'Umi-a-Liloa ., 14th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii (1470 - 1525)

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Birthdate:
Birthplace: South Kohala, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, u.S.a
Death: Died in South Kohala, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, u.S.a
Occupation: Sovereign Hawaiian Chief
Managed by: MRA ♥
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About 'Umi-a-Liloa ., 14th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii

'Umi-a-Liloa 1470 - 1525 ruled as the 14th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii 1510 - 1525. He was the sovereign king or chief of the island of Hawaii.

Royal Birth

'Umi-a-Liloa, commonly known as 'Umi, was younger son of Liloa, 12th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii. 'Umi's mother Akahiakuleana was of much lower rank and distantly related to Liloa. The story of the birth of Umi is as follows "Liloa, the father of Umi, was at that time the king of all Hawaii and had fixed residence in the Waipio, Hamakua. The incident occurred while Liloa was making a journey through Hamakua toward the borders of Hilo to attend the consecration of the heiau of Manini. This heiau, which Liloa had been pushing forward to completion, was situated in the hamlet of Kohola-lele, Hamakua. When the the kapu had been removed, he waited for a while, till the period of refreshment (hoomahanahana) was over, and then moved on to the north of that place ans stayed at Kaawikiwiki, where he gratified his fondness for pahee and other games. While staying at this place he went to bathe in a little stream that runs through Hoea, a land adjoining Kealakaha. It was there and then he came across Akahiakuleana. She had come to the stream after her period of impurity and was bathing in preparation for the ceremony of purification, after which she would rejoin her husband, that being the custom among women at the time. Her servant was sitting on the bank of the stream guarding her pa-u. When Liloa looked upon her and saw that she was a fine-looking woman, he conceived a passion for her, and taking hold of her, he said, "Lie with me."

Recognizing that it was Liloa, the king, who asked her, she consented, and they lay together. After the completion of the act, Liloa, perceiving that the woman was flowing, asked her if it was her time of impurity, to which she answered, 'Yes, this is the continuation of it.' 'You will probably have a child then,' said Liloa, and she answered that it was probable. Liloa then asked her whose she was and what was her name. 'I am Akahiakuleana,' said she, 'and Kuleanakapiko is the name of my father.' 'You are undoubtedly a relation of mine,' said Liloa. "Quite likely," said she.

Then Liloa instructed her regarding the child, saying, 'When our child is born, if it is a girl do you name it from your side of the family; but if it is a boy, give to him the name Umi.' 'By what token shall I be able to prove that the child is yours, the king's?' Then Liloa gave into her hands his malo, his niho-palaoa, and his club (laau palau), saying,'These are the proofs of our child, and when he has grown up give these things to him.' To this arrangement Akahiakuleana gladly assented and handed the things over to her maid to be taken care of for the child.

Liloa then made himself a substitute for a malo by knotting together some ti leaves with which he girded himself. On returning to the house, the people saw that he had a covering of ti leaf, which was not his proper malo, and they remarked to each other, 'What a sight! Liloa is out of his head. That isn't his usual style; it's nothing but a ti leaf makeshift for a malo.' Liloa remained at this place until the period of refreshment (hoomahanahana) was over and then he went back to Waipio, his permanent residence."

Early Life

The boy grew up with his mother and her husband, a fine, hearty, well-developed lad, foremost in all sports and athletic games of the time, but too idle and lazy in works of husbandry to fit his plodding stepfather. When Umi was nearly a full-grown young man, his stepfather once threatened to strike him as punishment for his continued idleness, when the mother averted the blow and told her husband, 'Do not strike him; he is not your son; he is your chief;' and she then revealed the secret of his birth, and produced from their hiding place the keepsakes which Liloa had left with her. The astonished stepfather stepped back in dismay, and the mother furnished her son with means and instruction for the journey to Waipio.

Recognized by Liloa

Two young men accompanied him of the journey, Omaukamau and Piimaiwaa, who became his constant and most trusted attendants ever after. Arrive din Waipio valley, they crossed the Wailoa stream, and Umi proceeded alone to the royal mansion, not far distant. According to his mother's instructions, though contrary to the rules of etiquette observed by strangers or inferior visitors, instead of entering hte courtyard by the gate, he leaped over the stockade, and instead of entering the mansion by the front door, he entered by the back door, and went straight up to where Liloa was relcining and set himself down in Liloa's lap. surprised at the sudden action, Liloa threw the young man on the ground, and, as he fell, discovered his Malo and his ivory clasp on the body of Umi. Explanations followed, and Liloa publicly acknowledged Umi as his son. Umi's position was now established at the court of Liloa, and, with the exception of his older brother Hakau, whose ill-will and jealousy his recognition by Liloa had kindled, he soon became the favourite of all.

Relation with his Brother

When Liloa was near dying, he called the two sons before him, and publicly gave the charge of the government of Hawaii, the position of Moi, to Hakau, and the charge of the war god- that is, the maintenance of the Heiaus and the observance of the religious rites - to Umi, telling the former, 'You are the ruler of Hawaii, and Umi is your man,' equivalent to next in authority.

He deposed his elder brother Hakau after his brother was treating the people cruely in 1510. He sacrificed Hakau and his attendants. The kingdom became his because of his humbleness and of the prowess of his adopted sons and his care of the war god Kuka'ilimoku. Although of lowly birth, he rose until the kingdom was his through his victories in battle.

War with Maui

Legend adds, that shortly after these Piilani of Maui died, and his son, Lono-a-Pii, succeeded him. When Kiha-a-Piilani, the younger brother of Lono-a-Pii, had to flee from Maui, he sought refuge with his sister, Piikea (wife of Umi), at the court of Umi. Here his sister advocated his cause so warmly, and insisted with Umi so urgently, that the latter was induced to espouse the cause of the younger brother against the older, and prepared an expedition to invade Maui, depose Lono-a-Pii, and raise Kiha-a-Piilani to the throne of his father. Umi summoned the chiefs of the various districts of Hawaii to prepare for the invasion of Maui. When all the preparations were ready, Umi headed the expedition in person, accompanied by his wife, Piikea, and her brother, Kiha-a-Piilani, and by his bravest warriors. Crossing the waters of 'Alenuihaha' (the Hawaii Channel), the fleet of Umi effected a landing at Kapueokahi, the harbour of Hana, Maui, where Lono-a-Pii apepars to have continued to reside after his father Piilani's death.

Having failed to prevent the landing of Umi's forces, Lono-a-Pii retired to the fortress on the top of the neighbouring hill called Kauwiki, which in those days was considered almost impregnable, partly from its natural strength and partly from the superstitious terror inspired by a gigantic idol called Kawalakii, which was believed to be the titular genius of the fort. Umi laid siege to the fort of Kauwiki, and, after some delay and several unsuccessful attempts, finally captured the fort, destroyed the idol, and Lono-a Pii having fallen in the battle, Kiha-a-Piilani was proclaimed and acknowledged as Moi of Maui. Having accomplished this, Umi and his forces returned to Hawaii.

Later Years

After Umi returned from the war with Maui, he turned his attention to the domestic affairs of the island. Some legends refer to difficulties between Umi and Imaikalani, the powerful blind chief of Kau and parts of Puna, and though other intimate that Piimaiwaa was despatched to bring the obstinate old chief under subjections, yet it is not clear that any open rupture occurred between Umi and his great feudatory during their lifetime.

It is doubtless true that Umi discontinued the permanent residence of the Hawaii sovereigns at Waipio. The reasons why are not very explicitly rendered. But though Umi deserted Waipio and established his royal camp or headquarters at the Ahua-a-Umi, he did by no means withdraw himself from the active supervision of the affairs of his kingdom. He frequently visited the different districts, settled disputes between chiefs and others, and encouraged industry and works of public utility. It is presumed that Umi's life passed tranquilly after his removal from Waipio. No wars, convulsions, or stirring events have been recorded. In making his tours around the island, Umi erected several Heiaus. Umi is reported to have been a very religious kind, according tot he ideas of his time, for he enriched the priests, and is said tohave built a number of Heiaus; though in the latter case tradition often assigns the first erection of a Heiau to a chief, when in reality he only rebuilt or repaired an ancient one on the same site.

Family

He married first Kulamea. Then second Maka'alua and third his half-sister, Alii Kapukini, daughter of Liloa, 12th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii, by his third wife, Haua. Fourth Alii Piikea, daughter of Piilani, 15th Mo'i of Maui. Fifth he married Mokuahualeiakea. He married a sixth time Ohenahena and a seventh time Alii Pinea, daughter of his elder half-brother, Hakau, 13th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii. He died circa 1525, having had issue, three sons and six daughters:

He son included Keali'iokaloa and Keawe-nui-a-'Umi by his wife Alii Kapukini and Kumalae by his fourth wife Piikea. His daughters were Alii Kapunanahunui through Kulamea, Alii Nohowa through Maka'alua, Alii Kapulani Kapukini through Alii Kapukini, Alii Aihakoko Amauaikookoo through Alii Piikea, Alii Akahiilikapu through Mokuahualeiakea, and Alii Kamolanui through Ohenahena.

Reference

David Malo, Hawaiian Antiquities, Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press, 1951

Abraham Fornander, An Account of the Polynesian Race: Its Origin and Migrations, Rutland, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Company, 1969.

--------------------

Royal Birth

'Umi-a-Liloa, commonly known as 'Umi, was younger son of Liloa, 12th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii. 'Umi's mother Akahiakuleana was of much lower rank and distantly related to Liloa. The story of the birth of 'Umi is as follows "Liloa, the father of 'Umi, was at that time the king of all Hawaii and had fixed residence in the Waipio, Hamakua. The incident occurred while Liloa was making a journey through Hamakua toward the borders of Hilo to attend the consecration of the heiau of Manini. This heiau, which Liloa had been pushing forward to completion, was situated in the hamlet of Kohola-lele, Hamakua. When the kapu had been removed, he waited for a while, till the period of refreshment (hoomahanahana) was over, and then moved on to the north of that place and stayed at Ka'awikiwiki, where he gratified his fondness for pahee and other games. While staying at this place he went to bathe in a little stream that runs through Hoea, a land adjoining Kealakaha. It was there and then he came across Akahiakuleana. She had come to the stream after her period of impurity and was bathing in preparation for the ceremony of purification, after which she would rejoin her husband, that being the custom among women at the time. Her servant was sitting on the bank of the stream guarding her pa-u. When Liloa looked upon her and saw that she was a fine-looking woman, he conceived a passion for her, and taking hold of her, he said, "Lie with me."

Recognizing that it was Liloa, the king, who asked her, she consented, and they lay together. After the completion of the act, Liloa, perceiving that the woman was flowing, asked her if it was her time of impurity, to which she answered, 'Yes, this is the continuation of it.' 'You will probably have a child then,' said Liloa, and she answered that it was probable. Liloa then asked her whose she was and what was her name. 'I am Akahiakuleana,' said she, 'and Kuleanakapiko is the name of my father.' 'You are undoubtedly a relation of mine,' said Liloa. "Quite likely," said she.

Then Liloa instructed her regarding the child, saying, 'When our child is born, if it is a girl do you name it from your side of the family; but if it is a boy, give to him the name 'Umi.' 'By what token shall I be able to prove that the child is yours, the king's?' Then Liloa gave into her hands his malo (loin-cloth), his niho-palaoa, and his club (laau Palau), saying,'These are the proofs of our child, and when he has grown up give these things to him.' To this arrangement Akahiakuleana gladly assented and handed the things over to her maid to be taken care of for the child.

Liloa then made himself a substitute for a malo by knotting together some ti leaves with which he girded himself. On returning to the house, the people saw that he had a covering of ti leaf, which was not his proper malo, and they remarked to each other, 'What a sight! Liloa is out of his head. That isn't his usual style; it's nothing but a ti leaf makeshift for a malo.' Liloa remained at this place until the period of refreshment (ho'omahanahana) was over and then he went back to Waipio, his permanent residence."

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'Umi-a-Liloa ., 14th Alii Aimoku of Hawaii's Timeline

1470
1470
South Kohala, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, u.S.a
1500
1500
Age 30
Hilo, Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1505
1505
Age 35
Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1525
December, 1525
Age 55
South Kohala, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, u.S.a
1527
1527
Age 55
Hilo, Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1565
1565
Age 55
Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1565
Age 55
Hilo, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1568
1568
Age 55
Hilo, Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1598
1598
Age 55
hili, Island Of Hawaii, Hawaii, USA
1600
1600
Age 55
North Kohala, Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, u.S.a