Umberto I Biancamano, conte di Savoia

Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, Rhône-Alpes, France

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Humbert I 'Blanches-Mains' Biancano (Biancamano), comte de Savoie

Also Known As: "Mãos Brancas", "Humbert Blanches-Mains", "Humberto "de las manos Blancas"", "Umberto I of /Savoy/", "aux Blanches Mains", "white hands", "Biancamano (Whitehand)", "Humbert aux blanches mains", "Humbert"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Geneva, Switzerland
Death: Died in France
Place of Burial: Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, Rhône-Alpes, France
Immediate Family:

Son of Amadeus, Count of Belley and Savoy and Amadeus Count of Belley de Savoie
Husband of Ancilie
Father of Oddon Count of Savoy, Maurienne, and Chablais; Amedee I "la Queue" Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais; Burchard of Savoy, Archbishop of Lyon; Costanza di Savoia; Osilie de Savoie and 1 other

Occupation: Marquis, , comte de Maurienne, puis d'Aoste, comte de Bugey, de Chablais et de Sermorens., Count of Savoy, Conte di Savoia, Aloso Count of Maurienne, Nyon, Val D'Osta and Tarentoise., Comte, he is regarded as the founder of the dynasty of Savoy
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Umberto I Biancamano, conte di Savoia

From Charles Cawley's Medieval Lands Database:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm#_Toc359741802

Chapter 1. COMTES de SAVOIE [1060]-1417


A. COMTES de MAURIENNE, COMTES de CHABLAIS


The origins of Humbert [I] "blancis manibus" Comte de Maurienne, first known ancestor of the counts of Savoy, are unproven. Alternative theories have been proposed: · Manteyer suggests that he was descended from Garnier Comte de Troyes (see the document CHAMPAGNE NOBILITY), whose son Hugues may have received part of the county of Vienne, and whose own son Humbert has been postulated (probably incorrectly) as the father of comte Humbert [I][7]. · Previté-Orton prefers the theory of descent from the local family headed by Amedée Comte [de Belley] (see the document BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY), who was living in [977][8]. A link between these two groups of families is suggested by the various donations of property in the county of Belley made by Humbert [I] and his descendants. · descent from the first kings of Provence. This proposition is based only on a manuscript note written by d´Hozier in 1675, in a copy of Guichenon´s Histoire généalogique de la maison de Savoie later deposited at the Bibliothèque nationale in Paris, which states that "les chartes qui établissent la descendance de la Maison de Savoie des rois de Provence sont dans les Cartulaires de Saint-Maurice à Vienne"[9]. Presumably such alleged descent would be through Charles Constantin Comte de Vienne, son of Louis King [of Provence], about whose two sons nothing is known apart from their names (see the document PROVENCE). No reference to such charters is found in the commentary on the cartulary of Vienne Saint-Maurice published by Ulysse Chevalier, or in the handful of charters themselves which he reproduced[10]. It must be assumed that, if such documentation ever existed, it has since disappeared. · son of "Béraud". The book of anniversaries of the church of Aosta includes an entry dated 1040 the dating clause of which notes "regnante et principante in Valle nostra Augustæ Salassorum Umberto P. Maurianensi filio illustris Beroldi de Saxonia"[11]. This is the origin favoured by Guichenon after reviewing numerous alternative theories. In addition to "tradition" in the family, he bases his conclusion on an anachronistic heraldic argument and a supposed common connection with St Maurice. He identifies Béraud with "Berthold" who is named in two charters of Rudolf III King of Burgundy dated 1016 and 1018 (see the document BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY). Guichenon also launches into highly speculative conjecture about the precise origin of Béraud in the families of Widukind and Emperor Otto I (set out in the document SAXONY DUKES) which is not worth summarising[12]. Assuming that the Aosta entry is factually correct (it is assumed that it is not contemporary), the reference to "Saxonia" may represent an imperfect transcription. It is not therefore impossible that Humbert was the son of a local "comte Béraud" who is otherwise unrecorded. It is also possible that Humbert [I] was related to Ermengarde, second wife of Rudolf III King of Burgundy, who appointed him as her representative in administrative dealings relating to her territorial holdings after her husband died. If this is correct, the family relationship cannot be traced as Queen Ermengarde´s parentage is not known, although the fact that Humbert [I]´s possible sister was also named Ermengarde (see BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY) may also indicate a family connection.


HUMBERT, son of --- ([970/75]-1 Jul [1047/51], bur Saint-Jean de Maurienne). ["Umberto comitis et uxoris suæ" signed the charter dated 4 Apr 1003 under which Eudes Bishop of Belley granted land "in pago Gratiopolitano in agro Salmojacense"[13]. It is not certain whether this charter relates to Humbert [I] "blancis manibus" Comte de Maurienne or to his supposed maternal uncle Humbert Comte [de Belley].] "Rodolfus rex" jointly with "…comitibus Rodulpho et Uberto" gave the castle of Moras to "Umberto episcopo eiusque matri domine Freburgie et nepotibus eius, Wigonis bone memorie filiis, Umberto Wigoni Willelmo" by charter dated 6 Jun 1009[14]. "Domni Umberti comes, Lambertus comes…" witnessed the charter dated 1 Apr 1018 under which "Ratcherius" confirmed a donation to "Sancti Petri Romani monasterio"[15]. Lanter Bishop of Langres granted property "in comitatu Genevensi et pago Albonensi in villa…Casei", except for that part held by "Ermengardis regina", to "nostro amico Humberto comiti et duobus heredibus filiis eius…unus…Amedeus et alter Burchardus episcopus" for life, by charter dated 8 Apr 1022[16]. "Ermengardis, domini Rodulphi regis coniux" founded the monastery of Talloires "in pago Albanense in villa…Talueris", with the advice of "…comitis Umberti", by charter dated to [1025], signed by "Umberti comitis…"[17]. "Donnus Ubertus comes" exchanged property with "Dominum Brocardum Episcopum Augustensis" by charter dated 16 Nov [1026][18]. "Ermengart regina" donated "duos mansos in pago Genevense" to Cluny, for the soul of her late husband Rudolf III King of Burgundy, acting "per advocatum meum comitum Humbertum", by charter dated to [1033/48][19]. It is assumed that this document refers to Comte Humbert, although this is not beyond all doubt. Saint-Genis (who assumes that the co-identity is correct) suggests that the use of the term "advocatum" in this document indicates that Humbert was administrator of royal lands only and was not a direct fiefholder himself[20]. If this is correct, the title "comes" would have been honorary, linked to his royal appointment rather than territorial holdings. At first sight the hypothesis of Saint-Genis appears attractive because, if Humbert held no county, his parentage may have been obscure, which could account for the difficulties in tracing his origin. However, there appears no reason why Humbert could not have held comital jurisdiction over a specific territory at the same time as an appointment as "advocatus" of the queen in relation to her own property. In any case, all the earlier documents quoted here confirm that Humbert held full comital status, although none of them specify his geographical jurisdiction (which is not unusual for early 11th century charters). His appointment by Queen Ermengarde as her representative may indicate a family relationship between the two, which cannot now be traced as the queen´s parentage is not known. "Amedeus filius Uberti comitis et Adaelgida uxor mea" donated "ecclesia S. Mauricii…in pago…Maltacena" to the priory of Bourget by charter dated 22 Oct 1030, signed by "Uberti comitis, Anciliæ uxoris eius, Amedei comitis, Adilæ uxoris eius…Rodulphi regis, reginæ Ermengardis, Odonis, Antelmi"[21]. Humbert recognised the suzerainty of Emperor Konrad II, to whom King Rudolf III bequeathed the kingdom of Burgundy in 1032, and fought against Eudes II Comte de Blois who challenged the emperor´s succession[22]. The emperor invested Humbert with Chablais and Saint-Maurice en Valley in 1034 as a reward for his services[23]. From this time, he is taken to have become HUMBERT I "blancis manibus/of the White Hands" Comte de Maurienne, Comte de Chablais. His nickname appeared for the first time in the 14th century Chronicle of Hautecombe[24]. According to Szabolcs de Vajay, the popular version is a misreading of "blancis moenibus/of the White fortresses"[25]. Saint-Genis suggests that the nickname should be considered the equivalent of "clean hands", indicating Humbert´s honesty in administrative dealings[26]. "Domnum Humbertum comitem et filium eius Amadeum" are named as present in the charter dated 1037 which records the foundation of the priory of Bugey[27]. "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[28]. "Domnus Upertus comes" is named in a charter relating to a church "in loco Scalas quod antiquitus vocatur Lavastrone" dated 21 Jan 1042, signed by "Brochardi archiepiscopi, Aimoni episcopi, Ameei, Oddoni, Orlini et filiorum eius Wigoni, Anselmi, Rostagni, Bornoni…Rostagni"[29]. "Umbertus comes et filii mei Amedeus et Oddo" donated the church "in pago qui antiquitus vocatur Lavastrone…Scalas in episcopati Gratianopolitano" to the abbey of Saint-Chaffre by charter dated 10 Jun 1042, signed by "Brochardi archiepiscopi, Amedei comitis, Oddonis, Bornonis, Aureliani, Rostagni"[30]. "Humbertus comes et Theobaldus episcopus Maurianensis" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean by charter dated 14 Jun 1046, signed by "Aimonis nepotis eius, Ioannis, Berillonis, Odonis"[31]. "Domni Huberti comitis…" subscribed the charter of "Aymo" (his presumed grandson) dated [1046][32].

m ([995/1000]) AUXILIA, daughter of ANSELM & his wife Aldiud ---. "Amedeus filius Uberti comitis et Adaelgida uxor mea" donated "ecclesia S. Mauricii…in pago…Maltacena" to the priory of Bourget by charter dated 22 Oct 1030, signed by "Uberti comitis, Anciliæ uxoris eius, Amedei comitis, Adilæ uxoris eius…Rodulphi regis, reginæ Ermengardis, Odonis, Antelmi"[33]. The parentage of Auxilia is deduced from her son Burchard being described by Rodolfus Glaber as nepos of Burchard Archbishop of Lyon[34], who was the illegitimate son of Conrad I King of Burgundy and his mistress Aldiud. Aldiud was the wife of Anselm, this couple presumably being Auxilia´s parents. Her parentage is also suggested by the charter dated 12 Jun 1052 under which her son "Aimo, Sedun…episcopus" donated property, inherited from "avunculo meo comite Oudolrico…in villam…Ursaria", to the church of Sion "per manum advocatis mei comitis Oudalrici"[35]. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that Count Humbert had two wives: firstly "---, sister of Graf Ulrich [von Lenzburg]" and secondly "Auxilia, relative of Saint Odilon de Mercœur abbé de Cluny"[36]. Europäische Stammtafeln shows only one wife "Auxilia von Lenzburg"[37], in an amalgam of these two proposed wives. None of the sources so far consulted in the preparation of the present document suggest that Humbert had two wives. Until more information comes to light, the simpler solution has been adopted in this document. The primary source which indicates Auxilia's relationship with the Mercœur family (see the document AUVERGNE) has not yet been identified.

Comte Humbert & his wife had four children:

1. AMEDEE ([995/1000] or after-after 18 Dec 1051). Lanter Bishop of Langres granted property "in comitatu Genevensi et pago Albonensi in villa…Casei", except for that part held by "Ermengardis regina", to "nostro amico Humberto comiti et duobus heredibus filiis eius…unus…Amedeus et alter Burchardus episcopus" for life, by charter dated 8 Apr 1022[38]. "Amedeus filius Uberti comitis et Adaelgida uxor mea" donated "ecclesia S. Mauricii…in pago…Maltacena" to the priory of Bourget by charter dated 22 Oct 1030, signed by "Uberti comitis, Anciliæ uxoris eius, Amedei comitis, Adilæ uxoris eius…Rodulphi regis, reginæ Ermengardis, Odonis, Antelmi"[39]. "Domnum Humbertum comitem et filium eius Amadeum" are named as present in the charter dated 1037 which records the foundation of the priory of Bugey[40]. "Amedeus comes et uxor mea Adela" donated "hereditate nostra in comitatu Bellicensi in villa Carnitus" to Cluny by undated charter[41]. "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[42]. "Amedeus comes et uxor mea Adela" donated property "in comitatu Belicensi in villa Larnitus" to Cluny by charter dated 1036[43]. "Domni Amedei comitis…" subscribed the charter of his presumed nephew dated [1046][44]. He succeeded his father in [1047/51] as AMEDEE I "la Queue" Comte de Maurienne et de Chablais. His nickname was acquired after he refused to enter the presence of Emperor Heinrich III at Verona after his retinue ("queue") was refused entry[45]. "Amedeus comes Belicensium" donated property "mansum Cavanerii" to the church of Belley by charter dated to [1031/60][46]. m ([1030]) ADELAIS, daughter of ---. "Amedeus filius Uberti comitis et Adaelgida uxor mea" donated "ecclesia S. Mauricii…in pago…Maltacena" to the priory of Bourget by charter dated 22 Oct 1030, signed by "Uberti comitis, Anciliæ uxoris eius, Amedei comitis, Adilæ uxoris eius…Rodulphi regis, reginæ Ermengardis, Odonis, Antelmi"[47]. "Amedeus comes et uxor mea Adela" donated "hereditate nostra in comitatu Bellicensi in villa Carnitus" to Cluny by undated charter[48]. Comte Amedée I & his wife had [two] children:

a) HUMBERT (-before 1051). His parentage is confirmed by the undated charter under which "Comes Amedeus et Adela uxor eius" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Maurice, for the repose of "Uberti filii"[49].

b) [AYMON (-[1050]). "Aymo Bellicensis episcopus" refers to property "ecclesiæ S. Ioannis Baptistæ" held by "pater noster Amedeus", by undated charter[50]. Carutti suggests that Aymon Bishop of Belley was the son of Amedée Comte [de Belley], recorded in the last quarter of the 10th century (see the document BURGUNDY KINGDOM NOBILITY)[51]. Bishop of Belley [1032]. A manuscript note attached to an undated charter, under which "Amedeus…comes et fratres mei, unacum genitrice nostra Gisla" donated property to the church of Belley "per nostros advocatos…comitem Aimonem Genevensem et Widonem de Mirabello", for the soul of "patris nostri Humberti comitis", states that "Hic Amadeus comes erat Belicensis pater Aimonis episcopi…"[52]. This note is incorrect as the donor under this charter was Amedée III Comte de Maurienne who lived about a century after Comte Amedée I. It is not known whether this is the only authority for asserting that Aymon Bishop of Belley was the son of Amedée I. If that is the case, the "proof" is shaky at best.]

2. BURCHARD ([995/1000] or after-after 10 Jul 1068). Lanter Bishop of Langres granted property "in comitatu Genevensi et pago Albonensi in villa…Casei", except for that part held by "Ermengardis regina", to "nostro amico Humberto comiti et duobus heredibus filiis eius…unus…Amedeus et alter Burchardus episcopus" for life, by charter dated 8 Apr 1022[53]. Bishop of Aosta . "Brocardu epm" [Bishop of Aosta] approved a donation by "Katelmus" by charter dated 19 Oct 1025, signed by "domni Umbertus comes"[54]. Rodolfus Glaber names "Burcardi nepos eiusdem equivocus", referring to Burchard Archbishop of Lyon who was an illegitimate son of Conrad I King of Burgundy by his mistress Aldiud wife of Anselm, when recording that the second Burchard "deserted his own see of Aosta in order rashly to seize Lyon"[55]. Coadjutor of Aosta. Provost of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune. Archbishop of Lyon 1030, deposed. Radulfus Glaber records that “Burcardi nepos, eiusdem æquivocus” left “sede propria Augustanæ civitatis” and imposed himself as archbishop of Lyon after the death of archbishop Burchard in 1033, and that "Burchardus III Archiep. Lugd. olim August. Episc." was captured by imperial troops and sent into exile in 1034[56]. "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[57]. "Burchardus Agannensis abbatiæ abbas…" donated property by charter dated 10 Jul 1068[58].

3. AYMON (-13 Jul [1054]). "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[59]. Benedictine abbot of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune. Bishop of Sion 1040. "Aymonis episcopi" enfeoffed a vassal with property "per manum Odvolrici eiusdem ecclesie aduocati" by charter dated 23 Dec 1043[60]. "Domni Aimoni Sedunensis episcopi…" subscribed the charter of his presumed first cousin dated [1046][61]. "Aimo, Sedun…episcopus" donated property, inherited from "avunculo meo comite Oudolrico…in villam…Ursaria", to the church of Sion "per manum advocatis mei comitis Oudalrici" by charter dated 12 Jun 1052[62]. "Aymo…Sedunensis episcopus" exchanged property "in comitatu Valensi in loco…Caldro" [Chatres] with his vassal "Vuarnerio", by the hand of "advocati eiusdem ecclesie Upoldi", by charter dated 13 Mar 1054[63]. The necrology of Sion records the death "III Id Jul" of "Aymonis episcopi"[64].

4. ODDON ([1017]-1 Mar 1060, bur Torino, cathedral of San Giovanni). "Hubertus comes" donated property to the canons of Saint-Jean and Saint-Urse by charter dated 1040, signed and consented to by "Oddo, Amedeus comes, Aymo Sedunensis episcopus, Brochardus filius Huberti comitis, Petrus marchio filius Odonis marchionis et commitissæ"[65]. Marchese di Susa [1046], by right of his wife. Comte de Chablais. [NOTE: There is a separate entry for Oddon, with more information and his descendancy]

----------------------------

Humberto I (980-1047/1048), llamado Blanca Mano (en italiano: Umberto Biancamano; en francés: Humbert Blanches-Mains) para designar su generosidad. Fue el primer Conde de Saboya a partir de 1032, cuando el condado de Vienne, que fue vendido recientemente a la archidiócesis de Vienne, fue dividido entre el condado de Albon y el de Maurienne. Humberto procedía de la nobleza, posiblemente de Sajonia, de Italia, de Borgoña o de Provenza. Él mismo nació en Maurienne.

Durante las guerras entre Rodolfo III de Borgoña y de Enrique II del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico, Humberto apoyó al último con provisiones y soldados, por su unión con la familia imperial por su matrimonio. Así, en 1003, el emperador le nombró Conde de Aosta, una región montañosa en la parte de Borgoña (hoy dentro de Italia), y le concedió el norte de Viennois como recompensa. Humberto alternadamente protegió el flanco derecho del ejército de Enrique durante la invasión de Italia (1004).

Las tierras de Humberto eran esencialmente autónomas después de la muerte de Enrique. Su inaccesibilidad y su menor importancia las llevaron a ser pasado por alto. En 1032, Humberto recibido Maurienne, su país nativo, del emperador Conrado II, a que él había ayudado en sus campañas italianas contra Aribert, arzobispo de Milán.

Murió en Hermillon.

Familia [editar]

--------------------

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humbert_I._%28Savoyen%29

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haus_Savoyen

Humbert I. von Savoyen (* 1003; † 1048; genannt: Humbert mit den weißen Händen) war der Sohn von Amadeus Graf von Belley (?). Humbert wird als Stammvater des Hauses Savoyen angesehen. Sein Vater Amadeus soll um 976 geboren sein und einer kelto-romanischen Familie abstammen.

Er heiratete Ansilia Tochter des Grafen vom Wallis. 1033 erkannte er sofort die Oberherrschaft von Kaiser Konrad II. über das Königreich Burgund an, dieser gewährte ihm Rechte in Maurienne und im Chablais (Regionen in Haute Savoye, Frankreich).

Aus der Ehe mit Ansilia entsprangen vier Kinder:

   * Amadeus, der seine Nachfolge antrat
   * Aymon († 1054) wurde Fürstbischof der Grafschaft Wallis in Sitten
   * Bourcard († 1068) wurde Erzbischof von Lyon
   * Otto trat nach dem Tode seines Bruders Amadeus die Regentschaft über Savoyen an.

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Humbert I "The Whitehanded", b. 970 in Savoy, France, d. ca. 1056

Children and grandchildren:

  1. Eudes Savoy, b. ca. 1002 in Geneva, Switzerland, m. Adelais Suza, d. 19 January 1057/60; 1 grandchild
  2. Humbert II of Maurienne, b. ca. 1010 in Savoy, France, m. Giselle of Burgundy; 2 grandchildren

--------------------

The family of Humbert Ier de SAVOIE and Auxilia de LENZBURG

[133759] SAVOIE (de), Humbert Ier (..), comte de Nyon, Aoste, Maurienne, Sermorens

  • married before 1020

LENZBURG (de), Auxilia (Arnold Ier & .. [134984])

     1) Odo, comte de Chablais, married about 1046 Adelheid MARKGRAFIN

Bibliographie : Europaische Stammtafeln

http://www.francogene.com/quebec--genealogy/133/133759.php

--------------------

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which had been sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and the Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony,[1] Italy, Burgundy or Provence.

He is also called Humbert the White-Handed (French: Humbert aux Blanches-Mains; Italian: Umberto Biancamano) reportedly to signify his generosity. However, this posthumously applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.[2].

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers because he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy in 1040.

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their mountainous inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power struggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon, a town in the Maurienne region of present day Savoie, France.

[edit] Family

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzburg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

  1. Amadeus I (died 1056), Count of Savoy, successor
  2. Aimone (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion
  3. Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon
  4. Otto (died ca. 1057), Count of Savoy, successor of his brother

Some authors believe that he had additional sons.

Preceded by

new title Count of Savoy Succeeded by

Amadeus I

[edit] Notes

  1. ^  "Savoy". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/Savoy. 
  2. ^ A copyist may have misread the "u" in "mur-" ("wall") as a minuscule "a" and the "r" as an "n.". History of House of Savoy

--------------------

Umberto `Bianca Mano' Count of Aosta, Marienne & Savoy ,Humbert the Whitehanded

Comte de Salmourenc, puis Comte de Noyon, puis Comte d'Aoste et de Maurienne

--------------------

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) (in French, Humbert aux blanches-mains; in Italian, Umberto Biancamano) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which had been sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and the Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony,[1] Italy, Burgundy or Provence.

He is also called Humbert the White-Handed (French: Humbert aux Blanches-Mains; Italian: Umberto Biancamano) reportedly to signify his generosity. However, this posthumously applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.[2].

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers because he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy in 1040.

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their mountainous inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power struggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon, a town in the Maurienne region of present day Savoie, France

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzburg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

Amadeus I (died 1056), Count of Savoy, successor

Aymon (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion

Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon

Otto (died ca. 1057), Count of Savoy, successor of his brother

Some authors believe that he had additional sons.

--------------------

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which was recently sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and that of Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony, Italy, Burgundy or Provence. He himself was born in Maurienne.

He is also called the White-Handed (Italian: Umberto Biancamano; French: Humbert Blanches-Mains) reportedly to signify his generosity, however, this retroactively applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers, for he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy (1004).

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power stuggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon.

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzbourg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

Amadeus I, successor

Aimone (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion

Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon

Otto, successor of his brother

--------------------

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which was recently sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and that of Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony, Italy, Burgundy or Provence. He himself was born in Maurienne.

He is also called the White-Handed (Italian: Umberto Biancamano; French: Humbert Blanches-Mains) reportedly to signify his generosity, however, this retroactively applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers, for he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy (1004).

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power stuggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon.

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzbourg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

Amadeus I, successor

Aimone (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion

Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon

Otto, successor of his brother

--------------------

Humbert I, Count of Savoy

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 (Redirected from Humbert I of Savoy)

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which was recently sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and that of Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony, Italy, Burgundy or Provence. He himself was born in Maurienne.

He is also called the White-Handed (Italian: Umberto Biancamano; French: Humbert Blanches-Mains) reportedly to signify his generosity, however, this retroactively applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.[1].

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers, for he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy (1004).

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power struggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon.

[edit]Family

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzbourg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

Amadeus I, successor

Aimone (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion

Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon

Otto, successor of his brother

Some authors believe that he had further sons.

--------------------

Humbert I (c. 980–1047/1048) was the first Count of Savoy from 1032, when the County of Vienne, which was recently sold to the Archdiocese of Vienne, was divided between the County of Albon and that of Maurienne. Humbert came of noble stock, possibly from Saxony, Italy, Burgundy or Provence. He himself was born in Maurienne.

He is also called the White-Handed (Italian: Umberto Biancamano; French: Humbert Blanches-Mains) reportedly to signify his generosity, however, this retroactively applied title may derive from a textual mistranslation of an early Latin record which actually refers to the walls of his castle, not his hands, as white.

During the wars between Rudolph III of Burgundy and the Emperor Henry II, Humbert supported the latter with provisions and soldiers, for he was related to the imperial family by marriage. Thus, in 1003, the emperor installed him as the Count of Aosta, a mountainous region then a part of Burgundy but today within Italy, and granted him the northern Viennois as a reward. Humbert in turn protected the right flank of Henry's army during his subsequent invasion of Italy (1004).

Humbert's lands were essentially autonomous after the death of Henry. Their inaccessibility and their minor importance lent them to being overlooked and ignored in the power stuggles which inevitably followed the death of the emperor. In 1032, Humbert received the Maurienne, his native country, from the Emperor Conrad II, whom he had helped in his Italian campaigns against Aribert, Archbishop of Milan.

He died at Hermillon.

Humbert married Ancilla (Auxilia or Ancilia) of Lenzbourg, the daughter of the master of ceremonies of Burgundy, and had at least four sons:

Amadeus I, successor

Aimone (died 1054 or 1055), Bishop of Sion

Burchard (died 1068 or 1069), Archbishop of Lyon

Otto, successor of his brother -------------------- Umberto I, Conte di Savoia also went by the nick-name of Umberto 'Whitehands' (?).1 He gained the title of Conte di Savoia in 1000.1

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Umberto I Biancamano, conte di Savoia's Timeline

970
970
Geneva, Switzerland
995
995
Age 25
Italy
995
Age 25
United States
1000
1000
Age 30
Maurienne, Savoie, France
1005
1005
Age 35
Italy
1017
March 1017
Age 47
Savoy, France
1032
1032
Age 62
Count of Savoy
1047
July 1, 1047
Age 77
France
????
????