentiary at Florence, used convicts, to build prison gave them 2 days off for each day of work.

1911 - San Diego, California. Under Sheriff to Ralph Conklin for 2-1/2 years

1914 - World War I, back to Arizona to drill Army Troops.

1932 - Retirement in San Diego, California.

SOURCE: http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/13902522/person/18003161232/media/3?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid|pgNum

FROM ANOTHER SOURCE: http://www.tomtoddbooks.com/Documents/Thomas%20Harbo%20Rynning.pdf

Tom’s Tombstone Travels: Thomas Harbo Rynning

Tom Rynning was born on February 17, 1866, in Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin, and became an orphan at age 12. He worked in a Wisconsin sawmill for a year before going to live with his sister in Chicago where he spent three years working as a stair builder. In 1882, at the age of sixteen, he went to Texas and became a bull whacker outside of Del Rio. He then hired on as a cowboy on a ranch in Texas' Davis Mountains and made two trail drives to Dodge City. All of his life his ambition was to become an Indian fighter and in February of 1885, outside of Del Rio, Texas, he enlisted in Troop D of the U.S. Eighth Cavalry to fight in the Indian Wars. Private Rynning was sent to Arizona where he rode dispatch for General Crook and then as a packer for General Miles. After the Apache wars ended, Rynning fought in Indian skirmishes from Texas to Deadwood, South Dakota, before mustering out as a sergeant when his five year hitch was up. He then made a visit to his boyhood home of Beloit and found his friends all gone and nothing was like he remembered. He gravitated down to Chicago and worked the Worlds Fair for a while.

Turning down an offer from Buffalo Bill to join his Wild West Show, Tom went into engineering and specialized in building bridges for the Southern Pacific Railroad. This took him back to Arizona where he was when the Spanish American War began and he enlisted with the First Volunteer Cavalry, soon to become known as the Rough Riders. He was quickly appointed as a sergeant and then promoted to lieutenant when the unit moved to San Antonio. In Cuba he fought side-by-side with Leonard Wood and Theodore Roosevelt and they became fast friends. When Captain Bucky O'Neill was killed at San Juan, Lieutenant Rynning led the charge up San Juan Hill. After the war he returned to Arizona and his contracting business.

On August 27, 1901, Tom married Margaret Eve Rollins. He was 35 years old, and she had just turned 19. They had three daughters. In 1901, the Arizona legislature had established the Arizona Rangers to combat all the lawlessness in the territory. Burt Mossman was selected as the first captain and after the first year he resigned. Governor Brodie appointed Rynning as the new captain and he received his commission on August 29, 1902. Under his leadership, he and his dedicated band of rangers, never numbering more than 25 at any one time, virtually eliminated major crimes in the territory. They also were called upon to quell union disputes on more than one occasion. He even led a band of Americans into Mexico to dispel a large union uprising a few miles below the border.

Tom served as captain for five years and was then appointed by President Howard Taft as the last warden of the Yuma Territorial Prison. While there he convinced the governor that living conditions were just too poor and that he could build a new prison at Florence, Arizona using only his contracting skills and prison labor. He was given permission to commence work. The prisoners were paid in time. For each day they worked they received two days in time. At the completion of the facility an appraiser from Washington gave an appraisal of $1,500,000. The actual cost had been $182,000. He stayed on as warden at Florence until 1911 when a Democratic president was elected and replaced him.

The Republicans returned to power in 1921 and Tom was again appointed as warden and his wife and three daughters returned to Florence. In 1932, the family returned to San Diego permanently, and two years later he was commissioned as a deputy U.S. marshal for the San Diego area where he also served as under sheriff. On June 17, 1941, at the age of 75 he was peacefully working in his garden when he was struck by a fatal heart attack. Tom and Margaret are buried side-by-side in the Fort Rosecrans Cemetery on Point Loma in San Diego, California.

The Following is From the Official Site of the Arizona Rangers - Serving Arizona For Over 200 Years:

http://www.azrangers.us/rynning.html

The history of the Arizona Rangers is one of integrity, pride, and unequaled law enforcement service. Our long commitment to the history of Arizona is built upon the dedication of men and women who, over the decades, committed themselves to a life of public service. No matter how distant, how difficult, or how dangerous, the Arizona Rangers has always answered the call for service.

The Arizona Rangers had been preceded by the organization of the ArizonalTerritorial Rangers in 1860. This group was formed by the 1860 Provisional Territorial Government, principally to protect against Apache raids. The intent was to have three companies of Territorial Rangers, two were formed in the mining camp of Pinos Altos, known as the Arizona Guards and the Minute Men, and another, the Arizona Rangers, in Mesilla by Captain James Henry Tevis.

With the arrival of Baylor's Confederate Army in Mesilla and his declaration of a Confederate Territory of Arizona in early 1862, the Arizona Territorial Rangers were disbanded by Captain Tevis who joined the San Elizario Spy Company in the Confederate Army. The Confederate Territorial Governor, General Baylor eventually saw the need for the Rangers and formed Company A, Arizona Rangers as the first of three companies for the defense of Arizona Territory. it was commanded by Captain Sherod Hunter and Second Lieutenant James Henry Tevis. The Arizona Rangers were sent to Tucson to defend western Arizona Territory. When the California Column drove the Confederates out of Arizona Territory, plans for organizing the Arizona Rangers were put off for years.

In the early 1880's, Arizona was not only have an Indian war, but border crimes and killings were making Arizona unfit to live in. Upon taking office, Governor Frederick Augustus Tritle faced a problem of lawlessness within the territory caused by outlaw cowboys and hostile natives. On April 24, 1882, he authorized formation of the 1st Company of the Arizona Rangers in Tombstone making John H. Jackson its Captain. They were to be similar to Texas Rangers and combat outlaws and hostile Indians. His first assignment to the Rangers was to scout near the border of the territory for Indians, and for those who recently killed a teamster there. The Rangers Captain was only able to pay the first months wages, and the Governor despite his best efforts was never able to get them funded by the Territorial Legislature or Congress. On May 20, 1882, the Governor wrote his last known letter to Captain Jackson concerning the Arizona Rangers.

"Captain John H. Jackson, Tombstone, A.T.

I have written to several prominent parties who have large interest about Tombstone to try and get an additional sum of money to pay the expenses of keeping your force in shape for use. As long as you have enough money remaining to have watch kept on your horses and equipments I hope you will do so and I will try every way to get some money if even in small amount."

P.S. As long as your company exists it will preserve order. Yours Truly, F.A. Tritle"

Arizona Rangers (1901 to 1909):

The approval to organize a company of Arizona Rangers arrived in the form of a bill approved in 1901 by the twenty-first Arizona Legislative Assembly. The current Governor, Nathan Oakes Murphy, suceded in getting funding where the 1882 attempt failed. On March 21, 1901, the legislative act became effective authorizing the organization of a company of Rangers. Fourteen men staffed the organization; One Captain hired at $120.00 per month, one Sergeant hired at $75.00 per month, and twelve Privates hired at $55.00 each per month.

Modeled after the Texas Rangers, the Arizona Rangers were created by the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1901, and subsequently disbanded in 1909. They were created to deal with the infestations of outlaws, especially rustlers, in the sparsely populated Territory of Arizona, especially along the Mexican border. The Rangers were an elite, well trained, and secretive agency mounted on the best horses money could buy and well equipped with modern weapons at State expense. They were very effective in apprehending members of outlaw bands, often surprising them by descending on them without warning.

On August 30, 1901, Burton C. Mossman of Bisbee, Arizona, became the first Captain of the Arizona Rangers. Mossman, who had previously been manager of the two million acre Aztec Land and Cattle Company, also called the "Hash Knife Outfit", in Northern Arizona near Holbrook and Winslow, had some success in controlling rustling of his company's cattle. He spoke Spanish, was a rough rider and was a great story teller. In July, 1902, after successfully recruiting and organizing the original Rangers, Mossman resigned, returning to the cattle business. Rumors had it that Mossman did not want to work under a new governor.

The second Captain was Thomas Rynning, who had been enlisted in the Eighth Cavalry, rode with General Miles, was a track and field competitor, also a Rough Rider, as his predecessor, and had been building railroad bridges for Southern Pacific before joining the Arizona Rangers.

Badges for the Arizona Rangers were first issued in 1903 under Rynning's command. They were solid silver five-pointed ball-tipped stars, lettered in blue enamel with engravings etched in blue, and are a valuable collectible. An officer's badge was engraved wit the Ranger's name, white badges for enlisted men were numbered. Upon resignation, a Ranger returned his badge, which was then available to be assigned to a new Ranger.

In March, 1903, the authorized force was increased to 26. The Rangers, many of whom in the early years were veterans of Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders, were skilled horsemen, trackers and marksmen. Rynning started a thorough training program with the Rangers. Captain Rynning resigned on March 20, 1907.

In addition to dealing with rustlers and other outlaws, the Rangers were called on to deal with several large strikes by Mexican workers at mines in Arizona and at a mine in Cananea in Mexico. Contemporary news reports in the New York Times on June 3, 1906, reported that on June 1, 1906, strikers destroyed a lumber mill and killed two brothers who were defending the mine.

Eleven casualties were reported among the Mexican "rioters." Responding to a telegraphed plea from colonel William Cornell Greene of the Greene Consolidated Copper Company, a posse of 275 volunteers from Bisbee, Douglas and Naco, Arizona, commanded by Captain Thomas H. Rynning of the Arizona Rangers, entered Mexico against the orders of Joseph Henry Kibbey Governor of Arizona Territory, and at the invitation of Rafael Yzabel, the Governor of Sonora, reinforced the Sonoran rurales. Mexican troops were reported en route to the city. Four troops of the Fifth Cavalry en route from Fort Huachuca were held at Naco, Arizona, on the border on the orders of President Taft. According to Colonel Greene, the "trouble was incited by a socialistic organization that has been formed in Cananea by malcontents opposed to the Diaz government."

The third and last captain was Harry C. Wheeler, who took the oat on March 25, 1907. He moved the Ranger headquarters from Douglas to Naco. Wheeler, who had served the Rangers at every rank brought discipline and idealism to the ranks. He was known for his iron will and absolute honesty. Captain Wheeler was the best possible field officer and administrator. On February 15, 1909, the act establishing the Arizona Rangers was repealed. During the seven and a half years of its existence, 107 men served in the Rangers. The vote to disband was vetoed by Republican Territorial Governor Joseph Henry Kibbey, but the democratic-dominated assembly overrode the veto, backed by political pressure from county sheriffs and district attorneys in northern Arizona. The Arizona Rangers were extremely capable men whose exploits were extensively reported by the newspapers of the day.

After the Arizona Rangers disbanded, many of the former Rangers stayed in law enforcement. Tom Rynning was a prison warden in Yuma, Arizona. Harry Wheeler became Sheriff of Cochise County. Seven former Rangers reunited in 1940 to ride together in the Prescott Rodeo Parade. In 1955, the State of Arizona authorized a $100 monthly pension for former Rangers who had served at least six months and who still lived in Arizona. five men qualified for this pension.

Second Captain of the Arizona Rangers - Thomas Harbo Rynning:

"Since the year of 1898, I have personally and favorably known Captain Thomas H. Rynning of Roosevelt's Rough Riders. His career in Arizona as a member and later captain of the Arizona Rangers, one of the best bodies of peace officers that ever sat saddle or pulled a trigger, and later as Warden of the Arizona Territorial Penitentiary of Yuma, and constructor of the new prison in Florence, has been replaced with every service magnificently accomplished. During my last term as Governor of Arizona, Captain Rynning was my warden at the Arizona State Penitentiary and as such he lived up to his former splendid reputation. He was always a leader of men, a soldier of distinction and the public administrator without a peer. His career is almost unparalleled and I am happy as one of his old friends who, for over 30 years, has watched this man in action, to learn that some of his experiences will be retained for present and prosperity of the vivid history of his days in Arizona." Thomas E. Campbell, Former Governor of Arizona.

"I've been in many a tough town in my day, but from Deadwood to Tombstone I've never met up with a harder formation than Douglas was when we made the Arizona Rangers' home corral there in 1902." Captain Thomas H. Rynning shortly after arriving in Douglas, Arizona.

"Out of a lifetime in which I've been under all kinds of fire, rushing trenches through artillery barrages, in Indian skirmishes so hot I've had my gun shot out of my hand, hell-roaring Range battles with border outlaws, or just plain two-man duels with outlaws, our crazy raid through Dodge City, 48 years ago, stand out in my memory as the fiercest gun play I ever been was mixed up with." Captain Thomas Rynning.

Thomas Harbo Rynning (February 17, 1866 - June 18, 1941) was an officer in the United States Army that served with Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War. He was also the captain of the Arizona Rangers, warden of Yuma Territorial Prison, and a United States Marshal in San Diego, California.

Thomas Rynning was born in Christiana, Norway on February 17, 1866. At the age of two, his parents emigrated to the United States and settled in Beloit, Wisconsin. By 1885, Rynning was in Texas when he decided to enlist in the U.S. Army's 8th Cavalry Regiment. His first battle was against the Cheyenne while serving under General Philip Sheridan. After the Cheyenne were defeated, he was transferred with his regiment to Arizona Territory. Under Lieutenant Samuel Fountain, Rynning engaged in Geronimo's War and was present when Geronimo was captured by Leonard Wood. In 1888, Rynning participated in the Great March, the longest cavalry ride in American history, from Arizona Territory to Dakota Territory. In Dakota, the 8th Cavalry relieved the 7th Cavalry and eventually went on to fight in the Ghost Dance War against Chief Sitting Bull. Rynning was honorably discharged in 1891 with a record of seventeen battles against natives. He then went to California, but two years later, he settled in Tucson, Arizona, where he became a successful building contractor.

Spanish-American War: In 1898, Rynning discovered that the war with Spain had begun and that his old friend, Colonel Leonard Wood, was raising a volunteer cavalry regiment, which later became known as Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders. He enlisted as a private and returned from the war a second lieutenant in Troop B, 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. During the Battle of San Juan Heights, Rynning took command of the American line following the death of Captain Buckey O'Neill. A few minutes later he led the Rough Riders up Kettle Hill and was the first American to reach the summit. Under heavy fire from the nearby San Juan Hill, Rynning ordered his men to wave the regiment's flag to rally the others and it was during this time that the flag was badly holed. The flag is now preserved by the Department of Library and Archives in the state capitol building in Phoenix, Arizona. After that, Rynning joined Theodore Roosevelt in the charge up San Juan Hill, which ended the battle with an American victory.

Later life and death Arizona Rangers: After returning from Cuba, Rynning went back to Arizona and continued working as a contractor. However, in 1902, his friend and fellow Rough Rider, Alexander Oswald Brodie, was elected governor of Arizona and one of his first appointments was making Rynning the new Captain of the Arizona Rangers. Rynning was living in Douglas at that time, so after becoming Captain, he moved his headquarters there from Bisbee. In 1903, Rynning played an important role in helping keep the peace during the Clifton and Morenci riots.

In 1905, Rynning commanded a large posse of American militia that assisted Colonel Emilio Kosteritsky in quelling the riot at Cananea, Sonora. In June, authorities received a telegram from mine owner William D. Greene reporting that American citizens were being attached by rioting caused by seventy others armed with rifles, boarded a train at Naco and entered Sonora with orders to suppress the rioting and protect American lives and property. Although Governor Rafael Izabal was alerted to the possibility of the escalation of the conflict between the Arizona Rangers and the largely unarmed strikers, the governor simply refused to intervene commenting that the men were "on their own". The fighting had long since ended as a truce had been arraigned by the strikers and local officials by the time of Rynning's arrival. Placed between the strikers and the office buildings of the Cananea Company, Rynning's men guarded the property during negotiations until asked to leave by Mexican officials several hours later.

On September 4, 1906, Rynning led Arizona Rangers and immigration officers in a raid on an underground cell of the Partido Liberal Mexican during a meeting in Douglas. Discovering dynamite, pistols and banners, seven members were arrested for violation of the Neutrality Law. The group had been gathering weapons and ammunition for a major expedition into Mexico which included capturing custom houses on the border, blowing up railways, cutting telegraph wires and raiding stores for weapons and supplies. The Douglas group had also commissioned Javier Huitemea to negotiate with the Yaqui to support them promising the tribe the return of the land which had been taken from them. Extensive evidence of correspondence with Saint Louis Junta provided American authorities with evidence of other groups operating in Mowry and Patagonia.

Yuma Territorial Prison and Florence State Prison: Resigning his position with the Arizona Rangers in March, 1907, he was appointed superintendent of the Yuma Territorial Prison in Yuma by President William Howard Taft. He then immediately began the process of abandoning the old prison complex and building a new one in Florence. Rynning supervised the construction and brought convicts from Yuma to help with the work. When Arizona became a state in 1912, a Democratic government under George W.P. Hunt took over and removed Rynning from his post. However, after Thomas Edward Campbell was elected, Rynning was again appointed superintendent of the prison in 1921.

Death: In his later life, Rynning moved to San Diego, California, where he received a commission as a deputy marshal in 1934. He also served as an under sheriff there. Rynning died in San Diego on June 18, 1941, at the age of seventy-five, and was buried at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery. In popular culture Rynning was portrayed by Tristram Coffin (1909-1990) in the 1957-1959 syndicated television series 26 Men. Kelo Henderon co-stared as Deputy Clint Travis.

FROM ANOTHER SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_H._Rynning

Thomas Harbo Rynning (February 17, 1866-June 18, 1941) was an officer in the United States Army that served with Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War. He was also the captain of the Arizona Rangers, warden of Yuma Territorial Prison, and a United States Marshal in San Diego, California.

Biography - Early life and military career - American Indian Wars

Thomas Rynning was born in Christiana, Norway, on February 17, 1866. At the age of two, his parents emigrated to the United States and settled in Beloit, Wisconsin. By 1885, Rynning was in Texas when he decided to enlist in the United States Army's 8th Cavalry Regiment. His first battle was against the Cheyenne while serving under General Philip Sheridan. After the Cheyenne were defeated, he was transferred with his regiment to Arizona Territory. Under Lieutenant Samuel Fountain, Rynning engaged in Geronimo's War and was present when Geronimo was captured by Leonard Wood.

In 1888, Rynning participated in the Great March, the longest cavalry ride in American history, from Arizona Territory to Dakota Territory. In Dakota, the 8th Cavalry relieved the 7th Cavalry and eventually went on to fight in the Ghost Dance War against Chief Sitting Bull. Rynning was honorably discharged in 1891 with a record of seventeen battles against natives. He then went to California, but, two years later, he settled in Tucson, Arizona, where he became a successful building contractor.

Spanish-American War

In 1898, Rynning discovered that the war with Spain had begun and that his old friend, Colonel Leonard Wood, was raising a volunteer cavalry regiment, which later became known as Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Riders. He enlisted as a private and returned from the war a second lieutenant in Troop B, 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. During the Battle of San Juan Heights, Rynning took command of the American line following the death of Captain Buckey O'Neill. A few minutes later he led the Rough Riders up Kettle Hill and was the first American to reach the summit. Under heavy fire from the nearby San Juan Hill, Rynning ordered his men to wave the regiment's flag to rally the others and it was during this time that the flag was badly holed. The flag is now preserved by the Department of Library and Archives in the state capitol building in Phoenix, Arizona. After that, Rynning joined Theodore Roosevelt in the charge up San Juan Hill, which ended the battle with an American victory.

Later life and death - Arizona Rangers

After returning from Cuba, Rynning went back to Arizona and continued working as a contractor. However, in 1902, his friend and fellow Rough Rider, Alexander Oswald Brodie, was elected governor of Arizona and one of his first appointments was making Rynning the new captain of the Arizona Rangers. Rynning was living in Douglas at that time so, after becoming captain, he moved his headquarters there from Bisbee. In 1903, Rynning played an important role in helping keep the peace during the Clifton and Morenci riots.

In 1906, Rynning commanded a large posse of American militia that assisted Colonel Emilio Kosterlitsky in quelling the riot at Cananea, Sonora. In June, authorities received a telegram from mine owner William D. Greene reporting that American citizens were being attacked by rioting caused by a strike among the workers at the Cananea Consolidated Copper Company. A volunteer force of 275 armed men was quickly organized and Rynning, with five rangers and seventy others armed with rifles, boarded a train at Naco and entered Sonora with orders to suppress the rioting and protect American lives and property.

Although Governor Rafael Izabal was alerted to the possibility of the escalation of the conflict between the Arizona Rangers and the largely unarmed strikers, the governor simply refused to intervene commenting that the men were "on their own". The fighting had long since ended as a truce had been arraigned by the strikers and local officials by the time of Rynning's arrival. Placed between the strikers and the office buildings of the Cananea Company, Rynning's men guarded the property during negotiations until asked to leave by Mexican officials several hours later.

On September 4, 1906, Rynning led Arizona Rangers and immigration officers in a raid on an underground cell of the Partido Liberal Mexicano during a meeting in Douglas. Discovering dynamite, pistols and banners, seven members were arrested for violation of the Neutrality Law. The group had been gathering weapons and ammunition for a major expedition into Mexico which included capturing custom houses on the border, blowing up railways, cutting telegraph wires and raiding stores for weapons and supplies. The Douglas group had also commissioned Javier Huitemea to negotiate with the Yaqui to support them promising the tribe the return of the land which had been taken from them. Extensive evidence of correspondence with Saint Louis Junta provided American authorities with evidence of other groups operating in Mowry and Patagonia.

Yuma Territorial Prison and Florence State Prison

Resigning his position with the Arizona Rangers in March 1907, he was appointed superintendent of the Yuma Territorial Prison in Yuma by President William Howard Taft. He then immediately began the process of abandoning the old prison complex and building a new one in Florence. Rynning supervised the construction and brought convicts from Yuma to help with the work. When Arizona became a state in 1912, a Democratic government under George W. P. Hunt took over and removed Rynning from his post. However, after Thomas Edward Campbell was elected, Rynning was again appointed superintendent of the prison in 1921.

Death

In his later life, Rynning moved to San Diego, California, where he received a commission as a deputy marshal in 1934. He also served as an under sheriff there. Rynning died in San Diego on June 18, 1941, at the age of seventy-five, and was buried at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery.

In popular culture Rynning was portrayed by Tristram Coffin (1909-1990) in the 1957-1959 syndicated television series 26 Men. Kelo Henderson co-starred as Deputy Clint Travis.

See also: Tiburon Island Tragedy, Shootout in Benson, Arizona State Prison Complex – Florence

Further reading: Rynning, Thomas H., Gun Notches: The Life Story of a Cowboy-Soldier. Published in New York by Frederick A. Stokes, in 1931.

References:


http://genealogytrails.com/ariz/rynning.htm

http://www.usgennet.org/usa/az/state/rangers.htm

Hart, John Mason. Revolutionary Mexico: The Coming and Process of the Mexican Revolution. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987. (pg. 67) ISBN 0-520-21531-1

   

Martínez, Oscar Jáquez. U.S.-Mexico Borderlands: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Wilmington: Scholarly Resources, 1996. (pg. 118) ISBN 0-8420-2447-6

Magon, Ricardo Flores. Dreams of Freedom: A Ricardo Flores Magon Reader. Oakland, California: AK

Press, 2006. (pg. 51-52) ISBN 1-904859-24-0

Debs, Eugene Victor and J. Robert Constantine. Letters of Eugene V. Debs. Urbana: University of Illinois, 1990. (pg. 338) ISBN 0-252-01742-0

Preceded by Burton C. Mossman, Captain of the Arizona Rangers, 1902-1907

Succeeded by Harry C. Wheeler

The Find a Grave memorial was created by Kit and Morgan Benson and the record was added August 8, 2005. it is Find A Grave Memorial # 11498382.

Thomas Harbo Rynning's wife, Margaret Eve Rollins Rynning, passed away 26 years after his death on June 22, 1967, in Pacific Beach, San Diego, California, and was buried with her husband at the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego.

Tom and Maggie's daughter, Linda Marie Rynning, born August 26, 1902, in Safford, Graham County, Arizona, passed away January 12, 1973, in San Diego. She married Gordon T. Taylor, born in 1898, but they later divorced. At some point she may have also married a man by the name of Ward. It is not known if she had any children.

Daughter Margaret Alexandria Rynning, born March 3, 1905, in Douglas, Cochise, Arizona, died June 8, 1969, in San Diego. She married Calvin Davis Swalm (1910 to 1974), and they had one son who was also a famous military man, Major General Thomas Sterling Swalm. There is extensive biographical information about the Major General on his Geni profile page, a link to which is as follows:

http://www.geni.com/people/Major-General-Thomas-Sterling-Swalm/6000000022484991683

Daughter Rosamond Rynning, was born June 15, 1912, in San Diego, and died March 29, 1996, in San Diego. She married O'Donnell "Don" Patrick Fogarty sometime before 1947 in San Diego, and they had two daughters. Don was born August 39, 1904, in Montana to John Michael Fogarty (1862-1939) and Mary "Mollie" Tierney (1869-1939). John Michael Fogarty was born in Ballinure, Cappamore, Ireland, and his wife, Mary, was born in Cappaghwhite, Tipperary, Ireland.

John came to America in the late 1880's where he joined the U.S. Navy. After his discharge he married Mary Tierney in Chicago, Illinois, in 1890. They moved to Butte, Silver Bow, Montana in about 1891 or 1892. John worked as a copper miner during the 1890's when Butte, Montana was a copper mining boom town. Thousands of men and women moved there to seek their fortunes, who were remembered as the "Copper Kings." Mary had arrived in America from Ireland in 1885 and was naturalized in 1889. John and Mary had 11 children but divorced in 1910 in Kuna, Ada, Idaho, two years after the birth of their last son in 1908. Mary remained there and passed away in Eagle, Idaho, January 12, 1939. John passed away the following month on February 15, 1939, in Boise, Idaho. Around 1930 Mary, 52, had been living alone near the Dewey Palace Hotel, in Nampa, Canyon County, Idaho. From 1903 to 1963, the Dewey Palace Hotel was part of Nampa's culture. It was a meeting place, a landmark, and a legacy from one of Nampa's biggest boosters. Thought it was torn down to make way for urban development, the old structure remained an integral part of many Nampan's lives and memories.

In 1947 and 1948 Rosamond and Don were living at 4883 Santa Cruz Avenue, and Don was working as an attorney for Luce, Forward, Kunzel & Scripps legal firm. Sadly, Don passed away before his 50th birthday on March 17, 1954, in Los Angeles, California. Five years later, in 1959 Rosamond was listed in a U.S. City Directory living at 4427 Brighton Avenue with her mother, Margaret. I don't know if Rosamond ever remarried, but in 1993, she was listed in the U.S. Public Records Index living at 1069 Grand Avenue, San Diego, 92109-4118, and was shown there as Rosamond R. Fogarty, so it seems she never remarried after the death of Don Fogarty.

Tom's friend and brother-in-law, Jesse West Rollins, was born April 6, 1872 in Minersville, Beaver County, Utah, and died on November 4, 1930, in Tucson, Pima County, Arizona. Jesse had one son, Thomas Rollins Lyall (adopted after his mother's second marriage), who was named for Jesse's friend Thomas Harbo Rynning.

The above information was revised December 20, 2014 by Della Dale Smith-Pistelli, of Brenham, Texas. Thomas Harbo Rynning was her second great uncle, since he was married to Margaret Eve Rollins, the sister of Della's great grandfather, John Henry Rollins, Jr. (1865 - 1889). John was killed at the young age of only 24 years old when he fell from a wagon and his head was crushed by the wheels of the wagon. Three of John's brothers also died young, including Edward Ephraim Rollins (1861 to 1887) who may have died from a diphtheria epidemic, Charles Watson Rollins (1876-1879), and Moses Porter Rollins (1878 to 1896).

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Thomas Harbo Rynning's Timeline

1866
February 17, 1866
Came to US age 2, Beloit, Wisconsin, USA
1902
August 26, 1902
Age 36
Safford, Graham, AZ, USA
1905
March 3, 1905
Age 39
Douglas, Cochise, AZ, USA
1912
June 19, 1912
Age 46
San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
1941
June 18, 1941
Age 75
San Diego, San Diego, California, United States
June 23, 1941
Age 75
San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA
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