Thomas Andrew Sanford

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Thomas Andrew Sanford

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex, England
Death: Died in Milford, New Haven, CT, USA
Place of Burial: Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Ezekiel Sanford and Rose Sanford (Warner)
Husband of Sarah Dorothea Sanford
Father of Ezekiel Sanford; Sarah Shute; Andrew Sanford; Mary Boxford; Samuel Sanford and 3 others
Brother of John Sanford; Ezekiel Sanford, Jr; Robert Sanford; Andrew Sanford; Samuel Sanford and 5 others

Occupation: of Milford, Conn
Managed by: Brandt Joseph Gibson
Last Updated:

About Thomas Andrew Sanford

Thomas Sanford arrived in the colonies with his younger brother Andrew and his uncle, Andrew Warner, in 1632 at Dorchester, Massachusetts. He sailed on the ship Arabella as part of the Winthrop Fleet. Many ships over many months came as a part of that activity. He, one brother and their uncle, traveled as single men. He married Dorothea Meadows in Dorchester and they had two children. She died shortly after. He married Sarah Meadows and they set out for Hartford, Connecticut, where some of his relatives had settled, then went on to Milford, Connecticut, where they made their home and had more children. They became an important part of that community by owning property and being very active in both church and civic affairs. They were considered among the founders of Milford, Connecticut. All but the first two children were born at Milford and the parents were buried there. He was married to Sarah Meadows in 1641 in Dorchester. There are no stones marking their graves. The oldest stone marker is 1726, Mrs. Samuel Sanford. Maid Sara Whitlock is mentioned in his will. (Source: Elizabeth Wallace)

Thomas Sanford was nephew of Andrew and Mary (Humphrey) Warner of this genealogy. He lived in Dorchester from 1634 to 1640 then moved to Milford, Connecticut, where he was admitted to the church on January 9, 1641/2. His wife, Sarah, was admitted to the Milford church on December 15, 1642.

His will was dated September 23, 1691; his estate was inventoried on October 21, 1681. It mentions: eldest son Ezekiel, sons Thomas, Ephraim, and Samuel; daughters Sarah wife of Richard Shute of Eastchester, and Elizabeth wife of Obadiah Allyn of Middletown; grandchildren Sarah Shute and Thomas Allyn; and Sarah Whitlock, his maid.

http://www.otal.umd.edu/~walt/gen/htmfile/2620.htm -------------------- Carlton Sanford concluded that eldest sons Thomas and John were born at their mother's home in Hatfield Broad Oak. Thomas probably married Sarah at Dorchester between 1632 and 1636. He died between 23 September 1681 (date of will) and 21 October 1681 (date of inventory). Some early authors erroneously claimed that Thomas Sanford was the son of Anthony Sanford, and that he married in England Dorothy Meadows, daughter of Henry Meadows of Stowe. Carlton Sanford ably refutes that pedigree, and builds a solid argument that Thomas is instead the son of Ezekiel Sanford of Stanstead Mountfitchet. "Thomas John and Ezechiell thre of the sonnes of Ezechiell Sandford my sonne in lawe" were mentioned in the will of his grandfather John Warner of Hatfield Broad Oak dated 16 July 1614, to receive L3-6s-8d at 21. On 12 May 1627 grandchild Thomas Sanford was mentioned in the will of Mary Warner of Hatfield Broad Oaks. And on 27 February 1632 great-granduncle Richard Sanford of Much Hadham bequeathed him 20s. Thomas came to New England (on the Arabella, according to Banks; to Boston in 1631, according to Holmes) with several of his brothers, following their uncle Andrew Warner. Thomas may have been at Dorchester as early as 1632. Dorchester was settled in 1630, but no lands were allotted until 3 April 1633. The Town Records of Dorchester begin 16 January 1632, and no vital records exist. Thomas had land booked to him at Dorchester November 1634; he had to be settled and join the church to receive a grant of land. Thomas could read, write and "cast accompts" at a time when 3/4 of the English people could not read or write. On 22 November 1634 the town of Dorchester ordered Thomas Thorneton, Thomas Sandford, and Henry Wright to "have four acres of ground on the west side of the way by Mr. Hathornes by the brooke on Roxbury bounds." (Dorchester Town Records, p. 12) On 4 Jan 1635, Thomas Sandford was allotted 16 acres in the same locality. On 18 Feb 1635, Goodman Sampford was allotted two acres in the fresh marsh nearest the town. ("Goodman" was a title of good standing in the town, bestowed only on worthy citizens.) On 17 April 1635, Dorchester: "Thomas Thornton and Thomas Sanford to undertake the keeping of the cows for 7 months beginning April 15." On 16 January 1636/37 the town of Dorchester ordered Matthias Sension and Thomas Sampford to "keepe the Cowes this yeere" and to "have for their pay in keepeing 5 shill[ings] the head." He was made a freeman of Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA, on 9 March 1637. The title gave the right to vote, and was an advantage in the division of lands. To be a freeman required that one be at least 20 years old, a church member, take an oath of allegiance to the government of Massachusetts, to be worth L200, to hold office if elected or pay a fine of 40s, and to vote at all elections or pay the same fine. In the fall of 1639 a band of settlers from New Haven went through the woods guided by Indian fighter Thomas Tibbals. Peter Prudden (the Herefordshire minister) led the group. Tradition held that the pioneers of Milford were wholly or in large part discontented settlers from Dorchester and Watertown MA who traveled through the woods to Hartford, to New Haven, to Milford. Supposedly they carried the Dorchester church records with them, and the records were lost on the journey. Most of the settlers had come from London to Boston with John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, etc. two and one-half years earlier. A year later, they went with the Davenport company to the mouth of the Quinnipiac River. The settlement at Milford was laid out in long, narrow lots, which permitted all settlers to have the same kind of land. The salt hay that grew on the marshy meadow was much prized. Title to the region was based solely on land purchase from the Indians and not upon any grant from the English Crown. The first purchase included nearly all of the present towns of Orange and Milford, and part of the town of Woodbridge. Deeding the land to its new owners was effected with the old English "twig and turf" ceremony. After the customary signing of the deed by both parties, Ansantawae was handed a piece of turf and a twig. Taking the piece of turf in one hand, and the twig in the other, he thrust the twig into the turf, and handed it to the English. In this way he signified that the Indians relinquished all the land specified in the deed and everything growing upon it The Paugusset Indians sold the Wepawaug land in the hope that they would enlist English protection against the Mohawks, who were continually raiding their territory. Thomas was a freeplanter in Milford in 1639, assigned lot #21, consisting of 2 acres and 3 rods. In April 1640 a parcel of land previously only "booked" to Thomas Sanford was granted to him in Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA. And the General Meeting at Milford CT on 22 November 1643 indicates that Thomas Sanford owned land there. On 9 January 1642, he was admitted to membership in First Church, Milford, New Haven County, CT. (Milford OL:98) On 17 May 1661 Regicides Cols. Edward Whalley and William Goffe hid at Milford. Under Cromwell, they were two of the Judges who signed the death warrant of Charles the First, and once Charles' son regained the throne of England, they were under sentence of death. The plain people of Milford were mostly their friends, and they hid them and brought them food. A search was required by royal decree. From the Milford CT records: "May 17th, 1661 for the Marshalls or Deputies at Milford. You are to make deligent search by the first throughout the whole town of Milford and the precincts there of taking with you two or three sufficient persons and--calling in any other help you shall see need of who are hereby required for your assistance upon call! and this to be in all dwellings houses, barns or other buildings whatsoever and all vessels in the harbor for the finding and aprehending of Colonel Whalley and Colonel Goffe who stand charged with crimes as by his Majestie's letter appears: and being found you are to bring them to the Deputee Governor or some other Magistrate to be sent over for England according to his Majestie's orders whereof fail at peril. Attest by order of General Court Jasper Crane William Leete, Dep. Gov. Nathan Gilbert Robert Treat In the Marshalls Absence, I do appoint and empower Thomas Sanford, Nicholas Camp and James Tapping to the above named power according to the tenor of the warrant and to make a return of under your hand to me by the first. Robert Treat, Gov. We the said persons appointed to serve and search by virtue of this order warrant do hereby declare and testifie that to our best light we the 10th May, 1661 made deligent search according to the tenor of this warrant as Witness our hand. Thomas Sanford Nicholas Camp James Tapping his Lawrence Ward x mark"

Family stories handed down about the search indicate they tried very hard to comply with the decree - many men searched diligently with many lanterns and much noise. The judges hid in the cave at West Rock (later known as "Judges Cave") in New Haven from May 15 to June 11, and resided in concealment in the vicinity of Milford from 1661-1664, three years and seven months. The most prominent house of historic interest that can be identified as still in existence is undoubtedly the Regicide House, restored and removed within the recollection of many of the present day to the south side of Peacock Lane (now Maple Street) a short distance from West River Street. Stiles says, "The Judges took up an asylum in the house of Mr. Tompkins thirty or forty rods from the meeting house; that Governor Law afterwards bought this house and lot and built his seat on that lot a rod or two from it."... The Judges were here in concealment for two years, 1661-1662. Roger Newton was the minister. Mr. Treat, Mr. Fenn and a few others were said to be in the secret. The regicides later died at the home of Rev. John Russell of Hadley MA (also a relative of ours).

Thomas appeared on the census of October 1669 in Milford, New Haven County, CT: "A List of the Freemen of Milford ... Thomas Samford."

The will of Thomas Sanford of Milford is dated 23 September 1681, with codicil 26 September 1681; inventory was taken 21 October 1681 by John Beard and Samuell Clarke, and amounted to L450 : 18 : 03. The will reads: "I Thomas Sanford, aforesaid, being weak in body, yet of perfect memory & sound understanding do now make this my last Will & Testament, in manner and form as followeth. First, I comitt my soul into ye hands of God through Jesus Christ, in whom alone I hope to be saved; and my body to be decently interred, & for my wordly estate I dispose of as followeth. Imp: I give unto my Eldest son Ezekiel Sanford twenty pounds, besides what I have already given him. / Item. I give unto my son Thomas Sanford ten pounds, besides what I have already given him. / Item: I give unto my son Ephraim Sanford that piece of meadow, that I bought of Mr. Adam Blackman lying on an island in Stratford river, contayning seven acres, besides what he hath had already./-- Item: I give unto my daughter Sarah Shute, wife of Richard Shute of East Chester, the sum of fifty shillings, besides what I have already given her./-- Item: I give unto my daughter Elizabeth Allyn, wife of Obadiah Allyn of Middletown, the sum of five pounds, besides what I have already given her./-- Item: My Will is that my ingagement of twenty pounds, to my grandaughter Sarah Shute, should be fulfilled, by my executor, as also all ye forementioned bequests, within ye term of three years after my decease. Item: I give unto my grandchild, Thomas Allyn, five pounds to be payd when he attains to the age of twenty one years./-- Item: I give unto my son Samuel Sanford, my dwelling house, barns, outhouseing, with my home lott, & all the rest of my lands, both Arrable and meadow ground, within ye bounds of Milford, that I have not formerly disposed of, with all ye appurtenances & Priviledges thereunto belonging, to him, & his heyrs & assigns forever. And I do hereby make my sd son Samuel Sanford my whole and sole executor, of this my last Will and Testament. And I do desire & appoint the honored Major Robert Treat & Mr. Daniell Buckingham & Samuell Eells to be overseers to see this my Will fulfilled, and In wittness that this is my last Will & testament I have hereunto sett my hand & seal this three and twenthieth Day of September 1681. Thomas Sanford (seal) Signed, sealed & Delivered In ye presence of us Daniell Buckingham Samuel Eells Jonathan Laws

The above sd Thomas Sanford did further declare on ye 26th day of this instant September that it was his mind & Will that his son Ezekiel Sanford should have five pounds more out of his estate, & his Daughter Elizabeth Allon should have five pounds more out of his estate, and that Sarah Whitlock that was his mayd should have fifty shillings, & this was done in the presence of Daniell Buckingham, Samuell Eells -- Wiftnesses."

His stone on the Memorial Bridge reads: "Thomas Sandford Obit 1681 Sarah His Wife." -------------------- Carlton Sanford concluded that eldest sons Thomas and John were born at their mother's home in Hatfield Broad Oak. Thomas probably married Sarah at Dorchester between 1632 and 1636. He died between 23 September 1681 (date of will) and 21 October 1681 (date of inventory). Some early authors erroneously claimed that Thomas Sanford was the son of Anthony Sanford, and that he married in England Dorothy Meadows, daughter of Henry Meadows of Stowe. Carlton Sanford ably refutes that pedigree, and builds a solid argument that Thomas is instead the son of Ezekiel Sanford of Stanstead Mountfitchet. "Thomas John and Ezechiell thre of the sonnes of Ezechiell Sandford my sonne in lawe" were mentioned in the will of his grandfather John Warner of Hatfield Broad Oak dated 16 July 1614, to receive L3-6s-8d at 21. On 12 May 1627 grandchild Thomas Sanford was mentioned in the will of Mary Warner of Hatfield Broad Oaks. And on 27 February 1632 great-granduncle Richard Sanford of Much Hadham bequeathed him 20s. Thomas came to New England (on the Arabella, according to Banks; to Boston in 1631, according to Holmes) with several of his brothers, following their uncle Andrew Warner. Thomas may have been at Dorchester as early as 1632. Dorchester was settled in 1630, but no lands were allotted until 3 April 1633. The Town Records of Dorchester begin 16 January 1632, and no vital records exist. Thomas had land booked to him at Dorchester November 1634; he had to be settled and join the church to receive a grant of land. Thomas could read, write and "cast accompts" at a time when 3/4 of the English people could not read or write. On 22 November 1634 the town of Dorchester ordered Thomas Thorneton, Thomas Sandford, and Henry Wright to "have four acres of ground on the west side of the way by Mr. Hathornes by the brooke on Roxbury bounds." (Dorchester Town Records, p. 12) On 4 Jan 1635, Thomas Sandford was allotted 16 acres in the same locality. On 18 Feb 1635, Goodman Sampford was allotted two acres in the fresh marsh nearest the town. ("Goodman" was a title of good standing in the town, bestowed only on worthy citizens.) On 17 April 1635, Dorchester: "Thomas Thornton and Thomas Sanford to undertake the keeping of the cows for 7 months beginning April 15." On 16 January 1636/37 the town of Dorchester ordered Matthias Sension and Thomas Sampford to "keepe the Cowes this yeere" and to "have for their pay in keepeing 5 shill[ings] the head." He was made a freeman of Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA, on 9 March 1637. The title gave the right to vote, and was an advantage in the division of lands. To be a freeman required that one be at least 20 years old, a church member, take an oath of allegiance to the government of Massachusetts, to be worth L200, to hold office if elected or pay a fine of 40s, and to vote at all elections or pay the same fine. In the fall of 1639 a band of settlers from New Haven went through the woods guided by Indian fighter Thomas Tibbals. Peter Prudden (the Herefordshire minister) led the group. Tradition held that the pioneers of Milford were wholly or in large part discontented settlers from Dorchester and Watertown MA who traveled through the woods to Hartford, to New Haven, to Milford. Supposedly they carried the Dorchester church records with them, and the records were lost on the journey. Most of the settlers had come from London to Boston with John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton, etc. two and one-half years earlier. A year later, they went with the Davenport company to the mouth of the Quinnipiac River. The settlement at Milford was laid out in long, narrow lots, which permitted all settlers to have the same kind of land. The salt hay that grew on the marshy meadow was much prized. Title to the region was based solely on land purchase from the Indians and not upon any grant from the English Crown. The first purchase included nearly all of the present towns of Orange and Milford, and part of the town of Woodbridge. Deeding the land to its new owners was effected with the old English "twig and turf" ceremony. After the customary signing of the deed by both parties, Ansantawae was handed a piece of turf and a twig. Taking the piece of turf in one hand, and the twig in the other, he thrust the twig into the turf, and handed it to the English. In this way he signified that the Indians relinquished all the land specified in the deed and everything growing upon it The Paugusset Indians sold the Wepawaug land in the hope that they would enlist English protection against the Mohawks, who were continually raiding their territory. Thomas was a freeplanter in Milford in 1639, assigned lot #21, consisting of 2 acres and 3 rods. In April 1640 a parcel of land previously only "booked" to Thomas Sanford was granted to him in Dorchester, Suffolk County, MA. And the General Meeting at Milford CT on 22 November 1643 indicates that Thomas Sanford owned land there. On 9 January 1642, he was admitted to membership in First Church, Milford, New Haven County, CT. (Milford OL:98) On 17 May 1661 Regicides Cols. Edward Whalley and William Goffe hid at Milford. Under Cromwell, they were two of the Judges who signed the death warrant of Charles the First, and once Charles' son regained the throne of England, they were under sentence of death. The plain people of Milford were mostly their friends, and they hid them and brought them food. A search was required by royal decree. From the Milford CT records: "May 17th, 1661 for the Marshalls or Deputies at Milford. You are to make deligent search by the first throughout the whole town of Milford and the precincts there of taking with you two or three sufficient persons and--calling in any other help you shall see need of who are hereby required for your assistance upon call! and this to be in all dwellings houses, barns or other buildings whatsoever and all vessels in the harbor for the finding and aprehending of Colonel Whalley and Colonel Goffe who stand charged with crimes as by his Majestie's letter appears: and being found you are to bring them to the Deputee Governor or some other Magistrate to be sent over for England according to his Majestie's orders whereof fail at peril. Attest by order of General Court Jasper Crane William Leete, Dep. Gov. Nathan Gilbert Robert Treat In the Marshalls Absence, I do appoint and empower Thomas Sanford, Nicholas Camp and James Tapping to the above named power according to the tenor of the warrant and to make a return of under your hand to me by the first. Robert Treat, Gov. We the said persons appointed to serve and search by virtue of this order warrant do hereby declare and testifie that to our best light we the 10th May, 1661 made deligent search according to the tenor of this warrant as Witness our hand. Thomas Sanford Nicholas Camp James Tapping his Lawrence Ward x mark"

Family stories handed down about the search indicate they tried very hard to comply with the decree - many men searched diligently with many lanterns and much noise. The judges hid in the cave at West Rock (later known as "Judges Cave") in New Haven from May 15 to June 11, and resided in concealment in the vicinity of Milford from 1661-1664, three years and seven months. The most prominent house of historic interest that can be identified as still in existence is undoubtedly the Regicide House, restored and removed within the recollection of many of the present day to the south side of Peacock Lane (now Maple Street) a short distance from West River Street. Stiles says, "The Judges took up an asylum in the house of Mr. Tompkins thirty or forty rods from the meeting house; that Governor Law afterwards bought this house and lot and built his seat on that lot a rod or two from it."... The Judges were here in concealment for two years, 1661-1662. Roger Newton was the minister. Mr. Treat, Mr. Fenn and a few others were said to be in the secret. The regicides later died at the home of Rev. John Russell of Hadley MA (also a relative of ours).

Thomas appeared on the census of October 1669 in Milford, New Haven County, CT: "A List of the Freemen of Milford ... Thomas Samford."

The will of Thomas Sanford of Milford is dated 23 September 1681, with codicil 26 September 1681; inventory was taken 21 October 1681 by John Beard and Samuell Clarke, and amounted to L450 : 18 : 03. The will reads: "I Thomas Sanford, aforesaid, being weak in body, yet of perfect memory & sound understanding do now make this my last Will & Testament, in manner and form as followeth. First, I comitt my soul into ye hands of God through Jesus Christ, in whom alone I hope to be saved; and my body to be decently interred, & for my wordly estate I dispose of as followeth. Imp: I give unto my Eldest son Ezekiel Sanford twenty pounds, besides what I have already given him. / Item. I give unto my son Thomas Sanford ten pounds, besides what I have already given him. / Item: I give unto my son Ephraim Sanford that piece of meadow, that I bought of Mr. Adam Blackman lying on an island in Stratford river, contayning seven acres, besides what he hath had already./-- Item: I give unto my daughter Sarah Shute, wife of Richard Shute of East Chester, the sum of fifty shillings, besides what I have already given her./-- Item: I give unto my daughter Elizabeth Allyn, wife of Obadiah Allyn of Middletown, the sum of five pounds, besides what I have already given her./-- Item: My Will is that my ingagement of twenty pounds, to my grandaughter Sarah Shute, should be fulfilled, by my executor, as also all ye forementioned bequests, within ye term of three years after my decease. Item: I give unto my grandchild, Thomas Allyn, five pounds to be payd when he attains to the age of twenty one years./-- Item: I give unto my son Samuel Sanford, my dwelling house, barns, outhouseing, with my home lott, & all the rest of my lands, both Arrable and meadow ground, within ye bounds of Milford, that I have not formerly disposed of, with all ye appurtenances & Priviledges thereunto belonging, to him, & his heyrs & assigns forever. And I do hereby make my sd son Samuel Sanford my whole and sole executor, of this my last Will and Testament. And I do desire & appoint the honored Major Robert Treat & Mr. Daniell Buckingham & Samuell Eells to be overseers to see this my Will fulfilled, and In wittness that this is my last Will & testament I have hereunto sett my hand & seal this three and twenthieth Day of September 1681. Thomas Sanford (seal) Signed, sealed & Delivered In ye presence of us Daniell Buckingham Samuel Eells Jonathan Laws

The above sd Thomas Sanford did further declare on ye 26th day of this instant September that it was his mind & Will that his son Ezekiel Sanford should have five pounds more out of his estate, & his Daughter Elizabeth Allon should have five pounds more out of his estate, and that Sarah Whitlock that was his mayd should have fifty shillings, & this was done in the presence of Daniell Buckingham, Samuell Eells -- Wiftnesses."

His stone on the Memorial Bridge reads: "Thomas Sandford Obit 1681 Sarah His Wife." -------------------- He was born August, 1607, in Hatfield, Broad Oak, Essex, England and died October 9, 1681 in Milford, New Haven County, Connecticut Colony.

He was christened in 1607 in Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, England. In 1632, Thomas along with his brother and an Uncle, Andrew Weaver, were in Dorchester, Suffolk County, Massachusetts Colony. He married Dorothea Meadows in 1636 at Dorchester, Massachusetts. He signed his will September 23, 1681 in Milford, Connecticut Colony.

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Thomas Andrew Sanford's Timeline

1607
August 1607
Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex, England
1608
1608
Much Hadham, Herts, England, England
1608
Much Hadham, Hertshire, England
1636
1636
Age 28
Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
1637
1637
Age 29
Dorchester (within present Boston), Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1639
1639
Age 31
Dorchester, Massachusetts
1640
1640
Age 32
Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA
1642
January 16, 1642
Age 34
Milford, Fairfield Co., Connecticut
1643
April 30, 1643
Age 35
Milford, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA
1644
December 1644
Age 37
Milford, New Haven, Connecticut, USA