Titus Flavius Sabinus, Consul 47 (c.8 - 69) MP

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Birthplace: Rieti, Rieti, Lazio, Italy
Death: Died in Rome, Roma, Lazio, Italy
Cause of death: Massacré par les partisants de Vitellius
Occupation: Sénateur, Préfet de Rome, Gouverneur de Mésie, Consul 47 CE
Managed by: Justin Swanström
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About Titus Flavius Sabinus, Consul 47

Wagner, Sir Anthony Richard; ‘Pedigree and Progress: Essays in the Genealogical Interpretation of History’ has him as the 3rd husband of Mariamne III - but see Discussion looking for evidence to corroborate this.

From Wikipedia:

Titus Flavius Sabinus (8 AD–20 December 69 AD) was a Roman politician and soldier. He was the elder son of Titus Flavius Sabinus and Vespasia Polla and brother of the Emperor Vespasian.

Career

Along with his younger brother Vespasian, he was born in Reate, modern Rieti, in Sabinia, Italy, and served in the Roman conquest of Britain as a Legate in a legion in 43 AD, during the reign of the Emperor Claudius. He was Consul Suffectus in 47 AD (some say in 45 AD, or perhaps Ordinarius in 45 AD?), Governor, or better Legatus Augusti pro praetore of Moesia from 50 to 56 AD or from c. 53 to 60 AD, Consul Suffectus in November 52 AD, and from 56 to 69 AD was Praefectus Urbi Romae. Lucius Pedanius Secundus served as Prefect of Rome in year 61 AD however, and so most scholars conclude that Sabinus served two terms as Prefect, one from 56 to 60 AD and another from 62 to 69 AD.[1] The reason for his temporary deposition is unknown. Others say he was temporarily deposed in 69 AD.

Sabinus was an important supporter of his brother: when Vespasian found himself in financial difficulties while governor of Africa, Sabinus lent him the money to continue, and while Vespasian was governor of Iudaea Sabinus was a vital source of information on events in Rome. However in 69 AD, the Year of the Four Emperors, as pro-Vespasian forces advanced to Rome, Sabinus, who had been made Consul Suffectus in May of that year, was besieged on the Capitoline Hill before being put to death by the Emperor Vitellius, and did not live to see his brother take over the Empire. He was buried in Rome in 70 AD and had a state funeral.

He married Arrecina Clementina, born in Pisaurum, Italy, c. 12 AD, daughter of Arrecinus and wife Tertulla and sister of Marcus Arrecinus Clemens, and had one son, also called Titus Flavius Sabinus, and one daughter Flavia, born c. 30 AD, who married Lucius Caesennius Paetus.{{[2]}} There is a possibility that Clemens would be related to the paternal side of Vespasian. Vespasian's and Sabinus's paternal grandmother bore the cognomen Tertulla and this cognomen was also bore by both his daughter and his mother.

Biblical mention

There have been conjectures that he might have been the Theophilus mentioned in the Bible to whom both the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts were written or dedicated.

References

  • Tacitus, Histories
  • Suetonius, Lives of the Twelve Caesars
  • Cassius Dio, Roman History
  • Arnold Blumberg (ed) (1995), Great Leaders, Great Tyrants?: Contemporary Views of World Rulers Who Made History
  • Paul Maier, The Flames of Rome
  • Christian Settipani. Continuité gentilice et continuité sénatoriale dans les familles sénatoriales romaines à l'époque impériale, 2000
  1. Paul L. Maiers, The Flames of Rome, Pg. 427
  2. CIL 14, 2830 = ILS 995

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