Thomas Spencer, of Maine

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Thomas Spencer, of Maine

Birthdate:
Birthplace: England
Death: Died in South Berwick, York, Maine
Place of Burial: Old Fields Cemetery, South Berwick, York, Maine, United States
Immediate Family:

Husband of Patience Spencer
Father of William Spencer; Margaret Goodwin; Mary Etherington; Susanna Joy; Humphrey Spencer and 3 others

Occupation: Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper., came to Amer. in 1630, planter. lumberman, tavern-keeper
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Thomas Spencer, of Maine

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=101956658

Thomas Spencer

  • Birth: abt 1596- Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, England
  • Death: Dec 15 1681 - Berwick, York, Maine, USA
  • Parents: unknown
  • Wife: Patience Chadbourne

summary

He was a tavern keeper, planter and lumberman. His ancestry is unknown, although there are many speculative connections to various English Spencer families and to other Spencer immigrants.

Thomas and Patience were the parents of William, Margaret, Mary, Susanna, Humphrey, Elizabeth, Moses.

From Wittmeyer Family

  • *An Entire book has written about THOMAS SPENCER, which you can read online for free! Click HERE**

I: Immigrated to America in 1630 (when he was 34 years of age) - He landed in Cow Cove on a ship called the "Warwick" - "Thomas settled temporarily at his arrival, on the west side of the Piscataque River. There was a house called 'Mason's Hall' where the proprietors lodged their men, who were engaged in chiefly in fishing, hunting, salt-making, and tilling the extensive clearing. The principal crop was Indian maize, which was native to the soil. Additionally he is credit in taking part in an early legal case that established the American precedent for the doctrine of ownership by adverse possession.

brief biography

From Find A Grave Memorial# 101956658

Thomas arrived at Piscataqua, Maine in July 1630 on the barque Warwick, returned to England in 1633, then returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634.

Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Thomas and Patience lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of 'Piscataqua' (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (South Berwick). They were of Saco in 1654.

Thomas was disenfranchised [lost his right to vote] for entertaining Quakers in 1659. Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths". They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675. In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised".

Origins

He was once thought to have been a native of Winchcombe in Gloucester. A Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, was baptized 1603 in Winchcombe. It was formerly believed that his wife's family, the Chadbournes, were also from Winchcombe, but they are now known to have been from Tamworth in Staffordshire, which casts doubt on whether Thomas originated there. A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England. (LND, 651-2.) Further research is required to determine whether this could have been the Maine settler. He might have been a relative of Capt. Roger Spencer, living 1652 in Saco, Maine. A daughter of that Roger used as her coat of arms, Quarterly Argent and Gules in the second and third quarters a fret or overall on a bend Sable three escallops Or - the same coat of arms as Princess Diana. (America Heraldica.)

Notes on origins

GROUP 19: Thomas Spencer of Maine, m.Patience CHADBOURNE 

  • Thomas 1596-1681 m.Patience CHADBOURNE > Moses > Isaac > Moses > Daniel b.1740

biography

From chadbourne.org

He immigrated to New Hampshire in 1630 in the employment of Capt. John Mason, later moved to Maine, and settled at South Berwick. His family remained in England for a time, and immigrated later.

"Thomas Spencer was born in England in 1596. He was married there to Patience, daughter of William Chadbourne. He came to this country in the year 1630, when he was thirty-four years of age, with one of Mason's pioneer bands. There is a tradition in the family that he came hither with Alexander Cooper, who is said to have landed at Cow Cove in South Berwick the first cow ever brought into this region. Thomas evidently came in the "Warwick, " which sailed from the Downs off the Kentish coast under commission of Mason and Georges, Captain Wetherall, master, March 28; it touched at Plymouth, England, on April 8, and reached Piscataqua in May. . . . In the spring of 1634, the "Pied Cow" sailed from Portsmouth. . . . There were on board passengers and provisions for Captain John Mason's settlements. . . . Among the other passengers were James Wall, William Chadbourne, and John Goddard, who had made a contract with Mason and his Laconia company. . . . William Chadbourne was Thomas Spencer's father-in-law." (W. D. Spencer, The Maine Spencers, A History and Genealogy with Members of Allied Families.)

Thomas was sued for debt by William Scadlock in Saco on 7 February 1636. In 1647, he and Thomas Withers were called to account for rates and fines collected, indicating he must have been a constable.

He was disenfranchised in 1659 for entertaining Quakers, and in 1661 he and Daniel Goodwin were accused of trading with the Indians, but there were apparently no grounds for a case.

He was on the coroner's jury in 1647, and served on the grand jury in 1651, 1653 and 1656. He held a Taverner's license in 1659 and 1680.

Both he and Patience were absent from church meetings in 1663 and 1675. In 1676 he attested he was 80 and had lived in this country 40 years. -------------------- 2. PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3). A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2). The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found.

Thomas arrived at Piscataqua in July 1630 on the barque Warwick (TMS), returned to England in 1633, and returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634. In his 1904 work, Emery was probably mistaken when he said Spencer was from Winchcombe, Gloucester, England. Emery went on to say erroneously that this was also the English home of the Chadbournes. By the 1950s, it was known that this was untrue and that the Chadbournes came from Tamworth (Parish records). More may be learned about Thomas Spencer's arrival in Maine in MPC IV:172-4 and under #8 Humphrey Spencer. Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Pope's Pioneers of Maine & New Hampshire says that Thomas was a proprietor of Cambridge MA in 1633, a freeman in 1634 who removed to Kittery. Patience and Thomas lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of "Piscataqua" (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (S Berwick). Dispute over Thomas' title to land in S Berwick (where William Chadbourne gave them a house) is described under their son Humphrey #8. They were of Saco in 1654 (Holmes, Dictionary of New England Families) and Patience was (erroneously) called a widow of Saco in 1662 (Savage, Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England). In 1682 Patience was probably of Berwick as Thomas died there in 1681 and she in 1683.

Thomas was disenfranchised for entertaining Quakers in 1659 (LND, 652). Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths" (MPC II:139). They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675 (ibid, II:306). In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised" (The Records of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, Vol 4, part 1, p 407). Edward Wharton piloted a vessel that carried a group of Quakers up the coast, and seven people were fined varying sums and/or disenfranchised (lost the right to vote) by the Massachusetts Bay government, the only entity which could disenfranchise a freeman. Thomas Spencer obviously answered their questions in sympathy with the Quakers, defied the government, and was cast out as a result. Because we don't have copies of his answers to the Court's questions, we don't know how steadfastly he supported the Quakers, but he clearly satisfied the Court that he was in sympathy with them or they would not have taken action against him. They did not take action against James Rawlings, for instance, whom they found to be "more innocent and ingenious then the rest."

           Brother Humphrey Chadbourne expressed concern for his sister Patience Spencer when he wrote his will in 1662.  Humphrey directed his wife to assist "sister Spencer" if she should fall into "decay" (qv).

After Thomas' death in Dec 1681, Patience may have continued to operate the tavern. After her death her children and relatives, William, Humphrey and Moses Spencer, Ephraim Joy, and Thomas Chick, chose William Spencer and Thomas Chick to help them divide the estate 15 Nov 1683 (MPC III:186), and then finally settled on Edward Rishworth, Richard Nason and James Emery to make the division (ibid, III:188), probably because William and Thomas were heirs.

1679 Will of Thomas Spencer

           In the name of God amen I Thomas Spencer of Newgewanacke in the Townshipp of Kittery being sick of body, but through the mercys of god, sound of Mind & memory and not knowing how soone my Change may come desire to dispose of that Estate which god hath given unto Mee as followeth viz:
           Imps I give unto my Eldest sonn William Spencer after my decease & the decease of Patience my loving wife my now dwelling house & all out housing by it & belonging to it & all the Land adjoyning to it being now in my possession & lying on the North side of the highway, by my sd dwelling house, whither it be Gardens orchards, pasture Meddows Corne Land to him the sd William Spencer my child, & to his hayres for ever, provided hee pay or Cause to be paid unto my Two daughters, namely Susanna & Elizabeth with in six weeks after my decease & or my loving wife Patience, the full and just Sum of Tenn pounds, apiece in money or pay equivalent there unto the houses and the land lying responsable until ye Legseys aforsd bee duly payd.
           2ly I give to patience my loving wife all the rest of my Estate, whither bee in lands Chattles, Cattle, goods debts house hould stuff Meddows &c: not mentioned as abovesd for her to distribute & dispose of amongst my Children at her own discretion, except what I have already given to my Eldest sonn as abovesd
           Lastly I do nominate & appoynt patience my sd loveing wife to bee my Soole executrix of this my last will & testament in Consideration where of I have here unto set my hand & seale, the second day of June in the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred seaventy nine/1679

Signed sealed & Delivered Thomas Spencer Presence of his mark Gillbard Warrins his marke x George Pearsons

           An Appendix to my last will & testament as on the other side of this paper, appeareth my further will in that, where as formerly I gave unto my sonn in law John Gattinsby who married my daughter Susannah a certen Tract of land being part of that too hundred acres that the Town of Kittery granted to mee, joyneing to my house lott, & the sd Gattensby sould his sd right or tract of land unto my sonn in law, Thomas Everington who married my daughter Mary, & the sd Gattinsby was fully Contented, & payd by sd Everington my sonn in law, for his sd land & the sayd Everington my sonn in law possessed the sd Land his life tyme, & left it to his heyres; and wh as I also gave unto my sonn Etherington a Certain Tract of Land adjoyning to the land hee bought of the sd John Gattinsby on which the dwelling house of the sayd Etherington now standeth, & both Tracts of land contayning about Twety foure Acres, by Estimation, bee it more or less, as they are now bounded with Richard Nason & the high way on the South, William Spencers land on the West, Daniell Goodins land & Humphry Spencers land on the North, & that part of my land Called Parkers Marsh on the East: And although some writeings have been Prused about the Premisses, yet nothing yt I know upon record about it, & that the sd Land according to my true intent discend unto the right heyres of it, both by the sayd Etherington's purchase of the sayd Gattensby in part, & my gift unto the sayd Etherington of the rest of the sd land: Now my will is that the sayd Land with the dwelling house Upon it, & all the appurtenances & priviledges yt unto belonging, should bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of John Wincoll Junior, sonn of John Wincoll of Kittery & of Mary his wife deceased, who was the daughter of my sd sonn in law Thomas Etherton & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould the sd tract of Land, dwelling house with all the appertuancnes, & priviledges there unto belonging to him the sd John Wincoll Junjr & his heyres lawfully begotten of his body; and if hee dy without such lawful heyres my will is that the sd Tract of Land houseing & all appurtenances and priviledges yt unto belonging shall bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of patience Atherton daughter unto sd Thomas Etherington & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould to her & her heyres for ever/ in witness where unto I have afixed my hand & Seale, this fifth day of June one thousand six hundred seventy nine 1679

Signed sealed & delivered Thomas Spencer in Presence of his mark Gilbard Warrine his marke x George Pearson Acknowledged 15 June 1679, recorded 15 June 1682 Inventory taken 1 May 1682 and the estate valued at £257.14.0 by Richard Nason, Moses Spencer and John Wincoll 1 May 1682, who stated that Thomas Spencer was deceased in Dec 1681 (MW, 66-8). According to historian John Frost, the Old Fields cemetery of S Berwick originated as Thomas and Patience Spencer's burial plot. Frost believes that two of the three old plots near the woods on the riverbank, in what now appears to be an unmarked grave, hold the remains of Thomas and Patience (Chadbourne) Spencer and other early settlers ("Talk of George F Sanborn Jr," Pied Cow 7:1). Children, surname SPENCER:

           i.          WILLIAMC3 b ca 1630/1; d 15 May 1696.  His will mentions no wife or children. He may be the child referred to by Torrey as b 1630.  William was granted land in Berwick in 1651 and served the town in various capacities.  He and Walter Allen were in charge of Great Works Mills sometime after 1650 (LND, 652).  As eldest son he inherited a considerable estate (MPA 1/34), which he left to his nephew Humphrey  Spencer as his sole heir on 18 June 1687 (MW 110-1).  A codicil to his will provided for servant Moses Spencer.

5 ii. MARGARET, b ca 1632. 6 iii. MARY, b ca 1634. 7 iv. SUSANNA, b Berwick ca 1636. 8 v. HUMPHREY, b Berwick ca 1638. 9 vi. ELIZABETH, b Berwick ca 1640 or 26 Mar 1848 (Gene Pool). 10 vii. MOSES, b Berwick ca 1642.

Figure 3: The First Permanent Settlement in Maine adapted from Everett S Stackpole Courtesy of Old Berwick Historical Society

--------------------

PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3).  A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2).  The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire.  Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found.

Thomas arrived at Piscataqua in July 1630 on the barque Warwick (TMS), returned to England in 1633, and returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634. In his 1904 work, Emery was probably mistaken when he said Spencer was from Winchcombe, Gloucester, England. Emery went on to say erroneously that this was also the English home of the Chadbournes. By the 1950s, it was known that this was untrue and that the Chadbournes came from Tamworth (Parish records). More may be learned about Thomas Spencer's arrival in Maine in MPC IV:172-4 and under #8 Humphrey Spencer. Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Pope's Pioneers of Maine & New Hampshire says that Thomas was a proprietor of Cambridge MA in 1633, a freeman in 1634 who removed to Kittery. Patience and Thomas lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of "Piscataqua" (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (S Berwick). Dispute over Thomas' title to land in S Berwick (where William Chadbourne gave them a house) is described under their son Humphrey #8. They were of Saco in 1654 (Holmes, Dictionary of New England Families) and Patience was (erroneously) called a widow of Saco in 1662 (Savage, Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England). In 1682 Patience was probably of Berwick as Thomas died there in 1681 and she in 1683.

Thomas was disenfranchised for entertaining Quakers in 1659 (LND, 652). Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths" (MPC II:139). They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675 (ibid, II:306). In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised" (The Records of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, Vol 4, part 1, p 407). Edward Wharton piloted a vessel that carried a group of Quakers up the coast, and seven people were fined varying sums and/or disenfranchised (lost the right to vote) by the Massachusetts Bay government, the only entity which could disenfranchise a freeman. Thomas Spencer obviously answered their questions in sympathy with the Quakers, defied the government, and was cast out as a result. Because we don't have copies of his answers to the Court's questions, we don't know how steadfastly he supported the Quakers, but he clearly satisfied the Court that he was in sympathy with them or they would not have taken action against him. They did not take action against James Rawlings, for instance, whom they found to be "more innocent and ingenious then the rest."

           Brother Humphrey Chadbourne expressed concern for his sister Patience Spencer when he wrote his will in 1662.  Humphrey directed his wife to assist "sister Spencer" if she should fall into "decay" (qv).

After Thomas' death in Dec 1681, Patience may have continued to operate the tavern. After her death her children and relatives, William, Humphrey and Moses Spencer, Ephraim Joy, and Thomas Chick, chose William Spencer and Thomas Chick to help them divide the estate 15 Nov 1683 (MPC III:186), and then finally settled on Edward Rishworth, Richard Nason and James Emery to make the division (ibid, III:188), probably because William and Thomas were heirs.

1679 Will of Thomas Spencer

           In the name of God amen I Thomas Spencer of Newgewanacke in the Townshipp of Kittery being sick of body, but through the mercys of god, sound of Mind & memory and not knowing how soone my Change may come desire to dispose of that Estate which god hath given unto Mee as followeth viz:
           Imps I give unto my Eldest sonn William Spencer after my decease & the decease of Patience my loving wife my now dwelling house & all out housing by it & belonging to it & all the Land adjoyning to it being now in my possession & lying on the North side of the highway, by my sd dwelling house, whither it be Gardens orchards, pasture Meddows Corne Land to him the sd William Spencer my child, & to his hayres for ever, provided hee pay or Cause to be paid unto my Two daughters, namely Susanna & Elizabeth with in six weeks after my decease & or my loving wife Patience, the full and just Sum of Tenn pounds, apiece in money or pay equivalent there unto the houses and the land lying responsable until ye Legseys aforsd bee duly payd.
           2ly I give to patience my loving wife all the rest of my Estate, whither bee in lands Chattles, Cattle, goods debts house hould stuff Meddows &c: not mentioned as abovesd for her to distribute & dispose of amongst my Children at her own discretion, except what I have already given to my Eldest sonn as abovesd
           Lastly I do nominate & appoynt patience my sd loveing wife to bee my Soole executrix of this my last will & testament in Consideration where of I have here unto set my hand & seale, the second day of June in the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred seaventy nine/1679

Signed sealed & Delivered Thomas Spencer Presence of his mark Gillbard Warrins his marke x George Pearsons

           An Appendix to my last will & testament as on the other side of this paper, appeareth my further will in that, where as formerly I gave unto my sonn in law John Gattinsby who married my daughter Susannah a certen Tract of land being part of that too hundred acres that the Town of Kittery granted to mee, joyneing to my house lott, & the sd Gattensby sould his sd right or tract of land unto my sonn in law, Thomas Everington who married my daughter Mary, & the sd Gattinsby was fully Contented, & payd by sd Everington my sonn in law, for his sd land & the sayd Everington my sonn in law possessed the sd Land his life tyme, & left it to his heyres; and wh as I also gave unto my sonn Etherington a Certain Tract of Land adjoyning to the land hee bought of the sd John Gattinsby on which the dwelling house of the sayd Etherington now standeth, & both Tracts of land contayning about Twety foure Acres, by Estimation, bee it more or less, as they are now bounded with Richard Nason & the high way on the South, William Spencers land on the West, Daniell Goodins land & Humphry Spencers land on the North, & that part of my land Called Parkers Marsh on the East: And although some writeings have been Prused about the Premisses, yet nothing yt I know upon record about it, & that the sd Land according to my true intent discend unto the right heyres of it, both by the sayd Etherington's purchase of the sayd Gattensby in part, & my gift unto the sayd Etherington of the rest of the sd land: Now my will is that the sayd Land with the dwelling house Upon it, & all the appurtenances & priviledges yt unto belonging, should bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of John Wincoll Junior, sonn of John Wincoll of Kittery & of Mary his wife deceased, who was the daughter of my sd sonn in law Thomas Etherton & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould the sd tract of Land, dwelling house with all the appertuancnes, & priviledges there unto belonging to him the sd John Wincoll Junjr & his heyres lawfully begotten of his body; and if hee dy without such lawful heyres my will is that the sd Tract of Land houseing & all appurtenances and priviledges yt unto belonging shall bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of patience Atherton daughter unto sd Thomas Etherington & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould to her & her heyres for ever/ in witness where unto I have afixed my hand & Seale, this fifth day of June one thousand six hundred seventy nine 1679

Signed sealed & delivered Thomas Spencer in Presence of his mark Gilbard Warrine his marke x George Pearson Acknowledged 15 June 1679, recorded 15 June 1682 Inventory taken 1 May 1682 and the estate valued at £257.14.0 by Richard Nason, Moses Spencer and John Wincoll 1 May 1682, who stated that Thomas Spencer was deceased in Dec 1681 (MW, 66-8). According to historian John Frost, the Old Fields cemetery of S Berwick originated as Thomas and Patience Spencer's burial plot. Frost believes that two of the three old plots near the woods on the riverbank, in what now appears to be an unmarked grave, hold the remains of Thomas and Patience (Chadbourne) Spencer and other early settlers ("Talk of George F Sanborn Jr," Pied Cow 7:1). Children, surname SPENCER:

           i.          WILLIAMC3 b ca 1630/1; d 15 May 1696.  His will mentions no wife or children. He may be the child referred to by Torrey as b 1630.  William was granted land in Berwick in 1651 and served the town in various capacities.  He and Walter Allen were in charge of Great Works Mills sometime after 1650 (LND, 652).  As eldest son he inherited a considerable estate (MPA 1/34), which he left to his nephew Humphrey  Spencer as his sole heir on 18 June 1687 (MW 110-1).  A codicil to his will provided for servant Moses Spencer.

5 ii. MARGARET, b ca 1632. 6 iii. MARY, b ca 1634. 7 iv. SUSANNA, b Berwick ca 1636. 8 v. HUMPHREY, b Berwick ca 1638. 9 vi. ELIZABETH, b Berwick ca 1640 or 26 Mar 1848 (Gene Pool). 10 vii. MOSES, b Berwick ca 1642.

-------------------- lived first in Strawberry Banke, Portsmouth. Later in Piscataqua, Kitery Point. finally lived at Newichawannock, South Berwick. Was a lumberman, Tavern Keeper, and a planter.(referenced in "the maine spencers" by w.d. spencer rumford press 1898)

ref -------------------- Thomas & Patience lived in Berwick, Maine.

2. PATIENCE2 CHADBOURNE (1. William1), baptized Tamworth, Warwickshire, England 8 Nov 1612; died York Co ME (probably Berwick) 7 Nov 1683 (MPC III: 188-189, YD 5/1/23-4); married, perhaps in England, before 1629 (Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700 states that a child was born 1630) THOMAS1 SPENCER, born England about 1596, died Berwick 15 Dec 1681 (MW, 66-68; YD 5/1/12; inv YD 5/1/3). A Thomas Spencer was baptized 28 Mar 1597, son of William at Eastwick, Herefordshire, England (LND, 651-2). The baptism in 1603 of a Thomas Spencer, son of Thomas Spencer, has been noted in the parish registers of Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. Further research is required to determine whether this could be the Maine settler. No marriage record has been found. Thomas arrived at Piscataqua in July 1630 on the barque Warwick (TMS), returned to England in 1633, and returned to the colonies on the Pied Cow in 1634. In his 1904 work, Emery was probably mistaken when he said Spencer was from Winchcombe, Gloucester, England. Emery went on to say erroneously that this was also the English home of the Chadbournes. By the 1950s, it was known that this was untrue and that the Chadbournes came from Tamworth (Parish records). More may be learned about Thomas Spencer's arrival in Maine in MPC IV:172-4 and under #8 Humphrey Spencer.

Thomas was a planter, lumberman, and tavernkeeper. Pope's Pioneers of Maine & New Hampshire says that Thomas was a proprietor of Cambridge MA in 1633, a freeman in 1634 who removed to Kittery. Patience and Thomas lived first at Strawbery Bank (Portsmouth), then on 6 Mar 1636/7 were called residents of "Piscataqua" (Kittery Point), and finally of Newichawannock (S Berwick). Dispute over Thomas' title to land in S Berwick (where William Chadbourne gave them a house) is described under their son Humphrey #8. They were of Saco in 1654 (Holmes, Dictionary of New England Families) and Patience was (erroneously) called a widow of Saco in 1662 (Savage, Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England). In 1682 Patience was probably of Berwick as Thomas died there in 1681 and she in 1683.

Thomas was disenfranchised for entertaining Quakers in 1659 (LND, 652). Evidence that Thomas and Patience may have been Quakers is seen in the courts 7 July 1663 when they were presented for "neglecting to come to the publique meeteing on the Lords day to heare the word preached for about the space of 3 Moenths" (MPC II:139). They were presented again for the same offense on 6 July 1675 (ibid, II:306). In a long list of "those persons yt entertayned the Quakers, with the answers given in by them respectively" we find: "That Thomas Spencer pay as a fine to ye country for his entertayning the Quakers the somme of five pounds, & be disfranchised" (The Records of the Colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, Vol 4, part 1, p 407). Edward Wharton piloted a vessel that carried a group of Quakers up the coast, and seven people were fined varying sums and/or disenfranchised (lost the right to vote) by the Massachusetts Bay government, the only entity which could disenfranchise a freeman. Thomas Spencer obviously answered their questions in sympathy with the Quakers, defied the government, and was cast out as a result. Because we don't have copies of his answers to the Court's questions, we don't know how steadfastly he supported the Quakers, but he clearly satisfied the Court that he was in sympathy with them or they would not have taken action against him. They did not take action against James Rawlings, for instance, whom they found to be "more innocent and ingenious then the rest."

           Brother Humphrey Chadbourne expressed concern for his sister Patience Spencer when he wrote his will in 1662.  Humphrey directed his wife to assist "sister Spencer" if she should fall into "decay" (qv).

After Thomas' death in Dec 1681, Patience may have continued to operate the tavern. After her death her children and relatives, William, Humphrey and Moses Spencer, Ephraim Joy, and Thomas Chick, chose William Spencer and Thomas Chick to help them divide the estate 15 Nov 1683 (MPC III:186), and then finally settled on Edward Rishworth, Richard Nason and James Emery to make the division (ibid, III:188), probably because William and Thomas were heirs.

1679 Will of Thomas Spencer

               In the name of God amen I Thomas Spencer of Newgewanacke in the Townshipp of Kittery being sick of body, but through the mercys of god, sound of Mind & memory and not knowing how soone my Change may come desire to dispose of that Estate which god hath given unto Mee as followeth viz:
               Imps I give unto my Eldest sonn William Spencer after my decease & the decease of Patience my loving wife my now dwelling house & all out housing by it & belonging to it & all the Land adjoyning to it being now in my possession & lying on the North side of the highway, by my sd dwelling house, whither it be Gardens orchards, pasture Meddows Corne Land to him the sd William Spencer my child, & to his hayres for ever, provided hee pay or Cause to be paid unto my Two daughters, namely Susanna & Elizabeth with in six weeks after my decease & or my loving wife Patience, the full and just Sum of Tenn pounds, apiece in money or pay equivalent there unto the houses and the land lying responsable until ye Legseys aforsd bee duly payd.
               2ly I give to patience my loving wife all the rest of my Estate, whither bee in lands Chattles, Cattle, goods debts house hould stuff Meddows &c: not mentioned as abovesd for her to distribute & dispose of amongst my Children at her own discretion, except what I have already given to my Eldest sonn as abovesd
               Lastly I do nominate & appoynt patience my sd loveing wife to bee my Soole executrix of this my last will & testament in Consideration where of I have here unto set my hand & seale, the second day of June in the yeare of our Lord one thousand six hundred seaventy nine/1679
       Signed sealed & Delivered
       Thomas Spencer
       Presence of his mark
       Gillbard Warrins his marke x
       George Pearsons
               An Appendix to my last will & testament as on the other side of this paper, appeareth my further will in that, where as formerly I gave unto my sonn in law John Gattinsby who married my daughter Susannah a certen Tract of land being part of that too hundred acres that the Town of Kittery granted to mee, joyneing to my house lott, & the sd Gattensby sould his sd right or tract of land unto my sonn in law, Thomas Everington who married my daughter Mary, & the sd Gattinsby was fully Contented, & payd by sd Everington my sonn in law, for his sd land & the sayd Everington my sonn in law possessed the sd Land his life tyme, & left it to his heyres; and wh as I also gave unto my sonn Etherington a Certain Tract of Land adjoyning to the land hee bought of the sd John Gattinsby on which the dwelling house of the sayd Etherington now standeth, & both Tracts of land contayning about Twety foure Acres, by Estimation, bee it more or less, as they are now bounded with Richard Nason & the high way on the South, William Spencers land on the West, Daniell Goodins land & Humphry Spencers land on the North, & that part of my land Called Parkers Marsh on the East: And although some writeings have been Prused about the Premisses, yet nothing yt I know upon record about it, & that the sd Land according to my true intent discend unto the right heyres of it, both by the sayd Etherington's purchase of the sayd Gattensby in part, & my gift unto the sayd Etherington of the rest of the sd land: Now my will is that the sayd Land with the dwelling house Upon it, & all the appurtenances & priviledges yt unto belonging, should bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of John Wincoll Junior, sonn of John Wincoll of Kittery & of Mary his wife deceased, who was the daughter of my sd sonn in law Thomas Etherton & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould the sd tract of Land, dwelling house with all the appertuancnes, & priviledges there unto belonging to him the sd John Wincoll Junjr & his heyres lawfully begotten of his body; and if hee dy without such lawful heyres my will is that the sd Tract of Land houseing & all appurtenances and priviledges yt unto belonging shall bee & remaine the proper right & inheritance of patience Atherton daughter unto sd Thomas Etherington & Mary his wife deceased, to have & to hould to her & her heyres for ever/ in witness where unto I have afixed my hand & Seale, this fifth day of June one thousand six hundred seventy nine 1679
   Signed sealed & delivered
   Thomas Spencer
   in Presence of his mark
   Gilbard Warrine his marke x
   George Pearson

Acknowledged 15 June 1679, recorded 15 June 1682 Inventory taken 1 May 1682 and the estate valued at £257.14.0 by Richard Nason, Moses Spencer and John Wincoll 1 May 1682, who stated that Thomas Spencer was deceased in Dec 1681 (MW, 66-8). According to historian John Frost, the Old Fields cemetery of S Berwick originated as Thomas and Patience Spencer's burial plot. Frost believes that two of the three old plots near the woods on the riverbank, in what now appears to be an unmarked grave, hold the remains of Thomas and Patience (Chadbourne) Spencer and other early settlers ("Talk of George F Sanborn Jr," Pied Cow 7:1).

Children, surname SPENCER:

           i.          WILLIAMC3 b ca 1630/1; d 15 May 1696.  His will mentions no wife or children. He may be the child referred to by Torrey as b 1630.  William was granted land in Berwick in 1651 and served the town in various capacities.  He and Walter Allen were in charge of Great Works Mills sometime after 1650 (LND, 652).  As eldest son he inherited a considerable estate (MPA 1/34), which he left to his nephew Humphrey  Spencer as his sole heir on 18 June 1687 (MW 110-1).  A codicil to his will provided for servant Moses Spencer.

5 ii. MARGARET, b ca 1632. 6 iii. MARY, b ca 1634. 7 iv. SUSANNA, b Berwick ca 1636. 8 v. HUMPHREY, b Berwick ca 1638. 9 vi. ELIZABETH, b Berwick ca 1640 or 26 Mar 1848 (Gene Pool).

10 vii. MOSES, b Berwick ca 1642. Figure 3: The First Permanent Settlement in Maine adapted from Everett S Stackpole

Courtesy of Old Berwick Historical Society

view all 26

Thomas Spencer, of Maine's Timeline

1596
1596
England
1630
July 1630
Age 34
1630
Age 34
England
1630
Age 34
1630
Age 34
1631
1631
Age 35
England
1631
Age 35
South Berwick, York, Maine, United States
1634
1634
Age 38
York, Maine
1636
1636
Age 40
South Berwick, York, Maine
1638
1638
Age 42
South Berwick, York, Maine, United States