Uchtred "the Bold", Earl of Northumbria

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Uchtred

Also Known As: "Uchtred", "Uhtred", "Ughtred", "Earl of Northuberlia"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bernicia, Northumbria, England
Death: Died in Yorkshire, UK
Cause of death: Murdered by Thurband during the war .
Immediate Family:

Son of Waltheof I, Earl of Northumbria and Ælfleda of Northumbria
Husband of Ecgfrida; Sigen Styrsdóttir and Ælfgifu
Father of Ealdred FitzUchtred, Earl of Northumbria & Bernicia; Ecfrida; Eadwulf; Gospatrick; Ealdgyth and 3 others
Brother of Eadulf Cudel, Earl of Northumbria

Occupation: Earl of Northumberland, Ealdorman of Northumbria, Prince of Northumberland, -1016
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Uchtred "the Bold", Earl of Northumbria

Uchtred 'the Bold' of Northumbria

Son of Waltheof and his wife Judith

Married:

1. Ecgfrida, 2. Sigen, 3. Ælfgifu, daughter of King Æthelred II

Children:

With Ecgfrida (acc to Wikipedia) or Sigen (acc to MedLands): According to MedLands (http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#UhtredNorthumbriadied1016) Ecgfrida had no children

1. Ealdred, 2. Eadwulf, 3. Gospatric

With Ælfgifu according to MedLands (http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#UhtredNorthumbriadied1016)

1. Ealdgyth, 2. Nameless daughter, who marrried Æthelgar and had sons Siward and Ealdred

LINKS

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#EaldgythNorthumbriaMMaldredAllerdale

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchtred_the_Bold

MEDIEVAL LANDS

UHTRED, son of WALTHEOF Earl of Northumbria & his wife --- (-murdered 1016).

Simeon of Durham records that "his son Uchtred" succeeded "the elder Walthef" in Northumbria, stating that he was killed by "a powerful Dane Thurbrand surnamed Hold with the consent of Cnut"[324]. Inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow, refer to donations by "Uchtred filius Waldef…"[325]. "Uhtred dux" subscribed charters of King Æthelred II dated 1009 to 1015[326]. He defeated a Scottish army which had besieged Durham in 1006. He succeeded his father as Earl of Northumbria. After the invasion of Svend King of Denmark in 1013, Earl Uhtred submitted to him[327]. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that he was murdered on the orders of Eadric "Streona"[328]. Stenton refers to "northern sources of the Norman age" which show that the chief agent of the murder was Thurbrand, who was in turn killed by Uhtred's son Ealdred[329], presumably referring to Simeon of Durham quoted above. King Canute appointed Erik Haakonson Jarl in Norway as Earl of Northumbria after Uhtred's death.

m firstly (repudiated) as her first husband, ECGFRIDA, daughter of ALDUN Bishop of Durham & his wife --- (----, bur Durham). Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records the marriage of "Cospatric's son…Ucthred" (although from the context "Cospatric" appears to be an error for "Waltheof") and "Bishop Aldun…his daughter…Ecgfrida" and her repudiation by her husband, following which Uhtred married "the daughter of a rich citizen…Styr the son of Ulf…Sigen"[330]. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records Ecgfrida's second marriage to "a certain thane in Yorkshire…Kilvert the son of Ligulf" and "their daughter Sigrida…wife of Arkil the son of Ecgfrid" whose son was "Cospatric…[who married] the daughter of Dolfin the son of Tolfin, by whom he begot Cospatric who of late ought to have fought with Waltheof the son of Eilaf", her repudiation by her second husband, her taking the veil, and her burial at Durham[331].

m secondly SIGEN, daughter of STYR Ulfsson & his wife ---. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records the marriage of "Cospatric's son…Ucthred" (although from the context "Cospatric" appears to be an error for "Waltheof") and "the daughter of a rich citizen…Styr the son of Ulf…Sigen"[332].

m thirdly ([1009/16]) ÆLFGIFU, daughter of ÆTHELRED II King of England & his first wife Ælflæd ---. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records the third marriage of "Cospatric's son…Ucthred" (although from the context "Cospatric" appears to be an error for "Waltheof") and "king Ethelred…his…daughter Elfgiva"[333]. She is named as daughter of King Æthelred by Roger of Hoveden, when he records her marriage[334]. Her marriage date is estimated on the assumption that it is unlikely that she would have been married before her older sister Eadgyth.

Earl Uhtred & his [second] wife had three children:

1. EALDRED (-murdered Risewood 1039). Simeon of Durham names "Aldred, Eadulf and Cospatric" as the three sons of "Uchtred", stating that "Aldred" succeeded his paternal uncle Eadulf Cudel in Northumbria[335]. He is named as son of Uhtred by Roger of Hoveden, first of the three sons he lists[336]. He succeeded his paternal uncle as Earl of Northumbria. Simeon of Durham records that Ealdred killed "the murderer Thurebrand" to avenge his father, made peace with "Carl the son of Thurebrand", but the latter killed "Aldred" in "the wood called Risewood"[337]. m ---. The name of Ealdred's wife is not known. Ealdred & his wife had five children:

a) ÆLFLED . Simeon of Durham names "Elfleda daughter of Earl Aldred" as wife of Siward and mother of Waltheof[338]. She is named daughter of Ealdred by Roger of Hoveden, who also records her marriage[339]. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Earl Aldred was the father of five daughters, three of whom bore the same name Ælfleda, the fourth…Aldgitha and the fifth Etheldritha", specifying that "one of these Ælfledas married earl Siward by whom she became the mother of Waltheof"[340]. m SIWARD --- (-York 26 Mar 1055). He was recognised as Earl of Northumbria in 1041, in succession to his wife's uncle.

b) ÆLFLED . Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Earl Aldred was the father of five daughters, three of whom bore the same name Ælfleda, the fourth…Aldgitha and the fifth Etheldritha"[341].

c) ÆLFLED . Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Earl Aldred was the father of five daughters, three of whom bore the same name Ælfleda, the fourth…Aldgitha and the fifth Etheldritha"[342].

d) ÆLDGYTH . Simeon of Durham names "Algitha daughter of earl Aldred" as wife of "Ligulf", when recording the latter's murder[343]. Roger of Hoveden names her and her father, as well as her husband and two sons[344]. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Earl Aldred was the father of five daughters, three of whom bore the same name Ælfleda, the fourth…Aldgitha and the fifth Etheldritha"[345]. m LIULF, son of --- (-murdered 1080). Simeon of Durham records that "Ligulf a noble and good thane" was murdered[346]. Resident of Durham, he was friends with Walcher and was murdered by Gilbert sheriff of Northumberland[347]. Liulf & his wife had two children:

i) UHTRED . Simeon of Durham names "Uchthred and Morckar" as the two sons of "Ligulf" & his wife[348]. m ---. The name of Uhtred's wife is not known. Uhtred & his wife had [one possible child]:

(a) [LIULF . "…Lyulf filio Uchtredi…" witnessed the charter dated to [1120] under which "David comes filius Malcolmi Regis Scottorum" founded the abbey of Selkirk[349]. While no proof has been found that Liulf was the son of Uhtred, son of Liulf, this is probable because of the common use of the unusual name "Liulf".]

ii) MORCAR . Simeon of Durham names "Uchthred and Morckar" as the two sons of "Ligulf" & his wife, stating that Morcar was educated by the monks of Jarrow[350].

e) ETHELDREDA . Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Earl Aldred was the father of five daughters, three of whom bore the same name Ælfleda, the fourth…Aldgitha and the fifth Etheldritha"[351]. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records the marriage of "Etheldritha, one of the five daughters of earl Aldred" and "a certain thane of Yorkshire called Orm the son of Gamel"[352]. m ORM, son of GAMEL & his wife ---. Orm & his wife had one child:

i) ECGFRIDA . Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham names "Ecgfrida" as the daughter of "Etheldritha, one of the five daughters of earl Aldred" and "…Orm the son of Gamel", recording that she married "Eilsi of Tees…who took possession of Bermetun and Skirningheim by hereditary right" by whom she was mother of "Waltheof and his two brothers and Eda their sister"[353]. m EILSI, son of ---.

2. EADWULF (-murdered 1041). Simeon of Durham names "Aldred, Eadulf and Cospatric" as the three sons of "Uchtred"[354]. Simeon of Durham records that Eadwulf succeeded in Northumbria after his brother Ealdred was murdered but that he was "put to death by Siward"[355]. Named son of Uhtred by Roger of Hoveden, second of the three sons he lists, specifying that he succeeded his brother as Earl of Northumbria[356]. He was betrayed and murdered on the orders of King Harthacnut[357]. m as her second husband, SIGRIDA, [widow] of ARKIL (son of Fridegist), daughter of KILVERT & his wife Ecgfrida. Simeon of Durham's Account of the Siege of Durham records that "Sigrida, the daughter of Kilvert and of Ecgfrida, the daughter of bishop Aldun" (first wife of Eadwulf's father Uhtred) married "Arkil the son of Fridegist, and earl Eadulf, and Arkil the son of Ecgfrith"[358]. Eadwulf & his wife had [two] children:

a) OSWULF (-murdered 1069). Simeon of Durham records that Earl Morcar handed over the earldom "beyond the Tyne" to "the young Osulf son of…earl Eadulf", but that William I King of England appointed "Copsi who was on the side of earl Tosti" who was beheaded by Oswulf "in the fifth week of his charge of the earldom IV Id Mar at Newburn"[359]. Named son of Eadwulf by Roger of Hoveden, who specifies that he was appointed by King William I to succeed Morcar as Earl of Northumbria[360]. Simeon of Durham records that Oswulf was killed by a robber[361].

b) [HALDEN . Inquisitions by "David…Cumbrensis regionis princeps", dated 1124, concerning land owned by the church of Glasgow refer to donations by "…Halden filius Eadulf"[362]. It is not known whether this refers to an otherwise unknown son of Eadwulf, son of Uhtred.]

3. GOSPATRICK . Simeon of Durham names "Aldred, Eadulf and Cospatric" as the three sons of "Uchtred", stating that "the third…did not attain the rank of the earldom" but that he had "a son…Uchtred whose son was Eadulf surnamed Rus who afterwards appeared as the leader of those who murdered bishop Walcher"[363]. He is named as son of Uhtred by Roger of Hoveden, third of the three sons he lists, specifying that he ruled in no county[364]. m ---. The name of Gospatrick's wife is not known. Gospatrick & his wife had one child:

a) UHTRED . Simeon of Durham names "Aldred, Eadulf and Cospatric" as the three sons of "Uchtred", stating that "the third…did not attain the rank of the earldom" but that he had "a son…Uchtred…"[365]. m ---. The name of Uhtred's wife is not known. Uhtred & his wife had one child:

i) EADWULF (-murdered ----, bur Jedburgh). Simeon of Durham names "Aldred, Eadulf and Cospatric" as the three sons of "Uchtred", stating that "the third…did not attain the rank of the earldom" but that he had "a son…Uchtred whose son was Eadulf surnamed Rus who afterwards appeared as the leader of those who murdered bishop Walcher" and was himself killed "by a woman and was buried in the church of Geddewerde" [Jedburgh][366].

Earl Uhtred & his third wife had [two children]:

4. EALDGYTH [Ælfgifu] (1016 or before-). Simeon of Durham names "Algiva daughter of earl Uchtred [and] of Algiva daughter of king Agelred" when recording that her father arranged her marriage to "Maldred the son of Crinan"[367], although her father was long since dead when she married. She is named as daughter of Uhtred and Elgiva by Roger of Hoveden, who also names her husband and his father[368]. m ([before 1040]) MALDRED Lord of Allerdale, Regent of Strathclyde, son of CRINAN "the Thane" Mormaer of Atholl [Scotland] & his wife Bethoc of Scotland Lady of Atholl (-[killed in battle 1045]).

5. [daughter (1016 or before-). Her parentage has not been confirmed by primary sources. However, her husband is named as the father of Siward and Ealdred by Orderic Vitalis[369], the brothers being described as "pronepotes" of King Edward "the Confessor". Assuming this relationship is correctly translated as great-nephew, their father would have been either the king's nephew or married to the king's niece. If Æthelgar had been the king's blood relation, it is likely that he would have been referred to in other contemporary sources which appears not to have been the case. It is therefore more probable that it was Æthelgar's wife who was related to the king, a relationship through Ælfgifu daughter of King Æthelred II being the most likely possibility given the lack of information on descendants of any of the other daughters of King Æthelred.] m ÆTHELGAR (-before 1066). It is assumed that he had recently predeceased his sons in early 1067 when they "made peace with [King] William"[370]. If Æthelgar had been alive at the time, he would presumably have "made peace" himself and noted as such by Orderic Vitalis. If he had been long dead, it is unlikely that he would have been specifically named as father of the two brothers. Æthelgar & his wife had two children:

a) SIWARD (-after 1067). He and his brother were described as "pronepotes" of King Edward ["the Confessor"] by Orderic Vitalis, being among the men who "made peace with [King] William" in [early 1067][371]. There is no further indication about their precise relationship to the king. Presumably they were grandsons of one of his half-sisters. The name Ealdred suggests a connection with the family of the Earls of Northumbria, while Siward suggests a Danish connection.

b) EALDRED (-after 1067). He and his brother were described as "pronepotes" of King Edward ["the Confessor"] by Orderic Vitalis, being among the men who "made peace with [King] William" in [early 1067][372].

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WIKIPEDIA (Eng)

Uchtred or Uhtred, called the Bold, was the ealdorman of all Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I, ealdorman of Bamburgh, whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast.

In 995, according to Symeon of Durham, when the remains of St Cuthbert were transferred from Chester-le-Street to Durham, Uhtred helped the monks clear the site of the new cathedral. The new cathedral was founded by Bishop Aldhun, and Uhtred married Aldhun's daughter, Ecgfrida, probably at about this time. From his marriage he received several estates that had belonged to the church. [1]

In 1006 Malcolm II of Scotland invaded Northumbria and besieged the newly founded episcopal city of Durham. At that time the Danes were raiding southern England and King Ethelred was unable to send help to the Northumbrians. Ealdorman Waltheof was too old to fight and remained in his castle at Bamburgh. Ealdorman Ælfhelm of York also took no action. Uhtred, acting for his father, called together an army from Bernicia and Yorkshire and led it against the Scots. The result was a decisive victory for Uhtred. Local women washed the severed heads of the Scots, receiving a payment of a cow for each, and the heads were fixed on stakes to Durham's walls. Uhtred was rewarded by King Ethelred II with the ealdormanry of Bamburgh even though his father was still alive. In the mean time, Ethelred had had Ealdorman Ælfhelm of York murdered, and he allowed Uhtred to succeed Ælfhelm as ealdorman of York, thus uniting northern and souther Northumbria under the house of Bamburgh. It seems likely that Ethelred did not trust the Scandinavian population of southern Northumbria and wanted an Anglo-Saxon in power there. [2]

After receiving these honours Uhtred dismissed his wife, Ecgfrida, and married Sige, daughter of Styr, son of Ulf. Styr was a rich citizen of York. It appears that Uhtred was trying to make political allies amongst the Danes in Deira. [2]

In 1013 King Sweyn of Denmark invaded England, sailing up the Humber and Trent to the town of Gainsborough. Uhtred submitted to him there, as did all of the Danes in the north. In July 1013 Ethelred was forced into exile in Normandy. After London had finally submitted to him, Swein was accepted as king by Christmas 1013. However he only reigned for five weeks, for he died at, or near, Gainsborough on 2 February 1014. At Sweyn’s death, Ethelred was able to return from exile and resume his reign. Uhtred, along with many others, transferred his allegiance back to Ethelred, on his return. Uhtred also married Ethelred’s daughter Ælfgifu about this time. [2]

In 1016 Uhtred campaigned with Ethelred's son Edmund Ironside in Cheshire and the surrounding shires. While Uhtred was away from his lands, Sweyn's son, Cnut, invaded Yorkshire. Cnut's forces were too strong for Uhtred to fight, and so Uhtred did homage to him as King of England. Uhtred was summoned to a meeting with Cnut, and on the way there, he and forty of his men were murdered by Thurbrand the Hold, with the connivance of Cnut. Uhtred was succeeded in Bernicia by his brother Eadwulf Cudel. Cnut made the Norwegian, Eric of Hlathir, ealdorman ("earl" in Scandinavian terms) in southern Northumbria. [1]

The killing of Uhtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof, Eadred’s grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time. [3]

Uhtred's dynasty continued to reign in Bernicia through Ealdred (killed 1038) his son from his marriage to Ecgfrida, and Eadulf (killed 1041) his son from his marriage to Sige, and briefly Eadulf's son Osulf held the earldom of northern Northumbria 1067 until he too was killed. Uhtred’s marriage to Ælfgifu produced a daughter, Ealdgyth, who married Maldred, brother of Duncan I of Scotland and who gave birth to a son, Gospatric, who was Earl of Northumbria from 1068 to 1072. [4]

Fiction

In Bernard Cornwell's series The Saxon Stories the protagonist is Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg, also from Northumbria. The story of the siege of Durham and the severed heads on poles is told about the historical Uhtred (see Battles of the Dark Ages, Peter Marren), though it is perhaps possible to assume that the fictional Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg is an ancestor of this Uhtred.

----------------------------

Notes

  1. ^ a b Oxford DNB login
  2. ^ a b c Kapelle, William E, “The Norman Conquest of the North”, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (pages 15-16)
  3. ^ Kapelle, William E, The Norman Conquest of the North, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (pages 17-19)
  4. ^ Kapelle, William E, “The Norman Conquest of the North”, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (table 2, page 18)

References

   * Stenton, Sir Frank M. Anglo-Saxon England Third Edition. Oxford University Press, 1971.
   * Fletcher, Richard. Bloodfeud: Murder and Revenge in Anglo-Saxon England. Allen Lane 2002.

--------------------

From http://www.rpi.edu/~holmes/Hobbies/Genealogy/ps06/ps06_061.htm

Uchtred was granted the Earldom of Northumberland while his father, also Earl, was still alive - due to his bravery against

the Scots. He married: (1) Egfrida, dau. of Bp. Aldwin of Durham; (2) Sigen, dau. of Styr; (3) ____; and (4) Elgiva, dau. of

King Ethelred II of England. There is some doubt as to whether Cospatrick (ID2148) is his son or his grandson.

NORTHUMBRIA A large Anglo-Saxon Kingdom covering almost all of the thinly populated north country. Northumbria arose out of the amalgamation of two precursor states, Bernicia and Deira. It was further enhanced by the conquest of Rheged, adjacent to the Irish Sea, in the early 7th century. Ultimately though, it could not contain the onslaught of the Norse raiders in the 8th and 9th centuries, and it was eventually replaced by a Viking Kingdom at York.

The Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Northumbria was originally just a coastal strip on the North-east coast ov Britain. Between the sixth and eighth centuries it expanded until it stretched from the east coast to the west coast, and from the River Humber to the Firth of Forth. Northumbria was made up of two seperate kingdoms, Diera in the south and Bernicia in the north. Sometimes these kingdoms were ruled by two seperate kings, sometimes by one. This division also led to many civil wars in Northumbria. Northumbria suffered heavily in the Viking invasions, and the Kingdom of Diera formed the nucleus of Viking Northumbria.

References: [AR7],[PRES.GED]

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Uchtred the Bold

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Uchtred (or Uhtred), called the Bold, was the earl of Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I, earl of Bernicia, whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast since the late ninth century.

In 995, according to Symeon of Durham, when the remains of St Cuthbert were transferred from Chester-le-Street to Durham, Uchtred helped the monks clear the site of the new cathedral. The new cathedral was founded by Bishop Aldhun, and Uchtred married Aldhun's daughter, Ecgfrida, probably at about this time. From his marriage he received several estates that had belonged to the church. [1]

In 1006 Malcolm II of Scotland invaded Northumbria and besieged the newly founded episcopal city of Durham. At that time the Danes were raiding southern England and King Ethelred was unable to send help to the Northumbrians. Earl Waltheof was too old to fight and remained in his castle at Bamburgh. Earl Ælfhelm of York also took no action. Uchtred, acting for his father, called together an army from Bernicia and Yorkshire and led it against the Scots. The result was a decisive victory for Uchtred. Local women washed the severed heads of the Scots, receiving a payment of a cow for each, and the heads were fixed on stakes to Durham's walls. Uchtred was rewarded by King Ethelred II with the earldom of Bernicia even though his father was still alive. In the mean time, Ethelred had had Earl Ælfhelm of York murdered, and he allowed Uchtred to succeed Ælfhelm as earl of York, thus uniting the two ancient kingdoms of Bernicia and Deira under the house of Bamburgh. It seems likely that Ethelred did not trust the Danes of Deira and wanted an Anglo-Saxon in power there. [2]

After receiving these honours Uchtred dismissed his wife, Ecgfrida, and married Sige, daughter of Styr, son of Ulf. Styr was a rich citizen of York. It appears that Uchtred was trying to make political allies amongst the Danes in Deira. [2]

In 1013 King Sweyn of Denmark invaded England, sailing up the Humber and Trent to the town of Gainsborough. Uchtred submitted to him there, as did all of the Danes in the north. In July 1013 Ethelred was forced into exile in Normandy. After London had finally submitted to him, Swein was accepted as king by Christmas 1013. However he only reigned for five weeks, for he died at, or near, Gainsborough on 2 February 1014. At Sweyn’s death, Ethelred was able to return from exile and resume his reign. Uchtred, along with many others, transferred his allegiance back to Ethelred, on his return. Uchtred also married Ethelred’s daughter Ælfgifu about this time. [2]

In 1016 Uhtred campaigned with Ethelred's son Edmund Ironside in Cheshire and the surrounding shires. While Uchtred was away from his lands, Sweyn's son, Cnut, invaded Yorkshire. Cnut's forces were too strong for Uchtred to fight, and so Uchtred did homage to him as King of England. Uchtred was summoned to a meeting with Cnut, and on the way there, he and forty of his men were murdered by Thurbrand the Hold, with the connivance of Cnut. Uchtred was succeeded in Bernicia by his brother Eadwulf Cudel. Cnut made the Norwegian, Eric of Hlathir, Earl of Yorkshire. [1]

The killing of Uchtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof, Eadred’s grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time. [3]

Uhtred's dynasty continued to reign in Bernicia through Ealdred (killed 1038) his son from his marriage to Ecgfrida, and Eadulf (killed 1041) his son from his marriage to Sige, and briefly Eadulf's son Osulf held the earldom of Northumbria 1067 until he too was killed. Uchtred’s marriage to Ælfgifu produced a daughter, Ealdgyth, who married Maldred, brother of Duncan I of Scotland and who gave birth to a son, Gospatric, who was Earl of Northumbria from 1068 to 1072. [4]

[edit]Fiction

In Bernard Cornwell's series The Saxon Stories the protagonist is Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg, also from Northumbria. The story of the siege of Durham and the severed heads on poles is told about the historical Uhtred (see Battles of the Dark Ages, Peter Marren), though it is perhaps possible to assume that the fictional Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg is an ancestor of this Uhtred.

[edit]Sources

Stenton, Sir Frank M. Anglo-Saxon England Third Edition. Oxford University Press, 1971.

Fletcher, Richard. Bloodfeud: Murder and Revenge in Anglo-Saxon England. Allen Lane 2002.

^ a b Oxford DNB login

^ a b c Kapelle, William E, “The Norman Conquest of the North”, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (pages 15-16)

^ Kapelle, William E, The Norman Conquest of the North, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (pages 17-19)

^ Kapelle, William E, “The Norman Conquest of the North”, 1979, University of North Carolina Press, ISBN 0709900406, (table 2, page 18) -------------------- Uhtred was a powerful Earl of Northumbria during the second massive wave of Danish invasions.

Earl Uhtred was assassinated at King Canute's court. The Earl was visiting Canute in the hope of making peace by offering the king a number of hostages. Uchtred never got to see the king as he was set upon and murdered by one of his own noblemen called Thurbrand, who has some kind of vendetta against Uchtred. (In truth Uchtred, a known supporter of the King of Wessex was unlikely to be trusted by Canute and the king may well have instigated the murder.)

The killing of Uchtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof, Eadred’s grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time.

Uhtred was our ancestor through two distinct descent lines--both through his son Ealdred and his daughter Ealdgyth, each of whom was independently our ancestor.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchtred_the_Bold for considerably more information.

Also see "My Lines"

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/p335.htm#i11352 )

from Compiler: R. B. Stewart, Evans, GA

( http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~cousin/html/index.htm ) -------------------- Uchtred (or Uhtred), called the Bold, was the earl of Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I, earl of Bernicia, whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast since the late ninth century.

In 995, according to Symeon of Durham, when the remains of St Cuthbert were transferred from Chester-le-Street to Durham, Uchtred helped the monks clear the site of the new cathedral. The new cathedral was founded by Bishop Aldhun, and Uchtred married Aldhun's daughter, Ecgfrida, probably at about this time. From his marriage he received several estates that had belonged to the church.

In 1006 Malcolm II of Scotland invaded Northumbria and besieged the newly founded episcopal city of Durham. At that time the Danes were raiding southern England and King Ethelred was unable to send help to the Northumbrians. Earl Waltheof was too old to fight and remained in his castle at Bamburgh. Earl Ælfhelm of York also took no action. Uchtred, acting for his father, called together an army from Bernicia and Yorkshire and led it against the Scots. The result was a decisive victory for Uchtred. Local women washed the severed heads of the Scots, receiving a payment of a cow for each, and the heads were fixed on stakes to Durham's walls. Uchtred was rewarded by King Ethelred II with the earldom of Bernicia even though his father was still alive. In the mean time, Ethelred had had Earl Ælfhelm of York murdered, and he allowed Uchtred to succeed Ælfhelm as earl of York, thus uniting the two ancient kingdoms of Bernicia and Deira under the house of Bamburgh. It seems likely that Ethelred did not trust the Danes of Deira and wanted an Anglo-Saxon in power there.

After receiving these honours Uchtred dismissed his wife, Ecgfrida, and married Sige, daughter of Styr, son of Ulf. Styr was a rich citizen of York. It appears that Uchtred was trying to make political allies amongst the Danes in Deira.

In 1013 King Sweyn of Denmark invaded England, sailing up the Humber and Trent to the town of Gainsborough. Uchtred submitted to him there, as did all of the Danes in the north. In July 1013 Ethelred was forced into exile in Normandy. After London had finally submitted to him, Swein was accepted as king by Christmas 1013. However he only reigned for five weeks, for he died at, or near, Gainsborough on 2 February 1014. At Sweyn’s death, Ethelred was able to return from exile and resume his reign. Uchtred, along with many others, transferred his allegiance back to Ethelred, on his return. Uchtred also married Ethelred’s daughter Ælfgifu about this time.

In 1016 Uhtred campaigned with Ethelred's son Edmund Ironside in Cheshire and the surrounding shires. While Uchtred was away from his lands, Sweyn's son, Cnut, invaded Yorkshire. Cnut's forces were too strong for Uchtred to fight, and so Uhtred did homage to him as King of England. Uchtred was summoned to a meeting with Cnut, and on the way there, he and forty of his men were murdered by Thurbrand the Hold, with the connivance of Cnut. Uhtred was succeeded in Bernicia by his brother Eadwulf Cudel. Cnut made the Norwegian, Eric of Hlathir, Earl of Yorkshire.

The killing of Uchtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof, Eadred’s grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time.

Uhtred's dynasty continued to reign in Bernicia through Ealdred (killed 1038) his son from his marriage to Ecgfrida, and Eadulf (killed 1041) his son from his marriage to Sige, and briefly Eadulf's son Osulf held the earldom of Northumbria 1067 until he too was killed. Uchtred’s marriage to Ælfgifu produced a daughter, Ealdgyth, who married Maldred, brother of Duncan I of Scotland and who gave birth to a son, Gospatric, who was Earl of Northumbria from 1068 to 1072. -------------------- Uchtred (or Uhtred), called the Bold, was the ealdorman of all Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I, ealdorman of Bamburgh, whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast.

In 995, according to Symeon of Durham, when the remains of St Cuthbert were transferred from Chester-le-Street to Durham, Uhtred helped the monks clear the site of the new cathedral. The new cathedral was founded by Bishop Aldhun, and Uhtred married Aldhun's daughter, Ecgfrida, probably at about this time. From his marriage he received several estates that had belonged to the church. [1]

In 1006 Malcolm II of Scotland invaded Northumbria and besieged the newly founded episcopal city of Durham. At that time the Danes were raiding southern England and King Ethelred was unable to send help to the Northumbrians. Ealdorman Waltheof was too old to fight and remained in his castle at Bamburgh. Ealdorman Ælfhelm of York also took no action. Uhtred, acting for his father, called together an army from Bernicia and Yorkshire and led it against the Scots. The result was a decisive victory for Uhtred. Local women washed the severed heads of the Scots, receiving a payment of a cow for each, and the heads were fixed on stakes to Durham's walls. Uhtred was rewarded by King Ethelred II with the ealdormanry of Bamburgh even though his father was still alive. In the mean time, Ethelred had had Ealdorman Ælfhelm of York murdered, and he allowed Uhtred to succeed Ælfhelm as ealdorman of York, thus uniting northern and souther Northumbria under the house of Bamburgh. It seems likely that Ethelred did not trust the Scandinavian population of southern Northumbria and wanted an Anglo-Saxon in power there. [2]

After receiving these honours Uhtred dismissed his wife, Ecgfrida, and married Sige, daughter of Styr, son of Ulf. Styr was a rich citizen of York. It appears that Uhtred was trying to make political allies amongst the Danes in Deira. Through Sige, Uhtred had 2 children, Eadulf, later Eadulf III, and Gospatric. This Gospatric's grandson was the infamous Eadwulf Rus who murdered Bishop Walcher.[2]

In 1013 King Sweyn of Denmark invaded England, sailing up the Humber and Trent to the town of Gainsborough. Uhtred submitted to him there, as did all of the Danes in the north. In July 1013 Ethelred was forced into exile in Normandy. After London had finally submitted to him, Swein was accepted as king by Christmas 1013. However he only reigned for five weeks, for he died at, or near, Gainsborough on 2 February 1014. At Sweyn’s death, Ethelred was able to return from exile and resume his reign. Uhtred, along with many others, transferred his allegiance back to Ethelred, on his return. Uhtred also married Ethelred’s daughter Ælfgifu about this time. [2]

In 1016 Uhtred campaigned with Ethelred's son Edmund Ironside in Cheshire and the surrounding shires. While Uhtred was away from his lands, Sweyn's son, Cnut, invaded Yorkshire. Cnut's forces were too strong for Uhtred to fight, and so Uhtred did homage to him as King of England. Uhtred was summoned to a meeting with Cnut, and on the way there, he and forty of his men were murdered by Thurbrand the Hold, with the connivance of Cnut. Uhtred was succeeded in Bernicia by his brother Eadwulf Cudel. Cnut made the Norwegian, Eric of Hlathir, ealdorman ("earl" in Scandinavian terms) in southern Northumbria. [1]

The killing of Uhtred by Thurbrand the Hold started a blood feud that lasted for many years. Uhtred's son Ealdred subsequently avenged his father by killing Thurbrand, but Ealdred in turn was killed by Thurbrand's son, Carl. Eadred's vengeance had to wait until the 1070s, when Waltheof, Eadred’s grandson had his soldiers kill most of Carl's sons and grandsons. This is an example of the notorious Northumbrian blood feuds that were common at this time. [3]

Uhtred's dynasty continued to reign in Bernicia through Ealdred, Earl of Bamburgh (killed 1038) his son from his marriage to Ecgfrida, and Eadulf (killed 1041) his son from his marriage to Sige, and briefly Eadulf's son Osulf held the earldom of northern Northumbria 1067 until he too was killed. Uhtred’s marriage to Ælfgifu produced a daughter, Ealdgyth, who married Maldred, brother of Duncan I of Scotland and who gave birth to a son, Gospatric, who was Earl of Northumbria from 1068 to 1072. [4]

FIction

In Bernard Cornwell's series The Saxon Stories the protagonist is Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg, also from Northumbria. The story of the siege of Durham and the severed heads on poles is told about the historical Uhtred (see Battles of the Dark Ages, Peter Marren), though it is perhaps possible to assume that the fictional Earl Uhtred of Bebbanburg is an ancestor of this Uhtred. -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchtred_the_Bold -------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchtred_the_Bold

Uhtred the Bold

-------------------- Uchtred (or Uhtred), called the Bold, was the earl of Northumbria from 1006 to 1016, when he was assassinated. He was the son of Waltheof I, earl of Bernicia, whose ancient family had ruled from the castle of Bamburgh on the Northumbrian coast since the late ninth century.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uchtred_the_Bold -------------------- Uhtred (ca. 970-1016), the brave, was earl of Bamburgh and York, a position comparable to that of Duke of North and East of England.Uhtred took part to the foundation of the Cathedral in 995 of Durham. He married Ecgfrida, daughter of the Bishop of Durham, and received lands from church property. In 1006, he defeated the Scots that Durham and besieged brought them big losses. Uhtred was then appointed ealderman of Bamburgh even though his father was still alive, but that was too old to fight. After King Æthelred II ealderman Aelfhelm of York had murdered, Uhtred also got this title. He verstoott and a daughter Ecgfrida married Sige, from a wealthy Danish family in York.In 1013 Sweyn forkbeard Uhtred subjugated itself to but chose again the side of Æthelred in 1014 and married his daughter Aelgifu. In 1016 he subjugated to Cnut the great. Canute had him kill Thurbrand, during a discussion, however, by what to a prolonged blood feud between local families led. Uhtred was succeeded by his brother Eadulf Cudel, according to Symeon of Durham a lazy and cowardly guy.Uhtred was a son of Waltheof, earl of Northumbria. Uhtred got the following children:From his first marriage to Ecgfrida:Ealdred (died 1038), followed 1020/1025 his uncle as earl Eadulf of Bernicia. Around this time he killed Thurbrand, the murderer of his father, and concluded a peace with his son Carl. But that again, in an ambush in 1038 Ealdred murdered in a forest. Ealdred had five daughters.From his second marriage to Sige:Eadwulf (died 1041), succeeded his brother Ealdred as earl, Siward in command of King Harthacanute killed by that with one of the daughters of Ealdred was married and succeeded as earl Eadwulf. Eadwulf had two sons. One of them was Oswulf (died 1069) under William the Conqueror earl of Northumbria and was by a robber was assassinated.Gospatrick, father of Uhtred that father was of Eadwulf. Eadwulf was leader of a group of men who killed the Bishop Walcher, Eadwulf was in turn by a woman murdered and buried in Jedburgh.From his third marriage with Aelgifu:Ealdgyth, married Maldred, regent of Strathclydea daughter, mother of two sons, Siward and Ealdred in 1067 William the Conqueror with atoned. -------------------- ◦IDENTITY: "Waltheof dux" subscribed to a charter of King Aethelred dated 994. His son Uchtred was killed by a powerful Dane , Thurbrand surnamed Hold, with the consent of Knut, 1016. [There are other accounts.] [Simeon of Durham.] He defeated a Scottish army at Durham 1006. His brother was Eadulf Cudel - Simeon describes him as "a lazy and cowardly fellow." --------------------



Notes ◦1 - also Earl of Bernicia

2 - In the 969th year after the birth of Our Lord, in the reign of Ethelred, King of the English; Malcolm, king of the Scots, son of King Kenneth, having gathered the army of all Scotland, devastated the province of the Northumbrians by fire and slaughter. and surrounded Durham in a siege. At this time, the bishop in this same place was Ealdun. Waltheof who had been earl of the Northumbrians, shut himself up in Bamburgh. He was in fact of great age and so too old to he able to make a stand against the enemy. Bishop Ealdun had given his daughter, Ecgfrida, as a wife to Earl Waltheoes son, Uhtred - a young man of great energy and very skilled in war. Ealdun gave with her these vills of the Church of St Cuthbert - Barmpton, Skirningham, Elton, Carlton, School Aycliffe, Monk Heselden - under this condition, that he (Uhtred) retain them for as long as he always lived honourably in marriage with his daughter. Seeing the land devastated by the enemy and Durham besieged. and his father unable to act, the young warrior gathered the army of the Northumbrians and the people of York, no small force. and killed almost all the Scottish host: whose king himself barely escaped by fleeing with a few men. He had the heads of the dead made more presentable with their hair combed, as then was the custom, and transported to Durham; there washed by four women, and fixed on stakes round the walls; they gave the women who had washed them a cow each as payment.
Hearing of this. King Ethelred called the aforementioned young man to him, and whilst his father, Waltheof, was still living, gave him as a reward for his prowess and the way in which he fought. his father's earldom, adding the earldom of York.
But on his return home, Uhtred dismissed the daughter of Bishop Ealdun, and because he put her away against that which he had promised and sworn, the father of the girl. namely the bishop, took back the aforesaid church lands which he had given with her to Uhtred. Having sent away the bishop's daughter, Uhtred married Sige, the daughter of Styr, son of Ulf, a wealthy and prominent man; her father gave her to him on the condition that he would kill Styr's leading enemy Thurbrand. After this, of course. Uhtred went on to greater and greater military success and King Ethelred united him in marriage with his daughter Aelfgifu, from whom he had a daughter, Ealdgyth, whose father gave her in marriage to Maldred son of Crinan the thegn. To them was born Cospatric, father of Dolfin, Waltheof, and Cospatric.
Swegn, king of the Danes, King Ethelred of the English having fled to Normandy, invaded the kingdom of the same. But, not long after, he died and King Ethelred returned to his kingdom hav ing joined to himself in marriage Emma, daughter of Earl Richard of the Normans. A very short time later, Cnut, son of the aforesaid king of the Danes, Swegn, arriving with an enormous force in England to reign, sent to Earl Uhtred, asking him to help him against King Ethefred, with all those whom he could gather together, promising him ample rewards and much more besides if he would help him. For he (Uhtred) was already an earl of great power in that he held the earldom of the Yorkshiremen and the Northumbrians. But he was in no way favourable - he replied that the worst man is the one who does such things against his lord and father-in-law. "No reward" he said "could persuade me to do what I ought not to. I will serve the king as long as he lives. He is both my lord and my father-in-law, by whose gift I enjoy enough riches and honour. I will never betray him." And so Cnut got no help from Uhtred.
After King Ethelred's death. when Cnut had laid hands upon the whole kingdom of England, he sent to the earl ordering him to come to him as his new lord. He did so, having accepted safe conduct for his journey and return. On the appointed day, he entered the kings presence at "Wiheal" to discuss terms of peace: through the treachery of a powerful king's thegn, Thurbrand, known as Hold, the kings soldiers who had hidden behind a curtain spread across the width of the hall. suddenly sprang out in mail and slaughtered the earl and forty of his chief men who had entered with him.
[A Study of Marriage and Murder in Eleventh-century Northumbria:Issue 82 By Christopher J. Morris]
3 - The rulers of Bernicia held the title of High Reeve of Bamburgh from at least 913 until 1041, when the last was killed by Harthacnut; sometimes - 954-963 and 975-1016 - they also served as Earls of York. The castle was destroyed in a renewed Viking attack in 993 and in 1018 the Lothian part of Bernicia was ceded to Scotland, significantly reducing the area controlled from Bamburgh.
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamburgh]

 

Sources 1.[S280] Stirnet Genealogy, Peter Barns-Graham, Swinton01 (Reliability: 3)



            
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Uchtred "the Bold", Earl of Northumbria's Timeline

971
971
Northumbria, England
991
991
Age 20
England
992
992
Age 21
Northumberland, UK
995
995
Age 24
997
997
Age 26
Northumberlandshire, UK
1006
1006
Age 35
England, United Kingdom
1007
1007
Age 36
Northumberlandshire, UK
1010
1010
Age 39
England
1015
1015
Age 44
Northumbria, England
1016
1016
Age 45
Yorkshire, UK