Trór / Thor, king of Thrace

public profile

Trór / Thor, king of Thrace's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Trór / Thor, king of Thrace

Also Known As: "Tror King of Thrace", "Thor", "Thór", "Tror", "Thor Lorace", "King of Thrace", "Trór", "Þórr", "Þunor", "Thunaer", "Donar", "Þunraz"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Troy, Turkey
Death: Died in Åsgard
Immediate Family:

Son of Memnon of Troy and Tróán
Husband of Sybil / Sif (Fictional)
Father of Lóridi / Hloritha (Fictional)

Occupation: Også kjent som Tror (Thor), Supreme commander of the Asgard Fleet
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Trór / Thor, king of Thrace

  1. ID: I171164
  2. Name: King Thor [@ <^>v] de Asgaard
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: in c 1200 BC

Father: King Memnon [@ <^>v] de Asgaard b: BEF 100 in c 1230 BC

Mother: Queen Troana Illium [@ <^>v] de Troy b: BEF 100 in c 1230 BC

Marriage 1 Prophetess Sif [<^>v] de Asgaard b: in c 1200 BC

Children

  1. Has Children Vingener [@ <^>v] de Asgaard b: in c 1170 BC

source:

.


http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&db=gilead07&id=I253485

--------------------

Gen 86:

Thor of Troy, King of Thrace was the son of Memnon and Troana.

http://www.geocities.com/familyretzlaff/denmark.html

The Upsala Codex, a parchment document from about 1330, is one of the most important manuscripts of the Prose Edda, or so-called "Younger Edda", which was written by Snorri Sturluson around 1220 CE. It has four sections.

Thor King of Thrace [also see his father Mennon down to Oden] is mentioned in the Prose Edda as follows:

Near the center of the world where what we call Turkey lies, was built the most famous of all palaces and halls - Troy by name. That town was built on a much larger scale than others then in existence and in many ways with greater skill, so lavishly was it equipped. There were twelve kingdoms with one over-king, and each kingdom contained many peoples. In the citadel were twelve chieftains and these excelled other men then living in every human fashion.

One of the kings was called Múnón or Mennón. He married a daughter of the chief king Priam who was called Tróáin, and they had a son named Trór - we call him Thór. He was brought up in Thrace by a duke called Loricus and, when he was ten years old, he received his father's arms. When he took his place amongst other men he was as beautiful to look at as ivory inlaid in oak; his hair was lovelier than gold. At twelve years old he had come to his full strength and then he lifted ten bear pelts from the ground at once and killed his foster father Loricus with his wife Lóri or Glóri, and took possession of the realm of Thrace - we call that Thrúdheim.

After that he traveled far and wide exploring all the regions of the world and by himself overcoming all the berserks and giants and an enormous dragon and many wild beasts. In the northern part of the world he met with and married a prophetess called Sibyl whom we call Sif . I do not know Sif's genealogy but she was a most beautiful woman with hair like gold. Lóridi, who resembled his father, was their son. Lóridi's son was Einridi, his son Vingethór, his son Vingener, his son Módi, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra, whom we call Annar, his son Ítrmann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun, whom we call Skjöld, his son Bíaf whom we call Bjár, his son Ját, his son Gudólf, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf whom we call Fridleif; he had a son named Vóden whom we call Odin; he was a man famed for his wisdom and every kind of accomplishment. His wife was called Frígída, whom we call Frigg.

Odin, and also his wife, had the gift of prophecy, and by means of this magic art he discovered that his name would be famous in the northern part of the world and honored above that of all kings. For this reason he decided to set out on a journey from Turkey. He was accompanied by a great host of old and young, men and women, and they had with them many valuables.

Through whatever lands they went such glorious exploits were related of them that they were looked on as gods rather than men. They did not halt on their journey until they came to the north of the country now called Germany.

There Ódin lived for a long time taking possession of much of the land and appointing three of his sons to defend it. One was called Vegdeg; he was a powerful king and ruled over East Germany; his son was Vitrgils; his sons were Vitta, father of Heingest, and Sigar, father of Svebdag, whom we call Svipdag. Odin's second son was called Beldeg, whom we call Baldr; he had the country now called Westphalia; his son was Brand; his son, Frjódigar, whom we call Fródi; his son, Freóvin; his son, Wigg; his son, Gevis, whom we call Gave. Odin's third son was called Sigi; his son, Rerir; this pair ruled over what is now called France, and the family known as Völsungar come from there. Great and numerous kindreds have come from all of them. Then Odin set off on his journey north and coming to the land called Reidgotaland took possession of everything he wanted in that country. He appointed his son Skjöld to govern there; his son was Fridleif; from thence has come the family known as Skjöldungar; they are kings of Denmark and what was then called Reidgotaland is now named Judand.

Thereafter Odin went north to what is now called Sweden. There was a king there called Gylfi and, when he heard of the expedition of the men of Asia, as the Æsir were called, he went to meet them and offered Odin as much authority over his kingdom as he himself desired. Their travels were attended by such prosperity that, wherever they stayed in a country, that region enjoyed good harvests and peace, and everyone believed that they caused this, since the native inhabitants had never seen any other people like them for good looks and intelligence.

The plains and natural resources of life in Sweden struck Odin as being favorable and he chose there for himself a townsite now called Sigtuna. There he appointed chieftains after the pattern of Troy, establishing twelve rulers to administer the laws of the land, and he drew up a code of law like that which had held in Troy and to which the Trojans had been accustomed.

After that, he traveled north until he reached the sea, which they thought encircled the whole world, and placed his son over the kingdom now called Norway. Their son was called Saeming and, as it says in the Háleygjatal, together with the earls and other rulers the kings of Norway trace their genealogies back to him.

Odin kept by him the son called Yngvi, who was king of Sweden after him, and from him have come the families known as Ynglingar. The Æsir and some of their sons married with the women of the lands they settled, and their families became so numerous in Germany and thence over the north that their language, that of the men of Asia, became the language proper to all these countries. From the fact that their genealogies are written down, men suppose that these names came along with this language, and that it was brought here to the north of the world, to Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Germany, by the Æsir. In England, however, there are ancient district and place names which must be understood as deriving from a different language.

http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/prologue.html

Lóriði is the son of Thor and Sif and forefather of Norse rulers, according to the prologue of the Prose Edda. Loridi does not appear in any other instance of Norse mythology.

One should note that the author of the Prose Edda Snorri Sturluson was a Christian and he used the prologue to explain how the Norse pagans came to believe what they did. The prologue allowed Snorri the framework to assert that he was a Christian before going on to relate the potentially heretical pagan tales of the Norse gods in the Gylfaginning. Snorri posits the theory that many of the heroes from ancient city of Troy came to Scandinavia and were revered as gods and demigods.

For these reasons Lóriði should not be considered the son of the mythical Thor. Lóriði is not an actual part of the ancient Norse myths.

       -Near the earth's centre was made that goodliest of homes and haunts that ever have been, which is called Troy, even that which we call Turkland. This abode was much more gloriously made than others, and fashioned with more skill of craftsmanship in manifold wise, both in luxury and in the wealth which was there in abundance. There were twelve kingdoms and one High King, and many sovereignties belonged to each kingdom; in the stronghold were twelve chieftains. These chieftains were in every manly part greatly above other men that have ever been in the world. One king among them was called Múnón or Mennón; and he was wedded to the daughter of the High King Priam, her who was called Tróán; they had a child named Trór, whom we call Thor. He was fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus; but when he was ten winters old he took unto him the weapons of his father. He was as goodly to look upon, when he came among other men, as the ivory that is inlaid in oak; his hair was fairer than gold. When he was twelve winters old he had his full measure of strength; then he lifted clear of the earth ten bear-skins all at one time; and then he slew Duke Lóríkus, his foster-father, and with him his wife Lórá, or Glórá, and took into his own hands the realm of Thrace, which we call Thrúdheim. Then he went forth far and wide over the lands, and sought out every quarter of the earth, overcoming alone all berserks and giants, and one dragon, greatest of all dragons, and many beasts. In the northern half of his kingdom he found the prophetess that is called Síbil, whom we call Sif, and wedded her. The lineage of Sif I cannot tell; she was fairest of all women, and her hair was like gold. Their son was Lóridi, who resembled his father; his son was Einridi, his son Vingethor, his son Vingener, his son Móda, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra (whom we call Annarr), his son Ítermann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun (whom we call Skjöld), his son Bjáf (whom we call Bjárr), his son Ját, his son Gudólfr, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf (whom we call Fridleifr); his son was he who is named Vóden, whom we call Odin: he was a man far-famed for wisdom and every accomplishment. His wife was Frígídá, whom we call Frigg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loridi

--------------------

story. Notes:

Fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus. He was goodly to look

at with hair faireer than gold. When he was 12 he was so strong he could lift

10 bear skins. He killed his foster father and mother (Lora) and took the

kingdom of Thrace. He then travelled the earth, it is claimed, killing Giants

Dragons and many beasts. He met his wife in the north, where she was a

prophetess.

--------------------

Name: Thor (Tror) OF THRACE

Prefix: King

Given Name: Thor (Tror)

Surname: of Thrace

Sex: M 1 2

Father: Memnon OF TRACE

Mother: Troan

Marriage 1 Sif (Sibil)

Children

Hloritha (Loridi)

Sources:

Abbrev: Stevens (1998) Tithonus

Title: The line of Tithonus. In Descent from Adam.

Author: Stevens, Luke

Publication: Webpage: <http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/2444/Tithonus.htm>12/4/1998.

Abbrev: Edda

Title: The prose Edda, tales from norse mythology.

Author: Sturlasson, Snorri (Translation and introduction by A. G. Brodeur)

Publication: Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 1916 (republ. 2006)

Page: p. 7

Enligt Snorre var Tor son av Mennon och Priamos dotter Troan. Han var en jätte som lyfte tio björnfällar och tog livet av fosterföräldrarna i Trakien.

Men Trakien blev för trångt och han for världen runt och gjorde sina hjältedåd, men föll sen för spåkvinnan Siv. Sen vart han bunden med veipa = bröllopskläde. Efter detta räknar Snorre upp 22 släktled fram till Oden.

Snorre visar att han kan sin grekiska historia. Kung Priamos antas ha levt omkring 1200 f.Kr. och Tors födelse skulle vara då. Odin kommer 22 generationer senare och enligt normal generationsväxling är det ungefär 700 år senare dvs. ca 500 f.Kr.

Tor (fornnordiska Þórr, anglosaxiska Þunor, forntyska Donar) ("åska") var den fornnordiske och allmänt forngermanske åskguden. Till etymologin, och i stort sett till funktionen, identisk med den fornindiske guden Indra; i stort sett till funktionen, men inte till etymologin, även med den grekiske guden Zeus och den romerske Jupiter. Namnet Þórr är också identiskt med det svenska ordet dunder (av lågtyskt dunder, donner) – liksom engelskans thunder, tyskans Donner och så vidare. I svenskan och i övriga germanska språk har Tor givit namn åt torsdagen. Islänningarna har dock ersatt þórsdagur med fimmtudagur.

Enligt vissa religionshistoriker kan Tor, liksom Indra, från början ha varit höggud. Vid tiden för våra källor, främst poetiska och prosaiska Eddan, hade dock denna roll övertagits av Oden (Óðinn), och då har Tor omdefinierats som Odens äldste son; Tors mor var jorden (Jörð, möjligen ett sidonamn på Frigg, men detta är oklart). Tors hustru är Siv (Sif). De har sönerna Magne (Magni) och Mode (Móði) och dottern Trud (Þrúðr). Deras hem är borgen Bilskirne i Trudvang (Þrúðvangr) i Asgård (Ásgarðr).

Tor, Oden och Loke (Loki) är de tre gestalter som oftast uppträder i den nordiska mytologin. De främsta gudarna i den fornnordiska kulten är Tor, Oden och Frej (Freyr).

När Tor vredgas åker han runt på sin vagn, som dras av bockarna Tanngnjóstr och Tanngrisnir, bland molnen och strider med sin hammare, Mjölner (Mjölnir, en symbol för åskviggen), mot det onda i form av jättarna; en liknande strid utkämpas i indisk mytologi mellan Indra och Asuras. Det är så åska uppkommer. Andra attribut är kraftbältet Megingjord (Megingjörð), som får hans styrka att växa när han drar åt svångremmen. Han har också järnhandskar och en järnstång i vänsterhanden.

Psykologiskt sett är Tor rätt enkelt funtad, till skillnad från grubblaren Oden. Tor dyrkades främst av enkelt folk – han är böndernas och trälarnas gud. Tor är guden som bringar ordning ur kaos. Likt de andra asagudarna (Æsir) är han inte odödlig. I Ragnarök kommer Tor och Midgårdsormen (Miðgarðsormr) att döda varandra. Hans båda söner överlever däremot – de har inte utövat makt i denna tidsålder.

När kristendomen blev en allvarlig konkurrent till den gamla religionen blev Tors hammare symbolen för denna, liksom korset för de kristna.

Man åkallar Tor i frågor som berör vind, väder och årsväxt.

Andra namn på Tor  [redigera]

Asator (Ásaþórr)

Einride (Einriði, 'den som färdas ensam')

Jofur (Jöfurr), på 1700-talet ett namn som avsåg åsk- och himmelsguden, antingen Tor eller Jupiter.

Lorride eller Hlorride (Hlór(r)iði, 'det bullrande åskvädret'), som fosterson till Hlora.

Veur (Véurr)

Vingner (Vingnir)

Vingtor (Vingþórr)

Åketor, (Ökuþórr, 'den vagnskörande Tor')

[rediger] Om Tor

Tor var gift med åsynjen Siv, som var nesten like fager som Frøya, som var den vakreste. De fikk sønnen Mode og datteren Trud. Tor fikk også barn med en del andre kvinner bl.a. fikk han Magne med jotunkvinnen Jernsaksa. Tor og Siv sin bolig i Åsgard heter Bilskirne som ligger i Trudvang (Tors rike i Åsgard, Trudvang betyr «Styrkens bolig»).

Som mange andre av æsene hadde han flere roller. Han hadde også rollen som fruktbarhetsgud og krigsgud. Krigsguder var det mange av, bl.a. Odin selv, og andre kjente fruktbarhetsguder var Njord, Frøy og Frøya. Som sedvanlig når man er fruktbarhetsgud, rår han også over jordbruket.

Hans humør er kjent for å svinge veldig.

Tor kjempet stadig mot jotnene, som var kjemper som bodde forskjellige steder, både i fjellene og i ødemarken, i skogen og i havet. Som våpen hadde han hammeren Mjølner, smidd av dvergen Sindre, som traff alt han siktet på, og kom alltid tilbake til hånden hans. Den kunne også gjøres stor eller liten, alt etter hva Tor hadde bruk for. Han brukte også en jernhanske for å holde Mjølner, og han hadde et styrkebelte (Megingjord) rundt livet.

Tor hadde en vogn som ble dratt av to bukker; Tanngnjost (den tanngnissende) og Tanngrisne (åpne mellomrom mellom tennene). Bukkene kunne han spise, men de var like levende neste dag, så lenge han samlet alle beinene i hudene etterpå. Når han kjørte over himmelen med vogna si, bråkte det forferdelig, dette kaltes Tor-drønn (torden). Jotnene var redde for Tor, så de gjemte seg når de hørte ham.

Tjenerne til Tor het Tjalve (Þjálfi) og Røskva. De var mennesker, av fattig bondeslekt. Tor fikk de to søsknene av bonden etter at en av Tors bukker blir halt, etter et ubetenksomt kveldsmåltid hjemme hos dem.

Som den nest mektigste æsen, finnes det mange historier om Tor. Nedenfor følger noen.

[rediger] Tors fisketur


En gang ba Tor jotnen Hyme ta ham med ut å fiske. Han forkledde seg som en jotne-unge og derfor ville ikke Hyme ta ham med. Hyme ga seg til slutt, på betingelsen at gutten skaffet sitt eget agn; Tor rev behørig hodet av Hymes største okse. Tor ble satt til å ro, og satte opp en veldig fart. Hyme begynte å bli urolig når gutten rodde forbi, og lenger enn alle hans vanlige fiskeplasser. Ute på åpent hav stoppet Tor og trev oksehodet. Han brukte et anker som krok. Det gikk kort tid før noe bet på. Etterhvert som gutten ikke klarte å dra den opp, og båten skalv, ble Hyme virkelig redd. Tor reiste seg i båten, strammet inn styrkebeltet til full gudestyrke, båten revnet rundt ham mens han stevnet beina mot havbunnen. Mens tordenen samlet seg i himmelen, viste Midgardsormen sin eter-pustende kjeft, og Tor brølte i triumf. Idet han hevet Mjølner til slag fikk Hyme nok og kappet fiskesnøret; Tor drepte Hyme rasende, og vasset i land. Samme kveld ble Norden rammet av en forferdelig storm.

[rediger] Tor får Roskva og Tjalve

En natt Tor var ute og red med bukkene sine ble det så sent at han og Loke måtte ta inn på en gård for kvelden. Her bodde det en fattig bonde og hans kone, datteren Roskva og sønnen Tjalve, som gav dem husly. På gården slaktet Tor bukkene sine for å ete dem sammen med familien. Etter måltidet ga Tor beskjed om at alle beina måtte kastes på bukkeskinnene. Men Tjalve gjorde ikke som Tor sa, og knakk et lårbein for å spise margen! Neste morgen oppdaget Tor at den ene bukken var halt, og skjønte at bondefamilien ikke gjorde som han hadde sagt. Da Tor blir sint, tilbyr bonden ham alt han eier. Tor svarer ved å frata ham Roskva og Tjalve, og siden den dag har de fulgt ham.

[rediger] Tor hos Utgards-Loke

Etter at Tor hadde tatt Roskva og Tjalve fra bonden, lot han bukkene stå igjen, og red videre mot Jotunheimen. Tjalve var rask til beins, og bar nistepakken til Tor. Da kvelden kom, fant de seg et herberge, med svære rom, og de la seg til å sove i det ene rommet. Midt på natten våknet de av et jordskjelv, og hele huset ristet. De trakk inn i et av de andre rommene, mens Tor holdt vakt ved inngangen, sammen Mjølner. Da de våknet, så de en kjempe som lå ved siden av herberget, og herberget var hansken hans! Så stor var han. Kjempen het Skryme.

De ble enige om å dra videre sammen. Skryme bandt sammen maten deres med sin, og bar den på ryggen. Neste natt kom, og Skryme la seg til å sove, mens de andre ville spise kveldsmat. Men Tor fikk ikke knyttet opp nisteposen! Til slutt ble han så sint at han slo Skryme i hodet med Mjølner så hardt han kunne. Kjempen våket til, og spurte om det hadde falt ned et løvblad i hodet sitt... Senere på natten våknet Tor av snorkingen til kjempen igjen, og slo ham i hodet igjen. Kjempen våknet, og lurte på om det hadde falt en eikenøtt i hodet sitt. Tor ble frustrert over dette, og kunne nesten ikke vente til kjempen hadde sovnet igjen, da skulle han slå ham ihjel. Kjempen sovnet nok en gang, og Tor slo det han maktet i tinningen til kjempen. Han våknet, men lurte bare på om det hadde falt ned rusk og rask fra treet over seg, og truffet ham i hodet. Her skiltes deres veier, kjempen skulle videre opp i fjellene, mens Tor og følget hans skulle til Utgard. De var glade de var kvitt kjempen.

Endelig kom de fram til borgen til Utgard-Loke. Her var det mange kjemper som satt inne i salen. Da de kom inn, sa Utgard-Loke at her måtte alle kunne en kunst, som ingen andre var like flink i! Han spurte Tor og følget hans hva de kunne. Loke svarte at ingen kunne ete like fort som ham. Utgard-Loke ba derfor Loge komme fram på gulvet for å kappspise med Loke. De kappåt i samme trauet, og møttes på midten, men siden Loke bare spiste kjøttet, mens Loge spiste beina og trauet med, så tapte Loke. Utgard-Loke spurte så hva Tjalve kunne, og fikk vite at Tjalve gjerne ville kappløpe med en derfra. Han fikk Huge til å kappes. I første løp kom Huge så lenge før Tjalve til mål at han kunne snu seg mot Tjalve før han kom i mål. Andre løpet gikk likedan. Tredje gang hadde ikke Tjalve kommet halvveis engang, da Huge var kommet i mål. Utgard-Loke spurte så Tor hva han kunne. Tor ville drikke om kapp med en. Utgard-Loke ba sin skutilsvein finne det store hornet som hirdmennene ble dømt til å drikke av dersom de hadde forbrutt seg. De sa til Tor at han burde greie hele hornet i en slurk, for det var få som trengte to slurker, og nesten ingen som trengte tre. Men, selv etter tre slurker, hadde ikke hornet blitt særlig tommere. Da utfordret Utgard-Loke Tor i nok en lek – å løfte katten hans fra gulvet. Det pleide ungguttene i Utgard å leke seg med, så det burde Tor greie. Man samme hvor høyt Tor strakk seg for å løfte katten, letten den bare såvidt på en fot. Tor ble sint, og utfordret da en eller annen til å komme å ta i seg, så skulle de kjenne hvor sterk han var. Utgard-Loke ropte på sin gamle fostermor Elle, som kom inn og tok tak med Tor. Men samme hvor mye Tor tok i, sto Elle like fast. Det gikk ikke bedre enn at Elle brukte triks mot Tor, og fikk ham i kne.

De lå over til neste dag, og nøt all mulig gjestmildhet. Neste morgen, da Tor og følget skulle dra, spurte Utgard-Loke hva Tor syntes om oppholdet sitt der. Tor svarte at han hadde ingen ære av oppholdet, og gremtes over at de så på ham som en usling. Utgard-Loke innrømte da overfor Tor at siden Tor var så sterk, vil han aldre få komme inn i borgen, for han ville bare bringe dem i ulykke! Han fortalte så Tor at de hadde vært lurt av et synsbedrag, for det var Utgard-Loke som var kjempen Skryme, og han hadde holdt et fjell imellom seg og hammeren til Tor, ellers ville Tor ha drept ham! Og konkurransene – Loge var ilden, som kunne fortære både kjøtt og trau. Huge var Utgard-Lokes tanke. Og i andre enden av hornet som Tor drakk av, lå selveste havet, og selv havet hadde sunket da Tor drakk! Da Tor løftet katten, ble de alle redde, for det var Midgardsormen! Tor hadde løftet den så høyt at kun hodet og halen rørte bakken. Og til sist, den gamle Elle som Tor hadde tatt tak med, var alderdommen selv! Aldri har det vært, og aldri kommer det til å bli noen som ikke faller for alderdommen. Utgard-Loke håpet at Tor aldri kom dit igjen, for da måtte han finne på lignende kunster. Tor hevet hammeren og ville slå Utgard-Loke, men plutselig var han borte! Borgen var også borte, og Tor vendte seg om og dro tilbake til Trudvang.

[rediger] Tor og fergemannen

Tor hadde vært og kjempet mot troll, slik han ofte var. På vei hjem måtte han over et sund, men fergemannen som sto på andre siden ville ikke ta Tor over. Han kalte ham rekefant, og hånet Tor fordi han var barbeint og lurvete, og minte ham på den gangen han hadde gjemt seg i Skrymes hanske (se over). Tor fikk vite at fergemannen het Hårbard, men visste ikke at det var Odin som hadde forkledd seg. Samme hvilke bragder Tor skrøt av, fikk han bare hån tilbake. Når Tor spurte Hårbard hvor han hadde lært å egle slik, fikk han til svar at han hadde lært det av de gamle gubbene som bor i heimehaugene. Han sa også at Tor burde pelle seg hjem til Siv, for hun hadde en elsker på besøk. Tor ga til slutt opp, og dro derfra, men lovet å hevne seg neste gang de møttes.

[rediger] Trym stjeler Tors hammer

Kort gjengivelse av Trymskvida.

Historien forteller at Tor en gang mistet Mjølner. Loke fant ut at det var den onde jotnen Trym som hadde stjålet den, og nektet å gi den tilbake før han fikk gifte seg med den vakreste av alle gudinnene, Frøya. Tor kledde seg ut som Frøya, med to steiner som bryster, og Loke kledde seg ut som brudepike. De får da hammeren av søsteren til Trym, hvorpå Tor knuser alle jotnene med hammeren, og reiser hjem.

[rediger] Tor redder Loke fra jotunen Geirrød

Jotunen Geirrød hadde en gang tatt Loke til fange. Loke blir tvunget til å lure Tor dit uten hammeren og styrkebeltet sitt. På vei dit møter Tor et par jernhansker, et annet styrkebelte, og mystiske Grid-staven. Når Tor kommer fram til Geirrød, dreper han først de to døtrene hans, ved å knekke ryggen på dem. Geirrød blir sint, og kaster en glødende jernstang etter Tor. Tor tar stangen, og kaster den gjennom en jernsøyle, videre gjennom Geirrød, og ned i bakken utenfor. Slik døde Geirrød.

[rediger] Tors kamp mot Rungne og Mokkurkalve

Tor hadde vært ute og drept troll, samtidig som Odin red på Sleipner til Jotunheimen. Der kom Odin til jotunen Rungne. Rungne lurte på hvem Odin var, og kommenterte både hjelmen og den fine hesten til Odin. Odin ga til svar at raskere hest finnes ikke! Men Rungne hadde hesten Gullfakse, som han mente var raskere. Odin red mye raskere enn Rungne, og Rungne ble så sint at han glemte hvor han red, og endte opp i Åsgard. Der ble han buden inn på drikke, og Tors skåler ble budt ham. Han tømte dem etter tur. Rungne ble full, og begynte å skryte. Han skulle løfte opp hele Valhall og flytte den til Jotunheimen! Han skulle også senke hele Åsgard, og drepe alle unntatt Frøya og Siv, de skulle han ta med seg, for de var så vakre. Æsene ble litt redd ham, og begynte å snakke om Tor, akkurat da kom Tor inn, med løftet hammer. Han var sint fordi Rungne satt der, han var jo ingen ås, men en jotun! De kranglet litt, og Rungne utfordret Tor til holmgang på Grjotunagard. Da de kom dit, hadde Rungne fått laget en ni mil høy leiremann som het Mokkurkalve, som han sto ved siden av. Tjalve løp fram til Rungne og fortalte at Tor hadde sett ham, og planla å komme opp av bakken under ham. Rungne la derfor skjoldet sitt under seg. Tor sprang imot Rungne og svingte Mjølner. Rungne kastet slipesteinen sin mot Tor, men Tor slo den i to biter i lufta. Den ene delen traff panna til Tor så han datt overende, den andre falt i bakken. Mjølner traff Rungne i panna så hodet sprakk. Tjalve felte Mokkurkalve med en pil, så foten falt over halsen til Tor, slik at Tor ikke fikk rikket seg. Tors sønn Magne kom og fikk flyttet foten, enda han var bare tre dager gammel. Magne fikk da Gullfakse som takk. Volven Groa sang galder for å få brynesteinen ut av panna til Tor, men da Tor fortalte om hvordan han en gang hadde reddet mannen hennes, Aurvandil, ble hun så glad at hun glemte galdrene. Brynesteinen ble derfor sittende.

[rediger] Tors død

Det sies at Tor skal møte Midgardsormen ved Ragnarok, og der skal de drepe hverandre. Etter at Tor dreper ormen, orker han bare ni skritt, før han segner om og dør..

[rediger] Andre navn på Tor

Ake-Tor, Asator (Åsator), Astvinr, Einride, Lorride/Hlorride, Horagalles, Thur, Ukko, Veur, Vingne, Vingtor.

[rediger] Kilde

Snorre: Kongesagaer, Ynglinge-saga, Gyldendal, 1979.

--------------------

Thor (Old Norse: Þórr) is the red-haired and bearded god of thunder in Germanic mythology and Germanic paganism, and its subsets: Norse paganism, Anglo-Saxon paganism and Continental Germanic paganism. The god is also recorded in Old English as Þunor, Old Saxon as Thunaer, as Old Dutch and Old High German: Donar, all of which are names deriving from the reconstructed Proto-Germanic name *Þunraz.

Most surviving stories relating to Germanic mythology either mention Thor or center on Thor's exploits. Thor was a much revered god of the ancient Germanic peoples from at least the earliest surviving written accounts of the indigenous Germanic tribes to over a thousand years later in the late Viking Age.

Thor was appealed to for protection on numerous objects found from various Germanic tribes and Miniature replicas of Mjolnir, the weapon of Thor, became a defiant symbol of Norse paganism during the Christianization of Scandinavia.

[source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor]

--------------------

  1. ID: I171164
  2. Name: King Thor [@ <^>v] de Asgaard
  3. Sex: M
  4. Birth: in c 1200 BC

Father: King Memnon [@ <^>v] de Asgaard b: BEF 100 in c 1230 BC

Mother: Queen Troana Illium [@ <^>v] de Troy b: BEF 100 in c 1230 BC

Marriage 1 Prophetess Sif [<^>v] de Asgaard b: in c 1200 BC

Children

1. Has Children Vingener [@ <^>v] de Asgaard b: in c 1170 BC

source:

.

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=PED&am...

--------------------

Gen 86:

Thor of Troy, King of Thrace was the son of Memnon and Troana.

http://www.geocities.com/familyretzlaff/denmark.html

The Upsala Codex, a parchment document from about 1330, is one of the most important manuscripts of the Prose Edda, or so-called "Younger Edda", which was written by Snorri Sturluson around 1220 CE. It has four sections.

Thor King of Thrace [also see his father Mennon down to Oden] is mentioned in the Prose Edda as follows:

Near the center of the world where what we call Turkey lies, was built the most famous of all palaces and halls - Troy by name. That town was built on a much larger scale than others then in existence and in many ways with greater skill, so lavishly was it equipped. There were twelve kingdoms with one over-king, and each kingdom contained many peoples. In the citadel were twelve chieftains and these excelled other men then living in every human fashion.

One of the kings was called Múnón or Mennón. He married a daughter of the chief king Priam who was called Tróáin, and they had a son named Trór - we call him Thór. He was brought up in Thrace by a duke called Loricus and, when he was ten years old, he received his father's arms. When he took his place amongst other men he was as beautiful to look at as ivory inlaid in oak; his hair was lovelier than gold. At twelve years old he had come to his full strength and then he lifted ten bear pelts from the ground at once and killed his foster father Loricus with his wife Lóri or Glóri, and took possession of the realm of Thrace - we call that Thrúdheim.

After that he traveled far and wide exploring all the regions of the world and by himself overcoming all the berserks and giants and an enormous dragon and many wild beasts. In the northern part of the world he met with and married a prophetess called Sibyl whom we call Sif . I do not know Sif's genealogy but she was a most beautiful woman with hair like gold. Lóridi, who resembled his father, was their son. Lóridi's son was Einridi, his son Vingethór, his son Vingener, his son Módi, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra, whom we call Annar, his son Ítrmann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun, whom we call Skjöld, his son Bíaf whom we call Bjár, his son Ját, his son Gudólf, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf whom we call Fridleif; he had a son named Vóden whom we call Odin; he was a man famed for his wisdom and every kind of accomplishment. His wife was called Frígída, whom we call Frigg.

Odin, and also his wife, had the gift of prophecy, and by means of this magic art he discovered that his name would be famous in the northern part of the world and honored above that of all kings. For this reason he decided to set out on a journey from Turkey. He was accompanied by a great host of old and young, men and women, and they had with them many valuables.

Through whatever lands they went such glorious exploits were related of them that they were looked on as gods rather than men. They did not halt on their journey until they came to the north of the country now called Germany.

There Ódin lived for a long time taking possession of much of the land and appointing three of his sons to defend it. One was called Vegdeg; he was a powerful king and ruled over East Germany; his son was Vitrgils; his sons were Vitta, father of Heingest, and Sigar, father of Svebdag, whom we call Svipdag. Odin's second son was called Beldeg, whom we call Baldr; he had the country now called Westphalia; his son was Brand; his son, Frjódigar, whom we call Fródi; his son, Freóvin; his son, Wigg; his son, Gevis, whom we call Gave. Odin's third son was called Sigi; his son, Rerir; this pair ruled over what is now called France, and the family known as Völsungar come from there. Great and numerous kindreds have come from all of them. Then Odin set off on his journey north and coming to the land called Reidgotaland took possession of everything he wanted in that country. He appointed his son Skjöld to govern there; his son was Fridleif; from thence has come the family known as Skjöldungar; they are kings of Denmark and what was then called Reidgotaland is now named Judand.

Thereafter Odin went north to what is now called Sweden. There was a king there called Gylfi and, when he heard of the expedition of the men of Asia, as the Æsir were called, he went to meet them and offered Odin as much authority over his kingdom as he himself desired. Their travels were attended by such prosperity that, wherever they stayed in a country, that region enjoyed good harvests and peace, and everyone believed that they caused this, since the native inhabitants had never seen any other people like them for good looks and intelligence.

The plains and natural resources of life in Sweden struck Odin as being favorable and he chose there for himself a townsite now called Sigtuna. There he appointed chieftains after the pattern of Troy, establishing twelve rulers to administer the laws of the land, and he drew up a code of law like that which had held in Troy and to which the Trojans had been accustomed.

After that, he traveled north until he reached the sea, which they thought encircled the whole world, and placed his son over the kingdom now called Norway. Their son was called Saeming and, as it says in the Háleygjatal, together with the earls and other rulers the kings of Norway trace their genealogies back to him.

Odin kept by him the son called Yngvi, who was king of Sweden after him, and from him have come the families known as Ynglingar. The Æsir and some of their sons married with the women of the lands they settled, and their families became so numerous in Germany and thence over the north that their language, that of the men of Asia, became the language proper to all these countries. From the fact that their genealogies are written down, men suppose that these names came along with this language, and that it was brought here to the north of the world, to Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Germany, by the Æsir. In England, however, there are ancient district and place names which must be understood as deriving from a different language.

http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/prologue.html

Lóriði is the son of Thor and Sif and forefather of Norse rulers, according to the prologue of the Prose Edda. Loridi does not appear in any other instance of Norse mythology.

One should note that the author of the Prose Edda Snorri Sturluson was a Christian and he used the prologue to explain how the Norse pagans came to believe what they did. The prologue allowed Snorri the framework to assert that he was a Christian before going on to relate the potentially heretical pagan tales of the Norse gods in the Gylfaginning. Snorri posits the theory that many of the heroes from ancient city of Troy came to Scandinavia and were revered as gods and demigods.

For these reasons Lóriði should not be considered the son of the mythical Thor. Lóriði is not an actual part of the ancient Norse myths.

-Near the earth's centre was made that goodliest of homes and haunts that ever have been, which is called Troy, even that which we call Turkland. This abode was much more gloriously made than others, and fashioned with more skill of craftsmanship in manifold wise, both in luxury and in the wealth which was there in abundance. There were twelve kingdoms and one High King, and many sovereignties belonged to each kingdom; in the stronghold were twelve chieftains. These chieftains were in every manly part greatly above other men that have ever been in the world. One king among them was called Múnón or Mennón; and he was wedded to the daughter of the High King Priam, her who was called Tróán; they had a child named Trór, whom we call Thor. He was fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus; but when he was ten winters old he took unto him the weapons of his father. He was as goodly to look upon, when he came among other men, as the ivory that is inlaid in oak; his hair was fairer than gold. When he was twelve winters old he had his full measure of strength; then he lifted clear of the earth ten bear-skins all at one time; and then he slew Duke Lóríkus, his foster-father, and with him his wife Lórá, or Glórá, and took into his own hands the realm of Thrace, which we call Thrúdheim. Then he went forth far and wide over the lands, and sought out every quarter of the earth, overcoming alone all berserks and giants, and one dragon, greatest of all dragons, and many beasts. In the northern half of his kingdom he found the prophetess that is called Síbil, whom we call Sif, and wedded her. The lineage of Sif I cannot tell; she was fairest of all women, and her hair was like gold. Their son was Lóridi, who resembled his father; his son was Einridi, his son Vingethor, his son Vingener, his son Móda, his son Magi, his son Seskef, his son Bedvig, his son Athra (whom we call Annarr), his son Ítermann, his son Heremód, his son Skjaldun (whom we call Skjöld), his son Bjáf (whom we call Bjárr), his son Ját, his son Gudólfr, his son Finn, his son Fríallaf (whom we call Fridleifr); his son was he who is named Vóden, whom we call Odin: he was a man far-famed for wisdom and every accomplishment. His wife was Frígídá, whom we call Frigg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loridi

--------------------

story. Notes:

Fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus. He was goodly to look

at with hair faireer than gold. When he was 12 he was so strong he could lift

10 bear skins. He killed his foster father and mother (Lora) and took the

kingdom of Thrace. He then travelled the earth, it is claimed, killing Giants

Dragons and many beasts. He met his wife in the north, where she was a

prophetess.

--------------------

Fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lórikus. He was goodly to look at with hair fairer than gold. When he was 12 he was so strong he could lift 10 bear skins. He killed his foster father and mother (Lora) and took the kingdom of Thrace. He travelled the earth, it is clained, killing Giants Dragons and many beasts. He met his wife in the north, where she was a prophetess.

--------------------

Born c.270BC

--------------------

Thor owns a short-handled hammer, Mjolnir, which, when thrown at a target, returns magically to the owner. His Mjolnir also has the power to throw lightning bolts. To wield Mjolnir, Thor wears the belt Megingjord, which boosts the wearer’s strength and a pair of special iron gloves, Jarn Griepr, to lift the hammer. Mjolnir is also his main weapon when fighting giants. The uniquely shaped symbol subsequently became a very popular ornament during the Viking Age and has since become an iconic symbol of Germanic paganism.

Thor travels in a chariot drawn by the goats Tanngrisnir and Tanngnjóstr and with his servant and messenger Þjálfi and with Þjálfi’s sister Röskva. The skaldic poem Haustlöng relates that the earth was scorched and the mountains cracked as Thor traveled in his wagon. According to the Prose Edda, when Thor is hungry he can roast the goats for a meal. When he wants to continue his travels, Thor only needs to touch the remains of the goats and they will be instantly restored to full health to resume their duties, assuming that the bones have not been broken.

detail from a rune- and image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. The three men are interpreted as Odin, Thor and Freyr, due to the objects they hold in their hands: a spear, a hammer-like object and a scythe. 

A detail from a rune- and image stone from Gotland, in the Swedish Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm. The three men are interpreted as Odin, Thor and Freyr, due to the objects they hold in their hands: a spear, a hammer-like object and a scythe.

According to one myth in the Prose Edda, Loki was flying as a hawk one day and was captured by Geirrod. Geirrod, who hated Thor, demanded that Loki bring his enemy (who did not yet have his magic belt and hammer) to Geirrod’s castle. Loki agreed to lead Thor to the trap. Grid was a giantess at whose home they stopped on the way to Geirrod’s. She waited until Loki left the room then told Thor what was happening and gave him her iron gloves and magical belt and staff. Thor killed Geirrod and all other frost giants he could find (including Geirrod’s daughters, Gjálp and Greip).

According to Alvíssmál, Thor’s daughter was promised to Alvis, a dwarf. Thor devised a plan to stop Alvis from marrying his daughter. He told Alvis that, because of his small height, he had to prove his wisdom. Alvis agreed and Thor made the tests last until after the sun had risen — all dwarves turned to stone when exposed to sunlight, so Alvis was petrified.

Thor was once outwitted by a giant king, Útgarða-Loki. The king, using his magic, tricked Thor. The king raced Thought itself against Thor’s fast servant, Þjálfi (nothing being faster than thought, which can leap from land to land, and from time to time, in an instant). Then, Loki (who was with Thor) was challenged by Útgarða-Loki to an eating contest with one of his servants, Logi. Loki lost, eventually. The servant even ate up the trough containing the food. The servant was an illusion of “Wild-Fire”, no living thing being able to equal the consumption rate of fire. He called Thor weak when he only lifted the paw of a cat, the cat being the illusion of the Midgard Serpent. Thor was challenged to a drinking contest, and could not empty a horn which was filled not with mead but was connected to the ocean. This action started tidal changes. And here, Thor wrestled an old woman, who was Old Age, something no one could beat, to one knee. Thor left humiliated, but was heartened later when he met a messager who told he that he had in fact performed great feats worthy of a powerful warrior god for doing as well as he did with those challenges.

Another noted story of Thor was the time when Þrymr, King of the Thurse (Giants), stole his hammer, Mjölnir. Thor went to Loki in hopes to find the culprit responsible for the theft. Loki and Thor went to Freyja for council. She gave Loki the Feather-robe so he could travel to the land of the giants to speak to their king. The king admitted to stealing the hammer and would not give it back unless Freyja gave her hand in marriage.

Freyja refused when she heard the plan so the gods decided to think of a way to trick the King. Heimdall, the fairest of the gods (and possibly one of the prophetic Vanir), suggested dressing up Thor in a bridal gown so he can take Freyja’s place. Thor at first refused to do such a thing as it would portray him as a coward and womanish, but Loki insisted that he do so or the Giants would attack Asgard and win it over if he were not to retrieve the hammer in time. Thor reluctantly agreed in the end and took Freyja’s place.

Odin rode Thor to the land of the Giants and a celebration ensued. The king noticed a few odd things that his bride was committing. He noted that she ate and drank more than what he would expect from a bride. Loki, who was in disguise as the false Freyja’s servant, commented that she rode for 8 full nights without food eager to take his hand. He then asked why his bride’s eyes are so terrifying, they seemed to be aglow with fire, again Loki responded with a lie that she did not sleep for 8 full nights eager for his hand. Then the giant commanded that the hammer be brought to his wife and placed on her lap. Once it was in Thor’s possession he threw off his disguise and attacked all the giants in the room. Due to this ruse the giants were careful not to make the same mistake again.

Thor is the Norse god of thunder and lightning. Like all Asgardians, Thor is not truly immortal but relies upon periodic consumption of the Golden Apples of Idun to sustain his lifespan, which to date has lasted many millennia. The strongest of the Norse gods, Thor has performed feats such as lifting the World Serpent, hurling the Odinsword, an enormous mystical blade, through a Celestial, and matching other beings of enormous strength, such as the Hulk and Hercules. If pressed in battle, Thor is capable of entering into a state known as the “Warrior’s Madness”, which will temporarily increase his strength tenfold. He also possesses virtually inexhaustible godly stamina, high resistance to physical injury (eg. rocketfire, falls from orbital heights) and superhuman speed and reflexes.

Thor is a superb hand-to-hand combatant and has mastered a number of weapons such as the war hammer, sword, and mace. He is also very cunning and intuitive in battle, with many centuries of experience. Thor possesses two items that assist him in combat: the Belt of Strength, and his mystical hammer Mjolnir. The former item doubles his strength, while the latter is used for control of his weather abilities; flight; energy projection and absorption; dimensional apertures; matter manipulation, as well as the most powerful of his offensives: the God Blast, and the Anti-Force.

After his resurrection, Thor has accepted his heritage as a child of the Elder Goddess Gaea, and has demonstrated the ability to create country-spanning chasms in the Earth itself.

-------------------- He was fostered in Thrace by a certain war-duke called Lóríkus. He was goodly to look at with hair fairer than gold. When he was twelve, he was so strong he could lift ten bear skins. He killed his foster father and mother (Lora) and took the kingdom of Thrace. He then traveled the earth, it is claimed, killing giants, dragons and many beasts. He met his wife in the North where she was a prophetess. (Notice how this story is a less exagerated version of the same story told about the Thor of Norse mythology in the time of Trór's descendent, Odin.) -------------------- Thor (thôr) , Germanic Donar (d?'när) , Norse god of thunder. An ancient and highly revered divinity, Thor was the patron and protector of peasants and warriors. As a god of might and war he was represented as extremely powerful and fearless, occasionally slow-witted, armed with a magical hammer (which returned to him when he threw it), iron gloves, and a belt of strength. Being a god of the people he was also associated with marriage, with the hearth, and with agriculture. According to one legend he was the son of Woden. Thor was identified with the Roman god Jupiter, and among Germanic peoples Jove's day became Thor's day (Thursday).

Thor Deity, common to all the early Germanic peoples, who appeared as a great, red-bearded warrior of tremendous strength. He was the implacable foe of the harmful race of giants but was benevolent toward humans. His name is the Germanic word for thunder. His great weapon was his hammer, Mjollnir. His greatest enemy was the world serpent Jörmungand, which he was destined to kill, and be killed by, in the Ragnarök. Thursday is named for Thor. Britannicia.com

view all

Trór / Thor, king of Thrace's Timeline

-1189
-1189
Troy, Turkey
-1183
-1183
Age 5
Åsgard
-1160
-1160
Age 6
Troy, Turkey
-1120
-1120
Age 6
BC, line of, King of, Troy
????
son, Memnon
????
son, Memnon
????
son, Memnon
????