Tonantius Ferreolus, III

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Tonantius Ferreolus

Also Known As: "Tonance Ferréol"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Narbonne, Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
Death: Died in Narbonne, Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Tonantius Ferreolus, II and Papianilla
Husband of Alquima and Industria of Narbonne
Father of Son of Tonantius; Firminus, bishop of Uzès; Duke Ferreolus de Rodez; Lucilia Ferreola; Deuteria de Narbonne and 2 others
Brother of Tonantia Ferreola; Ruricius, bishop of Uzès and Fidentius

Occupation: Praetoriaanse prefect van Gallie (praefectus praetorio Galliarum), Prefeito Pretoriano da Gália, Tribune of Gaul, Konsul i Rom, Gallo-Roman senator, Consul, Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, Senator, Sénateur de Narbonne (vv.479-517)
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Tonantius Ferreolus, III

He was a Gallo-Roman Senator. He was at Rome in 469 and 475. He appears as a Vir Clarissimus (a title meaning "most eminent man") between 507 and 511. He was a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinarus. He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517.

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Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol) (440 or say 450 – 511 or after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then Narbo, and a Senator of Narbonne between 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla. His wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she was Industria of Narbonne, then Narbo, born ca 450 or 465, whom he married before 475, daughter of Flavius Probus, Roman Senator, and wife Eulalia (?) (a German cousin of Sidonius Apollinaris).

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness when Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world". He was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517.

Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11 Fadentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15

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Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol) (440 or say 450 – 511 or after 517), Vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then Narbo, and a Senator of Narbonne between 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla. His wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she was Industria of Narbonne, then Narbo, born ca 450 or 465, whom he married before 475, daughter of Flavius Probus, Roman Senator, and wife Eulalia (?) (a german cousin of Sidonius Apollinaris).

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness when Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world". He was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517. -------------------- Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol in modern French) (between about 440 and 450 – between 511 to after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Gallo-Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then called Narbo, between about 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla. Papianilla is generally regarded as belonging to the Arvernian family of the Aviti, though in a generation senior to Sidonius' wife of the same name.

Issue

   * Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus.

Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès.

   * Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11[16], [17]
   * Fidentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15 Mommarets and Kelley [18] that Ferreolus Bishop of Uzes was son of a Ferreolus, presumably Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne above.

[edit] References and sources

   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7
   * New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112
   * Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii
   * Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989).
   * Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

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Wikipedia Entry on Senator Tonantius Ferreolus (Retrieved 1-22-2009) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonantius_Ferreolus_(senator)

Tonantius Ferreolus (senator) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol) (440 or say 450 – 511 or after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then Narbo, and a Senator of Narbonne between 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla. His wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she was Industria of Narbonne, then Narbo, born ca 450 or 465, whom he married before 475, daughter of Flavius Probus, Roman Senator, and wife Eulalia (?) (a german cousin of Sidonius Apollinaris).

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness when Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world". He was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517.

Issue

   * Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus
   * Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès
   * Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11
   * Fadentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15

References and sources

   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7
   * New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112
   * Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii
   * Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989).
   * Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

See also

   * Descent from antiquity

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Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol) (440 or say 450 – 511 or after 517), Vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then Narbo, and a Senator of Narbonne between 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris.[citation needed] He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus, Prefect (405-475) and Papianilla.[citation needed] His wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she was Industria of Narbonne, then Narbo, born ca 450 or 465,[citation needed] whom he married before 475, daughter of Flavius Probus, Roman Senator, and wife Eulalia (?) (a german cousin of Sidonius Apollinaris).[citation needed]

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness where Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world". He was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517.[citation needed] Contents [hide]

   * 1 Issue of Tonantius and Industria
   * 2 References
   * 3 Sources
   * 4 References

[edit] Issue of Tonantius and Industria

   * Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus[citation needed]
   * Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès[citation needed]
   * Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11[citation needed]
   * Fadentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15[citation needed]

[edit] References

   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7

[edit] Sources

   * New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112

[edit] References

   * Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii
   * Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989).
   * Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonantius_Ferreolus_%28senator%29)

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Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol) (440 or say 450 – 511 or after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then Narbo, and a Senator of Narbonne between 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla. His wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she was Industria of Narbonne, then Narbo, born ca 450 or 465, whom he married before 475, daughter of Flavius Probus, Roman Senator, and wife Eulalia (?) (a German cousin of Sidonius Apollinaris).

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness when Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world". He was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin St. Apollinaris of Valence in 517.

Issue Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11 Fadentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15

References and sources The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7 New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112 Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989). Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

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Photo: Roman Senators.

Tonantius Ferreolus (also called Tonance Ferréol in modern French) (between about 440 and 450 – between 511 to after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Gallo-Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then called Narbo, between about 479 and 517. He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Papianilla.

Papianilla is generally regarded as belonging to the Arvernian family of the Aviti, though in a generation senior to Sidonius' wife of the same name.[1] The younger Tonantius' wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she very likely was an Industria who lived at Narbonne, born ca 450 to 460, whom he married after 475, daughter, possibly, of Flavius Probus [2], Gallo-Roman Senator, and his wife Eulalia, cousin-german (first cousin) of Sidonius Apollinaris[3]). No civil or church offices are known for the younger Tonantius Ferreolus [1] He had several siblings whose names are not preserved. There is some argument as to whether Ferreolus of Narbo referred to as husband of Industria and father of Firminus is Tonantius Ferreolus or a brother

Issue: Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus

Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès

   * Firminus, Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11[16], [17]
   * Fidentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15 Mommarets and Kelley [18] that Ferreolus Bishop of Uzes was son of a Ferreolus, presumably Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne above.

[edit] References and sources

   * The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7
   * New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112
   * Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii
   * Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989).
   * Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).
   * Ralph Whitney Mathisen, The Ecclesiastical Aristocracy of Fifth Century Gaul: A Regional Analysis of Family Structure. Doctoral Disstertation, University of Wisconsin. University Microfilms (1979).
   * Christian Settipani, "L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'etude des genealogies carolingiennes" in ONOMASTIQUE ET PARENTE DANS L'OCCIDENT MEDIEVAL, Ed. K. S. B. Rohan & C. Settipani, Prosopographica et Genealogica (2000)
   * T. STANFORD MOMMAERTS & DAVID H. KELLEY, "The Anicii of Gaul and Rome." In Fifth-Century Gaul: A Crisis of Identity? Edited by John Drinkwater and Hugh Elton. Cambridge, 1992.

-------------------- From the Wikipedia page on Tonantius Ferreolus (Senator): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonantius_Ferreolus_(senator)

Tonantius Ferreolus II (also called Tonance Ferréol in modern French) (between about 440 and 450 or 462 according to French Wikipedia – between 511 to after 517), vir clarissimus between 507 and 511, was a Gallo-Roman Senator who lived in Narbonne, then called Narbo, between about 479 and 517.

He was also present and seen at Rome in 469 and 475 and was known to be a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris (430-486, through whom we know of Tonantius through his poem Panegyrique de Narbonne).

He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus (Praetorian Prefect of Gaul at Arles from 450 to 452-453) and wife Papianilla. Papianilla is generally regarded as belonging to the Arvernian family of the Aviti, though in a generation senior to Sidonius' wife of the same name.[1]

(French Wikipedia says that he is a descendant through his paternal grandmother of the Syagrii family. He is also related to Sidonius by Sidonius' mother through Papianilla, suggesting that they were relatives - the wife of Sidonius is herself a daughter of Avitus. His father held land around Nimes, as well as a villa called Prusianus on the banks of the Gardon River, which Sidonius had described its beauty. Tonantius is described also as the brother of Roricus, third Bishop of Uzes 457-538.)

(French Wikipedia also notes: Tonantius Ferreolus II spent his childhood between 469-475 in rome. With his father's large library, he read Varro, Horace, and all the authors of antiquity. He stayed quite often with his entire family at their villa Prusianus on the banks of the Gardon River, between Nimes and Clermont Auvergne. This library was not just for show. People in their home made real and daily use of it: everyone read in the morning, and then they talked during the meal of what they read, and in so doing joined scholarship and gaiety in their conversation.)

The younger Tonantius' wife's name was thought to have been lost to the ages but, according to the reference below she very likely was an Industria who lived at Narbonne, born ca 450 to 460, whom he married after 475, daughter, possibly, of Flavius Probus [2], Gallo-Roman Senator (and vir nobilis of Narbo, himself a son of Flavius Magnus, Consul of the Romans in 460 and friend of Sidonius), and his wife Eulalia, cousin-german (first cousin) of Sidonius Apollinaris[3] (and daughter of Thaumastus, son of Sidonius. "Eulalie, whose modesty, like that of the Athenian Minerva, inspires respedc for the most austere elder.")

No civil or church offices are known for the younger Tonantius Ferreolus [1]

He had several siblings whose names are not preserved. There is some argument as to whether Ferreolus of Narbo referred to as husband of Industria and father of Firminus is Tonantius Ferreolus or a brother.[4]

(French Wikipedia says: The Appolinaires and the Ferreols attempted to salvage the Empire, their country, and their lives. They succeeded for a short period to maintain the separation between the Franks and the Visigoths.)

Narbo was within the realm of the Visigoths and Tonantius Ferreolus most likely remained loyal to Euric and Alaric II prior to the Battle of Vouille. It is not known if he was involved in the Frankish Visigothic war and if he survived it for how long.

Following the collapse of the Kingdom of Alaric, Southern Gaul including Narbo was briefly under the control of the Ostrogothic Kingdom in Italy. However, after the fall of the Burgundian Kingdom in the early 530's the Austrasian Franks under Theodoric quickly took control of Burgundy to Provence as far as the Mediterranean and along the coast from at least Uzes on the west to the Italian border on the east leaving Narbo in Visigothic hands.

What is known of Tonantius Ferreolus' descendants from that time is derived either from the history of the see of Uzes or from those few noblemen in the family such as Ferreolus, father of Ansbert and Agilulf, who apparently relocated, or were kidnapped as hostages, (cf Gregory of Tours' relative Attalus [5]) to the heartland of the Austrasian Kingdom in the vicinity of Metz and Trier.

Since Ferreolus' grandfather, Tonantius Ferreolus the Elder was Prefect of Gaul (451) and possessed several consular ancestors including the two Syagrii during the reign of Theodosius [6], Tonantius Ferreolus' Austrasia bound son Ferreolus would have possessed sufficient standing in the eyes of the Franks to marry a Frankish princess of a deposed house.

Note also that at the time Ferreolus will have been relocating to Austrasia from Narbo, or more likely Frankish Provence, his second cousin Parthenius who had been made Patrician (Austrasian Governor - typically a Gallo Roman) of Provence in 542 and Tax Collector at Trier by 548 may have been helpful in his relocation.[7]

Tonantius Ferreolus was a witness when Sidonius Apollinaris, then bishop of Clermont, between 461 and 467, sent a letter to his friend, Donidius, describing a visit he made, a "most delightful time in the most beautiful country in the company of Tonantius Ferreolus (the elder) and Apollinaris, the most charming hosts in the world".

Tonantius was on the estates of his father when Sidonius Appolinarius visited between 461 and 467. As Sidonius relates, "at Prusianum, as the other (estate) is called, (the young) Tonantius and his brothers turned out of their beds for us because we could not be always dragging our gear about: they are surely the elect among the nobles of our own age".

He was visited by his cousin Saint Apollinaris of Valence in 517.

(Tonantius Ferreolus II is distinguished, according to Sidonius, by his natural inclination and taste for literature. He is a Vir Classimus between 507 and 511, and a Roman senator between 479 and 517. He lived at Narbonne, a town represented within the Roman Senate. In Rome, the Senate continued to exist until the end of the 6th century.)

Issue

(French Wikipedia says: "The barbarian invasions of the fifth century did not destroy all at once the structures of the Western Roman Empire. The barbarians were in fact only 5 percent of the population of the west. The prohibition of intermarriage with the Franks showed the fear of losing their identity. Besides their associations with Gallo-Roman women remained relatively rare. Intermarriage was more common with the other people who invaded the empire.)

The children of Tonantius Ferreolus and Industria of Narbonne were:

1. Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne, father of the Gallo-Roman Senator Ansbertus[8] Settipani here cites Paul the Deacon in his work on the Bishops of Metz where Agilulf, Bishop of Metz, brother of Ansbert and uncle of Arnoald Bishop of Metz, was referred to as the "son of a senator". Metz was in the Kingdom of Austrasia and Austrasia controlled Provence which included Uzes. Although Tonantius Ferreolus who was attested at Narbo likely took the side of the Goths before the death of Alaric II, by the mid 6th century his family had clearly relocated to within Frankish territory which began west of Uzes and extended West. Nîmes, just to the south and a little west of Uzes was in Visigothic hands until the Arab capture in the 8th century. Settipani, based on his reading of Paul the Deacon and the fact that the name Ferreolus was associated with the name Ansbert in two Autun Bishops (19 and 15 rspectively) in a Burgundian see that was regarded as both being hereditary and having ties with the Syagri-Ferreoli, was persuaded apparently to accept the slightly confused 9th century account stating that the senator in question was a "Ferreolus." Settipani suggests this Ferreolus tentatively as a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and Industria. Settipani further suggests that this son married to a daughter of Frankish Ripuarian Royal house which had survived through the clemency of Theoderic of Austrasia who was thought to have been a son of Clovis' 1st wife, an unattested daughter of Sigebert, the penultimate Ripuarian Frankish king. Kelley had come to the same or a similar conclusion in 1947 [9] but it appears from those who cite him that the original idea was that Ansbertus was a son of Tonantius Ferreolus and not a grandson.

2. Ruricius (d. 506, 507 or shortly after 507), Bishop of Uzès He was called Bishop of Uzes in the Life of Firminus [10] and based on the existnece of "Ruricius of Uzes" of the Life of Firminus, Dr. David Kelley postulated that "Ruricius of Uzes" was a brother of Tonantius, a son of Papianilla, wife of the elder Tonantius and that Ruricius of Limoges was her brother and Tonantius' uncle. This is still the position of a significant number of researchers [11] however Mathisen [12] and Settipani [13] have concluded that the octagenarian Bishop Ruricius referred to in the Life of Firminus is in fact Ruricius of Limoges. Settipani has suggested that Papianilla was the sister of Hiberia, wife of Ruricius of Limoges and daughter of Gallo Roman Senator Ommatius of Clermont [14] Given that a Ferreolus would succeed Ruricius and his descendants to the Episcopal chair of Limoges and commission the epitaphs of Ruricius I and II (hence he was a kinsman and probably a descendant),[15] it is likely there are aspects of the relationship between the Ruriciids and Ferreoli that are not yet explained by either theory. Caveat for English primary readers of Settipani: Because Settipani publishes in French but provides nice Stemma charts, said readers should make the effort to read the French text anyway, as there is much in the text that does not find its way to the charts.

3. Firminus, (fourth) Bishop of Uzès in 507 (ca 490 – 538, 551 or October 11, 553), Feast Day October 11[16],[17]

4. Fidentius, the father of St. Ferreolus, (fifth) Bishop of Uzès (553 ; January 4, 581), Feast Day January 4, and Saint Tarsicia of Rodez (died ca 600), Feast Day January 15 Mommarets and Kelley [18] that Ferreolus Bishop of Uzes was son of a Ferreolus, presumably Ferreolus, Senator of Narbonne above.

References and sources

The Royal Ancestry Bible Royal Ancestors of 300 Colonial American Families by Michel L. Call (chart 2074) ISBN 1-933194-22-7

New England Historic and Genealogical Register 101:112 Sidonius Apollinaris, The Letters of Sidonius (Oxford: Clarendon, 1915), pp. clx-clxxxiii

Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne (France: Éditions Christian, 1989).

Christian Settipani, Continuite Gentilice et Continuite Familiale Dans Les Familles Senatoriales Romaines A L'epoque Imperiale, Mythe et Realite, Addenda I - III (juillet 2000- octobre 2002) (n.p.: Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2002).

Ralph Whitney Mathisen, The Ecclesiastical Aristocracy of Fifth Century Gaul: A Regional Analysis of Family Structure. Doctoral Disstertation, University of Wisconsin. University Microfilms (1979).

Christian Settipani, "L'apport de l'onomastique dans l'etude des genealogies carolingiennes" in ONOMASTIQUE ET PARENTE DANS L'OCCIDENT MEDIEVAL, Ed. K. S. B. Rohan & C. Settipani, Prosopographica et Genealogica (2000)

T. Stanford Mommaerts & David H. Kelley, "The Anicii of Gaul and Rome." In Fifth-Century Gaul: A Crisis of Identity? Edited by John Drinkwater and Hugh Elton. Cambridge, 1992.

Gregory of Tours, The History of the Franks trans. by Lewis Thorpe. Penguin. (1977) (free Latin edition)

References

1.^ a b Mathison, 1979, p. 79. 2.^ Settipani, 2002, p. 13. 3.^ Mathison, 1979, p. 274. 4.^ Mathison, 1979, p. 114. 5.^ Thorpe's Translation of Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, 1977, p. 175. 6.^ MAthisen, 1979, p. 78. 7.^ Thorpe's translation of Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks, 1977, p.191. 8.^ Settipani, 2000, p. 221 9.^ NEGHR, 1947 10.^ Mathisen, 1979, p. 56 11.^ Mommaerts and Kelley, 1992, pp. 111-114. 12.^ Mathisen, 1999, p.44. 13.^ Settipani, 2002, pp. 11-14. 14.^ Settipani, 1991, pp. 198-199. 15.^ Mathisen, 1999, p. 48. 16.^ Mathisen, 1979, p. 56. 17.^ Settiani, 1991, p. 198. 18.^ Mommaerts & Kelley, 1992, p. 113.

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Tontantius was a friend and relative of Sidonius Apollinaris, seen in Rome 469 and 475.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonantius_Ferreolus_(senator)

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Suffix : Praetorianprefekt av Gallien

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Ferreolus, also called Ferreolus of Rodez (b. 470 or ca 475) was a Senator of Narbonne, then Narbo, who lived in Rodez and was also a Senator there. He was the son of Tonantius Ferreolus and wife Industria. Married firstly ca 531 to a Princess of the Salian Franks, born before 511, daughter of Chlodwig I, without issue, he later married secondly Saint Dode, born before 509, daughter of King Chloderic of the Ripuarian Franks, he was the father of: ▪ Ansbertus

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   Tonantius Ferreolus (sénateur), ou Tonance II Ferreol, né vers 450 et décédé après 517, est un aristocrate gallo-romain de la fin du Ve siècle et du début du VIe siècle. C'est grâce au poème de Sidoine Apollinaire, intitulé : Panégyrique de Narbonne que nous connaissons Tonance II Ferréol. Il est sénateur de la Gaule narbonnaise de 479 à 517 et vit presque toute sa vie à Narbonne. Il est l’ancêtre d’une partie des rois et des reines de l’Europe occidentale.
   Biographie
   Famille et jeunesse
   Son père, Tonantius Ferreolus, est préfet du prétoire des Gaules à Arles, de 450 à 452-453[1]. Il est un descendant par sa grand-mère paternelle de la grande famille des Syagrii. Il est aussi un proche de Sidoine Apollinaire, par sa mère, Papianilla[2], ce qui peut laisser penser qu'elles étaient apparentées (l'épouse de Sidoine est elle-même la fille d'Avitus). Son père a des terres aux alentours de Nîmes, et une villa appelée Prusianus sur les bords du Gardon, dont Sidoine Apollinaire, décrit la beauté.
   Tonance II Ferréol est le frère de Roricius (vers 457-538), 3e évêque d’Uzès.
   Tonance II Ferréol pendant son enfance vit entre 469 et 475 à Rome. Grâce à l’importante bibliothèque de son père peut lire Varron, Horace et tous les auteurs de l’antiquité[3]. Il séjourne assez souvent comme toute sa famille dans leur villa de Prusianus, sur les bords du Gardon, entre Nîmes et Clermont en Auvergne. Il ne faut pas s’imaginer que cette bibliothèque est seulement pour une vaine parade. Les personnes qui se trouvent dans la maison en font un usage réel et journalier : on y emploie à la lecture une partie de la matinée, et on s’entretient pendant le repas de ce qu’on a lu, en joignant ainsi dans le discours l’érudition à la gaieté de la conversation.
   Tonance II Ferréol se marie avec Industrie de Narbonne, fille de Flavius Probus, sénateur romain, vir nobilis de Narbonne, lui-même fils de Flavius Magnus, Consul de l’Empire romain en 460. Son père est un ami de Sidoine Apollinaire. Sa mère, Eulalie, est la fille de Thaumastus, et la cousine de Sidoine Apollinaire[4]. Eulalie, dont la pudeur, semblable à celle de Minerve l'Athénienne, inspire du respect aux plus austères vieillards[5].
   Les Appolinnaires et les Ferrols cherchent à sauver l'empire, leur pays et leurs vies[6]. Ils réussissent pendant quelques courtes périodes à maintenir une certaine indépendance entre les Francs et les Wisigoths.
   Carrière politique
   Tonance II Ferréol se distingue, selon Sidoine Apollinaire, par son inclination naturelle et son goût pour les lettres. Il est Vir clarissimus entre 507 et 511, puis sénateur romain entre 479 et 517. Il vit à Narbonne, ville dont il est le représentant au Sénat romain. À Rome, le Sénat continuera d'exister jusqu'à la fin du VIe siècle. Tonance II Ferréol rend visite à son cousin Saint Apollinaris de Valence en 517.
   Descendance
   Les invasions barbares du Ve siècle ne font pas disparaître d’un coup, les structures romaines de l’Occident. Les barbares ne représentent en effet que 5% de la population de l’Occident[7]. L’interdiction des mariages mixtes par les Francs montre la peur de perdre leur identité. D’ailleurs leurs unions avec des femmes gallo-romaines restent relativement rares. Elles sont plus fréquentes avec les autres peuples qui envahissent l’empire. Les enfants de Tonance II Ferréol et d’Industrie de Narbonne, sont[8] :
       un fils probablement nommé Ferréol, et sénateur dans la région de Narbonne, marié à Dode, fille du roi Chlodéric de Cologne, et père de :
           Ansbert, sénateur gallo-romain, se dévoue à la cause des rois d’Austrasie. Des généalogies carolingiennnes datant du IXe siècle lui attribuent pour épouse Bilichilde[9], fille de Clotaire Ier, mais cette parenté royale n'est plus prise en comte de nos jours[10].
           Agilulf, évêque de Metz de 591 à 601.
           Babon
           Déotaire, premier évêque d'Aristum en 591.
           Ragenfred.
       Firmin d'Uzès (516-553), 4e évêque d'Uzès de 507 à 553.
       Fadence, père de :
           Saint Ferréol, 5e évêque d'Uzès de 553 à 581[11].
   Références
       ↑ D'autres sources indiquent 450-453: Dom Vaissète indique 450-452 (Il mérita d'être élevé à la charge de préfet des Gaules qu'il occupa durant trois années consécutives, sçavoir l'année 452 et les deux précédentes), mais il semble bien être encore préfet en 453, lors du siège d'Arles par les Wisigoths.
       ↑ . D'après certains, il s'agit de la fille de Zénon l'Isaurien, alors Maître des milices de l'empire d'Orient. Le mariage, dans lequel Avitus avait servi d'intermédiaire, est célébré à Constantinople et chacun s'efforce de dissimuler aux yeux de Tonance la tare de la famille de son épouse. En ramenant Papianilla à Narbonne, puis à Arles, son père introduit dans la maison une hérétique nestorienne.
       ↑ Recherches sur les bibliothèques anciennes et modernes, jusqu'à la fondation ... par Petit-Radel, Louis Charles Fran, p.40.
       ↑ Oeuvres, avec le texte en regard et des notes par J.F. Grégoire et F.-Z ..., par Gaius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius, p.428
       ↑ Oeuvres, avec le texte en regard et des notes par J.F. Grégoire et F.-Z ..., par Gaius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius, p.423
       ↑ Histoire de France, par Jules Michelet, p.456.
       ↑ Michel Balard, Jean-Philippe Genêt, Michel Rouche, (1973), p 24
       ↑ Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne, 1989 [détail des éditions], p. 99-100.
       ↑ la Genealogia domni Karoli, du début du IXe siècle et la Genealogia domni Arnulfi, du IXe siècle.
       ↑ Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne, 1989 [détail des éditions], p. 84.
       ↑ Cf. Dom Devic, dom Vaissète, Histoire générale de Languedoc

Sources : - personne : J-P de Palmas (Tonantius Ferreolus) iv-2009, Jean-Marie Thiébaud (Geneanet, base de Dessus les Moustiers) 30 vii 2009 - famille : J-P de Palmas (Christian Settipani, Les Ancêtres de Charlemagne, Paris, 1989, 170 p. (ISBN 2-906483-28-1), p. 99-100) iv-2009, Jean-Marie Thiébaud (Geneanet, base de Dessus les Moustiers) 30 vii 2009

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Tonantius Ferreolus, III's Timeline

445
445
Narbonne, Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
453
453
- present
Age 8
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Age 40
France
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Age 45
Narbonne, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
490
Age 45
Moselle, Austrasia, France
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495
Age 50
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503
Age 58
France
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515
Age 70
France
517
517
Age 72
Narbonne, Aude, Languedoc-Roussillon, France
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France