Peter Warren (1703 - 1752)

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Vice Admiral Sir Peter Warren's Geni Profile

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Birthplace: Warrenstown, Meath, Ireland
Death: Died
Managed by: Doug Robinson
Last Updated:

About Peter Warren

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Warren_(admiral)

Sir Peter Warren, KB (10 March 1703 – 29 July 1752) was a British naval officer from Ireland who commanded the naval forces in the attack on the French fortress of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia in 1745. He later sat as MP for Westminster.

He was the youngest son of Michael Warren and Catherine Plunkett, née Alymer (his mother was the first wife of Sir Nicholas Plunkett).

A brother of his mother was Matthew Aylmer, 1st Baron Aylmer (died 1720), admiral and commander-in-chief, had entered the navy under the protection of the Duke of Buckingham, as a lieutenant, in 1678.

Warren signed on as an ordinary seaman in Dublin in 1716 when he was 13 years old. He rapidly rose in the ranks, becoming a Captain in 1727. His ship patrolled American colonial waters to provide protection from French forces. He became involved in colonial politics and land speculation. In 1731, he married Susannah Delancey (1707–1771), whose brother James was chief justice and lieutenant governor of the province of New York.

Warren's lands included several thousand acres on the south side of the Mohawk River west of Schenectady, New York. In 1738, he hired his nephew William Johnson to manage these western lands. In 1741, Warren built Warren House, a mansion overlooking the Hudson River on his 300-acre (120-hectare) estate in Greenwich Village. In 1744, he was made commodore and commanded a 16 ship squadron off the Leeward Islands, capturing 24 ships in four months. In 1745, Warren commanded a group of ships that supported the Massachusetts forces in the capture of Louisbourg. The prize system of the time allowed naval officers to profit from the capture of enemy ships, and this expedition earned Warren a fortune, a promotion to the rank of Rear Admiral of the Blue, and a knighthood.

Peter and Susannah had six children, but two died in 1744 during the smallpox epidemic in New York. He moved his wife and four surviving daughters to England in 1747. He was second in command of the British fleet on the Devonshire at the Battle of Cape Finisterre. His conduct in the battle won him further fame, a promotion to Vice-Admiral of the Red, and much prize-money. While on a visit to Ireland in 1752, he died suddenly in Dublin "of a most Violent fever."

His granddaughter, Susanna Maria Skinner, was married to Henry Gage, 3rd Viscount Gage, son of General Thomas Gage. (Her father, Lt. General William Skinner, was a brother of Loyalist General Cortlandt Skinner, and both brothers were grandsons of Stephanus Van Cortlandt; a daughter of Cortland Skinner named Catherine was married to Sir William Henry Robinson, a son of loyalist Beverley Robinson. Beverley Robinson was a first cousin once removed of Judith Robinson, first wife of patriot Carter Braxton).

The towns of Warren, Rhode Island and Warren, New Hampshire are named after him, and Warren Street in Lower Manhattan.

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Within the next ten years Westbury had been purchased by 'Admiral Sir Peter Warren, K.B., (fn. 93) an Irishman by birth. He obtained his commission as a lieutenant in 1722, and from that time his promotion was rapid. He aided the New England colonies in the war with France, and in 1745, with General Pepperell, captured Louisbourg, as a reward for which he was made rear-admiral of the Blue. After the capitulation of Louisbourg Warren captured three French ships valued at £1,000,000, and from his share of the spoils of war realized a large fortune. In 1747 he won a great naval victory off Cape Finisterre, and for his gallantry on this occasion was made Knight of the Bath. On his retirement from active service in 1748 he received many civic honours, being elected M.P. for Westminster in 1750. He died of a violent fever in 1752 while at Dublin, whither he had gone to purchase estates. In 1735 he had married Susanna daughter of Stephen de Lancey, a wealthy citizen of New York, and by her he left three daughters and co-heirs'—Anne, who married Lieut.-General Hon. Charles Fitzroy, first Lord Southampton, in 1758; Susanna, who married in 1767 Lieut.-General William Skinner; and Charlotte, who married Willoughby Bertie, fourth earl of Abingdon, in 1768. (fn. 94) The manor was at first divided among the three sisters, but in 1772 Charles Fitzroy and Anne and Willoughby, Earl of Abingdon, and Charlotte gave up their moieties to Lieut.-General Skinner and Susanna, (fn. 95) whose daughter and heir Susanna Maria married her first cousin Major-General Henry, third Viscount Gage, in 1789. Their son Henry, fourth Viscount Gage (1808–77), sold the manor to Mr. John Delawar Lewis, from whom it has descended to Colonel Le Roy-Lewis, the present owner.

From: 'Parishes: East Meon', A History of the County of Hampshire: Volume 3 (1908), pp. 64-75. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=41930&strquery=richard clark rout Date accessed: 25 December 2008.

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Wikipedia Biographical Summary

Sir Peter Warren, KB (10 March 1703 – 29 July 1752) was a British naval officer from Ireland who commanded the naval forces in the attack on the French fortress of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia in 1745. He later sat as MP for Westminster.

He was the youngest son of Michael Warren and Catherine Plunkett, née Alymer (his mother was the first wife of Sir Nicholas Plunkett).

A brother of his mother was Matthew Aylmer, 1st Baron Aylmer (died 1720), admiral and commander-in-chief, had entered the navy under the protection of the Duke of Buckingham, as a lieutenant, in 1678. Warren signed on as an ordinary seaman in Dublin, Ireland in 1716 when he was 13 years old. He rapidly rose in the ranks, becoming a Captain in 1727. His ship patrolled American colonial waters to provide protection from French forces. He became involved in colonial politics and land speculation. In 1731, he married Susannah Delancey (1707–1771), whose brother James was chief justice and lieutenant governor of the province of New York.

Warren's lands included several thousand acres on the south side of the Mohawk River west of Schenectady, New York. In 1738, he hired his nephew William Johnson to manage these western lands. In 1741, Warren built Warren House, a mansion overlooking the Hudson River on his 300-acre (120-hectare) estate in Greenwich Village.[1] In 1744, he was made commodore and commanded a 16 ship squadron off the Leeward Islands, capturing 24 ships in four months. In 1745, Warren commanded a group of ships that supported the Massachusetts forces in the capture of Louisbourg. The prize system of the time allowed naval officers to profit from the capture of enemy ships, and this expedition earned Warren a fortune, a promotion to the rank of Rear Admiral of the Blue, and a knighthood.

Peter and Susannah had six children, but two died in 1744 during the smallpox epidemic in New York. He moved his wife and four surviving daughters to England in 1747. He was second in command of the British fleet on the Devonshire at the Battle of Cape Finisterre. His conduct in the battle won him further fame, a promotion to Vice-Admiral of the Red, and much prize-money. While on a visit to Ireland in 1752, he died suddenly in Dublin "of a most Violent fever."

His granddaughter, Susanna Maria Skinner, was married to Henry Gage, 3rd Viscount Gage, son of General Thomas Gage. (Her father, Lt. General William Skinner, was a brother of Loyalist General Cortlandt Skinner, and both brothers were grandsons of Stephanus Van Cortlandt; a daughter of Cortland Skinner named Catherine was married to Sir William Henry Robinson, a son of loyalist Beverley Robinson. Beverley Robinson was a first cousin once removed of Judith Robinson, first wife of patriot Carter Braxton).

The towns of Warren, Rhode Island and Warren, New Hampshire are named after him, and Warren Street in Lower Manhattan.

SOURCE: Wikipedia contributors, 'Peter Warren (Royal Navy officer)', Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 12 March 2013, 03:17 UTC, <http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Peter_Warren_(Royal_Navy_officer)&oldid=543556445> [accessed 12 October 2013]

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Vice Admiral Sir Peter Warren's Timeline

1703
March 10, 1703
Warrenstown, Meath, Ireland
1738
1738
Age 34
1752
July 29, 1752
Age 49
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