Thomas 'the Miller' Lincoln, I (1600 - 1684) MP

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Birthplace: Norfolk, England
Death: Died in Hingham, Suffolk County (Present Plymouth County), Province of Massachusetts), (Present USA)
Occupation: Miller, Cooper and maltster
Managed by: Tammy Swingle (Tucker)
Last Updated:

About Thomas 'the Miller' Lincoln, I

Distinguished from the other three Thomases who early settled in Hing. by his vocation as a "miller," came from Old Eng. to New Eng. in 1635, and July 3, 1636, had a house-lot of five acres granted him on what is now South, near Main St. Other lots were also granted him for planting purposes. He prob. brought with him from Eng. two or three ch.; and before 1650 rem. from here with his family to Taunton, Mass., where, Dec. 10, 1665 he m. for his sec. w. Elizabeth Street, prob. the wid. of Francis Street. Tradition says that he erected at Taunton the old grist-mill, where, in 1675, King Philip and his chiefs met the pioneers of the place for a peaceful interview; and that at a later period his sons John and Samuel conveyed the old mill property to Robert Crosman. Whether there is any record to verify this statement ab. the old grist-mill or not, it is undoubtedly true that he continued in the same vocation which he had previously followed. In his will of 28 Apr. 1683, he calls himself "eighty years of age or thereabouts." Will proved 5 March foll.

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THOMAS LINCOLN is one of eight Lincoln's mentioned in the early records of Hingham, Plymouth, MA. It is thought that they all came from Hingham in Norfolk County, England. The same names which appear in Hingham, MA, also appear on the records of St. Andrew's Cuurch in Old Hingham, for more than a century before these emigrants came to New England.

Five of the eight are known to be two sets of brothers. Four of the eight have the name, "Thomas". The eight are often distinquished from each other by their occupations.

three brothers –> Daniel "unmarried" --> Samuel "the weaver" (ancestor of President Lincoln) ---> Thomas "the weaver"

 

two brothers –> Stephen --> Thomas "the husbandman"

 

relationship unknown –> Daniel "the Sergeant" --> Thomas "the cooper" --> Thomas "the miller" (OUR ANCESTOR)

THOMAS "the miller" LINCOLN came to New England in 1635, and Jul. 3, 1636, had a house lot of five acres granted to him in Hingham on what is now South Street, near Main Street. Other lots were also granted him for planting purposes. He probably brought with him from England, two or three children, and in 1649 removed from Hingham, with his family, to Taunton, Bristol, MA, where Dec. 10, 1665, he married, as his second wife, Elizabeth Street (or Streeter), probably the widow of Francis Street(er).

According to "The History of Hingham, Massachusetts, 1893", he erected at Taunton, the old grist-mill, upon a stream called Little River, now nearly in the heart of the city near the street leading from the railway station to City Square. Tradition says, that in 1675, King Philip and his chiefs met, at the mill, with the pioneers of the place, for a peaceful interview. The mill was passed to sons John and Samuel, and they later conveyed the old mill property to Robert Crosman, for a sum of sixty pounds. Whether there is any record to verify these statements about the old grist-mill or not, it is undoubtedly true that THOMAS continued in the same vocation which he had previously followed.

The first military company of Taunton was raised in 1649. A roster found among the "city hall papers", dated Apr. 8, 1682, shows the company was divided into four squadrons, and there appears THOMAS LINKON in the "2d squadron."

In his will dated Aug. 28, 1683, he calls himself, "eighty years of age thereabouts." The will was proved the following March 5. -------------------- There were four (4) Thomas Lincolns in Hingham at the same time. They were known as Cooper, Miller, Weaver, and Husbandman. There were three other Lincolns related to these. The majority settled in Hingham, Massachusetts. The name Lincoln, with its variants— Linkhorn, Linkoln, Lincon, was common in Hingham. England, for more than a century before the emigrants from that town founded Hingham. Massachusetts. There were eight of the name of Lincoln among the early settlers of Hingham, Massachusetts. The family came from Wymondham, county Norfolk, Lincoln. There were three brothers, Daniel, Thomas and Samuel, who came in the party, accompanied by their mother Joan. There were in the remarkable Lincoln Colony, of Hingham, no less then four of the name of Thomas Lincoln, and they were distinguished from one another by their trades. Thomas Lincoln, miller, removed to Taunton; Thomas Lincoln, cooper, and Thomas Lincoln, husbandman, resided in Hingham. Wymondham, or Windham, was probably the birthplace of Stephen and Thomas Lincoln, but they were closely connected with others of the name who came from Hingham, England, to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Thomas, the Cooper

Thomas, the "cooper", and also known as the "maltster," came from the west of England, says tradition, and settled in Hing. ab. 1635-6. His name, however, does not appear upon our records until 1636, when there was "granted unto Thomas Lincoln, cooper five acres of land at the west end of town for a house-lot, butting on the town street eastward, and upon the common westward, and with the land of Francis Smith northward, and with the land of Thomas Nichols southward." This lot he afts. sold or exchanged for one on North, near Beal St., which was his homestead. He also had a small trangular lot of land granted him subsequent to the first distribution of lots in 1635, at what is now the corner of North and Lincoln Sts. This (the triangular lot) he afts. gave with malt-house, etc., to his youngest son, Benjamin.

His w., whom he m. in Eng. ab. 1630, was Anis, or Avith lane, a dau. of William Lane. She d. in Hing. Feb. 13 or 14, 1682-83. Hing. town rec's say, "Annis Lincoln dyed 14 February, 1682-83;" while David Hobart, son of Rev. Peter Hobart, recorded the event in his diary as foll.: "February 13, 1683. The wife of Thomas Lincoln the cooper dyed." At the time the present meeting-house of the First Parish was erected (1680-81), Thomas Lincoln, cooper, was one of the five elderly gentlemen to whom was assigned a sitting "in the second seate under ye pulpit;" while for Mrs. Lincoln a place was allotted "in the second seate next ye pew." He d. at his residence on North St., West Hing., 28 Sept. 1691.

In his will, dated 13 July, 1688, proved 17 Oct. 1692, he mentions three sons and one dau.; s. Joseph to have the home place. Joseph's son Nehemiah came next into possession, and having no issue he left it to his nephew Israel Lincoln. A large part of the original homestead is still in possession of this branch of the family. The

Children with his ONLY wife Annis Lane:

  1. Thomas, born May 6, 1633
  2. Joseph, born Nov 20, 1640
  3. Benjamin, born May 7, 1643
  4. Deborah, born Aug 3, 1645. Married Samuel Thaxter on June 13, 1678.
  5. Sarah, born Oct 5, 1650.

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Thomas "the miller" Lincoln came to New England in 1635, and Jul. 3, 1636, had a house lot of five acres granted to him in Hingham on what is now South Street, near Main Street. Other lots were also granted him for planting purposes. He probably brought with him from England, two or three children, and in 1649 removed from Hingham, with his family, to Taunton, Bristol, MA, where Dec. 10, 1665, he married, as his second wife, Elizabeth Street (or Streeter), probably the widow of Francis Street(er).

According to "The History of Hingham, Massachusetts, 1893", he erected at Taunton, the old grist-mill, upon a stream called Little River, now nearly in the heart of the city near the street leading from the railway station to City Square. Tradition says, that in 1675, King Philip and his chiefs met, at the mill, with the pioneers of the place, for a peaceful interview. The mill was passed to sons John and Samuel, and they later conveyed the old mill property to Robert Crosman, for a sum of sixty pounds. Whether there is any record to verify these statements about the old grist-mill or not, it is undoubtedly true that THOMAS continued in the same vocation which he had previously followed.

The first military company of Taunton was raised in 1649. A roster found among the "city hall papers", dated Apr. 8, 1682, shows the company was divided into four squadrons, and there appears “Thomas Linkon” in the "2d squadron."

In his will dated Aug. 28, 1683, he calls himself, "eighty years of age thereabouts." The will was proved the following March 5.

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Thomas "The Miller" Lincoln's Timeline

1600
December 28, 1600
Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton Morley,Norfolk,England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England
December 28, 1600
Swanton, Morley, Norfolk, England